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News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Charles Wilson, professor and Ewing Halsell Chair in Biology at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has received an eight-year, grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services expected to total $5,292,000. Wilson will receive the grant through the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), which aims to reduce the burden of neurological disease by supporting and conducting neuroscience research. Wilson's research focuses on the brain region involved in voluntary motor behavior, the basal ganglia. "This prestigious award from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is an immeasurable investment in brain health, which is a key research area not only for UTSA but also for the entire UT System. Dr. Wilson's research focus on the circuitry and function of neurons of the basal ganglia, which controls movement, will advance our understanding of degenerative disorders such Parkinson's disease. As a member of the UTSA Neurosciences Institute, Dr. Wilson is well deserving of this highly competitive NIH grant, and his top-tier research aligns with our Tier One goals," said Bernard Arulanandam, UTSA interim vice president for research. Wilson's research will examine local cell signaling in the basal ganglia to further develop a model of basal ganglia function. The goal of this modeling is to help improve current understanding of basal ganglia disorders and to assist in the development of potentially effective treatments. "With this substantial funding, UTSA will continue its leadership in brain health research and help the scientific community better understand, diagnose, treat and prevent neurological disorders like Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. This work will help reduce folks' suffering and save lives," said U.S. Representative Joaquin Castro. "Thanks in large part to UTSA's impressive and expansive research programs, San Antonio is increasingly known as a city where science thrives. Our nation must never lose sight of the value of research, discovery, and knowledge. I'm proud that UTSA and the broader San Antonio community are leaders in learning, particularly in the field of brain health." The UTSA faculty includes 40 active researchers in brain health, an extensive initiative that includes research in neurodegenerative disease, traumatic brain injury, regenerative medicine, stem cell therapies, medicinal chemistry, neuroinflammation and drug design. This work is conducted across five top-tier research centers, including the UTSA Neurosciences Institute, the San Antonio Cellular Therapeutics Institute, the South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, the Center for Innovative Drug Discovery and the Institute for Health Disparities Research. Leading the brain health revolution is one of UT System Chancellor William McRaven's "Quantum Leap" initiatives to provide the citizens of Texas the very best in higher education, research and health care. Chancellor McRaven has worked to make unprecedented investments in leveraging and connecting all the cutting edge science ongoing at UT institutions to drive collaboration and expand research efforts in brain health to meet a growing demand. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke awarded the funding to UTSA through the Outstanding Investigator Award program. The program provides longer-term support to researchers whose records of achievement indicate their ability to make important contributions in the field of neuroscience. More stable grant funding gives recipients greater flexibility and freedom to conduct potentially groundbreaking research.


