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News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LOUISVILLE, Colo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--DAC, the premier conference devoted to the design and automation of electronic systems, is excited to once again host Thursday is Training Day allowing DAC attendees to attend high quality sessions in popular subjects. The 54th DAC will be held at the Austin Convention Center in Austin, Texas from June 18 - 22, 2017. Conference registration is now open, including sign-up for “Thursday is Training Day,” as well as the new free “Lunch ‘N’ Learn” taster session on Machine Learning on Wednesday. All sessions are taught by highly respected instructors who are each subject matter experts in their own right and who each have a wide experience of teaching engineers at all skill levels. On Wednesday, the special one hour taster session (including lunch) is provided by Doulos on the subject of Python for Machine Learning. On Thursday attendees may choose sessions from three parallel tracks with the option to select both the morning and afternoon sessions from the same track, or mix-and-match sessions from two different tracks or attend a single half-day session. Training sessions on SystemVerilog, UVM, and Python are taught by Doulos and C++ by Trull Consulting. Session details, including summaries, presenter information and room numbers, can be found at: https://dac.com/events/training. Reserve a seat when you register for DAC at www.dac.com. The Design Automation Conference (DAC) is recognized as the premier event for the design of electronic circuits and systems, and for electronic design automation (EDA) and silicon solutions. A diverse worldwide community of more than 1,000 organizations attends each year, represented by system designers and architects, logic and circuit designers, validation engineers, CAD managers, senior managers and executives as well as researchers and academicians from leading universities. Close to 60 technical sessions selected by a committee of electronic design experts offer information on recent developments and trends, management practices and new products, methodologies and technologies. A highlight of DAC is its exhibition and suite area, with approximately 200 of the leading and emerging EDA, silicon, and intellectual property (IP) companies and design services providers. The conference is sponsored by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the Electronic System Design Alliance (ESDA), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and is supported by ACM's Special Interest Group on Design. Design Automation Conference acknowledges trademarks or registered trademarks of other organizations for their respective products and services.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Synopsys' Subsystem Verification Solution provides USB Type-C Connection State Machine function and supports USB, DisplayPort and USB Power Delivery protocols. The solution features the ability to add future protocols as USB Type-C adoption increases. It is a highly configurable verification environment with automated UVM testbench generation capabilities and a comprehensive set of subsystem-level verification features. "We continue to collaborate extensively with industry leaders on next-generation SoC designs, leveraging our expertise in the latest VIP protocols and specifications for rapidly emerging technologies," said Vikas Gautam, group director of VIP R&D and corporate applications for the Synopsys Verification Group. "Synopsys is committed to delivering comprehensive product offerings including robust protocol VIP, source code test suite and subsystem verification solutions." Synopsys' USB Type-C Subsystem Verification Solution is available now. Synopsys' DesignWare® USB Type-C/DisplayPort Controller and PHY IP are available now. Synopsys, Inc. (Nasdaq: SNPS) is the Silicon to Software™ partner for innovative companies developing the electronic products and software applications we rely on every day. As the world's 15th largest software company, Synopsys has a long history of being a global leader in electronic design automation (EDA) and semiconductor IP and is also growing its leadership in software security and quality solutions. Whether you're a system-on-chip (SoC) designer creating advanced semiconductors, or a software developer writing applications that require the highest security and quality, Synopsys has the solutions needed to deliver innovative, high-quality, secure products. Learn more at www.synopsys.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/asix-adopts-synopsys-usb-type-c-subsystem-verification-solution-300459782.html


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

