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News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.bbc.co.uk

The US Navy has issued new rules forbidding personnel from sharing intimate photographs without consent. They ban the sharing of images when "the person depicted had a reasonable expectation of privacy" or "without legal justification or excuse". It follows the discovery that some marines were sharing photos of women in a private Facebook group. Service personnel found to be violating the regulations will be dealt with by military courts. The interim order, which was signed on Tuesday, is expected to be made permanent in the next edition of the US Navy regulations. The photos began to appear on the members-only Marines United group in January, when the first US Marine infantry unit began admitting women. They were often accompanied by obscene comments and some of the women in the pictures were identified by name, rank and unit. Membership of the group, now closed, was limited to active and retired male US Marines and Navy Corpsmen, and British Royal Marines. A spokesperson for the Royal Navy said that as the images were posted by US Marines, it was "a matter for the US authorities". Some of the images appeared to have been taken covertly, while others are believed to have been taken with the women's consent but posted without permission. Facebook and Google closed the social media accounts of those posting the images, following a request from the US Marine Corps. A Google Drive folder hosting the images was also deleted.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

Lockheed Martin has released a new video showing one of its two S-97 Raider prototype attack helicopters strutting its aerial stuff. Based on the remarkably fast X2 technology demonstrator with its co-axial rotor and push propeller design, the Raider is being developed by Lockheed subsidiary Sikorsky as part of an independent bid to provide the US armed forces with their next generation of combat rotorcraft. The release of the two and a half minute video comes within a week of Lockheed presenting its Future Vertical Lift concept helicopter, which is also a derivation of the scalable X2 technology that uses stiff composite co-axial, contra-rotating blades and a push propeller. The video shows the test aircraft in its black livery carrying out hovering; low speed, low altitude maneuvers; retracting its undercarriage; using its push prop to rapidly accelerate; and making a high-speed fly past. Interspersed with this were brief CGI clips showing the aircraft in full mission configuration. Lockheed says the S-97 Raider prototype represents the next-generation light tactical helicopter. It's designed to operate "high and hot" at temperatures of 95° F (35° C) and altitudes of 10,000 ft (3,048 m). The fly-by-wire rotorcraft boasts a low acoustic signature, improved hovering capability, and an internal auxiliary fuel tank to extend mission range to 354 mi (570 km). With a crew of two, the raider can carry six passengers and is capable of in-air refueling. Its General Electric YT706 2,600 bhp (1,900 kW) turbine power plant gives it a takeoff weight with payload of 11,000 lb (4,990 kg), a cruising speed of 220 kn (253 mph, 407 km/h), and a flight endurance of almost three hours. Armament includes seven-round rocket pods with Hellfire missiles and 2.75 in rockets, a .50 caliber machine gun with 500 rounds, and a 7.62 mm gun. Lockheed says that the X2 technology can also be adapted for light assault, light attack, armed reconnaissance, close-air support, combat search and rescue, and unmanned aircraft. The company hopes that it will one day see service with not only the US Army and Special Operations, but the US Air Force, US Navy, and US Marine Corps. The speed and maneuverability of the S-97 Raider is showcased in the video below.


SimCentric Technologies will be exhibiting at ITEC in Rotterdam, 16th – 18th May 2017. With vast ongoing global investment in the VBS3 virtual platform including UK MoD (DVS), US Army (GFT) and US Marine Corps (DVTE & ISMT), SimCentric’s value adding VBS3 middleware maximizes the return on this financial and training investment for militaries worldwide. At ITEC, SimCentric will be demonstrating their flagship VBS3 FiresFST Pro enabling full spectrum offensive fires, close air support and UAV vectoring capabilities. Augmenting this is our Ambience pattern of life generation tool enabling unprecedented realism in Collateral Damage Estimation and ROE application. Completing this configuration is our MediaMate smart device live streaming application simulating a UAV Rover 5 ISR feed in a BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) integration. A specific emphasis for ITEC 2017 will be demonstrating how incidents of Coalition fratricide and non-combatant collateral damage can be reduced through VBS3 FiresFST Pro visualization aides and procedural support features. SimCentric will also be demonstrating advanced applications aimed at delivering greater recurring efficiency and systemic flexibility dividends for the VBS3 user community. Our GUIMate Pro application is a development and modelling tool that accelerates the process of building, deploying and maintaining custom GUI content within VBS3. Through this application, significant training liabilities can be reduced through enhancing intuitive proficiency when operating VBS3. SimCentric will also be demonstrating our TrainingMate “virtual classroom” enabling synchronized and instructor enabled VBS3 training instances to be conducted either in a co-located environment, or geographically distributed. CEO SimCentric Dr Adam Easton commented “We are thrilled at the continuing strong adoption and growth of our modular VBS3 integrated software across a worldwide user community. Our fundamental principle is to ensure we understand the overall capability requirement and the training gap that exists, then address this with the right simulation solution. By continuous and collaborative engagement with our customers, we can meet our goal of delivering a solution, not just a product. ” Visit us at ITEC! SimCentric will be exhibiting at ITEC 16th – 18th May 2017 in Rotterdam. Click here https://www.simct.com/contact_us to schedule a demonstration. For more information please visit www.simct.com. For Press or Media enquiries contact tessbutler@ruddynice.com


News Article | April 14, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Baltimore, Md. - The Air Force Association's (AFA) CyberPatriot Program announced last week the winners of its CyberPatriot IX National Youth Cyber Defense Competition. It also recognized one competitor in particular – high school senior Leon Gaulin – who is just the fifth recipient of the Cyber All American Award. The Cyber All American designation is awarded to students who have played a role in advancing their teams to the CyberPatriot National Finals Competition in each of their high school years. In any given season fewer than one percent of CyberPatriot teams advance to the finals.  For any student to be part of a team that does so for each of his or her high school years is particularly rare. With a successful CyberPatriot career accomplished, Leon plans to attend Quinsigamond Community College in Worcester, Mass., to pursue an Engineering associate's degree, then through an articulation agreement transfer to Worcester Polytechnic Institute to obtain a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering. “Leon has been such an inspirational member of our school's CyberPatriot team and program,” said Coach, First Sergeant Paul Jornet, US Marine Corps, (Ret). “Throughout his four high school years Leon has helped to train so many students in the fundamentals of safe and ethical cyber behavior.  