DALLAS, TX / ACCESSWIRE / December 3, 2016 / Marcus Hiles has been a prominent real estate developer and innovator for more than thirty years. A dynamic personality, the CEO and Chairman of Western Rim Property Services singlehandedly transformed the Texas rental market by creating upscale communities throughout suburban Austin, Houston, Dallas and San Antonio. As the real estate industry represents the largest contributor to the total GDP of the U.S., its continued success is paramount for the economic wellbeing of the country. Hiles believes that future economic progress at both the state and national levels require policies that will foster private sector expansion and public education excellence; improving job creation will spur financial growth and, in turn, fuel a demand for housing, while a commitment towards readying students with 21st-century skills ensures that the workforce of America’s next generation remains a competitive power on the world stage. From a local perspective, Texas has shown no shortage of development. Homes are being constructed at their fastest pace in Dallas-Fort Worth in nearly a decade, and studies by the University of Texas show that employment has consistently trended positively in San Antonio, and research director of UTSA Institute for Economic Development, Thomas Tunstall, expects that "growth will continue to flow into the local economy for years." Marcus Hiles maintains that the best way to further enlarge the housing market statewide will be through sustained enactment of strong laws that protect and increase the labor force. The recent past provides a solid testimony for this position: after the housing bubble crisis decimated real estate prices nationwide, the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex was less affected than nearly every other major city, with a Fortune article asserting that the cause for the robust economy traces back to the "more than 100,000 new jobs added each year in North Texas." The rationale lies in its reputation for being business-friendly region with major corporations like Toyota, State Farm and Liberty Mutual relocating to the fourth-most populous American urban center in recent years. Forbes suggests that zoning and land-use construction burdens may be lifted throughout the U.S., as the new presidential administration could usher in an era of eased regulations and lowered building costs. Relaxed protocols for small banks may allow them to conduct business differently and boost development as well, having the flexibility to approve more loans for new housing projects. While safeguarding wage and job growth in the private sector is key, Marcus Hiles notes that political efforts also need to promote educational opportunities to empower students. The Programme for International Student Assessment placed U.S. school children in the middle of the international pack for math and science, with the Pew Research Center reporting scoring 36th and 28th out of 65 countries assessed. While politicians have been denouncing the results and demanding better training for decades, new policies must encourage more children to study math and science, ultimately, at the university level; The U.S. Department of Education believes that, "only 16 percent of high school students are interested in a [science, technology, engineering or math] career and have proven a proficiency in mathematics. Though the change in learning standards and curriculum must be instituted as early as grades K-6, teenagers finishing high school need better options for mastering trade skills that equip them for jobs in the construction and health care industries. Many expect that the next presidential administration makes good on promises to offer a bigger role for community colleges in the economy, with commercial real estate and house building industry career paths readily available to students working toward a future in development and infrastructure improvement." Marcus Hiles is a respected property authority and philanthropist who proudly supports many environmental and education causes. Having personally donated more than 59 acres of parkland to the general public for wildlife conservation, Hiles has also contributed significant capital to the improvement and protection of Texas's scenic beauty. As a firm believer that all students have the right to a quality education, he has given more than $2.5 million to public and private K-12 initiatives, after school programs, and university career services and job placement programs. DALLAS, TX / ACCESSWIRE / December 3, 2016 / Marcus Hiles has been a prominent real estate developer and innovator for more than thirty years. A dynamic personality, the CEO and Chairman of Western Rim Property Services singlehandedly transformed the Texas rental market by creating upscale communities throughout suburban Austin, Houston, Dallas and San Antonio. As the real estate industry represents the largest contributor to the total GDP of the U.S., its continued success is paramount for the economic wellbeing of the country. Hiles believes that future economic progress at both the state and national levels require policies that will foster private sector expansion and public education excellence; improving job creation will spur financial growth and, in turn, fuel a demand for housing, while a commitment towards readying students with 21st-century skills ensures that the workforce of America’s next generation remains a competitive power on the world stage. From a local perspective, Texas has shown no shortage of development. Homes are being constructed at their fastest pace in Dallas-Fort Worth in nearly a decade, and studies by the University of Texas show that employment has consistently trended positively in San Antonio, and research director of UTSA Institute for Economic Development, Thomas Tunstall, expects that "growth will continue to flow into the local economy for years." Marcus Hiles maintains that the best way to further enlarge the housing market statewide will be through sustained enactment of strong laws that protect and increase the labor force. The recent past provides a solid testimony for this position: after the housing bubble crisis decimated real estate prices nationwide, the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex was less affected than nearly every other major city, with a Fortune article asserting that the cause for the robust economy traces back to the "more than 100,000 new jobs added each year in North Texas." The rationale lies in its reputation for being business-friendly region with major corporations like Toyota, State Farm and Liberty Mutual relocating to the fourth-most populous American urban center in recent years. Forbes suggests that zoning and land-use construction burdens may be lifted throughout the U.S., as the new presidential administration could usher in an era of eased regulations and lowered building costs. Relaxed protocols for small banks may allow them to conduct business differently and boost development as well, having the flexibility to approve more loans for new housing projects. While safeguarding wage and job growth in the private sector is key, Marcus Hiles notes that political efforts also need to promote educational opportunities to empower students. The Programme for International Student Assessment placed U.S. school children in the middle of the international pack for math and science, with the Pew Research Center reporting scoring 36th and 28th out of 65 countries assessed. While politicians have been denouncing the results and demanding better training for decades, new policies must encourage more children to study math and science, ultimately, at the university level; The U.S. Department of Education believes that, "only 16 percent of high school students are interested in a [science, technology, engineering or math] career and have proven a proficiency in mathematics. Though the change in learning standards and curriculum must be instituted as early as grades K-6, teenagers finishing high school need better options for mastering trade skills that equip them for jobs in the construction and health care industries. Many expect that the next presidential administration makes good on promises to offer a bigger role for community colleges in the economy, with commercial real estate and house building industry career paths readily available to students working toward a future in development and infrastructure improvement." Marcus Hiles is a respected property authority and philanthropist who proudly supports many environmental and education causes. Having personally donated more than 59 acres of parkland to the general public for wildlife conservation, Hiles has also contributed significant capital to the improvement and protection of Texas's scenic beauty. As a firm believer that all students have the right to a quality education, he has given more than $2.5 million to public and private K-12 initiatives, after school programs, and university career services and job placement programs.


