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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

They are shy and elusive. They are tinier than a dolphin. And they are disappearing fast. Despite heroic efforts, vaquita porpoises are dying at astounding rates in illegal fishing nets in their limited habitat in the northwestern corner of the Gulf of California. Last week, two more vaquitas were found dead. Fewer than 30 vaquitas are believed to be alive today, making them the most endangered marine mammal in the world. But there is reason to hope. An unusual, diverse, international coalition of partners called VaquitaCPR and led by the Mexican government has worked feverishly to develop a bold, first-ever emergency plan to rescue the vaquita and place them in a sanctuary until illegal fishing is ended and their habitat is cleared of deadly gillnets. This week, the Mexican government's Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT) announced a pledge of up to $3 million dollars to help launch the first critical phase of this emergency plan, including construction of a sea pen sanctuary. This is a significant financial commitment, but additional support from the public is vital to ensure the full implementation of this daring effort to recover a population that totaled 600 animals just 20 years ago. "The challenge is staggering," says The Marine Mammal Center's Executive Director Dr. Jeff Boehm, who is leading the coalition's fundraising efforts. "How we respond to this emergency reveals who we are as a society. It sets precedent. We are asking the public to step up and donate what they can today at http://www. to match the Mexican government's generous funding. Additional donations are needed for veterinary care, staffing, and equipment and to ensure the program is not cut short because of lack of funds." The critical need for support from the public to help save the vaquita has been reinforced by a number of celebrities, who are asking their fans to help fund the project, according to Dr. Cynthia Smith, Executive Director of the National Marine Mammal Foundation. The Foundation is one of the primary partners supporting VaquitaCPR. Dr. Smith thanks singer, songwriter, and actress Miley Cyrus, and actors Leonardo DiCaprio, Chris Hemsworth, and Carolyn Hennesy. "Public outreach and awareness is so essential to this project," said Dr. Smith. "When people understand the world is about to lose something dear, they will try to make a difference." The caring, compassion, and concern that prompted the development of the emergency plan to save the vaquita from extinction gained additional support today. The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) announced its members have committed their support through its Save Animals from Extinction (SAFE) program and pledged to raise additional funds for VaquitaCPR. In recent years, significant contributions have enabled efforts that have focused on assessing the population and educating the public about the devastating threat facing the endangered porpoise. The Mexican government has expended more than $100 million to date on these efforts and more. According to Debborah Luke, AZA's Senior Vice President for Conservation & Science, the AZA community has also contributed to vaquita conservation through its innovative SAFE program in the past five years. The illegal gillnets killing vaquita are used to catch another endangered species, the totoaba. The fish's dried swim bladders fetch huge sums of money in China and Hong Kong, where it is believed the bladders help maintain youthful-looking skin. "We are very grateful that both the Mexican government and AZA have pledged support and hope it will inspire others who share our determination to save the vaquita to donate," emphasized Dr. Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho, lead researcher and head of Mexico's International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita (CIRVA). "Does the public care enough to help save the most endangered marine mammal in the world? I think so. We can't stand by and watch this precious resource disappear. It will be challenging, but we must try." To support the rescue effort, learn more about the vaquita and for information about VaquitaCPR, visit VaquitaCPR.org VaquitaCPR is led by Mexico's Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT). 'VaquitaCPR' is dedicated to conserving, protecting, and helping this rare porpoise recover. The National Marine Mammal Foundation, The Marine Mammal Center, and the Chicago Zoological Society are primary partners in this extraordinary conservation effort. Key collaborators in Mexico include the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita (CIRVA), the National Institute of Ecology and Climate Change (INECC), the Mexican Association of Habitats for the Interaction and Protection of Marine Mammals (AMHMAR), and Acuario Oceanico. Additional United States collaborators are Duke University and the Marine Mammal Commission, with NOAA Fisheries providing technical expertise. The Association of Zoos and Aquariums, Dolphin Quest, SeaWorld, Vancouver Aquarium, the International Marine Animal Trainer's Association and the Association of Marine Mammal Parks and Aquariums are offering support and expertise to the program and assisting with fundraising.


