US National Academy of Engineering

US National Academy of Engineering

The National Academy of Engineering is a government-created non-profit institution in the United States that was founded in 1964 under the same congressional act that led to the founding of the National Academy of Sciences. As a national academy, it consists of members who are elected by current members, based on their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. The election process for new members is conducted annually. The NAE is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the rest of the National Academies the role of advising the federal government. The NAE operates engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers.The NAE is part of the United States National Academies, which also includes: National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine National Research Council Formally, "members" of the NAE must be U.S. Citizens. The term "foreign associate" is applied to non-citizens who are elected to the NAE. "The NAE has more than 2,000 peer-elected members and foreign associates, senior professionals in business, academia, and government who are among the world’s most accomplished engineers," according to the NAE site's About page.Election to the NAE is considered to be the among the highest recognitions in engineering-related fields, and it often comes as a recognition of a lifetime's worth of accomplishments.The current president of the NAE is Dr. C. Daniel Mote, Jr. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.materialstoday.com

Dr Aziz Asphahani, the president and CEO of alloy specialist QuesTek Innovations, has been appointed to the US National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in recognition of his distinguished contributions to engineering. He is honored ‘for executive leadership in STEM education, integrated computer design of materials, and innovation and production of corrosion-resistant alloys,’ according to the company. Dr Asphahani began his career at Haynes International, where he held positions of increasing responsibility as corrosion engineer, director of research & development, haynes vice president, and CABVAL President. Afterwards, he served as President & CEO of CARUS Chemical Co. His work led to the granting of eight patents, one notable example being the patent for a corrosion resistant, high performance nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy, HASTELLOY C-22 (US Patent #4,533,414). This story is reprinted from material from Questek, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.


LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The world’s leading conference and exhibition for optical communications and networking professionals, today announced the keynote speakers for OFC 2017. On Tuesday, 21 March, Mischa Dohler, King’s College, UK; Urs Hölzle, Google, Inc., USA; and Meint K. Smit, Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands, will take the stage to discuss future innovations in optics-based communication technologies. “The OFC 2017 plenary program focuses on the future of optical communications and explores the exciting and evolving relationship of optical technologies under the sphere of artificial intelligence (AI), virtual reality (VR) and the Internet of Things (IoT),” said OFC General Chair, Peter Winzer, Nokia Bell Labs, USA. "We are seeing a transcendence of knowledge and innovation in optical networking today, and these presentations will provide guidance for 5G network infrastructure and beyond.” Mischa Dohler, Professor, King’s College, UK Internet of Skills – Where Communications, Robotics and AI Meet Mischa Dohler is the chair professor of Wireless Communications at King’s College in London, England. At King’s College, Dohler’s research interests range from 5G networks to the Internet of Things (IoT) and smart cities. Dohler serves as the director of the Center for Telecommunications Research (CTR), a research hub that attracts talent from around the globe to study applicable methods to relay concepts of wireless and mobile broadband systems and explore the greater economic implications of telecommunication technologies. Dohler is a Fellow of IEEE and the Royal Society of Arts (RSA), and a Distinguished Member of Harvard Square Leaders Excellence. An entrepreneur, composer and pianist, Dohler has four albums available on iTunes and will perform following his presentation at OFC. As the Senior Vice President for Technical Infrastructure at Google, Urs Hölzle leads the design, installation and operation of servers, networks and datacenters that provide power to Google services. Hölzle, with the support of his team have reduced the energy consumed by Google data centers to less than 50 percent, lower than the industry standard. Prior to his role as Google’s Senior Vice President for Technical Infrastructure, Hölzle served as Vice President of Operations and Vice President of Engineering, in which he developed Google’s operational infrastructure. He has served as a leading contributor to DARPA’s National Compiler Infrastructure project and was recognized for his work on high-performance implementations of object-oriented languages by the National Science Foundation, receiving the CAREER award in 1996. A recipient of a 1988 Fulbright Scholarship, Hölzle received his Master’s degree in Computer Science from ETH Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland, in 1988 and a Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1994. At Stanford, Hölzle invented techniques that are at the foundation of today’s leading Java compilers. Hölzle is a member of both the US National Academy of Engineering and the Swiss Academy of Technical Sciences. Hölzle will explore Google’s path to developing a cloud presence that is ubiquitous and rapidly evolving, thanks to a robust network. Meint K. Smit, Professor, Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands Photonic Integrated Circuits for All: How Foundries are Transforming the Prototype of Exciting New Devices Meint K. Smit, is professor of electrical engineering at Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands, Smit is a graduate of Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, receiving his Ph.D. in Integrated Optics in 1991. Smit’s research interests revolve around InP-based Photonic Integration and the integration of InP circuitry on Silicon. As the founder of the JePPIX platform, the joint Europe Platform for Photonic Integration of Components and Circuits, he has led development of the InP-based photonic foundry system in Europe. At Eindhoven University, he is the leader of the Opto-Electronic Devices group at the COBRA Research Institute at the Eindhoven campus. Smit will explore the successful models of photonics foundries, its growing presence around the world and will explore prototype costs and foundry-modeled photonic ICs across a broad range of applications. Registration Information Conference registration is open! Register before 20 February 2017 and save on a full technical conference pass. Credentialed media and analysts who wish to cover OFC 2017 can submit a form to register for a full-access conference media badge. Registration, travel information and exhibitor news can be found in the OFC media room. Post Deadline Papers Post deadline papers will be accepted from 14 December 2016 through 7 March 2017. Submission details are available on the OFC Conference website: Paper submission. The Optical Fiber Conference and Exposition (OFC) is the largest global conference and exposition for optical communications and networking professionals. For more than 40 years, OFC has drawn attendees from all corners of the globe to meet and greet, teach and learn, make connections and move business forward. OFC includes dynamic business programming, an exposition of more than 550 companies, and high impact peer-reviewed research that, combined, showcase the trends and pulse of the entire optical networking and communications industry. OFC is managed by The Optical Society (OSA) and co-sponsored by OSA, the IEEE Communications Society (IEEE/ComSoc), and the IEEE Photonics Society. OFC 2017 will be held from 19-23 March 2017 at the Los Angeles Convention Center, California, USA. Follow @OFCConference, learn more OFC Conference LinkedIn, and watch highlights OFC YouTube.