DALLAS, TX / ACCESSWIRE / November 25, 2016 / Marcus Hiles has been a prominent real estate developer and innovator for more than thirty years. A dynamic personality, the CEO and Chairman of Western Rim Property Services singlehandedly transformed the Texas rental market by creating upscale communities throughout suburban Austin, Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio. As the real estate industry represents the largest contributor to the total GDP of the U.S., its continued success is paramount for the economic wellbeing of the country. Hiles believes that future economic progress at both the state and national levels require policies that will foster private sector expansion and public education excellence; improving job creation will spur financial growth and, in turn, fuel a demand for housing, while a commitment towards readying students with 21st-century skills ensures that the workforce of America's next generation remains a competitive power on the world stage. From a local perspective, Texas has shown no shortage of development. Homes are being constructed at their fastest pace in Dallas-Fort Worth in nearly a decade, and studies by the University of Texas show that employment has consistently trended positively in San Antonio, and research director of UTSA Institute for Economic Development, Thomas Tunstall, expects that "growth will continue to flow into the local economy for years." Marcus Hiles maintains that the best way to further enlarge the housing market statewide will be through sustained enactment of strong laws that protect and increase the labor force. The recent past provides a solid testimony for this position: after the housing bubble crisis decimated real estate prices nationwide, the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex was less affected than nearly every other major city, with a Fortune article asserting that the cause for the robust economy traces back to the "more than 100,000 new jobs added each year in North Texas." The rationale lies in its reputation for being business-friendly region with major corporations like Toyota, State Farm, and Liberty Mutual relocating to the fourth-most populous American urban center in recent years. Forbes suggests that zoning and land-use construction burdens may be lifted throughout the U.S., as the new presidential administration could usher in an era of eased regulations and lowered building costs. Relaxed protocols for small banks may allow them to conduct business differently and boost development as well, having the flexibility to approve more loans for new housing projects. While safeguarding wage and job growth in the private sector is key, Marcus Hiles notes that political efforts also need to promote educational opportunities to empower students. The Programme for International Student Assessment placed U.S. school children in the middle of the international pack for math and science, with the Pew Research Center reporting scoring 36th and 28th out of 65 countries assessed. While politicians have been denouncing the results and demanding better training for decades, new policies must encourage more children to study math and science, ultimately, at the university level; The U.S. Department of Education believes that, "only 16 percent of high school students are interested in a [science, technology, engineering or math] career and have proven a proficiency in mathematics." Though the change in learning standards and curriculum must be instituted as early as grades K-6, teenagers finishing high school need better options for mastering trade skills that equip them for jobs in the construction and health care industries. Many expect that the next presidential administration makes good on promises to offer a bigger role for community colleges in the economy, with commercial real estate and house building industry career paths readily available to students working toward a future in development and infrastructure improvement. Marcus Hiles is a respected property authority and philanthropist who proudly supports many environmental and education causes. Having personally donated more than 59 acres of parkland to the general public for wildlife conservation, Hiles has also contributed significant capital to the improvement and protection of Texas's scenic beauty. As a firm believer that all students have the right to a quality education, he has given more than $2.5 million to public and private K-12 initiatives, after school programs, and university career services and job placement programs. DALLAS, TX / ACCESSWIRE / November 25, 2016 / Marcus Hiles has been a prominent real estate developer and innovator for more than thirty years. A dynamic personality, the CEO and Chairman of Western Rim Property Services singlehandedly transformed the Texas rental market by creating upscale communities throughout suburban Austin, Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio. As the real estate industry represents the largest contributor to the total GDP of the U.S., its continued success is paramount for the economic wellbeing of the country. Hiles believes that future economic progress at both the state and national levels require policies that will foster private sector expansion and public education excellence; improving job creation will spur financial growth and, in turn, fuel a demand for housing, while a commitment towards readying students with 21st-century skills ensures that the workforce of America's next generation remains a competitive power on the world stage. From a local perspective, Texas has shown no shortage of development. Homes are being constructed at their fastest pace in Dallas-Fort Worth in nearly a decade, and studies by the University of Texas show that employment has consistently trended positively in San Antonio, and research director of UTSA Institute for Economic Development, Thomas Tunstall, expects that "growth will continue to flow into the local economy for years." Marcus Hiles maintains that the best way to further enlarge the housing market statewide will be through sustained enactment of strong laws that protect and increase the labor force. The recent past provides a solid testimony for this position: after the housing bubble crisis decimated real estate prices nationwide, the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex was less affected than nearly every other major city, with a Fortune article asserting that the cause for the robust economy traces back to the "more than 100,000 new jobs added each year in North Texas." The rationale lies in its reputation for being business-friendly region with major corporations like Toyota, State Farm, and Liberty Mutual relocating to the fourth-most populous American urban center in recent years. Forbes suggests that zoning and land-use construction burdens may be lifted throughout the U.S., as the new presidential administration could usher in an era of eased regulations and lowered building costs. Relaxed protocols for small banks may allow them to conduct business differently and boost development as well, having the flexibility to approve more loans for new housing projects. While safeguarding wage and job growth in the private sector is key, Marcus Hiles notes that political efforts also need to promote educational opportunities to empower students. The Programme for International Student Assessment placed U.S. school children in the middle of the international pack for math and science, with the Pew Research Center reporting scoring 36th and 28th out of 65 countries assessed. While politicians have been denouncing the results and demanding better training for decades, new policies must encourage more children to study math and science, ultimately, at the university level; The U.S. Department of Education believes that, "only 16 percent of high school students are interested in a [science, technology, engineering or math] career and have proven a proficiency in mathematics." Though the change in learning standards and curriculum must be instituted as early as grades K-6, teenagers finishing high school need better options for mastering trade skills that equip them for jobs in the construction and health care industries. Many expect that the next presidential administration makes good on promises to offer a bigger role for community colleges in the economy, with commercial real estate and house building industry career paths readily available to students working toward a future in development and infrastructure improvement. Marcus Hiles is a respected property authority and philanthropist who proudly supports many environmental and education causes. Having personally donated more than 59 acres of parkland to the general public for wildlife conservation, Hiles has also contributed significant capital to the improvement and protection of Texas's scenic beauty. As a firm believer that all students have the right to a quality education, he has given more than $2.5 million to public and private K-12 initiatives, after school programs, and university career services and job placement programs.