AUSTIN, TX--(Marketwired - May 23, 2017) - Austemper Design Systems today unveiled the semiconductor industry's first end-to-end tool suite to analyze, augment and verify functional safety in system-on-chip (SoC), application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and intellectual property (IP) designs ensuring they meet functional safety requirements. "Functional safety is a challenge shared by the automotive, medical, industrial and enterprise markets, and is currently a manual process that doesn't scale," says Sanjay Pillay, founder and chief executive officer of Austemper. "Our goal is to meet the challenge with a cost-effective and comprehensive one-stop solution with all the pieces of the functional safety puzzle in an automated and repeatable fashion that meets a variety of certification-oriented applications." Austemper will demonstrate its Functional Safety Tool Suite at the Design Automation Conference (DAC) in Booth #1420 June 19-21 from10 a.m. until 6 p.m. at the Austin Convention Center in Austin, Texas. Austemper's Functional Safety Tool Suite includes SafetyScope for safety analysis, Annealer and RadioScope to handle safety synthesis and augment design structures, and KaleidoScope for safety verification. An engineering group would start with SafetyScope to implement functional safety estimates based on a mission profile and set of diagnostic coverage mechanisms. SafetyScope automatically applies default values from industry standards ISO26262 and/or IEC61508 for Failures-in-Time (FIT) rates and other diagnostic coverage metrics. It can be used for analog, digital or mixed-signal designs and can be integrated with existing electronic design automation (EDA) flows. It runs hierarchically and scales to multi-million gate designs. SafetyScope supports System Verilog, Verilog, VHDL and Netlist designs. The engineering group would move on to Annealer to automate the formerly manual, error-prone approach of adding fault tolerance to a design's storage elements and hardening the design. Annealer can handle memories, register files, FIFOs or entire processing units. RadioScope provides fine-grained safety synthesis capabilities. Like macro-oriented Annealer, it offers automated fault-detection insertion and tolerance methods targeting state elements in the design and cones of synthesizable logic. Annealer and RadioScope support System Verilog, Verilog and netlist designs to accommodate a variety of designs and tool flows, as well as multi-clock designs. The synthesis tools have the ability to auto-recognize design structures. Annealer recognizes memory macros, while RadioScope recognizes finite state machines (FSMs) and other control structures. For state elements, RadioScope can auto-group elements to generate parity and engineering change orders. Both provide self-checking for inserted functional safety enhancements as testbenches and test scripts to highlight automated changes introduced into the design. The output is tool-agnostic and integrates with any universal verification methodology (UVM)-compliant simulation framework. They also generate SEC/LEC scripts to show the original design intent was preserved and meets ISO requirements of traceability and fault tolerance. The final step is KaleidoScope, the industry's only parallel fault simulator with hybrid simulation capabilities. Traditional fault-injected simulation models inject faults into the synthesized netlist and run exhaustive gate-level simulations that take months. KaleidoScope removes the bottleneck by decoupling the simulator from fault injection by taking in the design file with an industry-standard value change dump (VCD) format file. Its patent-pending technology runs multiple fault simulations in parallel to model permanent or transient single-point or multi-point faults for a 100x speedup, reducing the fault verification cycle from months to days. KaleidoScope supports System Verilog, Verilog, VHDL and netlist designs. The Austemper Functional Safety Tool Suite is shipping now and has been adopted by functional safety architects, design and verification teams worldwide with automotive applications demonstrating reliable, repeatable and verifiable functional safety. Austemper has a direct sales channel in the United States and Europe, backed by a variety of customer support and service options including on-site training, hotline support and consulting services. Pricing is available upon request. Austemper Design Systems provides the industry's only end-to-end tool suite to analyze, augment and verify functional safety in system-on-chip (SoC) and application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and intellectual property (IP) designs, ensuring they meet functional safety requirements. Austemper of Austin, Texas, was founded in 2015 by experienced semiconductor professionals with the mission to provide a best-in-class solution to meet functional safety requirements of the automotive, industrial, medical and enterprise markets. For more information, visit: www.austemperdesign.com Austemper Design Systems acknowledges trademarks or registered trademarks of other organizations for their respective products and services.


