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The US political war on women has reached an all-time apex Donald Trump's sexual and reproductive health policy changes threaten women in the USA and across the world, warns an expert in the Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care. "Much progress has been made in the use of more effective contraception and in the reduction of unintended pregnancies", explains Professor Daniel Grossman from the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco. However, he warns that "Trump's policies could roll back progress on women's health." A concerning development is Trump's re-imposition of the Mexico City Policy, also known as the Global Gag Rule, which prevents US-funded organisations from providing, informing about, or advocating for abortion care in their countries. "If reducing abortion were the aim of this policy," Grossman says, "it is not at all clear that this is effective," as data suggests the policy was associated with an increase in abortion in sub-Saharan African countries. This is possibly because affected organisations lost funding for contraceptive supplies. Furthermore, Trump has made statements in support of reversing the Roe v. Wade 1973 landmark ruling that made abortion legal. While it is unclear that this ruling could be overturned, it is worrying because "state legislatures and the US Congress will certainly feel emboldened under the new administration to pass more restrictive legislation," explains Grossman. For example, the US House of Representatives passed a bill that would deny insurance coverage of abortion care to millions of women, and Trump indicated he would sign into law a federal ban on abortion after 20 weeks' gestation. Several policy proposals have the potential to severely limit access to contraception, adds Grossman. This includes prohibiting clinics affiliated with Planned Parenthood from receiving federal funding from sources such as Medicaid, and Title X, which help low income individuals. Evidence has shown after clinics in Texas were excluded, contraceptive use declined significantly, and unintended pregnancy increased. Furthermore, if the Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as Obamacare, is repealed, as Trump has promised, this may lead to more restrictions. The ACA provides women with insurance to access contraception without additional payments, and research shows women's expenditure has fallen and contraceptive use appears to have increased. The recent decline in national abortion rates has been partially related to improvement in contraceptive access and use. "These gains may be reversed if the contraceptive coverage guarantee under the ACA disappeared," warns Grossman. Other benefits at risk under the ACA include companies reverting to biased policies that cause women to pay more for health insurance, and the decline of well-woman visits with screening for sexually transmitted infections, and mental health and substance use disorder services. "Perhaps most concerning," Grossman adds, "is low income individuals in states that have expanded public insurance coverage...as part of the ACA may soon find themselves lacking any health insurance if federal funding is withdrawn." In addition, other anticipated policies could discriminate against women and lesbian, gay and transgender individuals, and impact access to sexual and reproductive healthcare services. "It remains to be seen how many of these proposed policies will really go into effect," explains Grossman. "But regardless, it is clear that the US political war on women has reached an all-time apex. Women's health physicians have a critical role to play: we must be a loud voice in support of evidence-based health care that is unencumbered by political interference." Editorial: Sexual and reproductive health under the Trump presidency: policy change threatens women in the USA and worldwide The Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care is one of 60 specialist journals published by BMJ. For more information, visit: http://jfprhc.


The Trump administration does not plan to reform the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), and instead will reauthorize the law in efforts to protect national security, according to a recent Reuters report. FISA's purpose is to govern spy programs for foreigners. However, "an unknown amount of communications belonging to Americans are also collected due to a range of technical and practical reasons," Reuters noted. While US intelligence agencies have called this data "incidental," and say the law cannot be used to target Americans, privacy advocates argue that it permits the government to conduct bulk searches of Americans' online communications. "We support the clean reauthorization and the administration believes it's necessary to protect the security of the nation," an unnamed White House official told Reuters. Of particular interest to those in the tech industry is a controversial provision called Section 702, which became law in 2008, and was renewed for five years in 2012. It will expire on December 31, 2017, unless it is reauthorized. SEE: Video: FBI CISO on aftermath of Wikileaks, Snowden, 2016 election Section 702 authorizes US intelligence authorities to target the communications of non-US citizens located outside of the country for "foreign intelligence purposes," according to the US House of Representatives Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. This provision gained national attention in 2013 due to the leaks by Edward Snowden, which revealed that the section's internet surveillance program, Prism, gathers messaging data from Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple, and other major tech companies. Another program called Upstream intercepts moving data in the US. "A key anti-terror tool that has helped to thwart numerous terror plots including the 2009 conspiracy to bomb the New York City subway, Section 702 operations are subject to multiple layers of oversight by all three branches of government," according to the intelligence committee's website. On Wednesday, the US House of Representatives' Judiciary Committee met to discuss the law. After the Snowden leaks, the Pew Research Center conducted a study on Americans' views on privacy issues. Pew found that 52% of Americans described themselves as "very concerned" or "somewhat concerned" about government surveillance of Americans' data and electronic communications. Meanwhile, 46% of Americans said they were "not very concerned" or "not at all concerned" about this. Pew noted that those who followed the news about the Snowden leaks were more anxious about privacy policy and their own privacy than those who did not. Pew also surveyed technology experts, who predicted that few individuals will have the energy or resources to protect themselves from "dataveillance" in the coming years. The experts also said they foresee increasing security issues due to the rise of Internet of Things (IoT) devices in consumers' homes. This makes it even more important for tech companies that develop these devices to ensure that they have robust security protections in place. The US is not the only nation concerned with national security. In November 2016, the UK passed the Investigatory Powers Bill, known by critics as the "snoopers charter," which forces communications providers to store customer website history, calls, and texts for one year to be used in police investigations. It also gives the UK government the ability to hack into user devices for an investigation, TechRepublic reported. 1. The Trump administration plans to fully reauthorize the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), according to a Reuters report, in order to bolster national security efforts. 2. The provision Section 702, which allows intelligence authorities to target the communications of non-US citizens located outside of the country for foreign intelligence purposes, will expire on December 31, 2017, unless it is reauthorized. 3. The law has gained criticism from Congress and privacy advocates, who say that it collects data on American citizens and violates their privacy.