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.materialstoday.com

The recipient of the 2017 Acta Biomaterialia Gold Medal is Professor Allan S. Hoffman,             Emeritus Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Washington in Seattle. The Award will be presented at the 2017 Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials to be held in Minneapolis in April 2017. Professor Hoffman studied at M.I.T., where he received his B.S., M.S., and Sc.D. degrees in Chemical Engineering between 1953 and 1957. He taught on the faculty of the Chemical Engineering Department at M.I.T. for a total of ten years. He then spent 46 years as Professor of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. Prof. Hoffman’s major research interests are in drug delivery; diagnostic assays; “smart”, stimuli-responsive polymers; hydrogels; and chemical and biological modification of biomaterial surfaces. He has published over 400 peer-reviewed articles and is co-inventor on over 35 issued patents.  He is co-Editor (along with Buddy D. Ratner, Fred J. Schoen and Jack E. Lemons) of “Biomaterials Science”, Elsevier Publishers, now in its 3rd Edition. His early work in 1984 on the use of “smart” polymers in a temperature-driven phase separation immunoassay sparked a huge worldwide interest in such stimuli-responsive polymers as biomaterials.  Biomedical applications of “smart” polymers continue to grow rapidly around the world at the present time. He has been an Honorary Professor at: Sichuan University, Chengdu, China; South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, China; Wuhan University, Wuhan, China; Shanghai University, Shanghai, China; and Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. In 2013 he completed a four-year appointment (2009-2013) as WCU (“World Class University”) Distinguished Professor at the Kyungpook National University Medical School in Daegu, South Korea. Professor Hoffman was elected to the US National Academy of Engineering in 2005.  His other recognitions and awards include Presidency of the US Society for Biomaterials (1983); the “Biomaterials Science Prize” of the Japanese Society for Biomaterials (1990); the Founders’ Award of the US Society for Biomaterials (in 2000); the Chandra Sharma Award of the Society for Biomaterials and Artificial Organs of India (2003); the “International Polymer Research Award” of the Japanese Society of Polymer Science (2006), and the Founder’s Award of the US Controlled Release Society (2007); Special symposia have been organized in Maui, Hawaii by his colleagues to celebrate his 60th, 70th and 80th birthdays. Former students, along with many academic colleagues, have also organized symposia which they have called “Hoffman Family Symposia” (HFS) and since 2010 there have been four, the first two were in Tokyo, Japan in 2012 and 2014, the third was in Gwangju, Korea in 2015, and a fourth was in Taipei, Taiwan September, 2016.  A fifth HFS will be held in Shanghai, China this coming October, 2017.


News Article | April 6, 2015
Site: www.xconomy.com

Apparently, I’m pushy. I can’t help it. It’s my genes, and also all I’ve been through. When you’re a woman in engineering, there are a host of voices (some residing in your head, some not), telling you that you’re not good enough, not smart enough—that when you’re alone amid a sea of male faces at conferences, there must be a reason for that. I met my future husband in our first week of college. By our senior year, he was the only person who suggested I should aim high and apply for graduate school in engineering. I had a 4.0 GPA in computer science, yet no professor and no college counselor had ever suggested it. In my first year in graduate school at MIT, I felt the full-fledged impostor syndrome—the belief I was there by mistake and that I would be found out any day. It turns out that nearly everybody at MIT has this feeling (though most don’t fess up to it), but women in particular do because we are not socialized to own our own successes. I happened to attend a workshop where I learned a great bit of advice: “Fake it ‘til you make it.” To men it comes naturally; women have to be reminded to do it. I was the only woman professor in the first computer science department where I was hired. Then I was the second woman professor in the second computer science department where I was hired, and soon after I was the only one, when the first woman left. Things are much better now, I’m happy to say. So, push. It’s kind of like Sheryl Sandberg’s “lean in,” but a lot pushier. Nothing, absolutely nothing, that I have achieved has come without quite a lot of pushing and effort on my part. When I do push, it turns out I can achieve almost anything. That’s not because I’m me, it’s because that’s what it takes, and we all can do that. I’m at USC, where “Fight on” is officially part of our college spirit. So that’s what I do. That may sound trite, but consider this: Studies show that when men are told, “No,” what they hear and perceive is, “Not now.” Does that sound familiar from dating, maybe? It’s actually a great way to be. Women should be like that, too. “No” doesn’t always mean no; sometimes, it means not now, but try again in five minutes. Push for things you believe in. Push for getting more women into computing. And as the curtain rises for National Robotics Week, I’m pushing to get more women into engineering and robotics. The USC Viterbi School of Engineering, where I am vice dean of research, is no stranger to this particular push. Thirty-seven percent of USC Viterbi’s entering freshmen are women; nearly double the national average. In addition, the female student percentage in computer science, a notoriously under-represented field for women, is close to 28 percent, also nearly double the national average. But it’s not nearly enough. We’re currently in the midst of an ambitious push to change a culture on the national level—to explode some stereotypes about what engineers are, what they look like and what they do. Conveniently, our school is close to Hollywood, the epicenter of popular culture. Rather than bemoan the fact that women engineers are virtually invisible on television and in the movies, we’ve decided to enlist Hollywood to change that. Thirty years ago, MacGyver was the most iconic engineer hero on TV. In 2015, in the spirit of that show, we’re looking for new, female, engineering heroes. No mullets required. The “Next MacGyver” global crowdsourcing competition, led by the USC Viterbi School and the National Academy of Engineering, has partnered with some of the most successful television producers in Hollywood to make it happen. We are looking for the first great show with an iconic female engineer as the main character, and five winners will each be awarded $5,000 and paired with a TV producer to develop her or his script. You can find more information here. I have two daughters, ages 5 and 16, with a son in the middle. One of the things we do together is watch one of their favorite shows and then talk about it. My oldest daughter loves to watch “House.” She tells me she enjoys the way the strong females on the diagnostic team always challenge the lead character’s actions and ethics. We see a lot of strong female characters in medical, forensics, and law shows, but we’ve never really seen them as engineers. Most kids don’t know about the fascinating opportunities for careers in engineering because they are missing in the media. Forensics has soared in popularity as a direct result of media coverage. Let’s do that for engineering! As pushes go, I can think of few better. Maja Matarić, a pioneer in robotics, is a professor and Chan Soon-Shiong Chair of Computer Science, Neuroscience, and Pediatrics; founding director of the USC Center for Robotics and Embedded Systems; and vice dean for research at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering. She is urging more women to pursue careers in engineering. Follow @


