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News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

TAMPA, FL--(Marketwired - February 24, 2017) - The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), James A. Haley Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) released on Friday, February 24 a sources sought notice letting prospective contractors know about a potential opportunity to provide durable medical equipment (DME) services for the Northern, Central, and Caribbean Zones, VA Medical Centers (VAMC). Interested contractors must meet Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations Standards (JCAHCO), to provide DME services to eligible beneficiaries throughout Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) 8, the VA Sunshine Healthcare Network. DME Services involves the delivery, setup, repair/maintenance etc. of all items of a therapeutic or rehabilitative nature, which are determined as medically necessary for home treatment of eligible veterans (e.g., hospital beds, over-bed tables, bathroom equipment, invalid lifts, hand cycles, stair glides, room air conditioners, standing tables, portable ramps, mobility (walking) aids, environmental control units (ECUs), etc.). The contractor who receives the award must provide all supplies, materials, equipment, labor, supervision, transportation, infection control, storage, cleaning; delivery, sanitization, assembly/set-up, repair, pick-up, routine service/refurbishment, and patient training/instruction-in-the-use of government-furnished equipment (GFE) DME. The contractor also must put in place mechanisms and methods to register complaints, resolve emergencies, and provide pertinent documentation of performing all tasks. The VA has set aside this opportunity for veteran-owned small business (VOSB) contractors. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) for this procurement is 621610, Home Health Care Services, and the business size standard is $15,000,000. The VA indicated its plans to issue one contract to a contractor who can provides services in each region/zone, but will consider awarding one contract per zone, if necessary. The VA intends to release an official solicitation by the end of March. The point of contact for this opportunity is Contract Specialist Melva Stennis, who may be reached at melva.stennis@va.gov. To receive the contract, contractors also must be registered with the System for Award Management (SAM) database, and have as part of the Registration all current Representations and Certifications. US Federal Contractor Registration, the world's largest third-party government registration firm, completes the required Registrations on behalf of its clients. It also makes available information about opportunities like this, as well as training on how to locate, research, and respond to opportunities. For more information, to get started with a SAM registration, or to learn more about how US Federal Contractor Registration can help your business succeed, call 877-252-2700, ext. 1. We also make available for our clients and for contracting officers our proprietary Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS). Our Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS) gives you in one place instant bid notifications, bid proposal prospecting, and information about government procurement officers. We make this search tool available to clients, as part of our commitment to helping each and every USFCR client succeed and thrive as a government contractor. For contracting officers, the AFPDS gives them in one place access to a database of available contractors and also a place to post information about opportunities. Contracting officers get free access to AFPDS. We also provide interested contracting officers a list of contractors who may be able to provide a service and/or product that they need. US Federal Contractor Registration also helps qualified businesses become certified as a Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Business. To learn more about how we can help you succeed as a government contractor, call 877-252-2700, ext. 1.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