Les citernes pluviales et les composteurs de jardin sont deux des programmes qui ont été mis en place dans la province. Note aux rédacteurs : Une photo est associée avec ce communiqué de presse. L'institut canadien de plomberie et de chauffage (ICPC) a décerné au Fonds Éco IGA le prix national ICPC pour une utilisation efficiente de l'eau, en reconnaissance de son engagement à la cause de la conservation de l'eau, de ses partenariats environnementaux et de son programme de sensibilisation des consommateurs. C'est la troisième fois que ce prix est décerné depuis sa création en 2016. Il distingue une contribution exceptionnelle à l'amélioration de notre relation avec l'eau. « Les efforts déployés par IGA au Québec dans le but d'optimiser l'utilisation de l'eau sont une source d'inspiration car ils participent d'une détermination solidement ancrée et assortie d'objectifs bien précis », de dire Bill Palamar, président du CA de l'ICPC et président de Weil-McLain Canada. « Il y a toutes sortes de choses qu'on peut faire dans un jardin pour optimiser sa consommation d'eau, et il est bon d'encourager les familles, les quartiers, les entreprises locales et les entreprises internationales à y contribuer. C'est en reconnaissance de leurs efforts que nous leur décernons ce prix. » Le Fonds Éco IGA fait participer les consommateurs et les employés à plusieurs programmes : « L'eau est une ressource précieuse. Celle qu'on récupère dans les citernes pluviales peut servir à arroser le jardin, parmi bien d'autres utilisations. La collecte des eaux de pluie est une façon simple et pratique de protéger nos ressources naturelles et notre environnement », de dire Pierre Lussier, directeur du Fonds ÉCO IGA. En 2016, le premier prix ICPC pour une utilisation efficiente de l'eau a été remis à WaterAid Canada, en reconnaissance de ses efforts inlassables pour faciliter l'accès à de l'eau potable, à des installations sanitaires et à des toilettes dans les collectivités les plus pauvres de la planète. La même année, le Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre s'est également vu décerner le prix, en reconnaissance de sa contribution à la conservation de la vie aquatique, à l'éducation, à la recherche et à l'expérimentation de pratiques novatrices. Quelques mots sur l'Institut canadien de plomberie et de chauffage Fondé à Montréal en 1933, l'ICPC est une association à but non lucratif, qui s'emploie à offrir à ses membres les outils dont ils ont besoin pour réussir dans le contexte économique actuel. Plus de 260 entreprises sont membres de cette association professionnelle canadienne influente. Ce sont des fabricants, des distributeurs grossistes, des maîtres distributeurs, des agents de fabricants et des entreprises alliées qui fabriquent et distribuent des appareils sanitaires, du matériel de chauffage, des systèmes hydroniques, des TVR industriels, des équipements d'adduction d'eau et d'autres produits mécaniques. Les grossistes de l'ICPC exploitent plus de 700 entrepôts et salles d'exposition au Canada. Le chiffre d'affaires de l'industrie s'élève à plus de 6,5 milliards de dollars par an, et les membres de l'ICPC emploient plus de 20 000 personnes dans tout le Canada. Pour voir la photo associée avec ce communiqué de presse, veuillez visitez le lien suivante : http://www.marketwire.com/library/20170427-ecoiga.jpg


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.treehugger.com

From now on, thirsty visitors can refill their own bottles at water fountains or grab a reusable cup in the cafeteria. The Vancouver Aquarium has taken a bold and admirable step in banning single-use plastics from its facility. Water bottles, straws, cup lids, and disposable cutlery will no longer be sold on the premises, as the Aquarium strives to align its retail practices with responsible ocean stewardship. It is the first aquarium or zoo to do so in Canada, and will hopefully inspire others to follow. Visitors are encouraged to bring reusable water bottles that can be refilled at four new water fountains and bottle-filling stations located throughout the Aquarium and even outdoors. In a pinch, there are reusable cups available in the cafeteria – a practice which is frequently rejected by restaurants on the basis of hygiene, but seems to be coming back into fashion, thankfully. Sometimes a powerful visual presentation is the easiest way to convince a skeptical audience. The Aquarium has created a temporary art installation showcasing the number of plastic water bottles sold in the café between September and November last year. It looks like a giant trash heap, and yet is only a fraction of the approximately 37,000 bottles sold on-site in 2016. Inside the window, a 20-foot model of a humpback whale swims among ‘waves’ of 1,200 plastic bottles – the average number of bottles that will be eliminated from the Aquarium’s waste stream every two weeks, now that the policy has changed. John Nightingale, president and CEO of the Vancouver Aquarium, said in a media release: “Humans are producing tremendous amounts of plastic at a time when the problem has never been more pressing. Currently, there is enough plastic in the ocean to cover every meter of world’s coastlines. There is a great dependency on single-use plastic water bottles that we must curb and the Aquarium, as an ocean conservation organization, is fully committed to doing our part.” The trend away from single-use water bottles is gathering steam. Last week Business Insider called bottled water “the new smoking” and, in a bizarre ad for Soda Stream, celebrity Paris Hilton even took an anti-plastic stance: I don’t ever listen to Paris Hilton, but she’s hit the nail on the head this time. Way to go, Vancouver Aquarium, for getting with the times and realizing that single-use water bottles really have no place in 2017. May others follow your example.