Leon has assisted with the instruction of two cyber summer camps for middle school students and three cyber STEM camps for high school students. Commitment to community is a trademark of Leon's, as he currently serves our school as the Student Representative to the School Committee.” The CyberPatriot IX competition season began in October 2016 with more than 4,400 teams registered. After four months of rigorous online challenges, the top teams met in Baltimore, Md., to compete for the title of National Champion. Leon and his team took home third place honors in the All Service Division. CyberPatriot, an education initiative established by the Air Force Association and presented by the Northrop Grumman Foundation, is a one-of-a-kind cyber defense competition designed to inspire students toward futures in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Other program sponsors include Cyber Diamond sponsors AT&T Federal and the AT&T Foundation, Cisco, Microsoft, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and the Office of the Secretary of Defense; Cyber Gold sponsors Facebook, Riverside Research, Splunk, and Symantec; and Cyber Silver sponsors Air Force Reserve, Air Force STEM, American Military University, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Leidos, and University of Maryland University College. To learn more about CyberPatriot’s programs and initiatives, and to sign up for CyberPatriot X, please visit www.uscyberpatriot.org. The Air Force Association is a non-profit, independent, professional military and aerospace education association. Our mission is to promote a dominant United States Air Force and a strong national defense, and to honor Airmen and our Air Force Heritage. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/cca8deb7-dde4-49ef-bdb2-a66828024d30


News Article | May 7, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

“The connectivity that is the heart of globalisation can be exploited by states with hostile intent to further their aims.[…] The risks at stake are profound and represent a fundamental threat to our sovereignty.” Alex Younger, head of MI6, December, 2016 “It’s not MI6’s job to warn of internal threats. It was a very strange speech. Was it one branch of the intelligence services sending a shot across the bows of another? Or was it pointed at Theresa May’s government? Does she know something she’s not telling us?” Senior intelligence analyst, April 2017 In June 2013, a young American postgraduate called Sophie was passing through London when she called up the boss of a firm where she’d previously interned. The company, SCL Elections, went on to be bought by Robert Mercer, a secretive hedge fund billionaire, renamed Cambridge Analytica, and achieved a certain notoriety as the data analytics firm that played a role in both Trump and Brexit campaigns. But all of this was still to come. London in 2013 was still basking in the afterglow of the Olympics. Britain had not yet Brexited. The world had not yet turned. “That was before we became this dark, dystopian data company that gave the world Trump,” a former Cambridge Analytica employee who I’ll call Paul tells me. “It was back when we were still just a psychological warfare firm.” Was that really what you called it, I ask him. Psychological warfare? “Totally. That’s what it is. Psyops. Psychological operations – the same methods the military use to effect mass sentiment change. It’s what they mean by winning ‘hearts and minds’. We were just doing it to win elections in the kind of developing countries that don’t have many rules.” Why would anyone want to intern with a psychological warfare firm, I ask him. And he looks at me like I am mad. “It was like working for MI6. Only it’s MI6 for hire. It was very posh, very English, run by an old Etonian and you got to do some really cool things. Fly all over the world. You were working with the president of Kenya or Ghana or wherever. It’s not like election campaigns in the west. You got to do all sorts of crazy shit.” On that day in June 2013, Sophie met up with SCL’s chief executive, Alexander Nix, and gave him the germ of an idea. “She said, ‘You really need to get into data.’ She really drummed it home to Alexander. And she suggested he meet this firm that belonged to someone she knew about through her father.” “Yes. And she suggested Alexander should meet this company called Palantir.” I had been speaking to former employees of Cambridge Analytica for months and heard dozens of hair-raising stories, but it was still a gobsmacking moment. To anyone concerned about surveillance, Palantir is practically now a trigger word. The data-mining firm has contracts with governments all over the world – including GCHQ and the NSA. It’s owned by Peter Thiel, the billionaire co-founder of eBay and PayPal, who became Silicon Valley’s first vocal supporter of Trump. In some ways, Eric Schmidt’s daughter showing up to make an introduction to Palantir is just another weird detail in the weirdest story I have ever researched. A weird but telling detail. Because it goes to the heart of why the story of Cambridge Analytica is one of the most profoundly unsettling of our time. Sophie Schmidt now works for another Silicon Valley megafirm: Uber. And what’s clear is that the power and dominance of the Silicon Valley – Google and Facebook and a small handful of others – are at the centre of the global tectonic shift we are currently witnessing. It also reveals a critical and gaping hole in the political debate in Britain. Because what is happening in America and what is happening in Britain are entwined. Brexit and Trump are entwined. The Trump administration’s links to Russia and Britain are entwined. And Cambridge Analytica is one point of focus through which we can see all these relationships in play; it also reveals the elephant in the room as we hurtle into a general election: Britain tying its future to an America that is being remade - in a radical and alarming way - by Trump. There are three strands to this story. How the foundations of an authoritarian surveillance state are being laid in the US. How British democracy was subverted through a covert, far-reaching plan of coordination enabled by a US billionaire. And how we are in the midst of a massive land grab for power by billionaires via our data. Data which is being silently amassed, harvested and stored. Whoever owns this data owns the future. My entry point into this story began, as so many things do, with a late-night Google. Last December, I took an unsettling tumble into a wormhole of Google autocomplete suggestions that ended with “did the holocaust happen”. And an entire page of results that claimed it didn’t. Google’s algorithm had been gamed by extremist sites and it was Jonathan Albright, a professor of communications at Elon University, North Carolina, who helped me get to grips with what I was seeing. He was the first person to map and uncover an entire “alt-right” news and information ecosystem and he was the one who first introduced me to Cambridge Analytica. He called the company a central point in the right’s “propaganda machine”, a line I quoted in reference to its work for the Trump election campaign and the referendum Leave campaign. That led to the second article featuring Cambridge Analytica – as a central node in the alternative news and information network that I believed Robert Mercer and Steve Bannon, the key Trump aide who is now his chief strategist, were creating. I found evidence suggesting they were on a strategic mission to smash the mainstream media and replace it with one comprising alternative facts, fake history and rightwing propaganda. Mercer is a brilliant computer scientist, a pioneer in early artificial intelligence, and the co-owner of one of the most successful hedge funds on the planet (with a gravity-defying 71.8% annual return). And, he is also, I discovered, good friends with Nigel Farage. Andy Wigmore, Leave.EU’s communications director, told me that it was Mercer who had directed his