NEW YORK, March 02, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Alice V. Cheuk, Practice Chief of the Radiation Oncology Department at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center, has been selected to join the Physician Board at the American Health Council. She will be sharing her knowledge and expertise on Radiation Oncology, Cancer, and Radiation Therapy. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/a0c2e9b5-54df-4b90-9a4e-b0df6ff85256 With over a decade of experience in the field of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Cheuk offers valuable insight in her role as the Practice Chief of Radiation Oncology at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center. Considered the oldest Veteran’s Affairs facility in New York City, the James J. Peters VA Medical Center is a teaching hospital utilizing state-of-the-art technology to provide comprehensive healthcare through education and research. The available services at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center range from primary care, tertiary care, and long-term care in areas of medicine, surgery, psychiatry, physical medicine and rehabilitation, neurology, oncology, dentistry, geriatrics, and extended care. As the Practice Chief of Radiation Oncology at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center since 2009, Dr. Cheuk’s day-to-day responsibilities include managing the care of cancer patients, overseeing and supervising the Radiation Oncology staff at the hospital, teaching residents from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and serving on various hospital committees. In 2004, Dr. Cheuk earned her Medical Degree from the University of Maryland School of Medicine.  She completed an internship at The Reading Hospital and Medical Center in 2005 and a Radiation Oncology Residency at the University of Southern California/LAC+USC Medical Center in 2009 where she served as Chief Resident.  She is Board Certified in Radiation Oncology by the American Board of Radiology. Dr. Cheuk maintains affiliations with the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), Society for Palliative Radiation Oncology (SPRO), Association of VA Hematology/Oncology (AVAHO), and is a member of the National VHA Palliative Radiotherapy Taskforce Group and Phi Beta Kappa. Dr. Cheuk’s desire to pursue the field of Radiation Oncology developed from her fascination with both oncology and technology. Looking back, she attributes her success to her persistence and strong work ethic. Among her plethora of professional accolades, Dr. Cheuk is most proud of the growth of the JJP VAMC Radiation Oncology Department during her tenure. Under her leadership, the department has increased staffing from 8.85 FTEE to 12.05 FTEE, acquired over 1 million dollars in new technology and upgrades to deliver state-of-the-art care to Veterans, revamped the practice to become ACR Accredited, and underwent a complete physical renovation to improve the comfort of patients.  Additionally, the department now has a standard rotation for Mount Sinai Radiation Oncology residents and is participating in cooperative group clinical trials. Her commitment to delivering the highest quality care to our Veterans has led to recognition with the Clinical Excellence Award for Customer Service by a JJP VAMC Outpatient Department in both 2013 and 2015. In her free time, Dr. Cheuk enjoys Broadway musicals, traveling, painting, drawing, writing, and karaoke. She volunteers at The Journey Church. Considering the future, Dr. Cheuk hopes for continual advancement of the Radiation Oncology Department and to help move the field of Radiation Oncology forward.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Following the success of the annual PAINWeek National Conference, the 2016 PAINWeekEnd (PWE) Regional Conference series resumes this fall on October 15 at Foxwoods Resorts & Casino, 350 Trolley Line Blvd. The full-day program will provide busy clinicians and allied healthcare practitioners with 6.0 hours of relevant, practical instruction in the management of chronic pain. Connecticut is in the midst of a heroin and opiate crisis. There were 729 drug overdose deaths in 2015; in 2016, almost 900. A large part of the problem is fentanyl and the fact that it’s 50 times stronger than heroin. How can practitioners keep up to date with changing healthcare issues? Abigail T. Brooks, PharmD, BCPS, and a presenter at PWE Mashantucket, commented, “As a practitioner in pain management, I recognize that change is all around us—from how opioids are prescribed, to how patients are screened or monitored while on opioids, and to even how opioids are dispensed to patients. The March release of the CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain was a catalyst of change for many.” Dr. Brooks is a clinical pharmacy specialist in pain management at the West Palm Beach VAMC in Florida. She continued, “In my research and reading about opioid use in Connecticut, the focus seems to be on a comprehensive bill signed into law by the Governor in May 2016 which became effective in June 2016. While this law seeks to limit the amount of opioids prescribed to an individual and put naloxone into the hands of both first responders and chronic pain patients to combat opioid addiction, the law also represents significant changes for those who have been taking opioids on a chronic basis for legitimate pain. Attending PAINWeekEND will allow providers practicing in the state of Connecticut to hear and learn more about both opioid and nonopioid treatment options as well as how to handle more difficult or complex patients and how to monitor patients deemed appropriate to remain on chronic opioid therapy.” The Connecticut Medical Examining Board requires 50 CME hours every 2 years. By attending PAINWeekEnd Mashantucket, participants can receive 6.0 CE/CME credit hours as they enhance their skills in medication risk evaluation and mitigation, pain assessment and diagnosis, and delivery of individualized multimodal treatment. Course topics at the Mashantucket PWE include diagnosis and management of centralized pain; the obscurity of opioids; nonopioid analgesics: antidepressants, adjuvant therapies, and muscle relaxants; patient centered urine drug testings; and courses entitled, “Fire the Molecule, Not the Patient! Addressing Irresponsible Prescribing Through Universal Precautions” and “Been Everywhere, Done Everything: Patients Who Fail Standard Treatments.” In addition, there will be commercially supported activities addressing a range of product, disease state, and medical information topics. To see the complete agenda and more information about this or other PAINWeekEnd Regional Conference, go to painweek.org. The online registration fee for this PAINWeekEnd Conference is $129. PAINWeekEnd registrants are further offered the opportunity to register for the 2017 PAINWeek National Conference, September 4-8, in Las Vegas, for $129 off the current online published price.