News Article | November 27, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

— CEO and Chairman of Western Rim Property Services, Marcus Hiles is a dynamic personality who singlehandedly transformed the Texas rental market by creating upscale communities throughout suburban Austin, Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio. As the real estate industry represents the largest contributor to the total GDP of the U.S., its continued success is paramount for the economic wellbeing of the country. Hiles believes that future economic progress at both the state and national levels require policies that will foster private sector expansion and public education excellence; improving job creation will spur financial growth and, in turn, fuel a demand for housing, while a commitment towards readying students with 21st-century skills ensures that the workforce of America’s next generation remains a competitive power on the world stage. From a local perspective, Texas has shown no shortage of development. Homes are being constructed at their fastest pace in Dallas-Fort Worth in nearly a decade, and studies by the University of Texas show that employment has consistently trended positively in San Antonio, and research director of UTSA Institute for Economic Development, Thomas Tunstall, expects that “growth will continue to flow into the local economy for years.” Marcus Hiles maintains that the best way to further enlarge the housing market statewide will be through sustained enactment of strong laws that protect and increase the labor force. The recent past provides a solid testimony for this position: after the housing bubble crisis decimated real estate prices nationwide, the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex was less affected than nearly every other major city, with a Fortune article asserting that the cause for the robust economy traces back to the “more than 100,000 new jobs added each year in North Texas.” The rationale lies in its reputation for being business-friendly region with major corporations like Toyota, State Farm and Liberty Mutual relocating to the fourth-most populous American urban center in recent years. Forbes suggests that zoning and land-use construction burdens may be lifted throughout the U.S., as the new presidential administration could usher in an era of eased regulations and lowered building costs. Relaxed protocols for small banks may allow them to conduct business differently and boost development as well, having the flexibility to approve more loans for new housing projects. While safeguarding wage and job growth in the private sector is key, Marcus Hiles notes that political efforts also need to promote educational opportunities to empower students. The Programme for International Student Assessment placed U.S. school children in the middle of the international pack for math and science, with the Pew Research Center reporting scoring 36th and 28th out of 65 countries assessed. While politicians have been denouncing the results and demanding better training for decades, new policies must encourage more children to study math and science, ultimately, at the university level; The U.S. Department of Education believes that, “only 16 percent of high school students are interested in a [science, technology, engineering or math] career and have proven a proficiency in mathematics. Though the change in learning standards and curriculum must be instituted as early as grades K-6, teenagers finishing high school need better options for mastering trade skills that equip them for jobs in the construction and health care industries. Many expect that the next presidential administration makes good on promises to offer a bigger role for community colleges in the economy, with commercial real estate and house building industry career paths readily available to students working toward a future in development and infrastructure improvement. Marcus Hiles is a respected property authority and philanthropist who proudly supports many environmental and education causes. Having personally donated more than 59 acres of parkland to the general public for wildlife conservation, Hiles has also contributed significant capital to the improvement and protection of Texas’s scenic beauty. As a firm believer that all students have the right to a quality education, he has given more than $2.5 million to public and private K-12 initiatives, after school programs, and university career services and job placement programs. For more information, please visit http://www.MarcusHiles-News.com


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Medication used to prevent infections may also help regenerate sperm from stem cells A new study led by Brian Hermann, assistant professor of biology at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), shows promising evidence that a medication previously used to prevent infections in cancer patients can also keep them from becoming infertile. Losing fertility is a frequent problem among cancer patients, as treatments for the disease often halt sperm production. Hermann and his research team have been pursuing a number of cutting-edge research initiatives to restore fertility in men who have lost their ability to have children as a result of cancer treatments they received as children. While working on methods to restart sperm production, the researchers discovered a link between a drug for recovering cancer patients and the absence of normal damage to reproductive ability. The drug is called G-CSF or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. It stimulates the bone marrow to produce neutrophils, which are white blood cells that are needed to fight infections. They're commonly lost after chemotherapy and radiation treatments. "We were using G-CSF to prevent infections in our research experiments," Hermann said. "It turned out that the drug also had the unexpected impact of guarding against male infertility." Because cancer treatments like radiation and chemotherapy often kill sperm stem cells, male reproduction can become essentially impossible. In Hermann's laboratory, G-CSF, by promoting cell growth, unexpectedly began regenerating sperm production by creating new sperm cells to replace the dead cells. A study authored by Hermann and his students describing these results was recently published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology. Hermann's laboratory focuses almost exclusively on regenerating dead testicular tissue through the use of stem cells, making the project an exciting but unexpected detour that he hopes to continue, if possible. The next step would be observing whether the use of the drug, which is already prescribed often by oncologists, has any correlation with improved fertility among cancer patients. Until then, Hermann is focusing on better understanding the stem cells that make male reproduction possible, so he can find even more effective solutions to treating male infertility. "Male infertility is an intuitive disease and we need creative solutions," he said. "But we need to understand how things work before we can fix them."