company, Cambridge Analytica, to “help” the Leave campaign. The second article triggered two investigations, which are both continuing: one by the Information Commissioner’s Office into the possible illegal use of data. And a second by the Electoral Commission which is “focused on whether one or more donations – including services – accepted by Leave.EU was ‘impermissable’”. What I then discovered is that Mercer’s role in the referendum went far beyond this. Far beyond the jurisdiction of any UK law. The key to understanding how a motivated and determined billionaire could bypass ourelectoral laws rests on AggregateIQ, an obscure web analytics company based in an office above a shop in Victoria, British Columbia. It was with AggregateIQ that Vote Leave (the official Leave campaign) chose to spend £3.9m, more than half its official £7m campaign budget. As did three other affiliated Leave campaigns: BeLeave, Veterans for Britain and the Democratic Unionist party, spending a further £757,750. “Coordination” between campaigns is prohibited under UK electoral law, unless campaign expenditure is declared, jointly. It wasn’t. Vote Leave says the Electoral Commission “looked into this” and gave it “a clean bill of health”. How did an obscure Canadian company come to play such a pivotal role in Brexit? It’s a question that Martin Moore, director of the centre for the study of communication, media and power at King’s College London has been asking too. “I went through all the Leave campaign invoices when the Electoral Commission uploaded them to its site in February. And I kept on discovering all these huge amounts going to a company that not only had I never heard of, but that there was practically nothing at all about on the internet. More money was spent with AggregateIQ than with any other company in any other campaign in the entire referendum. All I found, at that time, was a one-page website and that was it. It was an absolute mystery.” Moore contributed to an LSE report published in April that concluded UK’s electoral laws were “weak and helpless” in the face of new forms of digital campaigning. Offshore companies, money poured into databases, unfettered third parties… the caps on spending had come off. The laws that had always underpinned Britain’s electoral laws were no longer fit for purpose. Laws, the report said, that needed “urgently reviewing by parliament”. AggregateIQ holds the key to unravelling another complicated network of influence that Mercer has created. A source emailed me to say he had found that AggregateIQ’s address and telephone number corresponded to a company listed on Cambridge Analytica’s website as its overseas office: “SCL Canada”. A day later, that online reference vanished. There had to be a connection between the two companies. Between the various Leave campaigns. Between the referendum and Mercer. It was too big a coincidence. But everyone – AggregateIQ, Cambridge Analytica, Leave.EU, Vote Leave – denied it. AggregateIQ had just been a short-term “contractor” to Cambridge Analytica. There was nothing to disprove this. We published the known facts. On 29 March, article 50 was triggered. Then I meet Paul, the first of two sources formerly employed by Cambridge Analytica. He is in his late 20s and bears mental scars from his time there. “It’s almost like post-traumatic shock. It was so… messed up. It happened so fast. I just woke up one morning and found we’d turned into the Republican fascist party. I still can’t get my head around it.” He laughed when I told him the frustrating mystery that was AggregateIQ. “Find Chris Wylie,” he said. “He’s the one who brought data and micro-targeting [individualised political messages] to Cambridge Analytica. And he’s from west Canada. It’s only because of him that AggregateIQ exist. They’re his friends. He’s the one who brought them in.” There wasn’t just a relationship between Cambridge Analytica and AggregateIQ, Paul told me. They were intimately entwined, key nodes in Robert Mercer’s distributed empire. “The Canadians were our back office. They built our software for us. They held our database. If AggregateIQ is involved then Cambridge Analytica is involved. And if Cambridge Analytica is involved, then Robert Mercer and Steve Bannon are involved. You need to find Chris Wylie.” I did find Chris Wylie. He refused to comment. Key to understanding how data would transform the company is knowing where it came from. And it’s a letter from “Director of Defence Operations, SCL Group”, that helped me realise this. It’s from “Commander Steve Tatham, PhD, MPhil, Royal Navy (rtd)” complaining about my use in my Mercer article of the word “disinformation”. I wrote back to him pointing out references in papers he’d written to “deception” and “propaganda”, which I said I understood to be “roughly synonymous with ‘disinformation’.” It’s only later that it strikes me how strange it is that I’m corresponding with a retired navy commander about military strategies that may have been used in British and US elections. What’s been lost in the US coverage of this “data analytics” firm is the understanding of where the firm came from: deep within the military-industrial complex. A weird British corner of it populated, as the military establishment in Britain is, by old-school Tories. Geoffrey Pattie, a former parliamentary under-secretary of state for defence procurement and director of Marconi Defence Systems, used to be on the board, and Lord Marland, David Cameron’s pro-Brexit former trade envoy, a shareholder. Steve Tatham was the head of psychological operations for British forces in Afghanistan. The Observer has seen letters endorsing him from the UK Ministry of Defence, the Foreign Office and Nato. SCL/Cambridge Analytica was not some startup created by a couple of guys with a Mac PowerBook. It’s effectively part of the British defence establishment. And, now, too, the American defence establishment. An ex-commanding officer of the US Marine Corps operations centre, Chris Naler, has recently joined Iota Global, a partner of the SCL group. This is not just a story about social psychology and data analytics. It has to be understood in terms of a military contractor using military strategies on a civilian population. Us. David Miller, a professor of sociology at Bath University and an authority in psyops and propaganda, says it is “an extraordinary scandal that this should be anywhere near a democracy. It should be clear to voters where information is coming from, and if it’s not transparent or open where it’s coming from, it raises the question of whether we are actually living in a democracy or not.” Paul and David, another ex-Cambridge Analytica employee, were working at the firm when it introduced mass data-harvesting to its psychological warfare techniques. “It brought psychology, propaganda and technology together in this powerful new way,” David tells me. And it was Facebook that made it possible. It was from Facebook that Cambridge Analytica obtained its vast dataset in the first place. Earlier, psychologists at Cambridge University harvested Facebook data (legally) for research purposes and published pioneering peer-reviewed work about determining personality traits, political partisanship, sexuality and much more from people’s Facebook “likes”. And SCL/Cambridge Analytica contracted a scientist at the university, Dr Aleksandr Kogan, to harvest new Facebook data. And he did so by paying people to take a personality quiz which also allowed not just their own Facebook profiles to be harvested, but also those of their friends – a process then allowed by the social network. Facebook was the source of the psychological insights that enabled Cambridge Analytica to target individuals. It was also the mechanism that enabled them to be delivered on a large scale. The company also (perfectly legally) bought consumer datasets – on everything from magazine subscriptions