News Article | February 19, 2015
Site: www.bloomberg.com

Last July 7 a Nissan Titan pickup truck traveling on a state highway south of Tivoli, Texas, collided head-on with a Honda Civic. All the occupants in both vehicles were wearing seat belts, police said. But the pickup truck, weighing about 5,000 pounds, had physics on its side. The five occupants of the Titan escaped with injuries, but all four occupants of the Civic, which weighs about 2,700 pounds, were killed. Drivers of passenger cars had nothing in particular to fear from pickup trucks back in 1975, the year Congress passed the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) law, which imposed mandatory mileage requirements on carmakers. Then the two classes of vehicles weighed about the same. As recently as 2000, the weight gap was less than 1,000 pounds. By the 2014 model year, however, the difference had grown to almost 2,000 pounds, according to an October report by the Environmental Protection Agency. The average weight of pickups has risen about 26 percent since 2000 even as the other two types of vehicles classified as light trucks—sport-utility vehicles and minivans—have stayed basically the same weight, the EPA says. What explains the rise of the XXL pickup? Customer demand, for one. You can’t carry a load of plywood or tow a trailer home with a Ford Focus. And the comforts of tricked-out models such as the Ford F-150 King Ranch, with heated and cooled front seats, are unbeatable. Recently, cheap fuel has also helped prompt consumers to buy bigger. For the past few years, a quirk in federal policy has made it easy for Americans to keep supersizing their rides: Under CAFE rules that took effect in 2011, bigger cars have lower mileage requirements. For the first 30 or so years CAFE was on the books, the rules divided the market into cars and light trucks but held all vehicles in each class to the same fuel-efficiency standard. Automakers that sold only gas guzzlers, whether big cars or big trucks, had to pay penalties. That changed with a reconception of CAFE that began under President George W. Bush in 2008 and culminated in rules the Obama administration promulgated for 2011 and beyond. Now, automakers’ mileage targets vary depending on the “footprints” of the vehicles they sell—the area between the four wheels. Cars and trucks are still regulated separately, but within each class, fuel efficiency requirements drop as vehicles grow. That means automakers whose sales mix is weighted toward bigger vehicles have lower fuel-economy targets to meet. They no longer have to offset their big gas guzzlers with sales of small gas sippers to bring up the fuel-economy averages. As a result, there’s nothing anymore to hold them back from selling lots of big trucks, which drive profits. Ford gets half its U.S. profit from large pickups, and General Motors gets about 35 percent, says Barclays Capital analyst Brian Johnson. Kate Whitefoot, a researcher at the National Academy of Engineering, came to believe that the new CAFE rules were tilted in favor of large pickup trucks while working on her doctorate in design science at the University of Michigan. In a 2011 article in the journal Energy Policy, Whitefoot and a mechanical engineering professor, Steven Skerlos, concluded on the basis of computer simulations that it would be cheaper to meet the new standards for big pickups than for small pickups, SUVs, or cars. “The goal of the policy was that vehicle size wouldn’t change at all,” Whitefoot says. Instead, “We’re seeing that it clearly is going up for trucks.” Barbara Kiss, an engineer at GM who’s manager of vehicle efficiency and energy policy, says “the notion that it’s easier” to achieve the fuel-economy standards for bigger vehicles “is simply not true.” Trucks, she says, have tough performance demands such as towing power that complicate the effort to improve their fuel efficiency. But the high profits that carmakers earn on trucks show it’s still sweet to be a maker of pickups and SUVs. Kevin Tynan, an auto analyst for Bloomberg Intelligence, says each sale of a well-equipped pickup truck contributes “easily” $10,000 to automakers’ operating profits. Sandy Munro, chief executive officer of Munro & Associates, a consulting company in Auburn Hills, Mich., that specializes in cost studies, says, “I can’t begin to tell you how much simpler it is to make a truck vs. a car. If I was a head guy at Chrysler or Ford or whoever, my focus would be: How do I get everybody to buy trucks, where I can make a tremendous amount of money?” Pickups are more dangerous than cars and more common on the road than other hazardous vehicles, such as tractor-trailers. A study by economists at the University of California at Berkeley found that adding 1,000 pounds to the weight of a vehicle increases by 46 percent the risk of a fatality in the vehicle it hits. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety concluded in 2012 that car passengers are still more likely to die when hit by a pickup than when hit by an SUV or another car despite design changes that make pickups less likely to ride up on cars when they collide. The change in CAFE regulations was good for safety in one respect: Automakers have no reason anymore to make small cars even smaller (and more dangerous) to offset sales of their big ones. If they do, they’ll just find themselves having to meet tougher standards. And the rules encourage weight reductions in trucks of any given footprint. On net, though, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that the new rules for model years 2017 to 2025 will cause crash fatalities to rise by around 100 for occupants of cars and fall by a little more than 100 for occupants of light trucks over the vehicles’ lifetimes. (Those aren’t huge shifts: Traffic accidents kill about 30,000 people a year.) The NHTSA says it will look at the rise of big pickup trucks as part of a review of the CAFE rules that will apply to model years 2022 to 2025. That review doesn’t have to be finished until 2018, but the skirmishing has already begun. The bottom line: Fuel-efficiency standards free automakers to sell bigger pickups that are likelier to cause fatalities in car crashes.