News Article | April 20, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

An endangered green sea turtle found in Canada's frigid seas in January is now heading back to California's warmer waters after receiving initial rehabilitation from hypothermia. Comber, a green sea turtle discovered on a far-flung beach in Vancouver Island's west coast, had suffered from a hypothermia so terrible that it had been hard for officials to say if the turtle was still alive. Sea turtles such as Comber are cold-blooded, which means they depend on external environments to regulate body temperature. As such, sea turtles do not usually live in Canada because of the country's climate. On Jan. 23, the sea turtle, who is about 12 to 20 years old, was admitted to Vancouver Aquarium's Marine Mammal Rescue Center with an 11.2 degree Celsius (52.16 degree Fahrenheit) body temperature. Dr. Martin Haulena, the rescue center's head veterinarian, said Comber's state in January was so bad that he had difficulty breathing. The aquarium staff then treated Comber with gastrointestinal protectants, antibiotics, and a measured boost in temperature. They kept track of the turtle's heartbeats through ultrasound. Hauder said there is nowhere in the country with waters warm enough to help the 35-kilogram (77-pound) Comber survive. To make sure that Comber gets to find a suitable home, Vancouver Aquarium had coordinated with other agencies such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (UFWS), U.S. Coast Guard, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and several U.S. aquariums. Fortunately, Comber will be taken by the UFWS and returned to California. After staying at the Seattle aquarium for one night, Comber will be taken to San Diego SeaWorld where they will finish the turtle's rehabilitation. Once waters are temperate enough, Comber and other sea turtles under rehabilitation, including an olive ridley sea turtle named Tucker, will be freed. Of these animals, Comber is the single sea turtle that managed to reach Canada. Tucker was found off a Washington coast. Although Comber is the first green sea turtle rescued and released by the aquarium, he is not the first to be rehabilitated. In 2005, the team found a green sea turtle named Schoona in the waters off British Columbia. She was considered non-releasable and now stays in the aquarium's gallery of Tropical Waters. In California, when green sea turtles are rescued, only 30 percent of the saved animals make it to release, said Haulena. Comber, however, had beaten the odds. Haulena said getting Comber healthy enough so he could be released into the wild was their number goal. "He can contribute to the growth of the endangered sea turtle population," added Haulena. © 2016 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 7, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

