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Song Z.,Vascular Biology and Stroke Research Laboratory | Song Z.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | Zhu X.,Vascular Biology and Stroke Research Laboratory | Jin R.,Vascular Biology and Stroke Research Laboratory | And 8 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Although TAK1 has been implicated in inflammation and oxidative stress, its roles in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and in response to vascular injury have not been investigated. The present study aimed to investigate the role of TAK1 in modulating oxidative stress in VSMCs and its involvement in neointima formation after vascular injury. Double immunostaining reveals that vascular injury induces a robust phosphorylation of TAK1 (Thr187) in the medial VSMCs of injured arteries in wildtype mice, but this effect is blocked in CD40-deficient mice. Upregulation of TAK1 in VSMCs is functionally important, as it is critically involved in pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory effects on VSMCs and eventual neointima formation. In vivo, pharmacological inhibition of TAK1 with 5Z-7-oxozeaenol blocked the injury-induced phosphorylation of both TAK1 (Thr187) and NF-kB/p65 (Ser536), associated with marked inhibition of superoxide production, 3-nitrotyrosine, and MCP-1 in the injured arteries. Cell culture experiments demonstrated that either siRNA knockdown or 5Z-7-oxozeaenol inhibition of TAK1 significantly attenuated NADPH oxidase activation and superoxide production induced by CD40L/CD40 stimulation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that blockade of TAK1 disrupted the CD40L-induced complex formation of p22phox with p47phox, p67phox, or Nox4. Blockade of TAK1 also inhibited CD40L-induced NF-kB activation by modulating IKKα/β and NF-kB p65 phosphorylation and this was related to reduced expression of proinflammatory genes (IL-6, MCP-1 and ICAM-1) in VSMCs. Lastly, treatment with 5Z-7-oxozeaenol attenuated neointimal formation in wire-injured femoral arteries. Our findings demonstrate previously uncharacterized roles of TAK1 in vascular oxidative stress and the contribution to neointima formation after vascular injury. © 2014 Song et al. Source


Song Z.,Vascular Biology and Stroke Research Laboratory | Jin R.,Vascular Biology and Stroke Research Laboratory | Yu S.,Vascular Biology and Stroke Research Laboratory | Rivet J.J.,Vascular Biology and Stroke Research Laboratory | And 5 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Despite extensive investigations, restenosis, which is characterized primarily by neointima formation, remains an unsolved clinical problem after vascular interventions. A recent study has shown that CD40 signaling through TNF receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) plays a key role in neointima formation after carotid artery injury; however, underlying mechanisms are not clearly elucidated. Because neointima formation may vary significantly depending on the type of injury, we first assessed the effect of CD40 deficiency on neointima formation in 2 injury models, carotid artery ligation and femoral artery denudation injury. Compared with wild-type mice, CD40 deficiency significantly reduced neointima formation and lumen stenosis in two different models. Further, we investigated the mechanism by which CD40 signaling affects neointima formation after arterial injury. In wild-type mice, the expression levels of CD40, several TRAF proteins, including TRAF1, TRAF2, TRAF3, TRAF5, and TRAF6, as well as total NF-kB p65 and phospho-NF-kB p65, in the carotid artery were markedly upregulated within 3-7 days after carotid ligation. Deficiency of CD40 abolished the injury-induced upregulation of TRAFs including TRAF6 and NF-kB-p65 in the injured vessel wall. Further, CD40 -/- mice showed a significant decrease in the recruitment of neutrophils (at 3, 7d) and macrophages (at 7, 21d) into injured artery; this effect was most likely attributed to inhibition of NF-kB activation and marked downregulation of NF-kB-related gene expression, including cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6), chemokines (MCP-1), and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1). Moreover, neutrophil recruitment in a model of thioglycollate-induced peritonitis is impaired in CD40-deficient mice. In vitro data revealed that CD40 deficiency blocked CD40L-induced NF-kB p65 nuclear translocation in leukocytes. Altogether, our data identified for the first time that CD40 is essential in the upregulation of TRAF6, NF-kB activation, and NF-kB-dependent proinflammatory genes in vivo. Our findings firmly established the role for CD40 in neointima formation in 2 distinct injury models. © 2011 Song et al. Source

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