News Article | July 30, 2015
Site: arstechnica.com

Here at Ars, we get a steady flow of e-mails offering us the opportunity to interview people. Typically, those people are looking for publicity for their company, their new book, or a new product. I recently had an e-mail show up that didn't fit into any of those categories. Instead, the interview subject needed more publicity simply because more people should be able to appreciate all that she's accomplished. The interview subject in this case is Millie Dresselhaus, Institute Professor at MIT (and the first woman ever so honored). The occasion was her receiving the IEEE Medal of Honor (again, the first female recipient), but a look at her Wikipedia biography shows that awards are nothing new for Dresselhaus. Highlights of a long list include the National Medal of Science and the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and her Kavli Prize in Nanoscience was the only Kavli awarded to a single recipient, an indication of how pioneering her research has been. She also has administrative chops. She headed the Department of Energy's Office of Science, was president of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and held the post of treasurer at the National Academies of Science. With all that going for her, it might be surprising that Dresselhaus isn't more widely known, but our recent feature on Emmy Noether showed that intellectual achievements don't always lead to widespread recognition. However, Dresselhaus is well-known enough that she has picked up the nickname "the Queen of Carbon," as her work helped pave the way for our understanding of graphene and carbon nanotubes. How can you say no to the Queen of Carbon? What follows are some excerpts from our conversation that have been lightly edited for clarity (or heavily edited, in the case of my questions). Ars: I saw at MIT that you are now an emeritus professor. Are you still actively doing research? Dresselhaus: Nothing's changed that much except my formal status. Ars: So what sorts of problems are you working on now? Dresselhaus: All kinds of problems! In the last few minutes, I just came back from [a discussion of] the influence of what we do on mechanical engineering, of all things. I'm invited to be on the thesis committee of many people in mechanical engineering right now. I don't know how many, but it's more than a handful. And when I read the theses, they're very much like what I'm doing in my own research field. I involve them, and I ask them lots of questions. The point I'm basically making is that the effect of electrical engineering on mechanical engineering and others—aerospace and whatnot—has been profound. And everybody is using solid state electronics, computer communications, and all kind of things. For them, getting smaller, smaller, smaller has been very important. So they like to talk to people who are kind of interdisciplinary and can listen to their needs. Ars: Your past work seems to have covered a huge range of topics. Do you see any consistent themes to it? Dresselhaus: The major themes start out with what's possible for materials—the physics of materials allows many different properties to be exploited by other fields. For various reasons, I've been exposed to problems of other fields. I think that my association with the National Academies of Science and Engineering have exposed me to these kinds of studies, and I've become aware of how other fields utilize findings in electrical engineering and computer science and have benefitted through this interaction. I can be kind of a conduit for those interdisciplinary activities. Ars: You started working on what we now call nanomaterials before there was even a name for the field. How did that end up happening? Dresselhaus: It happened very naturally. The reason that there was no name for it is that we didn't know that other people were that interested in what we were doing. We didn't know what we were doing was correct, whether it was scalable, whether it had any commercial interest, et cetera. So when you're working in a new field, you have no idea about it. You start out examining different concepts for their scientific interest and then go from there. If it turns out to be correct and interesting, other people get interested. But in the beginning, nobody understands too much about it, including the people working in the field. Ars: Was there a clear point where you realized that materials at this scale had some unique properties? Dresselhaus: I guess that started in the 1970s, but these things start slowly. At that time, we were studying systems that we could make because we had no idea whether, if we made something that was on the nanoscale, it would be interesting and it would be reproducible. You start out these things because they're scientifically interesting, and at a private university you have the freedom to work on strange topics—I had that freedom at MIT. So I was not particularly worried about the consequences. I was here, I had great students, I had a great environment, people were interested locally in what I was doing, so I just kept doing it and doing it. Ars: The field has made tremendous progress in the last few decades. Dresselhaus: It happened in steps. I think that most of the time, these big leaps for me have come by questions that I give in small groups—groups of maybe 30-40 people gathering for a colloquium, a symposium, something like that. I give a talk and some young person asks me a seemingly innocent question, and it sort of clicks somehow into thinking more deeply about something I've been doing. I don't know whether it happens that way to other people. For the most part, most of what I was doing was not understood that much by my colleagues and other people in the field. My colleagues [just] understood more than people more generally because I used to talk with them. Ars: How do you like working in what's become a big field? Dresselhaus: I'm happy with this. Some people don't like competition, but competition is fine. It generates new ideas, keeps you alert. Ars: What drew you into scientific research? Dresselhaus: I didn't have a plan about it. I got into the whole thing of science and research through the encouragement of a few teachers that made a big difference to me. At every step, I found that this is my thing. I was very happy doing it. I never expected to have a phone call like this about my success about anything; I was just doing whatever I was doing for personal interest, not to gain influence in the world. Now that you ask me to try to influence people, I'd say that this is a great career to have for anyone who wants to try to work hard and accomplish something. Some people may have to work less hard than others, but the end result is very satisfying. As you see, I don't have to work right now. There's not many people in my age group when I go to conferences. But I'm happy to be there, I'm happy to keep doing science and being a mentor to anyone who asks for advice on how I did it. But there are hundreds of other ways of doing it—contributing and being successful and enjoying life. Ars: Your thesis advisor didn't think that women should be doing science. Why stick with science despite that level of discouragement? Dresselhaus: Encouragement is always useful, but it's not necessarily the rate-limiting step. Luckily for me, Sputnik came along, and there was funding available for basic science research. My advisor wasn't so happy with me, but I could just work for myself. My thesis was very, very cheap. There was all this surplus equipment that was left from World War II that was lying in a bin someplace, and you could pick it up, renovate it at almost zero cost. So that was my thesis. Ars: So you adopted the hardware to your needs? Dresselhaus: Yeah, pretty much, and I built a few other things for myself. Which helped me learn how to build things, design something. This is valuable experience. Maybe if I had more spoon-feeding like we do today, I wouldn't have benefitted as much. On the other hand, people think that they wouldn't survive if they didn't have a great deal of support. And maybe that's necessary today. Science is moving so fast, and you can't linger too much. Ars: You were the first female faculty member at MIT? Dresselhaus: I wouldn't say it was difficult, because I wasn't expecting anything—I was just working. It didn't matter to me. I never asked anybody when I was appointed whether it was tenured or not tenured; it wasn't that important to me. Nowadays people worry about those things, but I figured I'd get a job somewhere, somehow. Ars: You've had a long history of encouraging women to take up science as a career. How did that get started? Dresselhaus: My first sponsor was the oldest sister of the Rockefeller family of five brothers. There were five brothers and a sister, and the sister thought there should be women in science, so that's encouragement. And she left a fund—it was a small fund, but it got me started. I used a small piece of that fund to meet with the few women students we had at MIT. It was a small number at the time. But it's a very large and growing number if you look at the statistics; about 50 percent of our undergraduates are female now. But they don't study exactly the same things as the men study, and I haven't been able to make that happen, but I succeeded I think in increasing the representation of women across the different fields. But we're very far from having balance—more of them favor the life sciences, and fewer are in the physical sciences, which is my end of things. But I think that's all right. It takes time. People will go where the opportunities are, and that's the way it will develop. Ars: You've also been involved in national efforts. Dresselhaus: I was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1974, I believe—a very long time ago. I guess I'm the oldest female member at the moment. Not that I'm all that active now because I have so many things on my plate that I can't deal with them all, and there are many other members now. But in the old days, I was very active, and I was on the council of both the NAE [National Academy of Engineering] and NAS [National Academy of Sciences] and tried to influence some of the issues—tried just working on them with the other committee members, who were almost all male. So in that way, there was some gender input. They saw me around. The main message is that I can do the work, too, and I'm trying my best to contribute, just like they are. And through that contact, I met many influential people who really made things happen in the world of science. So that was my payback in all this activity. I felt that all of us with some influence had to. Ars: A Nobel Prize winner recently made some comments about how it might be easier to have labs segregated by sex so there isn't a risk of emotional entanglements. Dresselhaus: I enjoy having talented and enthusiastic students of all sexes, whatever their thinking might be. We don't discuss their private lives, we just discuss science and engineering, and I worry about their job futures, and so forth. I feel all of those things are my responsibility, but their private thinking is their business. I get along with—I try to get along with—everybody. I don't know if I succeed. Ars: You also encourage everyone in general to get some experience with the sciences. Why is that? Dresselhaus: The entry of people into [the sciences], at least through the undergraduate and master's degree level, is quite important to give them the necessary background to start small companies and maybe think of an academic career. Science and engineering influences so many developments in our country. You're thinking about job creation, new industry creation, standards of living, and all those kinds of issues—the sorts of work that innovators engage in is important. Ars: Is there anything you'd like to say to our audience? Dresselhaus: I just encourage them to do their thing and express their professional interest and have some tolerance for all people who are working hard and are contributing to all our fields. The end result is that we're working for society, the betterment of society, and it has historically been related to invention. And whoever contributes to that should be encouraged. We'd like to thank Millie again for her time. If you want to learn more about her, there's a good profile here.