to airline travel – and uniquely it appended these with the psych data to voter files. It matched all this information to people’s addresses, their phone numbers and often their email addresses. “The goal is to capture every single aspect of every voter’s information environment,” said David. “And the personality data enabled Cambridge Analytica to craft individual messages.” Finding “persuadable” voters is key for any campaign and with its treasure trove of data, Cambridge Analytica could target people high in neuroticism, for example, with images of immigrants “swamping” the country. The key is finding emotional triggers for each individual voter. Cambridge Analytica worked on campaigns in several key states for a Republican political action committee. Its key objective, according to a memo the Observer has seen, was “voter disengagement” and “to persuade Democrat voters to stay at home”: a profoundly disquieting tactic. It has previously been claimed that suppression tactics were used in the campaign, but this document provides the first actual evidence. But does it actually work? One of the criticisms that has been levelled at my and others’ articles is that Cambridge Analytica’s “special sauce” has been oversold. Is what it is doing any different from any other political consultancy? “It’s not a political consultancy,” says David. “You have to understand this is not a normal company in any way. I don’t think Mercer even cares if it ever makes any money. It’s the product of a billionaire spending huge amounts of money to build his own experimental science lab, to test what works, to find tiny slivers of influence that can tip an election. Robert Mercer did not invest in this firm until it ran a bunch of pilots – controlled trials. This is one of the smartest computer scientists in the world. He is not going to splash $15m on bullshit.” Tamsin Shaw, an associate professor of philosophy at New York University, helps me understand the context. She has researched the US military’s funding and use of psychological research for use in torture. “The capacity for this science to be used to manipulate emotions is very well established. This is military-funded technology that has been harnessed by a global plutocracy and is being used to sway elections in ways that people can’t even see, don’t even realise is happening to them,” she says. “It’s about exploiting existing phenomenon like nationalism and then using it to manipulate people at the margins. To have so much data in the hands of a bunch of international plutocrats to do with it what they will is absolutely chilling. “We are in an information war and billionaires are buying up these companies, which are then employed to go to work in the heart of government. That’s a very worrying situation.” A project that Cambridge Analytica carried out in Trinidad in 2013 brings all the elements in this story together. Just as Robert Mercer began his negotiations with SCL boss Alexander Nix about an acquisition, SCL was retained by several government ministers in Trinidad and Tobago. The brief involved developing a micro-targeting programme for the governing party of the time. And AggregateIQ – the same company involved in delivering Brexit for Vote Leave – was brought in to build the targeting platform. David said: “The standard SCL/CA method is that you get a government contract from the ruling party. And this pays for the political work. So, it’s often some bullshit health project that’s just a cover for getting the minister re-elected. But in this case, our government contacts were with Trinidad’s national security council.” The security work was to be the prize for the political work. Documents seen by the Observer show that this was a proposal to capture citizens’ browsing history en masse, recording phone conversations and applying natural language processing to the recorded voice data to construct a national police database, complete with scores for each citizen on their propensity to commit crime. “The plan put to the minister was Minority Report. It was pre-crime. And the fact that Cambridge Analytica is now working inside the Pentagon is, I think, absolutely terrifying,” said David. These documents throw light on a significant and under-reported aspect of the Trump administration. The company that helped Trump achieve power in the first place has now been awarded contracts in the Pentagon and the US state department. Its former vice-president Steve Bannon now sits in the White House. It is also reported to be in discussions for “military and homeland security work”. In the US, the government is bound by strict laws about what data it can collect on individuals. But, for private companies anything goes. Is it unreasonable to see in this the possible beginnings of an authoritarian surveillance state? A state that is bringing corporate interests into the heart of the administration. Documents detail Cambridge Analytica is involved with many other right-leaning billionaires, including Rupert Murdoch. One memo references Cambridge Analytica trying to place an article with a journalist in Murdoch’s Wall Street Journal: “RM re-channeled and connected with Jamie McCauley from Robert Thomson News Corp office,” it says. It makes me think again about the story involving Sophie Schmidt, Cambridge Analytica and Palantir. Is it a telling detail, or is it a clue to something else going on? Cambridge Analytica and Palantir both declined to comment for this article on whether they had any relationship. But witnesses and emails confirm that meetings between Cambridge Analytica and Palantir took place in 2013. The possibility of a working relationship was at least discussed. Further documents seen by the Observer confirm that at least one senior Palantir employee consulted with Cambridge Analytica in relation to the Trinidad project and later political work in the US. But at the time, I’m told, Palantir decided it was too much of a reputational risk for a more formal arrangement. There was no upside to it. Palantir is a company that is trusted to handle vast datasets on UK and US citizens for GCHQ and the NSA, as well as many other countries. Now though, they are both owned by ideologically aligned billionaires: Robert Mercer and Peter Thiel. The Trump campaign has said that Thiel helped it with data. A campaign that was led by Steve Bannon, who was then at Cambridge Analytica. A leading QC who spends a lot of time in the investigatory powers tribunal said that the problem with this technology was that it all depended on whose hands it was in. “On the one hand, it’s being done by companies and governments who say ‘you can trust us, we are good and democratic and bake cakes at the weekend’. But then the same expertise can also be sold on to whichever repressive regime.” In Britain, we still trust our government. We respect our authorities to uphold our laws. We trust the rule of law. We believe we live in a free and fair democracy. Which is what, I believe, makes the last part of this story so profoundly unsettling. The details of the Trinidad project finally unlocked the mystery that was AggregateIQ. Trinidad was SCL’s first project using big data for micro-targeting before the firm was acquired by Mercer. It was the model that Mercer was buying into. And it brought together all the players: the Cambridge psychologist Aleksandr Kogan, AggregateIQ, Chris Wylie, and two other individuals who would play a role in this story: Mark Gettleson, a focus group expert who had previously worked for the Lib Dems. And Thomas Borwick, the son of Victoria Borwick, the Conservative MP for Kensington. When my article linking Mercer and Leave.EU was published in February, no one was more upset about it than former Tory adviser Dominic Cummings, the campaign strategist for Vote Leave. He launched an irate Twitter tirade. The piece was “full of errors & itself spreads disinformation” “CA had ~0% role in Brexit referendum”. A week later the Observer revealed AggregateIQ’s possible link to Cambridge Analytica. Cummings’s Twitter feed went quiet. He didn’t return my messages or my emails. Questions had already been swirling about whether there had been any coordination between the Leave campaigns. In the week before the referendum, Vote Leave donated money to two other Leave groups – £625,000 to BeLeave, run by fashion student Darren Grimes, and £100,000 to Veterans for Britain, who both then spent this money with AggregateIQ. The Electoral Commission has written to AggregateIQ. A source close to the investigation said that AggregateIQ responded by saying it had signed a non-disclosure agreement. And since it was outside British jurisdiction, that was the end of it. Vote Leave refers to this as the Electoral Commission giving it “a clean bill of health”. On his blog, Dominic Cummings has written thousands of words about the referendum campaign. What is missing is any details about his data scientists. He “hired physicists” is all he’ll say. In the books on Brexit, other members of the team talk about “Dom’s astrophysicists”, who he kept “a tightly guarded secret”. They built models, using data “scraped” off Facebook. Finally, after weeks of messages, he sent me an email. We were agreed on one thing, it turned out. He wrote: “The law/regulatory agencies are such a joke the reality is that anybody who wanted to cheat the law could do it easily without people realising.” But, he says, “by encouraging people to focus on non-stories like Mercer’s nonexistent role in the referendum you are obscuring these important issues”. And to finally answer the question about how Vote Leave found this obscure Canadian company on the other side of the planet, he wrote: “Someone found AIQ [AggregateIQ] on the internet and interviewed them on the phone then told me – let’s go with these guys. They were clearly more competent than any others we’d spoken to in London.” The most unfortunate aspect of this – for Dominic Cummings – is that this isn’t credible. It’s the work of moments to put a date filter on Google search and discover that in late 2015 or early 2016, there are no Google hits for “Aggregate IQ”. There is no press coverage. No random mentions. It doesn’t even throw up its website. I have caught Dominic Cummings in what appears to be an alternative fact. But what is an actual fact is that Gettleson and Borwick, both previously consultants for SCL and Cambridge Analytica, were both core members of the Vote Leave team. They’re both in the official Vote Leave documents lodged with the Electoral Commission, though they coyly describe their previous work for SCL/Cambridge Analytica as “micro-targeting in Antigua and Trinidad” and “direct communications for several PACs, Senate and Governor campaigns”. And Borwick wasn’t just any member of the team. He was Vote Leave’s chief technology officer. This story may involve a complex web of connections, but it all comes back to Cambridge Analytica. It all comes back to Mercer. Because the connections must have been evident. “AggregateIQ may not have belonged to the Mercers but they exist within his world,” David told me. “Almost all of their contracts came from Cambridge Analytica or Mercer. They wouldn’t exist without them. During the whole time the referendum was going on, they were working every day on the [Ted] Cruz campaign with Mercer and Cambridge Analytica. AggregateIQ built and ran Cambridge Analytica’s database platforms.” Cummings won’t say who did his modelling. But invoices lodged with the Electoral Commission show payments to a company called Advanced Skills Institute. It takes me weeks to spot the significance of this because the company is usually referred to as ASI Data Science, a company that has a revolving cast of data scientists who have gone on to work with Cambridge Analytica and vice versa. There are videos of ASI data scientists presenting Cambridge Analytica personality models and pages for events the two companies have jointly hosted. ASI told the Observer it had no formal relationship with Cambridge Analytica. Here’s the crucial fact: during the US primary elections, Aggregate IQ signed away its intellectual property (IP). It didn’t own its IP: Robert Mercer did. For AggregateIQ to work with another campaign in Britain, the firm would have to have had the express permission of Mercer. Asked if it would make any comment on financial or business links between “Cambridge Analytica, Robert Mercer, Steve Bannon, AggregateIQ, Leave.EU and Vote Leave”, a spokesperson for Cambridge Analytica said: “Cambridge Analytica did no paid or unpaid work for Leave.EU.” This story isn’t about cunning Dominic Cummings finding a few loopholes in the Electoral Commission’s rules. Finding a way to spend an extra million quid here. Or (as the Observer has also discovered )underdeclaring the costs of his physicists on the spending returns by £43,000. This story is not even about what appears to be covert coordination between Vote Leave and Leave.EU in their use of AggregateIQ and Cambridge Analytica. It’s about how a motivated US billionaire – Mercer and his chief ideologue, Bannon – helped to bring about the biggest constitutional change to Britain in a century. Because to understand where and how Brexit is connected to Trump, it’s right here. These relationships, which thread through the middle of Cambridge Analytica, are the result of a transatlantic partnership that stretches back years. Nigel Farage and Bannon have been close associates since at least 2012. Bannon opened the London arm of his news website Breitbart in 2014 to support Ukip – the latest front “in our current cultural and political war”, he told the New York Times. Britain had always been key to Bannon’s plans, another ex-Cambridge Analytica employee told me on condition of anonymity. It was a crucial part of his strategy for changing the entire world order. “He believes that to change politics, you have to first change the culture. And Britain was key to that. He thought that where Britain led, America would follow. The idea of Brexit was hugely symbolically important to him.” On 29 March, the day article 50 was triggered, I called one of the smaller campaigns, Veterans for Britain. Cummings’s strategy was to target people in the last days of the campaign and Vote Leave gave the smaller group £100,000 in the last week. A small number of people they identified as “persuadable” were bombarded with more than a billion ads, the vast majority in the last few days. I asked David Banks, Veterans for Britain’s head of communications, why they spent the money with AggregateIQ. “I didn’t find AggegrateIQ. They found us. They rang us up and pitched us. There’s no conspiracy here. They were this Canadian company which was opening an office in London to work in British politics and they were doing stuff that none of the UK companies could offer. Their targeting was based on a set of technologies that hadn’t reached the UK yet. A lot of it was proprietary, they’d found a way of targeting people based on behavioural insights. They approached us.” It seems clear to me that David Banks didn’t know there might have been anything untoward about this. He’s a patriotic man who believes in British sovereignty and British values and British laws. I don’t think knew about any overlap with these other campaigns. I can only think that he was played. And that we, the British people, were played. In his blog, Dominic Cummings writes that Brexit came down to “about 600,000 people – just over 1% of registered voters”. It’s not a stretch to believe that a member of the global 1% found a way to influence this crucial 1% of British voters. The referendum was an open goal too tempting a target for US billionaires not to take a clear shot at. Or I should say US billionaires and other interested parties, because in acknowledging the