Bergamo, Italy
Bergamo, Italy

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Fusi F.M.,USSD Centro PMA | Fusi F.M.,University of Milan Bicocca | Arnoldi M.,USSD Centro PMA | Bosisio C.,USSD Centro PMA | And 5 more authors.
Gynecological Endocrinology | Year: 2015

The aim of this study was to compare GnRHa trigger and luteal addition of triptorelin to hCG trigger for final oocyte maturation in women at high risk for OHSS undergoing IVF. A total of 423 patients were divided in two groups both stimulated using antagonist short protocol. Gonadotropins 75-150 UI/day were started on day 2-5, GnRH antagonist was added when the lead follicle was >14 mm and the final trigger was obtained with hCG 250 μg or triptorelin 0.2 mg. The luteal phase was supported with progesterone alone in the hCG group, with progesterone plus triptorelin 0.1 every other day from embryo transfer in the triptorelin group. In the triptorelin group we did neither have to suspend any embryo transfer, nor we have any early clinical OHSS. In the control group, 13 patients were suspended due to symptomatic high risk for OHSS and two patients developed a clinically significant OHSS. No statistically significant difference was observed in terms of clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates and implantation rates. Our results indicate that a protocol including GnRHa as trigger and an intensive luteal phase supported with GnRHa is safer than a standard antagonist protocol using hCG as trigger. It displays similar results, therefore it can be used as the first choice in patients at high risk for OHSS. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.


PubMed | USSD Centro PMA
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Gynecological endocrinology : the official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology | Year: 2015

The aim of this study was to compare GnRHa trigger and luteal addition of triptorelin to hCG trigger for final oocyte maturation in women at high risk for OHSS undergoing IVF. A total of 423 patients were divided in two groups both stimulated using antagonist short protocol. Gonadotropins 75-150 UI/day were started on day 2-5, GnRH antagonist was added when the lead follicle was >14 mm and the final trigger was obtained with hCG 250 g or triptorelin 0.2 mg. The luteal phase was supported with progesterone alone in the hCG group, with progesterone plus triptorelin 0.1 every other day from embryo transfer in the triptorelin group. In the triptorelin group we did neither have to suspend any embryo transfer, nor we have any early clinical OHSS. In the control group, 13 patients were suspended due to symptomatic high risk for OHSS and two patients developed a clinically significant OHSS. No statistically significant difference was observed in terms of clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates and implantation rates. Our results indicate that a protocol including GnRHa as trigger and an intensive luteal phase supported with GnRHa is safer than a standard antagonist protocol using hCG as trigger. It displays similar results, therefore it can be used as the first choice in patients at high risk for OHSS.


PubMed | University of Turin, USSD Centro PMA, University of Rome La Sapienza, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Andrology | Year: 2016

Spermatozoa can be retrieved in non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) patients despite the absence of ejaculated spermatozoa in their semen because of the presence of isolated foci with active spermatogenesis. Conventional testicular sperm extraction (c-TESE) in patients with NOA has been partially replaced by micro-TESE. It is still under debate the problem regarding the higher costs related to micro-TESE when compared with c-TESE. In this study, we evaluated sperm retrieval rate (SRR) of c-TESE in naive NOA patients. Sixty-three NOA patients were referred to our centre for a c-TESE. For every subject, we collected demographic data, cause of infertility, time to first infertility diagnosis, serum levels of LH, FSH, total testosterone and prolactin. A statistical analysis was conducted to correlate all the clinical variables, the histology and the Johnsen score with the SRR. Sixty-three consecutive NOA patients with a mean age of 37.3years were included. The positive SRR was 47.6%. No statistical differences were observed between positive vs. negative SRR regarding mean FSH (17.12 vs. 19.03 mUI/mL; p=0.72), and LH (9.72 vs. 6.92 mUI/mL; p=0.39) values. Interestingly, we found a statistically significant difference in terms of time to first infertility diagnosis (+SRR vs. -SRR; 44.5 vs. 57months; p=0.02) and regarding to age (+SSR vs. -SRR; 40.1 vs. 35.3; p=0.04). There was a statistically significant decrease in SRRs with the decline in testicular histopathology from hypospermatogenesis to maturation arrest, and SCO. The mean Johnsen score was 5.9 with a mean percentage of Johnsen score 8 tubules equal to 19%. The overall pregnancy rate was 26.6%. In our prospective cohort of patients successful SRR with c-TESE was 47.6%. Lower costs and high reproducibility of this technique still support this procedure as an actual reliable option in NOA patients for sperm retrieval.

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