News Article | August 7, 2015
Site: www.prweb.com

The Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers® (SMPTE®), a worldwide leader in motion-imaging standards and education for the communications, media, entertainment, and technology industries, today announced that it has elevated 15 industry leaders to the status of SMPTE Fellow. This honor is conferred on individuals who have, through their proficiency and contributions to the industries, attained an outstanding rank among members of the Society. New SMPTE Fellows will be elevated on Wednesday, Oct. 28, during the Fellows Luncheon, held in conjunction with the SMPTE 2015 Annual Technical Conference & Exhibition (SMPTE 2015) at the Loews Hollywood Hotel in Los Angeles. Annie Chang, Vice President of Post-Production Technology at The Walt Disney Studios Annie Chang oversees the research and implementation of new technology within Disney's feature post-production and mastering pipelines through new file-based workflows and standards efforts. She is the chair of the SMPTE Interoperable Master Format (IMF) Working Group and represents Disney in the UHD Alliance as a board director. Prior to Disney, Chang spent six years at THX Ltd. as the senior engineer for the Digital Mastering Program and three years in DVD authoring and compression. She holds a Bachelor of Science in engineering technology from Texas A&M University. Paul R. Chapman, Senior Vice President of Technology at FotoKem Paul Chapman has worked in the video and post-production industries in Los Angeles for more than 25 years, having come from the U.K. after a career in software engineering. Early in his career, he was very active in the telecine community, working for both manufacturers and users such as Rank Cintel, Unimedia and Complete Post, and Unitel Video. In 1996, Chapman joined FotoKem, holding a variety of engineering leadership positions and, in his current role, takes responsibility for evaluating, recommending, and implementing all aspects of digital technology companywide. He is a past chair of the SMPTE Hollywood Section and a current SMPTE Hollywood Region Governor. Peter Fasciano, Executive Director at Franklin TV and WFPR-FM Peter Fasciano designed, built, and managed television stations and teleproduction studios throughout the 1970s and in the 1980s founded a successful film and video production company. He then worked with Bill Warner to launch Avid in 1987 and design the interface for Avid's first product, the Media Composer nonlinear editor. As vice president and corporate fellow for Avid Technology's Advance Product Development Group, he designed, developed, and prototyped AirPlay, the first play-to-air, fully automated video server; EditCam, the first tapeless video camcorder; Digidesign's AudioVision; and the Avid Unity enterprise media server system. He holds more than 20 patents, and his design research defined new product categories that have been honored with seven Emmy® Awards and two Oscars®. Simon Fell, Director of Technology and Innovation at European Broadcasting Union (EBU) Simon Fell leads the team spearheading developments in media technologies at the EBU. He has four decades of experience, formerly with ITV as director of future technologies. Previously, he helped establish Carlton Television, where he held several executive positions and participated in the digital broadcasting launch. Fell has chaired the Technical Council at the U.K.'s Digital Television Group (DTG) and was chairman of the HD Forum. Additional roles include serving as director of engineering for rushes and chief engineer of 625, and establishing Channel Four, where he assisted in the introduction of Super 16 film. Fell's early career included periods with Rank Cintel in the U.S. and with YTV in Leeds, U.K. William T. Hayes, Director of Engineering and Technology at Iowa Public Television William T. Hayes has worked in radio and television broadcasting since 1973, garnering extensive experience in planning, designing, and constructing television stations. He currently is responsible for the planning and development of all technology projects at Iowa Public Television, and he is active in future broadcast planning nationally and internationally, serving on a number of committees developing standards for emerging technologies such as mobile/hybrid television and the next generation of terrestrial digital television. Hayes is the SMPTE Central Region Governor and, as a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), serves as the president of the IEEE Broadcast Technology Society (BTS). He is also a member of the Society of Broadcast Engineers (SBE), which named him Educator of the Year in 2007 and the Society of Cable Telecommunications Engineers (SCTE). Larry J. Hornbeck, TI Fellow Emeritus at Texas Instruments Solid-state physicist, Larry J. Hornbeck has spent most of his 40-year research-and-development career at Texas Instruments developing microdisplays, first in TI's Central Research Laboratories and later in DLP® Products. Following a decade of research on analog technologies that fell short of expectations, he invented the digital micromirror device (DMD), a chip technology (the DLP chip) that provides for the high-speed, digital manipulation of light and enables products including the DLP Cinema® projectors popular today. Hornbeck holds 38 U.S. patents, and his numerous awards and honors include a 2014 Academy Award of Merit (Oscar® statuette), induction into the National Inventors Hall of Fame, the SMPTE 2002 David Sarnoff Medal Award, and a 1998 Emmy® Engineering Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and a Fellow of the IEEE and SPIE. Jim Houston, Principal at Starwatcher Digital Jim Houston currently consults on digital production and new technologies for motion pictures and television. Earlier, while vice president of technology and engineering for Sony Pictures, he designed and built the Colorworks 4K post-production facility. For 30 years, he has developed or managed digital production facilities for animation, visual effects (VFX), restoration, and post-production for Disney, Sony, and several post-production companies. He has received two Academy Scientific and Engineering Awards and led two projects winning 2012 Engineering Emmys. He is a member of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) Technology Committee, serves as cochairman of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) Academy Color Encoding System (ACES) Project Committee, and is active in standards development for digital cinema, ultra-high-definition television (UHDTV), metadata, and future display systems. Toshiaki Kojima, Senior Standard Manager at Sony Corporation Toshiaki Kojima has worked in both the audio/video (AV) and information technology (IT) industry sectors over the past 33 years. For the first 20 years of his career, Kojima was involved mainly in the design of professional video tape recorders (VTRs), from 1-inch to the e-VTR, and he received a 2004 Sports Emmy® recognizing the role of the e-VTR in NBC's Athens 2004 Olympics coverage. He since has moved into research and development with the aim of replacing dedicated professional AV interfaces with those of general Internet protocol (IP). Kojima is an active participant in network-related industry and standardization bodies including Framework for Interoperable Media Services (FIMS), Video Services Forum (VSF), SMPTE, and the Joint Task Force on Professional Networked Streamed Media (JT-NM). He holds 20 Japanese and international patents and is an MIT Fellow. Sara J. Kudrle, Product Marketing Manager at Grass Valley, a Belden Brand Sara