MIPI CSI-2 v2.0, using MIPI C-PHY v1.2 and MIPI D-PHY v2.1, has added new features for scrambling, alternate low power (ALP) for C/D-PHY, virtual channel extension, latency reduction and transport efficiency (LRTE), and new data types and compression schemes. It enables higher interface bandwidth and more flexibility, especially for imaging and vision applications. The latest D-PHY v2.1 and C-PHY v1.2 add features to support CSI-2 v2.0 including low-power modes (ALP/LVLP), HS reverse mode, HS-IDLE, and higher symbol rate. In addition, M-PHY v4.1 adds ADAPT clarifications and other features to support MIPI UniPro℠ v1.8, utilizing peak data rate of 11.6 Gbps per lane. Synopsys VIP uses a Native SystemVerilog/UVM-based architecture to design next-generation mobility chips with optimum performance. Synopsys VIP is natively integrated with Synopsys' Verdi® Protocol Analyzer debug solution and features advanced debug ports. The VIP also features error injection capabilities, built-in-protocol checks, coverage, and verification plans. "We continue to collaborate with leading standards organizations to develop the newest protocol specifications for next-generation designs," said Vikas Gautam, group director of VIP R&D and corporate applications for the Synopsys Verification Group. "With the introduction of Synopsys VIP for latest MIPI specifications, we provide our customers with advanced capabilities to accelerate the verification closure of their SoC designs." Synopsys, Inc. (Nasdaq: SNPS) is the Silicon to Software™ partner for innovative companies developing the electronic products and software applications we rely on every day. As the world's 15th largest software company, Synopsys has a long history of being a global leader in electronic design automation (EDA) and semiconductor IP and is also growing its leadership in software security and quality solutions. Whether you're a system-on-chip (SoC) designer creating advanced semiconductors, or a software developer writing applications that require the highest security and quality, Synopsys has the solutions needed to deliver innovative, high-quality, secure products. Learn more at www.synopsys.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/synopsys-announces-industrys-first-verification-ip-and-test-suites-for-latest-mipi-csi-2-v20-and-phy-specifications-300451354.html


News Article | February 19, 2017
Site: phys.org

If wild bee declines continue, it could hurt U.S. crop production and farmers' costs, said Taylor Ricketts, a conservation ecologist at the University of Vermont, at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting panel, Plan Bee: Pollinators, Food Production and U.S. Policy on Feb. 19. "This study provides the first national picture of wild bees and their impacts on pollination," said Ricketts, Director of UVM's Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, noting that each year $3 billion of the U.S. economy depends on pollination from native pollinators like wild bees. At AAAS, Ricketts briefed scholars, policy makers, and journalists on how the national bee map, first published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in late 2015, can help to protect wild bees and pinpoint habitat restoration efforts. At the event, Ricketts also introduced a new mobile app that he is co-developing to help farmers upgrade their farms to better support wild bees. "Wild bees are a precious natural resource we should celebrate and protect," said Ricketts, Gund Professor in UVM's Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources. "If managed with care, they can help us continue to produce billions of dollars in agricultural income and a wonderful diversity of nutritious food." The map identifies 139 counties in key agricultural regions of California, the Pacific Northwest, the upper Midwest and Great Plains, west Texas, and Mississippi River valley, which appear to have most worrisome mismatch between falling wild bee supply and rising crop pollination demand. These counties tend to be places that grow specialty crops—like almonds, blueberries and apples—that are highly dependent on pollinators. Or they are counties that grow less dependent crops—like soybeans, canola and cotton—in very large quantities. Of particular concern, some crops most dependent on pollinators—including pumpkins, watermelons, pears, peaches, plums, apples and blueberries—appeared to have the strongest pollination mismatch, growing in areas with dropping wild bee supply and increasing in pollination demand. Globally, more than two-thirds of the most important crops either benefit from or require pollinators, including coffee, cacao, and many fruits and vegetables. Pesticides, climate change and diseases threaten wild bees—but their decline may be caused by the conversion of bee habitat into cropland, the study suggests. In 11 key states where the map shows bees in decline, the amount of land tilled to grow corn spiked by 200 percent in five years—replacing grasslands and pastures that once supported bee populations. Over the last decade, honeybee keepers facing colony losses have struggled with rising demand for commercial pollination services, pushing up the cost of managed pollinators - and the importance of wild bees. "Most people can think of one or two types of bee, but there are 4,000 species in the U.S. alone," said