transatlantic links that bind Britain and America, Brexit and Trump, so tightly, we also must acknowledge that Russia is wrapped somewhere in this tight embrace too. For the last month, I’ve been writing about the links between the British right, the Trump administration and the European right. And these links lead to Russia from multiple directions. Between Nigel Farage and Donald Trump and Cambridge Analytica. A map shown to the Observer showing the many places in the world where SCL and Cambridge Analytica have worked includes Russia, Lithuania, Latvia, Ukraine, Iran and Moldova. Multiple Cambridge Analytica sources have revealed other links to Russia, including trips to the country, meetings with executives from Russian state-owned companies, and references by SCL employees to working for Russian entities. Article 50 has been triggered. AggregateIQ is outside British jurisdiction. The Electoral Commission is powerless. And another election, with these same rules, is just a month away. It is not that the authorities don’t know there is cause for concern. The Observer has learned that the Crown Prosecution Service did appoint a special prosecutor to assess whether there was a case for a criminal investigation into whether campaign finance laws were broken. The CPS referred it back to the electoral commission. Someone close to the intelligence select committee tells me that “work is being done” on potential Russian interference in the referendum. Gavin Millar, a QC and expert in electoral law, described the situation as “highly disturbing”. He believes the only way to find the truth would be to hold a public inquiry. But a government would need to call it. A government that has just triggered an election specifically to shore up its power base. An election designed to set us into permanent alignment with Trump’s America. Martin Moore of King’s College, London, pointed out that elections were a newly fashionable tool for would-be authoritarian states. “Look at Erdoğan in Turkey. What Theresa May is doing is quite anti-democratic in a way. It’s about enhancing her power very deliberately. It’s not about a battle of policy between two parties.” This is Britain in 2017. A Britain that increasingly looks like a “managed” democracy. Paid for by a US billionaire. Using military-style technology. Delivered by Facebook. And enabled by us. If we let this referendum result stand, we are giving it our implicit consent. This isn’t about Remain or Leave. It goes far beyond party politics. It’s about the first step into a brave, new, increasingly undemocratic world. SCL Group British company with 25 years experience in military “psychological operations” and “election management”. Cambridge Analytica Data analytics company formed in 2014. Robert Mercer owns 90%. SCL owns 10%. Carried out major digital targeting campaigns for Donald Trump campaign, Ted Cruz’s nomination campaign and multiple other US Republican campaigns – mostly funded by Mercer. Gave Nigel Farage’s Leave.EU “help” during referendum. Robert Mercer US billionaire hedge fund owner who was Trump’s biggest donor. Owns Cambridge Analytica and the IP [intellectual property] ofAggregateIQ. Friend of Farage. Close associate of Steve Bannon. Steve Bannon Trump’s chief strategist. Vice-president of Cambridge Analytica during referendum period. Friend of Farage. Christopher Wylie Canadian who first brought data expertise and microtargeting to Cambridge Analytica; recruited AggregateIQ. AggregateIQ Data analytics company based in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Worked for Mercer-funded Pacs that supported the Trump campaign. Robert Mercer owns AggregateIQ’s IP. Paid £3.9m by Vote Leave to “micro-target” voters on social media during referendum campaign. Outside British jurisdiction. Veterans for Britain Given £100,000 by Vote Leave. Spent it with AggregateIQ. BeLeave Youth Leave campaign set up by 23-year-old student. Given £625,000 by Vote Leave & £50,000 by another donor. Spent it with AggregateIQ. ASI Data Science Data science specialists. Links with Cambridge Analytica, including staff moving between the two and holding joint events. Paid £114,000 by Vote Leave. Vote Leave declared £71,000 to Electoral Commission. Donald Trump US president. Campaign funded by Mercer and run by Bannon. Data services supplied by Cambridge Analytica and AggregrateIQ. Nigel Farage Former Ukip leader. Leader of Leave.EU. Friend of Trump, Mercer and Bannon. Arron Banks Bristol businessman. Co-founder of Leave.EU. Owns data company and insurance firm. Single biggest donor to Leave – £7.5m. Some names, ages and other identifying details of sources in this article have been changed


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Hochgeschätzter führender Experte für Operationen, Koordination und Management im Bereich Sicherheit wird das Unternehmen in die nächste Wachstumsphase steuern LOS ANGELES, 17. Februar 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Airborne Wireless Network (OTCQB: ABWN) gibt heute bekannt, dass es Michael (Mike) J. Warren zum Chief Executive Officer ernannt hat. Mike Warren war bis vor Kurzem als Direktor für regionale Operationen und Sicherheit für ECC International in Afghanistan tätig. In dieser Funktion überwachte er die Sicherheit von 18 bedeutenden Bauprojekten des US-Verteidigungsministeriums mit einem Budget von insgesamt 1.000.000.000 USD, einschließlich eines Straßenprojekts über 500 Millionen USD der Asia Development Bank zum Bau der Tangente von Herat nach Mazer-e-Sharif, und eines Infrastruktur-Entwicklungsprojekts über 50 Millionen USD von USAID in Zusammenarbeit mit dem afghanischen Ministerium für Minenwesen, Öl und Gas. Davor war Mike Warren Direktor für Operations, Security & Safety für Checchi & Company Consulting, Inc., in Afghanistan und sein Schwerpunkt lag auf dem Programm Measurement and Evaluation im Auftrag von USAID. Vor dieser Funktion arbeitete er als Programm-Manager für die Human Terrain Systems im Rahmen der Internationalen Sicherheitsbeistandstruppe (International Security Assistance Force/ISAF) für die NATO und die US-Armee G-2. Er hat als Berater für die US-Botschaft, für COMISAF und CJ2X im ISAF-Hauptquartier in Kabul in Afghanistan fungiert. Mike Warren ist im Jahr 1994 aus dem US Marine Corps im Rang eines Lieutenant Colonel ausgeschieden. Als Infanterie-Offizier gehörte zu seinen Aufgaben der Dienst als Exekutiv-Offizier, 3. Surveillance & Reconnaissance Group in Okinawa, als Kommandant der größten Marinesicherheit-Kaserne in der Marinegefechtsstation Concord, Kalifornien, und er diente in mehreren Kommandofunktionen auf dem Militärübungsplatz des Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego. Er stammt aus Illinois und hat an der University of Missouri einen Bachelor-Studienabschluss in Politikwissenschaften absolviert. Mike Warren ist ebenfalls Absolvent des US Marine Corps Command and Staff College.  