News Article | January 6, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

A team of researchers led by Eric Schlegel, Vaughn Family Endowed Professor in Physics at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has discovered a powerful galactic blast produced by a giant black hole about 26 million light years from Earth. The black hole is the nearest supermassive black hole to Earth that is currently undergoing such violent outbursts. Schlegel's team used NASA's Earth-orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory to find the black hole blast in the famous Messier 51 system of galaxies. The system contains a large spiral galaxy, NGC 5194, colliding with a smaller companion galaxy, NGC 5195. "Just as powerful storms here on Earth impact their environments, so too do the ones we see out in space," Schlegel said. "This black hole is blasting hot gas and particles into its surroundings that must play an important role in the evolution of the galaxy." Schlegel and his colleagues detected two X-ray emission arcs close to the center of NGC 5195, where the supermassive black hole is located. "We think these arcs represent artifacts from two enormous gusts when the black hole expelled material outward into the galaxy," said co-author Christine Jones, astrophysicist and lecturer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). "We think this activity has had a big effect on the galactic landscape." Just beyond the outer arc, the researchers detected a slender region of hydrogen gas emission, suggesting that X-ray emitting gas displaced the hydrogen gas from the center of the galaxy. Moreover, the properties of the gas around the arcs suggest that the outer arc has swept up enough material to trigger the formation of new stars. This type of phenomenon, where a black hole affects its host galaxy, is called "feedback." "We think that feedback keeps galaxies from becoming too large," said co-author Marie Machacek, astrophysicist at CfA. "But at the same time, it can be responsible for how some stars form, showing that black holes can be creative, not just destructive." The astronomers believe the black hole's outbursts may have been triggered by the interaction of NGC 5195 with its larger companion, NGC 5194, causing gas to be funneled toward the black hole. The team estimates that it took about one to three million years for the inner arc to reach its current position, and three to six million years for the outer arc. "The black hole's behavior may be a local example of events that commonly took place when the universe was much younger. That makes this observation potentially very important," Schlegel said. The researchers presented their findings today at the 227th meeting of the American Astronomical Society meeting in Kissimmee, Fla. They have also described their work in a paper submitted to The Astrophysical Journal.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

AUSTIN, November 15, 2016 - On Tuesday, Nov. 15 at Austin City Hall, U.S. Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Economic Development, Jay Williams, announced major U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) investments for Texas and other states. Through a collaborative effort, the UTSA Institute for Economic Development's SBDC Technology Commercialization Center and the UTSA Office of Commercialization Innovation (OCI) were among national awardees of the EDA-sponsored Regional Innovation Strategies (RIS) i6 Challenge competition, securing a $500,000 matching grant towards their $ 1 Million project. The national innovation competition awards nonprofits, institutions of higher education, and entrepreneurship-focused organizations to spur innovation capacity-building activities nationwide. Austin City Mayor Steve Adler joined Assistant Secretary Jay Williams for the announcement. The i6 Challenge Grant is a leading national program designed to build globally competitive regions by increasing capacity for innovation driven entrepreneurship that results in new jobs and businesses, ideas, intellectual property, and applied research through the process of technology commercialization. Chaired by Director of the SBDC Technology Commercialization Center, Bijo Mathew, and co-chaired by UTSA Chief Commercialization Officer, Dr. Cory Hallam, the awarded project is set to span three years and will facilitate university, industry, and government knowledge transfer and adoption of best entrepreneurship and technology commercialization practices in the regionally targeted areas of Austin, San Antonio, Corpus Christi and the Rio Grande Valley. The project leverages multiple UTSA community resources including its South-West Texas Border Small Business Development Center Network (SBDC), the Center for Innovation, Technology and Entrepreneurship (CITE), the Office of Commercialization and Innovation (OCI) and partnering regional colleges and universities of the South Texas region. The SBDC Technology Commercialization Center, hosted at the Institute and a Center of the UTSA Southwest Texas Border SBDC Network, works to increase advanced science and technology based entrepreneurial capacity by providing outreach, enabling access to high risk investment capital, facilitating access to advanced science and technology innovations, management advisement and other support services. "This highly competitive national award recognizes and amplifies UTSA's business community outreach and the SBDC Network Technology Commercialization Center's on-going regional entrepreneurship and innovation capacity building activities. This i6 allows us to strategically leverage federal and state resources with academia, university and collaborative business resources to build dynamic and regionally responsive innovation clusters to facilitate the commercialization of advances in science and technology and greater economic prosperity for our region," said Bijo Mathew, UTSA SBDC Technology Commercialization Center Director and Principal Investigator of the i6 grant. Since 2014, after UTSA became the first university in Texas to become part of the infrastructure of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Innovation Network, the Office of Commercialization Innovation (OCI) has both hosted and assisted with regional workshops to help developing entrepreneurs. By taking the resources, content, processes and training developed by the OCI and teaming up with the SBDC Technology Commercialization Center, this collaboration will assist the communities of South Texas. "This is a perfect example of UTSA leveraging its academic resources for a broader base, diversifying its innovation ecosystem, and expanding its community impact. We are connecting commercialization with entrepreneurship for new participants who haven't had access to these opportunities," said Dr. Cory Hallam, UTSA Chief Commercialization Officer and co-Principal Investigator of the i6 grant.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.sciencenewsdaily.org