Insu Koh, a UVM postdoctoral researcher who co-hosted the AAAS panel and led the study. "When sufficient habitat exists, wild bees are already contributing the majority of pollination for some crops," Koh adds. "And even around managed pollinators, wild bees complement pollination in ways that can increase crop yields." A team of seven researchers—from UVM, Franklin and Marshall College, University of California at Davis, and Michigan State University—created the maps by first identifying 45 land-use types from two federal land databases, including croplands and natural habitats. Then they gathered detailed input from national and state bee experts about the suitability of each land-use type for providing wild bees with nesting and food resources. The scientists built a bee habitat model that predicts the relative abundance of wild bees for every area of the contiguous United States, based on their quality for nesting and feeding from flowers. Finally, the team checked and validated their model against bee collections and field observations in many actual landscapes. "The good news about bees," said Ricketts, "is now that we know where to focus conservation efforts, paired with all we know about what bees need, habitat-wise, there is hope for preserving wild bees." Explore further: Save the bees? There's an app for that


News Article | February 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The first-ever study to map U.S. wild bees suggests they are disappearing in the country's most important farmlands -- from California's Central Valley to the Midwest's corn belt and the Mississippi River valley. If wild bee declines continue, it could hurt U.S. crop production and farmers' costs, said Taylor Ricketts, a conservation ecologist at the University of Vermont, at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting panel, Plan Bee: Pollinators, Food Production and U.S. Policy on Feb. 19. "This study provides the first national picture of wild bees and their impacts on pollination," said Ricketts, Director of UVM's Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, noting that each year $3 billion of the U.S. economy depends on pollination from native pollinators like wild bees. At AAAS, Ricketts briefed scholars, policy makers, and journalists on how the national bee map, first published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in late 2015, can help to protect wild bees and pinpoint habitat restoration efforts. At the event, Ricketts also introduced a new mobile app that he is co-developing to help farmers upgrade their farms to better support wild bees. "Wild bees are a precious natural resource we should celebrate and protect," said Ricketts, Gund Professor in UVM's Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources. "If managed with care, they can help us continue to produce billions of dollars in agricultural income and a wonderful diversity of nutritious food." The map identifies 139 counties in key agricultural regions of California, the Pacific Northwest, the upper Midwest and Great Plains, west Texas, and Mississippi River valley, which appear to have most worrisome mismatch between falling wild bee supply and rising crop pollination demand. These counties tend to be places that grow specialty crops -- like almonds, blueberries and apples -- that are highly dependent on pollinators. Or they are counties that grow less dependent crops -- like soybeans, canola and cotton -- in very large quantities. Of particular concern, some crops most dependent on pollinators -- including pumpkins, watermelons, pears, peaches, plums, apples and blueberries -- appeared to have the strongest pollination mismatch, growing in areas with dropping wild bee supply and increasing in pollination demand. Globally, more than two-thirds of the most important crops either benefit from or require pollinators, including coffee, cacao, and many fruits and vegetables. Pesticides, climate change and diseases threaten wild bees -- but their decline may be caused by the conversion of bee habitat into cropland, the study suggests. In 11 key states where the map shows bees in decline, the amount of land tilled to grow corn spiked by 200 percent in five years -- replacing grasslands and pastures that once supported bee populations. Over the last decade, honeybee keepers facing colony losses have struggled with rising demand for commercial pollination services, pushing up the cost of managed pollinators - and the importance of wild bees. "Most people can think of one or two types of bee, but there are 4,000 species in the U.S. alone," said Insu Koh, a UVM postdoctoral researcher who co-hosted the AAAS panel and led the study. "When sufficient habitat exists, wild bees are already contributing the majority of pollination for some crops," Koh adds. "And even around managed pollinators, wild bees complement pollination in ways that can increase crop yields." A team of seven researchers -- from UVM, Franklin and Marshall College, University of California at Davis, and Michigan State University -- created the maps by first identifying 45 land-use types from two federal land databases, including croplands and natural habitats. Then they gathered detailed input from national and state bee experts about the suitability of each land-use type for providing wild bees with nesting and food resources. The scientists built a bee habitat model that predicts the relative abundance of wild bees for every area of the contiguous United States, based on their quality for nesting and feeding from flowers. Finally, the team checked and validated their model against bee collections and field observations in many actual landscapes. "The good news about bees," said Ricketts, "is now that we know where to focus conservation efforts, paired with all we know about what bees need, habitat-wise, there is hope for preserving wild bees." Learn more about UVM efforts to save global bees. Subscribe to Gund news alerts. Follow the AAAS news at #AAASmtg.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