J. Kudrle began her career as a broadcast industry engineer at Tektronix, where she worked in the VideoTele.com business, and then joined the TV transmitter group at Continental Electronics, which later became Axcera, working on exciter control software and single-frequency networks (SFNs). From there she moved on to Miranda/NVISION, where she handled several projects within the router control group, and, most recently, joined Grass Valley. She has authored papers for NAB, PBS, and SMPTE conferences and has been published in the SMPTE Motion Imaging Journal and Broadcast Engineering, earning the SMPTE 2012 Journal Award for "Fingerprinting for Solving A/V Synchronization Issues Within Broadcast Environments." She holds a Bachelor of Science in computer science with a minor in mathematics from California State University, Chico. Kudrle is a former SMPTE secretary/treasurer for Sacramento and is the current SMPTE Western Region Governor. She is also a member of IEEE. Karl Joseph Kuhn, Senior Video Applications Engineer at Tektronix Karl Joseph Kuhn is senior video systems application engineer with Tektronix, supporting test and measurement solutions for digital audio and video, compression, IP, file-based, and radio frequency (RF). He has been at Tektronix for 15 years and is deeply involved in presenting at industry events and providing technology training for his customers. Kuhn earlier was the lead video test engineer for IBM's Digital Video Development Laboratory. He holds three U.S. patents and one Japanese patent that cover in-service testing of digital broadcast video. Kuhn served on the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS) Technical and Engineering Emmy Committee from 2006 to 2010 and is past chairman of the SMPTE Washington, D.C., Section and past SMPTE Eastern Region Governor. He currently serves as SMPTE North American membership director. Kenneth Michel, Vice President of Content Systems Engineering at Disney/ABC (retired) Kenneth Michel spent 34 years at Disney/ABC in the broadcast operations and engineering division of the ABC TV network, serving as the vice president of engineering for 17 of those years. With more than 25 years in the ABC engineering lab, he helped to develop many products used in the TV industry today. Michel was instrumental in transitioning the industry to HDTV and in facilitating the adoption of progressive scan. He has been awarded five U.S. patents (two pending) and has received nine Disney Inventor Awards, two technical Emmy Awards for his work on the 1984 Olympics and the 1989 World Series, and a Primetime Emmy Award. He chaired the IEEE committee that revised the IEEE 208-1960 standard on how to measure camera resolution. Delbert R. Parks III, Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at Sinclair Television Group, Inc. Delbert R. Parks III has been with Sinclair Television Group since 1972, moving up through the ranks since he began in the engineering department of Sinclair's flagship station, WBFF-TV in Baltimore. In his current executive position, Parks handles planning, organizing, and implementing of operational and engineering policies and strategies as they relate to television operations, Internet activity, information management systems, and infrastructure. He is a member of the SBE and serves on the board of directors of the Baltimore Area Council, Boy Scouts of America. He is a retired Army lieutenant colonel who held various commands during his 26-year reserve career. Michael Strein, Director of Technology and Workflow at ABC-TV Over the past 25 years, Michael Strein has been at the forefront of virtually every technical advancement that the ABC network has made, from the analog-to-digital conversion, to the HDTV transition to the launch of the WATCH ABC streaming platform. Strein has earned 14 Disney Inventor Awards that have resulted in seven patents, with several others still in process. He has served on the SMPTE New York Section board of managers as television program chair since 1997, earning the SMPTE Citation for Outstanding Service to the Society award in 2010. He maintains an extensive involvement in the vendor and standards communities. Giles Wilson, Head of TV Compression Business at Ericsson As head of Ericsson's TV compression business, Giles Wilson oversees the strategy, vision, and development of the company's industry-leading compression technology portfolio to ensure that it meets the content acquisition, exchange, and delivery requirements of broadcasters and operators around the world. He has played a pioneering role in the company's 20-year heritage of creating next-generation compression solutions and has been instrumental in developing the technology architectures and solutions for many of today's leading TV experiences, including the world's first MPEG-4 AVC HD encoder, which was recognized with an Emmy Award for its technical innovation. Earlier executive roles include the head of TV technology at Ericsson, as well as chief architect and, subsequently, senior vice president of technology at Tandberg Television. Peter A. Wilson, Founder and Managing Director at High Definition & Digital Cinema Ltd. (HDDC) Peter A. Wilson began his career at 15 with an electronic and mechanical apprenticeship and subsequently worked in TV studio engineering before joining Sony Broadcast. He moved into HDTV in the mid-'80s, working on high definition (HD) productions, including the very first feature movie shot in HD, and eventually (for Sony Europe) setting up Europe's first HD-to-35mm film-out facility using electron beam recording technology. In 1998, he helped to organize the technical facilities for the first digital cinema demonstration at IBC Brighton and today, as a founding director of the European Digital Cinema Forum (EDCF), he continues to focus on digital cinema interoperability. During his time at Snell & Wilcox, he earned a Technical Emmy for work on HD upconversion. Through HDDC, he now provides training in HDTV, UHDTV, and digital cinema matters. He is a British Kinematograph, Sound and Television Society (BKSTS) Fellow, director of the EDCF and Event Cinema Association (ECA). Further information about SMPTE 2015 is available at http://www.smpte2015.org. About the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers® (SMPTE®) The Oscar® and Emmy® Award-winning Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers® (SMPTE®), a professional membership association, is a leader in the advancement of the art, science, and craft of the image, sound, and metadata ecosystem, worldwide. An internationally recognised and accredited organisation, SMPTE advances moving-imagery education and engineering across the communications, technology, media, and entertainment industries. Since its founding in 1916, SMPTE has published the SMPTE Motion Imaging Journal and developed more than 800 standards, recommended practices, and engineering guidelines. More than 6,000 members — motion-imaging executives, engineers, creative and technology professionals, researchers, scientists, educators, and students — who meet in Sections throughout the world sustain the Society. Through the Society's partnership with the Hollywood Post Alliance® (HPA®), this membership is complemented by the professional community of businesses and individuals who provide the expertise, support, tools, and infrastructure for the creation and finishing of motion pictures, television programs, commercials, digital media, and other dynamic media content. Information on joining SMPTE is available at http://www.smpte.org/join. All trademarks appearing herein are the property of their respective owners.