A new study by John Merrifield, professor of economics at The University of Texas at San Antonio, describes a way for the United States to curb its spending and stop the growth of the astronomical national debt, which is now close to $20 trillion. According to Merrifield, the country could be headed for disaster if it doesn't start taking its spending problem seriously. A new study by John Merrifield, professor of economics at The University of Texas at San Antonio, describes a way for the United States to curb its spending and stop the growth of the astronomical ... New UTSA study shows how the US can avoid a debt disaster, Mon 31 Oct 16 from Eurekalert


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new study by Bruce Rudy, assistant professor of management at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), examines the influence corporate CEOs have on their firm's political activity. Rudy's top-tier research focuses on corporate lobbying investment, finding that individual characteristics of the firm's leader influence such decisions. Rudy and his co-author, Andrew Johnson, assistant professor of management at Texas A&M University--Corpus Christi, examined 100 large companies over a 27-year period to assess the impact their CEOs have on the firm's investment in lobbying. "Strategy research talks a lot about the role of the leader in making critical decisions within the firm, yet most of this research focuses on market-related activities like mergers and acquisitions. We wanted to know whether CEOs' influence also impacted how firm's engage in politics," he said. "There are basically two types of lobbying investment a firm can make," Rudy said. "Firms can contract with existing lobbyists or choose to invest money to develop lobbying capabilities in-house. Each type of lobbying investment has benefits and drawbacks for the firm." Rudy and his co-author found that CEOs that were younger, had shorter tenure, held undergraduate degrees in business and law or were promoted to CEO via backgrounds in accounting, finance, and law were more likely to invest internally to build lobbying capabilities within the firm. Older and longer tenured CEOs were more likely to contract with Washington, D.C. lobbyists that were external to the organization. "External lobbyists tend to be former politicians or D.C. insiders who are really good at tapping into their network," Rudy said. "This skill set is particularly well-suited for maintaining the status quo in politics which older and tenured CEOs prefer. In contrast, the CEO characteristics that predicted a firm's investment in in-house lobbying capabilities tend to be less associated with status quo maintenance. A skilled in-house lobbying team may even be capable of shifting policy that can benefit the firm over the long-term." As for the future of CEOs and political activity with a corporate CEO soon to be inaugurated as President of the United States, Rudy noted that some industries are excited by the prospect, while others are not. "Firms are going to be focused on the president-elect's policy positions, more than his standing as a CEO," he said. "Corporations have been involved in politics since the early days of our nation and it is difficult to imagine a future where this isn't the case."


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.sciencenewsdaily.org

A new study by Bruce Rudy, assistant professor of management at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), examines the influence corporate CEOs have on their firm's political activity. Rudy's top-tier research focuses on corporate lobbying investment, finding that individual characteristics of the firm's leader influence such decisions. A new study by Bruce Rudy, assistant professor of management at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), examines the influence corporate CEOs have on their firm's political activity. ...

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