A California sea lion in critical condition was rescued off the coast of Salt Spring Island on Monday. The animal is now under the care of Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre. Locals say that it was in distress, lethargic, and just stayed in one place the whole time. "We had several reports of a male sea lion in distress on Salt Spring through the weekend," said Martin Haulena, head veterinarian of Vancouver Aquarium. Looking at the pictures they received, Haulena describes that the animal is in a very poor condition. It is so thin that the ribs and spine can be seen. It also suffered "massive weight loss." Together with the Island Wildlife Natural Care Centre and Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Haulena helped bring the animal from the coast to Vancouver Aquarium's rescue center to receive medical treatments. They then confirmed that the sea lion is a male, believed to be five to seven years old. Aquarium's staff are currently working to stabilize the animal. He is now being treated with gastric protectants, subcutaneous fluids, and antibiotics. However, it is still uncertain why the sea lion is in trouble. He will stay under observation and will have to undergo further examination. "The animal is in such poor condition that now is not the time to perform potentially stressful medical procedures," said Haulena. He added that it will be hard to target the treatment without diagnostic information. California sea lion, known for its playfulness, intelligence, social behavior and noisy barking, is a common animal found from British Columbia down to the southern part of Baja California. It has a steady growing population of approximately 238,000. Aside from Baja California and British Columbia, California sea lions can also be seen in Monterey, San Francisco, and Galapagos Islands. Sea lions are the most common patients of The Marine Mammal Center, a nonprofit veterinary research hospital and educational center devoted to rehabilitate and rescue ill and injured marine mammals. The common reasons why the sea lions are rescued are: toxicity, leptospirosis, pneumonia, cancer, entanglement on fishing gears, gunshots and malnutrition. © 2016 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Sea star wasting disease, the cause of which remains uncertain, has baffled scientists since it first appeared in the summer of 2013. Some species of the affected sea stars act lethargic or have arms that are abnormally curled upward; others abruptly change color. In either case, they soon develop skin lesions through which their internal organs may eventually fall out. In the end, their limbs detach, and they die. What makes this outbreak so alarming is that it is occurring from Mexico to Alaska and involves more than 20 species, says Littman. Millions have died. Previous incidents of wasting disease were restricted to a very small geographic range and affected only a few species. A significant loss of stars could have a dangerous domino effect. "You don't think of them as being particularly fast," says Littman, "but sea stars are important keystone predators in the tide pools." His summer studies investigated whether sea stars with the wasting disease could be identified before they showed outward signs of it. While early detection won't benefit sea stars in the wild, it would help aquatic veterinarians care for captive ones, which are getting sick just as much as their wild counterparts. Early indicators of the disease, Littman theorized, could be found in density scans of the sea creatures. His research followed up on the findings of a Monterey Bay Aquarium veterinarian who had seen some decreased density in the bodies of sea stars with the wasting syndrome. Littman's work was supported by the International Association for Aquatic Animal Medicine and the national AQUAVET program based at Cornell University. Felicia Nutter, V93, a research assistant professor of infectious disease and global health at Cummings School, hooked the third-year veterinary student up with veterinarians Lesanna Lahner of the Seattle Aquarium and Marty Haulena of the Vancouver Aquarium. Under their mentorship, Littman compared images of ailing and healthy sea stars in hopes of finding telltale density variations. He was interested in the tiny bones, called ossicles, that run throughout the bodies of sea stars. These vary in shape and size and form the skeletal network that supports a star's body. One of the biggest challenges Littman faced was how to use technology to get images of the ossicles. In human medicine, doctors use dual X-ray absorptiometry to measure bones' mineral density and diagnose conditions like osteoporosis. But the machines that do these scans are very expensive. Besides, he says, "I would have also needed to be able to compare the results to a range of 'normals,' which didn't exist" for sea stars. Maurice Solano, an assistant professor of diagnostic imaging at Cummings School, gave him tips on how to use software to come up with a range of normal densities for healthy sea stars, Those densities could then be compared with the densities of sea stars with wasting disease. Littman had hoped that X-ray, which is inexpensive and widely available, would help him detect the disease, but the invertebrates' unusual anatomy foiled that plan. "You put a star on a table and shoot a beam down to get one flat picture, but because [all the ossicles] overlap, and not all stars are of uniform thickness, X-ray turned out to be impractical for determining their densities," he says. CT scans did the job. Because a CT scanner takes hundreds of cross-sectional pictures, Littman was able to assess sea star ossicles in several different planes and even in 3-D. "We weren't able to determine where a lesion was going to appear on the skin of a sick sea star," he says, "but we were able to get the overall density of a sea star and determine whether it was above or below the 'normal' determined from CT scans of healthy stars. Our preliminary data showed that the ossicles of healthy stars have much higher density." Now back on campus, Littman expects to be first author, with Lahner and Haulena, on a forthcoming paper about how to perform an X-ray on a sea star to help diagnose other conditions. He says he hopes to continue working with sea stars and other marine animals. "The ocean covers 70 percent of the earth, and we know less about it than we do about space," says Littman. "Invertebrates, fish, marine mammals, sea turtles—that's where my passion lives."