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In an article published September 22, 2016 in Frontiers in Immunology, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center report that inhibiting prostaglandin production slows the progression of premalignant lesions to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Preclinical studies showed that treatment of premalignant lesions with indomethacin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) similar to aspirin, increased the presence of immune cells and lessened tumor burden. Cancers of the head and neck begin with lesions in the oral cavity, including the larynx, pharynx, throat, lips, mouth, salivary glands, and nasal passages. Although the incidence of HNSCC has been on the decline over the past several decades, the National Cancer Institute reports that approximately 3% of all cancers in the U.S. result from HNSCC, with men being diagnosed twice as often as women. Treatment for HNSCC includes surgical removal and chemo-radiation treatment; however, these interventions often fail, and patients have a five-year survival rate of only 50%. It is critical to determine better treatment options for HNSCC patients. One way researchers at MUSC are trying to improve the treatment of HNSCC is by enhancing the body's own immune system to attack the tumor. "There's a lot of effort to stimulate immune reactivity using immunotherapy. The problem with that is cancer can protect itself against the immune defenses. Head and neck cancer is notorious for that," said immunologist M. Rita Young, Ph.D., senior author for this study, who holds a dual appointment at MUSC and the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center. As an immunologist, Young has been working on addressing this problem by studying how the immune system affects tumor progression. Previous work from her laboratory has shown that the composition of immune cells within premalignant lesions differs from that within HNSCC. Significantly, as premalignant cells develop into HNSCC, the immune environment switches from stimulatory/inflammatory to immunosuppressive. This change in the tumor microenvironment prevents the immune system from combating the cancer. Prostaglandin may be an important mediator of this switch. The current study used a novel mouse model of HNSCC to determine how inhibition of prostaglandin affects tumor progression. Mice with premalignant lesions were given indomethacin, an NSAID that inhibits the production of prostaglandin. Indomethacin treatment increased the presence of immune cells at the lesion site and led to a systemic activation of the immune system. Specifically, there was an increase in both Th1-associated cytokines (IL-2 and IFN-γ) as well as Th2-associated cytokines (IL-10). This activation of the immune system reduced the progression of premalignant lesions to HNSCC. Future studies in this area will be focused on maintaining a strong immune presence in pre-malignant lesions for patients. If studies in humans bear out these preclinical findings, further research using more specific prostaglandin inhibitors in combination with other immunomodulatory compounds could provide a better treatment regimen to prevent the formation of HNSCC. "Immunotherapy should be considered as a treatment strategy for premalignant lesions before they progress to cancer. We can detect them. Why not treat them?" said Young. Furthermore, these intervention strategies may be able to help prevent smaller, as yet undetectable lesions from progressing to HNSCC. This work provides strong evidence that treatment of premalignant lesions with indomethacin reduces the tumorigenicity of HNSCC. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which the immune system combats early-stage cancer could lead to improved clinical outcomes in HNSCC, and potentially, other types of cancer as well. "If we can be more persistent and focused on finding premalignant lesions before they become malignant, simple therapies might be beneficial," said Sara Johnson, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at MUSC and a co-author on the article. Founded in 1824 in Charleston, The Medical University of South Carolina is the oldest medical school in the South. Today, MUSC continues the tradition of excellence in education, research, and patient care. MUSC educates and trains more than 3,000 students and residents, and has nearly 13,000 employees, including approximately 1,500 faculty members. As the largest non-federal employer in Charleston, the university and its affiliates have collective annual budgets in excess of $2.2 billion. MUSC operates a 750-bed medical center, which includes a nationally recognized Children's Hospital, the Ashley River Tower (cardiovascular, digestive disease, and surgical oncology), Hollings Cancer Center (a National Cancer Institute designated center) Level I Trauma Center, and Institute of Psychiatry. For more information on academic information or clinical services, visit musc.edu. For more information on hospital patient services, visit muschealth.org. Located in historic downtown Charleston, South Carolina, the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center is a tertiary care teaching hospital providing the highest level quality care from cardiology to neurology to primary and mental health care for 70,000 Veterans along the South Carolina and Georgia coast. The Ralph H. Johnson VA achieved a 5-Star rating according to VA's Strategic Analytics for Improvement and Learning Value (SAIL) model. The SAIL rating ranks the Charleston VA in the top 10 percent of VA medical centers nationwide for quality of care and efficiency. The Charleston VA is also ranked in the top 10th percentile according to the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS). HEDIS is an independent review that measures performance of 90 percent of America's health plans and facilities in both the public and private sector on dimensions of care and service. The Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center is a center of excellence for robotic surgery and orthopedics, and is the first VA National Tele-Mental Health Hub providing care for Veterans across the U.S. The 149-bed hospital includes six community based outpatient clinics, a 20-bed nursing home, women's health, and the full range of inpatient and outpatient care, including medical and surgical intensive care. The VAMC provides more than 875,000 outpatient visits and approximately 4,400 in-patient stays annually. With more than 2,500 employees, Charleston VA has an annual budget of $458 million, research funding of more than $21 million, and more than 100 principle investigators participating in approximately 300 research studies. For more information, visit http://www. .