The University of Southern California’s Viterbi School of Engineering has selected Los Angeles technology public relations firm PMBC Group as its agency of record. PMBC Group will be responsible for publicizing the school’s global crowdsourcing competition, “The Next MacGvyer,” aimed at developing the first great TV show with a female engineer lead. “We are excited to work with USC’s Viterbi School of Engineering to inspire and encourage the next generation of women to pursue engineering careers,” said Ola Danilina, CEO and founder of PMBC Group. “We are proud to play a key role in “The Next MacGyver” as we generate significant media awareness with a strategic national media relations campaign.” The media campaign will target technology, consumer and entertainment press with the objective to generate more entries to the competition from aspiring television industry writers, producers and directors as well as engineers, technology enthusiasts and anyone with a creative idea, to create a compelling TV series that features a strong female protagonist who uses engineering-based thought processes to solve problems. The media campaign also aims to reach girls and women, educators, career counselors and other influencers, to raise awareness of the shortage of female engineers, with women comprising only 19 percent of engineering graduates nationwide. USC’s Viterbi School of Engineering is collaborating on the project with the National Academy of Engineering and Lee Zlotoff, creator of the TV series MacGyver. To enter the competition, launched during National Engineers Week in February 2015, entrants must submit ideas by April 17. This will culminate in a Top 12 “Engineering Idol” event in Summer 2015 where finalists will pitch ideas directly before a distinguished panel of Hollywood and engineering judges. Five winners will receive $5,000 each and be paired with Hollywood mentors, including CSI creator Anthony Zuiker and President of Producer’s Guild of America Lori McCreary, as well as distinguished engineering professionals to develop their pilot scripts. With women comprising 37 percent of the Viterbi School of Engineering’s freshmen class, almost double the national average, USC is proud to lead this initiative to increase the number of female engineers nationwide. The university has attracted women and led this movement to raise awareness about the number of women in the engineering field through its visibility and mentorship of strong Viterbi female faculty. Since 2009, six women of Viterbi’s faculty have been named on the MIT Technology Review’s prestigious list of “Top 35 Global Innovators under 35.” PMBC Group is a fast-growing public relations agency based in Los Angeles, with offices in Beverly Hills. PMBC is dedicated to delivering tactical, results-driven public relations campaigns that build brand value and advance immediate and long-term business goals. PMBC’s success-proven formulas are designed to navigate the modern media landscape utilizing a collaboration of new and traditional media to achieve strategic media exposure to reach key consumer audiences, industry influencers, investors and other constituents that matter to our clients. PMBC is comprised of a team of professionals of varied backgrounds from public relations, journalism, social media, merchandising, product development, venture capital, entertainment and hospitality. For more information please visit http://www.PMBCgroup.com. Consistently ranked among the nation’s top 10 graduate schools of engineering, USC Viterbi School of Engineering, situated in the nation’s entertainment capital in Los Angeles, has enjoyed close ties to the film and television industry, as well as its fellow USC School of Cinematic Arts, the nations #1 cinema program. USC Viterbi’s own interdisciplinary work with USC Cinema include the nation’s top video games program (USC Games), and the USC Institute for Creative Technologies (ICT), a U.S. Army-funded research center which has resulted in cutting edge work in virtual humans and motivation capture technologies, including Oscar-winning visual effects of films like “Avatar,” “Spiderman 2” and “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.” USC Viterbi is also home of the Integrated Media Systems Center (IMSC), a NSF-supported Engineering Research Center at the crossroads of media, entertainment and engineering. For more information please visit http://www.viterbi.usc.edu.