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwired - Feb. 17, 2017) - The Government of Canada is committed to protecting our oceans and marine life for future generations. During his visit to Vancouver this week, the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, announced a suite of initiatives to ensure that our Pacific Coast remains healthy, prosperous and safe for generations to come. The Minister announced the establishment of the new Hecate Strait and Queen Charlotte Sound Glass Sponge Reefs Marine Protected Area, which will protect large colonies of unique glass sponges estimated to be 9000 years old. The reefs provide refuge, habitat and nursing grounds for many aquatic species such as rockfish, finfish and shellfish. The designation of this Marine Protected Area is a step forward in Canada's plan to protecting 5% of its marine and coastal areas by 2017 and 10% by 2020. In addition, the Minister signed, along with provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples and stakeholders, the Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area (PNCIMA) Plan. This Plan will help protect the health of the North Pacific Coast by setting out a framework to manage the marine activities and resources in that area. Under the Oceans Protection Plan, the government is taking action to better understand and address the cumulative effects of shipping on marine mammals. While speaking to stakeholders at the Vancouver Aquarium, the Minister announced that Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) will work with a coalition of partners to integrate underwater acoustic data to enhance our knowledge on the impacts of noise on marine mammals and make better decisions on how to mitigate these impacts. The Department is currently concluding an agreement with the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority to further support this project through the acquisition of hydrophones and other acoustic monitoring technology and systems. The Minister also announced that Fisheries and Oceans Canada has launched a science-based review of the effectiveness of current management and recovery actions under way for the southern resident killer whale, the North Atlantic right whale and the St. Lawrence estuary beluga. The science-based review will be completed this summer and will identify key additional measures and priorities for new or enhanced actions. At the Vancouver Aquarium, the Minister also announced over $1 million in support for two new research projects to monitor contaminants and investigate their impacts in the Pacific and Arctic Oceans. Fisheries and Oceans Canada is providing $399,000 to the Vancouver Aquarium to help implement Pollution Tracker, a new science program that will help identify the sources of contaminants in British Columbia and inform policies and management decisions. The Vancouver Aquarium is receiving a further $215,000 to study, for the first time, microplastics in the Arctic Ocean and their biological effects on marine life. An additional $520,000 in in-kind support, such as vessel use, will be provided to assist in the collection of samples. The Minister also highlighted the Government of Canada's commitment to enhancing the prevention and response capacity of the Canadian Coast Guard. New lifeboat stations, modern equipment, and emergency tow packages are among the measures that will be put in place under the Oceans Protection Plan. The Government of Canada will also be establishing a dedicated Primary Environmental Response Team (PERT) near Port Hardy, B.C. "Our Government is acting on its commitment to protect our coasts. While visiting beautiful British Columbia, I met with many partners and stakeholders and saw first-hand the accomplishments we can achieve by working together. With these initiatives, as well as other initiatives under the $1.5 billion Oceans Protection Plan, I know that we will make great strides in safeguarding our coasts for future generations." The Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, P.C., Q.C., M.P., Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard "Pollution is a major issue for sea life and human health around the world. The Government's announcement addresses the urgent need for data on a wide range of pollutants in coastal British Columbia - including hydrocarbons, flame retardants, and heavy metals - as well the emerging issue of plastics in our oceans. This partnership will help us all understand what needs to be done to protect ocean life and human health for future generations." "This acoustic data project will complement and help expand the work already underway as part of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority led ECHO program." Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area (PNCIMA) Plan officially endorsed by all planning partners For more information about the Canadian Coast Guard, visit www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