News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

CHEYENNE, WY--(Marketwired - December 13, 2016) - The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) released on Tuesday, December 13 a presolicitation notice for a contractor to provide two full-time equivalent (FTE) mental health nurse practitioners at the Cheyenne VA Rocky Mountain Consolidated Contracting Center (VAMC) from January 1, 2017 through June 30, 2017. The contract is set aside for a Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business (SDVOSB), and the associated NAICS codes are 621330 and 561320. Contractors interested in and capable of providing the required practitioners are invited to e-mail Contract Specialist Melissa Tybring at Melissa.tybring@va.gov by no later than December 20, 2016. To receive the contract, contractors must be registered with the System for Award Management (SAM) database, and have as part of the Registration all current Representations and Certifications. US Federal Contractor Registration, the world's largest third-party government registration firm, completes the required Registrations on behalf of its clients. It also makes available information about opportunities like this, as well as training on how to locate, research, and respond to opportunities. For more information, to get started with a SAM registration, or to learn more about how US Federal Contractor Registration can help your business succeed, call 877-252-2700, ext. 1. We also make available for our clients and for contracting officers our proprietary Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS). Our Advanced Federal Procurement Data Search (AFPDS) gives you in one place instant bid notifications, bid proposal prospecting, and information about government procurement officers. We make this search tool available to clients, as part of our commitment to helping each and every USFCR client succeed and thrive as a government contractor. For contracting officers, the AFPDS gives them in one place access to a database of available contractors and also a place to post information about opportunities. Contracting officers get free access to AFPDS. We also provide interested contracting officers a list of contractors who may be able to provide a service and/or product that they need. To learn more about our AFPDS, call 877-252-2700, ext. 1.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