Darüber hinaus verfügt er über Zertifizierungen als Stratege zur Terrorismusbekämpfung, als sogenannter COIN-Experte (Counterinsurgency/Aufstandsbekämpfung) und er hat zahlreiche Sicherheitskurse und -fortbildungen abgeschlossen. Mike Warren besitzt umfangreiches Hintergrundwissen im Projektmanagement und war bei mehreren Unternehmen in der Computerhardware- und Software-Branche aktiv, für die er entscheidende Beiträge zum Wachstum und zur Expansion der Unternehmen leistete. J. Edward Daniels, Präsident von Airborne Wireless Network sagte: „Mike wird für unseren technologischen Fortschritt auf die nächste Stufe des Wachstums eine zentrale Rolle spielen. Seine Kompetenz im Bereich Sicherheitsoperationen und sein Hintergrund - sowohl aus dem zivilen als auch dem staatlichen Sektor - sind äußerst wertvoll, während wir die Vermarktung des Infinitus Super Highway™ weiter offensiv fortsetzen. Wir sind davon überzeugt, dass sein einzigartiges Hintergrundwissen und sein Talent, Visionen in erstklassige Ergebnisse umzusetzen, genau die notwendigen Fähigkeiten sind, um das nächste Kapitel unserer Geschäftsaktivitäten zu eröffnen." Weitere Informationen finden Sie unter: www.airbornewirelessnetwork.com Diese Pressemitteilung enthält sogenannte „zukunftsbezogene Aussagen" im Sinne der Safe-Harbor-Bestimmungen des United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act von 1995. Diese Aussagen basieren auf den aktuellen Überzeugungen und Erwartungen der Geschäftsführung des Unternehmens und unterliegen beachtlichen Risiken und Ungewissheiten. Sollten sich die zugrunde gelegten Annahmen als unzutreffend erweisen oder Risiken und Unwägbarkeiten eintreten, könnten die tatsächlichen Ergebnisse wesentlich von denjenigen abweichen, die in den zukunftsbezogenen Aussagen enthalten sind. Risiken und Unwägbarkeiten beinhalten, sind aber nicht beschränkt auf die Verfügbarkeit von Kapital; die mit der Entwicklung neuer Produkte oder Technologien und der betrieblichen Tätigkeit als Unternehmen in der Entwicklungsphase verbundenen Unsicherheiten; unsere Fähigkeit zur zusätzlichen Erhöhung der Mittel, die wir benötigen, um unsere Geschäfts- und Produktentwicklungspläne weiter zu verfolgen; unsere Fähigkeit, Produkte auf Basis unserer Technologieplattform zu entwickeln und zu vermarkten; der Wettbewerb in der Branche, in der wir tätig sind und vermarkten; allgemeine Branchenbedingungen; allgemeine wirtschaftliche Faktoren; die Auswirkung von Branchenvorschriften; technologische Fortschritte; neue Produkte und Patente der Konkurrenz; Herstellungsschwierigkeiten oder -verzögerungen; Abhängigkeit von der Wirksamkeit der Patente des Unternehmens sowie das Risiko von Rechtsstreitigkeiten, einschließlich Patentstreitigkeiten und/oder regulatorischer Maßnahmen.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Highly Regarded Senior Expert on Security Operations, Coordination, and Management to Lead Company into Next Phase of Growth LOS ANGELES, Feb. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Airborne Wireless Network (OTCQB: ABWN) today announces that it has appointed Michael (Mike) J. Warren as Chief Executive Officer. Mike has recently served as the Regional Operations and Security Director for ECC International in Afghanistan.  In this capacity, he has overseen the security of 18 Major DOD Construction Projects, totaling $1,000,000,000, including a $500 million Asia Development Bank road project building the Ring Road from Herat to Mazer-e-Sharif, and a $50 Million USAID Infrastructure Development project with the Afghan Ministry of Mines, Oil, and Gas.  Before that, Mike was the Director of Operations, Security & Safety for Checchi & Company Consulting, Inc., in Afghanistan and he focused on the Measurement and Evaluation Program under contract with USAID.  Prior to that he was the Program Manager for the Human Terrain Systems under the International Security Assistance Force for NATO and the US Army G-2.  He has been an advisor to the US Embassy, to COMISAF and CJ2X at HQ's ISAF in Kabul, Afghanistan. Mike retired from the US Marine Corps with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in 1994.  An infantry officer, his assignments included serving as the Executive Officer, 3rd Surveillance & Reconnaissance Group in Okinawa; as Commanding Officer of the largest Marine Security Barracks at Naval Weapons Station, Concord, CA, and in multiple command positions on the drill field at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego.  A native of Illinois, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of Missouri. Mike is also a graduate of the US Marine Corps Command and Staff College.  He is also certified as a Counter Terrorism Planner, as a COIN (Counterinsurgency) expert and in numerous security and safety courses. Mike has an extensive background in project management and has served with numerous companies in the computer hardware and software industry, playing an integral role in the companies' growth and expansion. J. Edward Daniels, President of Airborne Wireless Network said, "Mike will be instrumental in advancing our technology into the next stage of growth. His expertise in security operations and background in both the civilian sector and governmental sector will be invaluable as we continue to aggressively market the Infinitus Super Highway™. We believe that his unique background and his ability to translate vision into world-class execution will be exactly what we need as we enter the next chapter of the business." For further information see: www.airbornewirelessnetwork.com This release includes "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are based upon the current beliefs and expectations of the company's management and are subject to significant risks and uncertainties. If underlying assumptions prove inaccurate or risks or uncertainties materialize, actual results may differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements. Risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, availability of capital; the inherent uncertainties associated with developing new products or technologies and operating as a development stage company; our ability to raise the additional funding we will need to continue to pursue our business and product development plans; our ability to develop and commercialize products based on our technology platform; competition in the industry in which we operate and market; general industry conditions; general economic factors; the impact of industry regulation; technological advances; new products and patents attained by competitors; manufacturing difficulties or delays; dependence on the effectiveness of the company's patents; and the exposure to litigation, including patent litigation, and/or regulatory actions.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

Enterprise wide contract vehicle in place for all components of the USMC to procure MobiKEY TORONTO, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - Feb. 28, 2017) - Route1 Inc. (OTCQB:ROIUF) (TSX VENTURE:ROI) (the Company or Route1), a world-leader in secure data protection technologies and user authentication for government and enterprise, today announced its first MobiKEY order from the US Marine Corps for 50 MobiKEY application software licenses and 50 MobiKEY Fusion3 devices. The US Marine Corps (USMC) started testing the MobiKEY technology in November 2015. In January 2017, in accordance with the US Department of Defense (DoD) Risk Management Framework (RMF), an Authority to Operate and Authority to Connect was issued by the USMC, authorizing Route1's MobiKEY technology for the Marine Corps enterprise network. The MobiKEY technology is now available on an enterprise-wide contract vehicle that allows all components of the USMC to procure MobiKEY. Route1 expects sales in the first ninety days of 100-250 users and additional further growth on a monthly basis similar to the Company's experience with the US Department of the Navy. The USMC will be leveraging the DEFIMNET platform hosted by the DoD Joint Service Provider (JSP). In February 2017, in accordance with the DoD RMF, an Authority to Operate was issued for Route1's MobiKEY technology, including the DEFIMNET hosted by JSP. The DEFIMNET is a universal identity management and service delivery platform that confirms the identities of individual users and their entitlement to access specific applications, data or resources. Route1 Inc. is a world-leader in secure data protection technologies and user authentication for government and enterprise. Route1 solutions enable the workforce to be more productive and more flexible without compromising system access, data-at-rest, or data-in-use. The Company's suite of patented enterprise security solutions combines best-in-class authentication, data security and secure communications with streamlined administration tools, running on a proven, trusted infrastructure. From