It's easy to find out how many calories are in a Twinkie. But how about in a tweet? A team of scientists have invented a new instrument for measuring just that: the caloric content of social media posts--like tweets. "This can be a powerful public health tool," says Peter Dodds, a scientist at the University of Vermont, who co-led the invention of the new device--called a Lexicocalorimeter. "It's a bit like having a satellite image of how people in a state or city are eating and exercising." A study of the new device was published February 10, in the journal PLOS ONE. Of course, people don't actually eat tweets. Instead, the Lexicocalorimeter gathers tens of millions of geo-tagged Twitter posts from across the country and fishes out thousands of food words -- like "apples," "ice cream," and "green beans." At the same time, it finds thousands of activity-related terms -- like "watching TV," "skiing," and even "alligator hunting" and "pole dancing." These giant bags of words get scored--based on data about typical calorie content of foods and activity burn rates -- and then compiled into two measures: "caloric input" and "caloric output." The ratio of these two measures begins to paint a picture that might be of interest not just to athletes or weight-watchers, but also to mayors, public health officials, epidemiologists, or others interested in "public policy and collective self-awareness," the team of scientists write in their new study. The Lexicocalorimeter is open for visits by the public, and the current version gives a portrait of each of the contiguous US states. For example, the tweet flow into the device suggests that Vermont consumes more calories, per capita, than the overall average for the US. Why? Well, at the top of its list of words that push the Green Mountain State to the gourmand's side of the ledger is "bacon" -- tied for second in the US when states are ranked by bacon's contribution to caloric balance. "We love to tweet about bacon," says Chris Danforth, a UVM scientist and mathematician who co-led the new study. But Vermont also expends more calories than average, the device indicates, thanks to relatively frequent appearances of the words "skiing," "running," "snowboarding," and, yes, "sledding." And why does the Lexicocalorimeter suggest that New Jersey expends fewer calories than the US average? Below-average on "running" while the top of its low-intensity activity list is "getting my nails done." Overall, Colorado ranks first in the US for its caloric balance ("noodles" plus "running" seem to be a svelte pair) while Mississippi comes in last with relatively high representation of "cake" and "eating." The new PLOS ONE study suggests that the Lexicocalorimeter could provide a new -- and real-time -- measure of the US population's health. And the study shows that the device's remotely sensed results correlate very closely with other traditional measures of US well-being, like obesity and diabetes rates. For the study, the team of scientists explored about 50 million geo-tagged tweets from 2011 and 2012 and report that "pizza" was the dominant contributor to the measure of "calories in" in nearly every state. The dominant contributor to calories out: "watching TV or movies." The nine scientists -- led by professors and students at the University of Vermont's Computational Story Lab as well as researchers at the University of California Berkley, WIC in East Boston, MIT, University of Adelaide, and Drexel University -- are quick to point out that the ratio of calories in to calories out in the new study are "not meaningful as absolute numbers, but rather have power for comparisons," they write. The Lexicocalorimeter is part of a larger effort by the University of Vermont team to build a series of online instruments that can quantify health-related behaviors from social media. "Given the right tools, our mobile phones will very soon know more about us than we know about ourselves," says UVM's Chris Danforth. "While the Lexicocalorimeter is focused on eating and exercise, and the Hedonometer is measuring happiness, the methodology we're building is far more general, and will eventually contribute to a dashboard of public health measures to complement traditional sources of data." The bigger goal: "enable real-time sensing at the population level, and help health care providers make date-driven recommendations for public policy," says Danforth. Other measures of public health and behavior the team is considering adding to the dashboard? "Sleep is a huge health issue," says UVM's Peter Dodds. "We would like to make an Insomniameter. Then there could be a Hangoverometer."