N-acetylcysteine reduced PTSD symptoms, cravings, and depression in veterans with PTSD and substance use disorder in a randomized controlled pilot trial conducted at the Medical University of South Carolina and the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center N-acetylcysteine, when combined with group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), reduced symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), cravings, and depression significantly more than CBT alone in veterans with co-occurring PTSD and substance use disorder, a particularly difficult-to-treat population, according to the findings of a randomized controlled pilot trial conducted by researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center. This trial is the first to use NAC as a pharmacotherapy for PTSD and a broad range of SUDs. The results were published online ahead of print on October 11, 2016 by the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. The National Center for PTSD estimates that seven to eight percent of Americans will have PTSD at some point in their life. The numbers are even worse for veterans: it is estimated, for example, that 30 percent of Vietnam veterans will have experienced PTSD at some point in their life. Approximately 40 to 50 percent of veterans with PTSD also have a substance use disorder (SUD). "Addiction goes along with virtually every psychiatric disorder at a higher percentage than it does in the general population" said Peter W. Kalivas, Ph.D. the senior author on the article and chair of the Department of Neuroscience at MUSC. "People who are prone to psychiatric disorders are also prone to addiction." Currently, there are no well-explored pharmacological treatments for patients with co-occurring PTSD/SUD. Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been approved by the FDA for treatment of PTSD, pharmacological treatments for co-occurring PTSD/SUD have yielded suboptimal results. Groundbreaking basic science research by Kalivas has shown that levels of glutamate transporters are decreased in SUDs and that administration of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine can help restore those levels and guard against relapse in animal models of SUD. Because evidence suggests that SUDs and PTSD share overlapping neurobiological pathways, Sudie E. Back, Ph.D., lead author on the article, hypothesized that NAC treatment with CBT would be a novel approach to treat co-occurring PTSD and SUD. Back is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at MUSC and a staff psychologist at the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center. In the eight-week randomized controlled trial led by Back and Kalivas, 35 veterans with PTSD and SUD, all of whom were receiving cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for their SUD, were randomized to either 2400 mg/day of NAC or placebo. The average age of the veterans was 49 years and many were veterans of the Vietnam War. To be included, veterans had to have abstained from substance use for at least seven days. Of the veterans enrolled in the trial, 83% completed it, a very high rate for this difficult-to-treat population. Veterans in the NAC-treated group showed a 46% reduction in PTSD symptoms, compared with a 25% reduction in the placebo group on the Clinical-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), which assesses trauma history and symptom severity. The threshold CAPS score for diagnosis of PTSD is 50. "As a group, the NAC-treated veterans were below diagnostic level for PTSD at the end of treatment," said Back. "For PTSD, these are some of the best outcomes we have seen in the literature for a medication." Craving and depression were also reduced in the NAC-treated group. The amount of craving was reduced by 81% and the frequency of craving by 71% in the NAC group, compared with 32% and 29% in the placebo group. "Craving is a key component of substance use in relapse," said Back. "If you have a medication that can really reduce craving, that will go a long way to helping people stay clean and sober." Depression, gauged using the Beck Depression Inventory, was reduced 48% in the NAC group vs. 15% in the placebo group. Veterans in the study had low rates of substance use during the trial, and the study found little effect of medication on use, perhaps due to the fact that all participants were receiving SUD treatment and exhibiting low levels of use. This finding could also be due to the relatively limited number of participants or to the chronic nature of the participants' PTSD. "This is a tough patient population with SUD to work with." said Kalivas. "We have Vietnam vets that have had PTSD for 15 to 20 years. This is not an easy-to-turn-around population." Although these early, promising findings show that NAC reduced PTSD symptoms, craving, and depression, NAC should not be used as a monotherapy or substitute for evidence-based behavioral treatment, but instead be seen as an adjunct therapy that enhances it. "We would not advocate using it instead of therapy," said Back. "But this could be something to help prevent relapse when used alongside a behavioral treatment." NAC is available over the counter and does not cause side effects at the doses used in the study, but it degrades quickly when stored, is contraindicated in patients with asthma, and can cause nausea at higher doses and so should always be obtained and administered under a physician's supervision. The next steps in Back's research are to run a longer-term trial of NAC in veterans with PTSD and SUD and to use MRS magnetic spectroscopy to better explore the effect of NAC on glutamate levels in patients with PTSD and SUD. Founded in 1824 in Charleston, The Medical University of South Carolina is the oldest medical school in the South. Today, MUSC continues the tradition of excellence in education, research, and patient care. MUSC educates and trains more than 3,000 students and residents in six colleges (Dental Medicine, Graduate Studies, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy), and has nearly 13,000 employees, including approximately 1,500 faculty members. As the largest non-federal employer in Charleston, the university and its affiliates have collective annual budgets in excess of $2.2 billion, with an annual economic impact of more than $3.8 billion and annual research funding in excess of $250 million. MUSC operates a 700-bed medical center, which includes a nationally recognized children's hospital, the Ashley River Tower (cardiovascular, digestive disease, and surgical oncology), Hollings Cancer Center (a National Cancer Institute-designated center), Level I Trauma Center, Institute of Psychiatry, and the state's only transplant center. In 2016, U.S. News & World Report named MUSC Health the number one hospital in South Carolina. For more information on academic programs or clinical services, visit musc.edu. For more information on hospital patient services, visit muschealth.org. Located in historic downtown Charleston, South Carolina, the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center is a tertiary care teaching hospital providing the highest level quality care from cardiology to neurology to primary and mental health care for 70,000 Veterans along the South Carolina and Georgia coast. The Ralph H. Johnson VA achieved a 5-Star rating according to VA's Strategic Analytics for Improvement and Learning Value (SAIL) model. The SAIL rating ranks the Charleston VA in the top 10 percent of VA medical centers nationwide for quality of care and efficiency. The Charleston VA is also ranked in the top 10th percentile according to the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS). HEDIS is an independent review that measures performance of 90 percent of America's health plans and facilities in both the public and private sector on dimensions of care and service. The Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center is a center of excellence for robotic surgery and orthopedics, and is the first VA National Tele-Mental Health Hub providing care for Veterans across the U.S. The 149-bed hospital includes six community based outpatient clinics, a 20-bed nursing home, women's health, and the full range of inpatient and outpatient care, including medical and surgical intensive care. The VAMC provides more than 875,000 outpatient visits and approximately 4,400 in-patient stays annually. With more than 2,500 employees, Charleston VA has an annual budget of $458 million, research funding of more than $21 million, and more than 100 principal investigators participating in approximately 300 research studies. For more information, visit http://www. .