mobile access to business continuity to best-in-class full system encryption, Route1 offers the most effective, affordable methods to secure the digital fortress, while meeting or exceeding the highest standards for government and industry. Route1 has Full Authority to Operate from the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of the Navy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Department of the Interior, and other government agencies. The Company is also trusted by enterprise security teams in the banking, healthcare, legal and education sectors, among others. With offices in Washington, D.C., Boca Raton, FL and Toronto, Canada, Route1 serves public and private sector clients around the world. Route1 is listed on the OTCQB in the United States under the symbol ROIUF and in Canada on the TSX Venture Exchange under the symbol ROI. This news release, required by applicable Canadian laws, does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any of the securities in the United States. The securities have not been and will not be registered under the United States Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "U.S. Securities Act") or any state securities laws and may not be offered or sold within the United States or to U.S. Persons unless registered under the U.S. Securities Act and applicable state securities laws or an exemption from such registration is available. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. This news release contains statements that are not current or historical factual statements that may constitute forward-looking statements. These statements are based on certain factors and assumptions, including, expected financial performance, business prospects, technological developments, and development activities and like matters. While Route1 Inc. considers these factors and assumptions to be reasonable, based on information currently available, they may prove to be incorrect. These statements involve risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to the risk factors described in reporting documents filed by the Company. Actual results could differ materially from those projected as a result of these risks and should not be relied upon as a prediction of future events. The Company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which such statement is made, or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as required by law. Estimates used in this news release are from Company sources. © 2017 Route1 Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced, transmitted or otherwise used in whole or in part or by any means without prior written consent of Route1 Inc. See https://www.route1.com/terms-of-use.html for notice of Route1's intellectual property.


LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Technavio has announced the top five leading vendors in their recent global military aerial refueling tanker market report. This market research report also lists three other prominent vendors that are expected to impact the market during the forecast period. According to the research analysis, the global military aerial refueling tanker market is witnessing a shift in end-user focus from quantity to quality. There is also increased emphasis on cost efficiency for the development and procurement of aerial refueling tankers. Simultaneously, the involvement of reduced maintenance cost has been an increasing requirement for operators. Maintaining a balance between cost and quality while providing adequate solutions to address modern military requirements can be a significant challenge for the market vendors. They must understand the changing patterns in military spending and buying, as well as their predisposition toward obtaining an aerial refueling tanker that has long-term, cost-efficient advantage. “The existing key vendors in the market need to recognize and respond to the evolving trends of the market by providing long-term support services in addition to technological upgrades so as to sustain and acquire new business opportunities,” says Moutushi Saha, a lead defense analyst from Technavio. Technavio’s sample reports are free of charge and contain multiple sections of the report including the market size and forecast, drivers, challenges, trends, and more. Technavio aerospace and defense market research analysts identify the following key vendors: Airbus designs, manufactures, and markets aircraft, helicopters, satellites, commercial space launch vehicles, defense systems, and electronics for the global aerospace and defense industries. The company through its Defense and Space business manufactures aerial refueling tankers and supplies cargos to the global defense industry. Boeing has developed a wide-body, multirole tanker, KC-46A, which can refuel military aircraft of the US and its allied countries and is compatible with international aerial refueling procedures. This new variant of refueling tanker can also carry patients, passengers, and cargo. Also, it can detect, avoid, and defeat threats by using multiple military-grade protection systems, which allow the aircraft to operate in medium-threat environments. Embraer designs and manufactures aircraft and associated parts and components for the commercial aviation, defense, and business jet industries. The company, through its defense and security segment, has engaged in the provision of a wide array of technology management and systems integration for the global defense industry. Ilyushin Aviation Complex is a Russian manufacturer of commercial and military aircraft. The company also provides modernization, testing, training, and support services for its different aircraft models to clients. The company develops and supplies multipurpose transport aircraft that are specifically designed for addressing the specific requirements of the Russian Air Force and the air forces of its allied countries. Lockheed Martin engages in the development of advanced technology systems, products, and services to global defense and aerospace industries. The company has been providing aerial refueling tankers of its KC-130 variants to the US defense forces since 1962. The primary users of KC-130 variants are the US Marine Corps. The newer version is also capable of refueling both fixed and rotary-wing aircraft, along with conducting ground refueling of vehicles, and fuel caches. Become a Technavio Insights member and access all three of these reports for a fraction of their original cost. As a Technavio Insights member, you will have immediate access to new reports as they’re published in addition to all 6,000+ existing reports covering segments like defense technology, general aviation, and homeland security. This subscription nets you thousands in savings, while staying connected to Technavio’s constant transforming research library, helping you make informed business decisions more efficiently. Technavio is a leading global technology research and advisory company. The company develops over 2000 pieces of research every year, covering more than 500 technologies across 80 countries. Technavio has about 300 analysts globally who specialize in customized consulting and business research assignments across the latest leading edge technologies. Technavio analysts employ primary as well as secondary research techniques to ascertain the size and vendor landscape in a range of markets. Analysts obtain information using a combination of bottom-up and top-down approaches, besides using in-house market modeling tools and proprietary databases. They corroborate this data with the data obtained from various market participants and stakeholders across the value chain, including vendors, service providers, distributors, re-sellers, and end-users. If you are interested in more information, please contact our media team at media@technavio.com.

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