BioBlitz Canada 150 will put Canadians in direct contact with our wildlife OTTAWA, ON--(Marketwired - November 30, 2016) - As part of Canada's 150th celebrations, the Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF), with BioBlitz Canada and other partners in conservation, will carry out a series of public bioblitzes across the nation to help showcase and conserve our natural heritage. "This fascinating project will engage, inspire and strengthen the environmental consciousness of Canadians all across the country. Let's take the opportunity being offered to us to become the guardians of our Canadian wildlife, an invaluable source of wealth," said the Hon. Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage. BioBlitz Canada 150 is one of 38 Signature Projects recently announced by Minister Joly under the federal Canada 150 initiative. BioBlitz Canada 150 events will bring together thousands of Canadians from all ages, cultural backgrounds and walks of life to explore Canada's terrestrial, freshwater, coastal and marine environments. The BioBlitz Canada 150 project will generate new scientific data and document new species, information which is critical for decisions on the state of Canada's biodiversity. In the next days, for instance, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) will announce their assessments of which species are at risk of extinction and which may be holding their own. These assessments are based on the kind of data that the BioBlitz Canada 150 project will provide. "Wildlife and nature are key parts of the Canadian identity and we're very pleased the Government of Canada recognizes and supports this aspect of our national celebration," said Rick Bates, CEO of the Canadian Wildlife Federation. "We look forward to having people from across the country participate in a bioblitz as part of the 150th anniversary celebrations." Public bioblitz events will blend science with community and youth engagement. Scientists and interested members of the public will go out together in nature to find, identify and record as many species as possible in a given time. The BioBlitz Canada 150 project will feature five flagship events in urban areas, 20 community events and 10 science-intense blitzes. Individuals, schools and organizations will also be encouraged to organize their own bioblitz events to share the celebration of Canada's wildlife and contribute to the national database. Locations, results and activity guides will be posted on the new BioBlitzCanada.ca website and observations will be tracked in real time through iNaturalist.ca, the official database platform for BioBlitz Canada 150. The website will feature a variety of other resources to encourage public participation throughout the year. Discoveries will be showcased to the Canadian public, wildlife managers, conservation organizations, educational institutions and government agencies to shape conservation decisions which will help to inform choices on such issues such as climate change and loss of biodiversity and ensure these wild species and spaces remain for generations to come. The project will create Canada's nature selfie for our 150th. For more information and to watch the project unfold visit BioBlitzCanada.ca. About the Canadian Wildlife Federation: The Canadian Wildlife Federation is dedicated to fostering awareness and appreciation of our natural world. By spreading knowledge of human impacts on the environment, sponsoring research, promoting the sustainable use of natural resources, recommending legislative changes and co-operating with like-minded partners, CWF encourages a future in which Canadians can live in harmony with nature. Visit CanadianWildlifeFederation.ca for more information. About BioBlitz Canada: BioBlitz Canada is a national partnership of leading conservation, education and research organizations with the goal to document Canada's biodiversity by connecting the public with nature in a scientist-led participatory survey of life from sea to sea to sea, and make sure this important information can be useful to current and future science, with open-source access to all. Its vision is to help Canadians learn about and connect with nature, be it in one's own backyard or the most important ecological sites in Canada. Alliance of Natural History Museums of Canada, Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, Biological Survey of Canada, Birds Studies Canada, Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service (Environment and Climate Change Canada), iNaturalist Canada, Nature Canada, Nature Conservancy of Canada, NatureServe Canada, New Brunswick Museum, Parks Canada, RARE Charitable Research Reserve, Royal Ontario Museum, Royal Saskatchewan Museum, Stanley Park Ecology Society, Toronto Zoo, Vancouver Aquarium and other organizations. About iNaturalist Canada: Launched in 2015, iNaturalist Canada is a virtual place where Canadians can record and share what they see in nature, interact with other nature watchers, and learn about Canada's wildlife. The app is run by the Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF) and the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in collaboration with iNaturalist.org and the California Academy of Sciences. Parks Canada, NatureServe Canada and CWF's Hinterland Who's Who have been key partners in the development of iNaturalist Canada and will continue to play a role in the program.