Anderson D.,VAMC
Physics Essays | Year: 2015

Asymmetric Doppler shifts in the Ives-Stilwell experiment are correctly predicted by the special theory of relativity. The same result can be obtained by changing the coordinate system. © 2015 Physics Essays Publication.


Beshai J.,VAMC
Omega (United States) | Year: 2012

This is a book review of Abdel-Khalek's (2005) Arabic Handbook on "Death and Dying." This review extrapolates the Islamic ontology presented in 492 pages covering 56 empirical and 304 empirical studies published by a host of Arab, American and European psychologists and psychiatrists. The Handbook presents an Islamic ontology on death anxiety for the first time to English readers. Freud's Judeo-Christian view of death anxiety is already familiar to readers of Omega. But the Islamic ontology of death is relatively unknown even though it is relevant. This reviewer finds the Islamic ontology of death to be similar to the Judeo-Christian one. Islam provides believers with assurance of God's mercy regardless of human vulnerability to evil. Death anxiety can be relieved by exercising moderation in relations with others. Quoting from the Qur'an, Abdel-Khalek (2005) makes the claim that there is a judicious path to follow between daily distress and achieving social goals. The Arabic term to describe this path is Surat-Mustakeem. It comes close to Aristotle's Eudaimona or happiness. Death Anxiety is neither negative nor positive in connotation. It is the ethical pursuit of a dialectic of truth and virtue. Death anxiety research shows a convergence between ontology and empirical research. © 2012, Baywood Publishing Co., Inc.


Anderson D.,VAMC
Physics Essays | Year: 2011

The two postulates of the special theory of relativity logically lead to the modern version of relativity. An assumption underlies the first postulate. That assumption is that light and matter should be unified under a common framework. Classic foundational experiments upon which the special theory of relativity is based have similar results when this assumption is abandoned. The theory of operation of the interferometer is reviewed and reinterpreted with this modification. © 2011 Physics Essays Publication.


Mookherjee S.,VAMC | Shoen C.,VAMC | Cynamon M.,VAMC
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy | Year: 2012

JPC 2067 is a novel dihydrotriazine dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor that is being developed as an antimalarial therapeutic. We evaluated the in vitro activity of JPC 2067 alone and in combination with sulfamethoxazole (SMX) against a panel of nocardia isolates. The MIC50s and MIC 90s for JPC 2067, SMX, and the combination were 0.125 μg/ml and 4 μg/ml, 16 μg/ml and 32 μg/ml, and 0.03 μg/ml and 2 μg/ml, respectively. JPC 2067 alone and in combination with SMX should be evaluated further to understand its clinical potential. Copyright © 2012, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

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