News Article | February 25, 2015
Site: www.patentlyapple.com

In December there was still a glimmer of hope that TSMC would retain the bulk of Apple's iDevice chip business in 2015 due to GlobalFoundries 14nm tooling delays being reported. Then earlier this month re/code reported that Apple had chosen Samsung to be the supplier for their A9 processor based on 14nm FinFET process. On February 8 TSMC sued a former employee for giving Samsung trade secrets about their upcoming 14nm FinFET process which lead to Samsung leapfrogging TSMC and gaining Apple's business. Earlier in the month TSMC spoke about vying for Apple's A10 processor orders and tempting new technologies based on 10nm FinFET and another technology called integrated fan-out (InFO) wafer-level packaging (WLP) technology. Today Samsung is trying to undermine any hope for TSMC ever regaining their edge by announcing a major breakthrough. On Monday Samsung Electronics unveiled the industry's first 10 nm semiconductor technologies, following the recent news that it started the mass production of mobile processor chips using 14-nanometer FinFET technology. Samsung's semiconductor business president Kim Ki-nam delivered a keynote speech at the 2015 International Solid-State Circuit Conference (ISSCC) in San Francisco titled "Silicon Semiconductor Technology and Solution in the Data-driven Era." The ISSCC is one of the world's top 3 semiconductor societies where leading semiconductor experts around the world gather and publish research papers on circuit design every year. President Kim, who is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and a fellow member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), is in charge of the semiconductor business in Samsung Electronics. Kim stated in his keynote address that "Thanks to the spread of various information technology devices, including the Internet of Things, we will usher in the data-driven era in the future. Through the innovation of silicon semiconductor technology, it is possible to improve the performance of semiconductor chips, which can process such data, and secure low-power solutions." It was here where Samsung Electronics unveiled its next-generation semiconductor technologies, including 10-nanometer FinFET technologies. In the memory sector, it presented 10 nm DRAM elements and 3D V-NAND technologies. In the system semiconductor sector, it presented 10-nanometer FinFET technology, which is smaller and more advanced than the 14-nanometer FinFET technology. In order to overcome the limitations of the planar structure in the previous 20 nm process, Samsung Electronics has developed a 3D FinFET structure for transistors when manufacturing mobile application processors. Samsung Electronics is still the only semiconductor manufacturer that can produce 14-nm-scale products. How TSMC intends to counter Samsung's latest technological advances is still in the air. Until their new plant is up and running, TSMC is likely to keep their plans a well-guarded secret … even though that hasn't helped them thus far. Are there more trade-secret traitors still hiding at TSMC? Only time will tell. For now, Samsung's 14nm processors and clear path to 10nm is likely what swayed Apple to make the shift back to Samsung. Then again, having Samsung and TSMC fighting for Apple's business is only going to help Apple's iDevices stay on the cutting edge for many years to come. About Making Comments on our Site: Patently Apple reserves the right to post, dismiss or edit any comments. Comments are reviewed daily from 4am to 7pm PST and sporadically over the weekend.


Can a TV show convince more females to pursue an education and career in engineering and science? A new effort, driven by the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and Lee Zlotoff, the creator of MacGyver, is hoping to create a new TV series--called "The Next MacGyver"--which will star and feature stories about women engineers. The group has been running a contest--with finals at the end of July--to help surface ideas for that TV series. The group says it will help connect its winners with Hollywood TV producers and engineering experts in developing their pilot scripts.

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