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

Health Insurance Woes Add To The Risky Business Of Farming There are many challenges to farming for a living: It's often grueling work that relies on unpredictable factors such as weather and global market prices. But one aspect that's often ignored is the cost of health care. A University of Vermont researcher found that nationally, most farmers cited health care costs as a top concern. Shoshanah Inwood is a rural sociologist at UVM. She has been studying the aging and shrinking farm population, and what components are needed to build a prosperous farm economy. Inwood says she hadn't thought about health care in particular as a factor until she conducted an unrelated survey in 2007 of farmers working the land in areas facing population growth and development pressures. The survey asked, "What are the issues affecting the future of your farm?" "And we assumed when we got that survey back, we would get things like the cost of land, the cost of inputs, neighbors. The number one issue facing farmers was the cost of health insurance. They identified that as the biggest threat to their farm," she said. Inwood says this held true for small and large farms: Two-thirds of commercial farmers cited the cost of health insurance as the biggest threat. Typically, strategies to build a robust farming industry have focused on access to land, capital and changes to market infrastructure. "But then you ask people, 'Well, how many people know a farmer that has an injury? Or a farm family that has a chronic health issue? Or a mental health issue?' And everybody's hand goes up," Inwood said. "And that's the one issue we really never talk about, are some of those social needs that farm families have." While it may be underrepresented in farm planning discussions, on the farm, families are talking about it. Take Taylor Hutchinson and Jake Mendell. The two fell in love with farming — and each other — on a small educational farm in California. When the two decided to take the plunge and start their own farm, they decided to head back east to Jake's hometown area. Over the past three years they've transformed three acres of his family's land in Starksboro, Vt., into a small farm business, selling vegetables, eggs and some meat through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). Access to free land puts them well ahead of many starting farmers, financially. But one thing they didn't initially factor into their business budget was health insurance. "We both came of age at the beginning of the Affordable Care Act. It's not something that we've really had to think about, paying in full for a health insurance plan," says Mendell. By "coming of age," he means he aged off his parents' health insurance at 26. Mendell was able to stay on his parents' plan beyond college under a provision in the Affordable Care Act. Then he switched onto a heavily subsidized plan through Vermont Health Connect. His partner, Taylor Hutchinson, is covered by Medicaid because her income falls just below the threshold. "It's a very fine line for me personally, that I'm skating under right now," Hutchinson said. With government assistance, right now health insurance is not among their highest expenses. But that all could change. If their income grows, Hutchinson would no longer eligible for Medicaid. Or if health care policy changes, their subsidies could go away. Both scenarios would have very real impacts on their farm business. "It's concerning now that, I mean, I just don't know how we could manage $800 a month, when right now it ends up being combined $60 a month," says Mendell. The whole situation gets even trickier if or when the couple were to get married. That act alone would bring their shared income above the Medicaid line, meaning they'd have to pay a significantly higher price for health insurance. And then — someday — there are kids to consider. "Something that I think about is when we have kids, in order to be able to afford the medical bills for that, as well as daycare, it is very likely that I will be stepping back from the farm," says Hutchinson. "It's something that I'm thinking about now. Would I get a part-time job? Or would I try for a full-time job that I could get benefits that would cover us all?" That calculation is not unique. Nationally, slightly more than half of farmers also work off the farm. Historically it has been women who work two jobs, but that dynamic is changing as more women are getting into full-time farming. Inwood says the need to work another job just to support the farm is a real roadblock to growing a "prosperous, bright farm population." And it comes at a time when the overall farm population in the U.S. is aging and shrinking. "We need folks who have strong backs, who are able to do work," Inwood says. "And one of the things that happens is when you're young, that tends to intersect with the age when you're really ready to have children, that's when health