News Article | January 14, 2016
Site: www.sciencenews.org

Decades after Europe banned toxic PCBs, the region’s killer whales and three smaller dolphin species still carry high levels of the pollutants. “They’re still at concentrations we really need to worry about,” said veterinary specialist Paul D. Jepson of the Zoological Society of London at a news conference January 12. PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) were once industrial wonder chemicals but were banned by many developed nations by the end of the 1980s because of human health and environmental concerns. Despite the long gap since then, mean concentration of the chemicals in the blubber of some populations of Europe’s killer whales exceeds — often by a lot — a high threshold for health damage. So do PCB concentrations in bottlenose as well as in striped dolphins, Jepson and his colleagues report online January 14 in Scientific Reports. PCB concentrations in harbor porpoises were lower but still exceeded a lower threshold above which physiological changes may occur. A team of researchers from across Europe — from Spain to Slovenia— compiled and analyzed PCB animal contamination information spanning from the early 1990s to 2009 or 2012. The data come from more than 1,000 animals, from either necropsies or blubber samples nipped from living animals. The concentrations represent a sum of the PCB variants detected. Adults of four species of cetaceans carry concentrations of long-lasting, toxic PCBs (measured in milligrams/kilogram of lipid) near or substantially greater than thresholds of observed effects from PCB contamination. The black line marks a level at which some lab tests start observing physiological changes in marine mammals. The red line represents a higher threshold, linked to reproductive effects in ringed seals. After a modest postban drop in body concentrations of the PCBs, levels appear to have remained stable and high in around much of Europe, Jepson says. PCBs are probably leaking out of landfills or otherwise working their way to the waters. “There’s a lot more PCBs to come,” Jepson warns. What had once seemed a great asset for better living through chemistry has turned out to be a long nightmare for environmental contamination. PCBs resist heat and general degradation. And the chemicals don’t just linger; they concentrate themselves in animals. PCBs dissolve in fat and grow more concentrated as contaminated predators get eaten by even bigger predators. Top predators that eat fat-rich prey and live long lives, such as mammal-hunting killer whales, are thus especially at risk for high concentrations. Males keep building up their body burden of PCBs, but females typically discharge most of theirs while lactating. The bad news: The PCBs freed from the females go into the milk their babies drink for months. The researchers looked at two thresholds at which PCBs cause physiological effects. A lower threshold of 9 milligrams of PCBs per kilogram of body fat comes from experimental studies, and a higher one (41 mg/kg) is described for reproductive troubles in ringed seals in the Baltic Sea. In comparison, killer whales sampled in the United Kingdom had mean PCB concentrations of almost 108 mg/kg. The survey can’t say for certain what population miseries come from the high PCB concentrations. Previous research suggests that PCBs impair reproduction, and Jepson notes that that Scotland’s killer whale population looks as if it’s going extinct. Only eight known survivors remain and no calves have been reported in almost two decades. The high concentrations of PCBs in the survey don’t surprise marine mammal toxicologist Peter Ross of the Vancouver Aquarium. He has followed PCB contamination in aquatic life and hasn’t seen much improvement in decades. And in the case of some Pacific killer whales, he doesn’t expect PCBs to fall to safe levels in that population until the end of the 21st century. In terms of spotting a menace to the environment before it spreads, “we learned a very hard lesson with PCBs,” he says.


MISSISSAUGA, ON--(Marketwired - October 31, 2016) - On Tues. Oct. 18, 2016, Canadian Plastics Industry Association (CPIA) held its annual "Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup" (GCSC). The CPIA team was joined by staff from CKF Inc and Polykar to help clean up litter along a portion of the Etobicoke Creek in Mississauga, Ontario. CPIA is a proud supporter of the GCSC which empowers people to make a difference in their communities by taking action against shoreline litter through cleanups. GCSC is one of the largest direct action environmental programs in Canada and the third largest cleanup in the world. "As a site sponsor of the Shoreline Cleanup, CPIA was very excited to participate again this year," says Carol Hochu, CPIA President and CEO. "This national conservation effort is a great chance for everyone to get involved and play an important role in keeping our waterways healthy, which benefits our community as well as the plants and animals that rely on our waters for survival." By removing shoreline litter from waterbodies, participants in the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup are helping prevent animal entanglement, water contamination and dangers for water-based activities such as boating and swimming. Over its history, the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup has helped to remove over 1.2 million kilograms of shoreline litter -- the approximate weight of 259 school buses. Shoreline cleanups can happen along the edge of any body of water -- rivers, ponds, lakes, beaches and anywhere else where land and water meet. The Shoreline Cleanup is a joint conservation initiative of the Vancouver Aquarium and WWF and every year thousands of Canadians participate. You can get involved by visiting www.shorelinecleanup.ca for a cleanup location near you. In 2015, the most common items found on shorelines included, cigarettes/cigarette filters; food wrappers; plastic bottles and caps; beverage cans and bottles; other plastic and foam; straws and stirrers. The Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup, presented by Loblaw Companies Limited, is one of the largest direct action conservation programs in Canada. A conservation initiative of the Vancouver Aquarium and WWF, the Shoreline Cleanup aims to promote understanding of shoreline litter issues by engaging Canadians to rehabilitate shoreline areas through cleanups. www.ShorelineCleanup.ca The Vancouver Aquarium is a non-profit society dedicated to the conservation of aquatic life. WWF is creating solutions to the most serious conservation challenges facing our planet, helping people and nature thrive. www.wwf.ca Since 1943, the Canadian Plastics Industry Association has served as the national voice and leader for plastics industry sustainability across Canada and beyond, representing the interests of plastics value chain including resin and raw material suppliers, processors/converters, equipment suppliers, recyclers and brand owners.

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