insurances concerns really start to enter into people's minds." As recently as 2012, the number of new farmers was down about 20 percent from five years earlier. There are many factors — financial and otherwise — that make becoming a farmer incredibly challenging. But Inwood says one key learning from her research is that advisers who work with farmers need to be better prepared to help them navigate the ever-changing world of health insurance. "A lot of farm viability planning and farm business planning, they generally will tend to mention health insurance, but there's no planning for it," says Inwood. "None of the workbooks currently really talk about how are you going to do this ... How does having health insurance fit into your overall farm plan?" Back on the farm in Starksboro, Hutchinson says if it weren't for the Affordable Care Act, she likely wouldn't have health insurance. "I think that the subsidies have been crucial for us to have been able to start our farm, and to be able to keep our personal costs ridiculously low for the first few years," she says. Hutchinson says she knows many who are in the same situation. She is on the leadership team of the National Young Farmers Coalition; she says she knows many farmers either on Medicaid or highly subsidized insurance. And she says that in a recent meeting, many farmers mentioned that they're considering getting an off-farm job or even liquidating the business because they're worried that the health insurance situation could change. This story comes from the New England News Collaborative: Eight public media companies coming together to tell the story of a changing region, with support from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.


ELK GROVE, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Accellera Systems Initiative (Accellera) announced today that Tom Alsop, co-chair of the Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) Working Group, is the recipient of the sixth annual Accellera Technical Excellence Award. The award was established to recognize the outstanding achievements of an individual among Accellera’s working group members and their significant contributions to the development of its standards. Mr. Alsop will be presented the award at DVCon U.S. on Monday, February 27th, during the Accellera Day luncheon from 12:00-1:30pm at the DoubleTree Hotel in San Jose, California. He will be recognized for his technical contributions and leadership as co-chair of the UVM Working Group and guiding the submission of UVM 1.2 as a contribution to the IEEE P1800.2™ working group for further standardization and maintenance. “Tom has been a key contributor to the advancement of UVM,” said Karen Pieper, Accellera Technical Committee Chair. “As co-chair of the working group, his leadership has inspired a group of dedicated working group members to work openly to develop the standards policies with well-established flows and processes that have helped make UVM one of the most widely applied standards in the EDA industry. It is the dedication of leaders like Tom that help to further the advancement of standards that benefit the entire electronics design eco-system. UVM is a tremendous benefit to the industry, and we have Tom and his team to thank for all of their efforts in getting it to the IEEE. We are looking forward to his continued success in his new role as chair of the IEEE P1800.2 UVM Working Group.” “I am honored to receive this award and recognition from the Accellera members,” said Mr. Alsop, who serves as Principal Engineer at Intel. “I am proud of the UVM Working Group members and their tireless efforts getting the standard to the IEEE. We have worked very hard on UVM 1.2, and to see it become the basis for IEEE P1800.2 has been incredibly rewarding. I would like to thank my team for their invaluable contributions.” Mr. Alsop has been a member and co-chair of the Accellera UVM Working Group for eight years, ultimately forming the IEEE P1800.2 UVM committee and leading UVM to become an IEEE standard in 2017. The goal of the UVM standard is to improve design productivity by making it easier to verify design components with a standardized representation that can be used with various verification tools, helping to lower verification costs and improve design quality. Mr. Alsop has spent the last 10 years in the Product Development Solutions team at Intel as a Tool, Flow, and Methodology (TFM) expert supporting RTL and Validation teams across Intel. He leads Intel’s High Level Synthesis (HLS) efforts and is responsible for the company’s RTL and Validation design infrastructure and environment. He has also made significant contributions to the IEEE 1800 SystemVerilog 2009 and 2012 specifications. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Brigham Young University. Accellera’s Technical Committee oversees 17 working groups that produce effective and efficient Electronic Design Automation (EDA) and Intellectual Property (IP) standards for today’s advanced IC designs. Participants include member companies and industry contributors. Technical contributors typically have many years of practical experience with IC design and developing and using EDA tools. For a list of Accellera Working Groups, please click here. Accellera Systems Initiative is an independent, not-for profit organization dedicated to create, support, promote and advance system-level design, modeling and verification standards for use by the worldwide electronics industry. The organization accelerates standards development and, as part of its ongoing partnership with the IEEE, its standards are contributed to the IEEE Standards Association for formal standardization and ongoing change control. For more information, please visit www.accellera.org. Find out more about membership. Follow @accellera on Twitter, or to comment please use #accellera. Accellera Global Sponsors are: Cadence, Mentor Graphics and Synopsys. DVCon is the premier conference and exhibition for discussion of the functional design and verification of electronic systems. DVCon U.S. is sponsored by Accellera Systems Initiative, an organization focused on the creation and adoption of EDA and IP standards. For more information, please visit www.accellera.org. For more information about DVCon, please visit www.dvcon.org. Follow @dvcon_us on Twitter, or to comment please use #dvcon_us. Accellera, Accellera Systems Initiative, and DVCon and are trademarks of Accellera Systems Initiative Inc. All other trademarks and trade names are the property of their respective owners.


News Article | February 19, 2017
Site: phys.org

Currently, she would have to walk through her fields, assess possible locations, take measurements, spend hours crunching costs and still only guess at the amount of bees and pollination the effort will generate. Soon, the farmer can do it all on her phone or computer with a mobile app that will calculate the crop productivity and pollination benefits of supporting endangered bees. University of Vermont (UVM) bee expert Taylor Ricketts, who is co-leading the app's development, introduced the interactive technology at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting panel, Plan Bee: Pollinators, Food Production and U.S. Policy, on Feb. 19. The soon-to-be named app, launching later this year, allows users to explore land management scenarios, and virtually test how bee-friendly decisions would improve their business, says Taylor Ricketts, Director of UVM's Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, and Gund professor at UVM's Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources. Loaded with aerial images of North America, the app allows users to "enter their address and begin adding best practices for boosting pollination," says Ricketts. "You simply draw different options - from wind breaks to planting flowers or bringing in honey bees." Farmers can save and compare different scenarios. "The app will do a pollination, productivity, and eventually, a cost-benefit analysis," adds Ricketts, who is developing the app with Philadelphia software company Azavea. "Farmers can then determine which choices bring the best return on investment." APP BUILDS ON FIRST U.S. BEE MAP The app builds on the first national map of U.S. wild bees, which found the key insects are disappearing in the country's most important farmlands - including California's Central Valley, the Midwest's corn belt and the Mississippi River valley. That study, led by UVM bee researchers, showed that with further bee losses, farmers could face higher costs and the nation's food production could experience "destabilization" due to climate change, pesticides, habitat loss and disease. "We found 139 counties - which together contain 39% of pollinator-dependent U.S. crops - at risk from simultaneously falling wild bee supply and rising crop pollination demand," says Ricketts, who published the map with UVM's Insu Koh in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) in December 2015. "Farmers are a natural partner to protect bees, because pollinators are essential for growing many foods," says Ricketts, noting that more than two-thirds of the most important crops either benefit from or require pollinators, including coffee, cacao, and many fruits and vegetables. With the app, Ricketts aims to make the best available science and bee-friendly practices accessible to society - to make real steps to reverse bee losses. "Government action is key, but saving bees requires more than that," says Ricketts. "Leadership from the private sector, especially farmers and agricultural businesses, is crucial. Their choices will have a huge impact on whether pollinators fail or flourish." "This gives farmers a chance to help with an issue that directly impacts their businesses," he adds. Learn more about UVM efforts to save global bees. Explore further: The quiet buzz of wild bees

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