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

A couple of summers ago, I strolled through Glen Feshie, wondering why this beautiful corner of the Cairngorms didn’t feel British. Ah, that’s it: little Scots pines poked through the heather alongside baby willows, dog rose, black grouse and other burgeoning signs of life. I grew up enjoying the bare majesty of the Lake District. Our treeless uplands are, to me and most other people, completely normal. In times of bewildering change, in everything from politics to the climate, we cling to normality. This must be why Mountaineering Scotland has allied with its normal foe, the Scottish Gamekeepers Association, to criticise the Scottish government’s plan to increase the country’s forest cover from 17% to 25% by 2050. The gamekeepers fear losing their normal business of deer stalking and grouse shooting. The mountaineers fret that tourists enjoy Scotland’s normal landscape and not “miles-long wanders through woods”, as Neil Reid from Mountaineering Scotland put it. Following an outcry from members about this apparent opposition to trees, Mountaineering Scotland has acknowledged that allowing native forests to return is a positive move. Trees aren’t intrinsically good. Covering another 8% of Scotland with lifeless industrial blocks of non-native plantations won’t meet government goals of enhanced landscapes, richer wildlife or more jobs. Modern mechanised forestry is not a big employer. Arguments about relative tree cover – Norway, the most comparable northern European country, has 33% tree cover; Finland 73% – aren’t totally convincing, as there’s something to be said for abnormality. Perhaps the treeless, denuded Scottish landscape is a unique selling point. But people fearing the extinction of normality should go for a walk through Glen Feshie (rewilded by the Danish clothing billionaire Anders Holch Povlsen, who owns more than 200,000 acres of Scotland – more than the Queen) or visit Trees for Life, recreating native Caledonian forest in the Highlands. These are landscapes bursting with life. The mountaineers will still have their views (magnificent peaks tower above any natural tree line), and hunters will have more wildlife to kill, if they really must (Finland’s forests support 300,000 hunters; Norway shoots more grouse than Scotland). This new normal will be better for everyone. It’s probably not the first question on everyone’s lips, but how will the Trump presidency treat animals? His first test comes now because the US House of Representatives has overturned a federal ban on the barbaric shooting of hibernating bears and wolf families with pups. Most shockingly, members voted to lift this ban in Alaskan wildlife reserves. Unlike his trophy-bagging sons, Trump prefers golf to pulling the trigger on bears or wolves, but given his distaste for environmental regulations, and enthusiasm for a wall that threatens 111 species, we can’t really hope he’ll intervene to save the bears. Out of my study window I’ve just seen the slow flight of my first butterfly of the year: a lemon yellow brimstone, meandering along an ivy-filled hedge by an industrial estate. According to Tove Jansson’s Moomintroll, the colour of your first spring butterfly shapes your summer. White betokens a quiet season, and gold will be wonderful; but dark ones, such as the red admiral, are best not spoken of. In the Moomintroll schema, yellow is pretty lovely.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

On 3 February, Florida Congressman Matt Gaetz introduced to the US House of Representatives a bill to terminate the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which standardises and enforces limits on air, land and water pollution. It comes as hundreds of former and some current employees of the agency have urged Congress to reject President Donald Trump’s nominee to run the agency, Oklahoma attorney general Scott Pruitt, who has in the past backed industry interests over that of the regulator, and led many lawsuits against the EPA. Pruitt could be confirmed by the Senate this week, and is expected by some to move forward on Trump’s campaign promise to “get rid of” the agency, though critics expect him to do so in a piecemeal manner by making cuts and weakening the agency’s powers. A major overhaul of the EPA’s website since Trump took over has already seen the removal of federal climate plans created under former president Barack Obama and a mention of carbon pollution as a cause of climate change. The bill to get rid of the agency altogether sounds drastic, but it may be more of an anti-regulation rallying cry than a real harbinger of what’s to come for federal environmental protection under Trump. “Given the overwhelming public support for clean air and water, it seems unlikely members of Congress would do away with the agency,” says Michael Tubman, director of outreach for the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions. “If they did, they’d have to find or create an agency to implement all of the environmental protections Congress has approved over the past 50 years.” Steven Cohen, executive director of The Earth Institute at Columbia University, agrees. “People like to breathe. That’s one of the things we’ve gotten used to in America.” Cohen has served as a policy analyst and consultant to the EPA at various points over the past four decades and says this bill, if approved, would create unnecessary inefficiency as states would have to work out on their own how to deal with water and air pollution that crosses state lines. It’s not as if eliminating the EPA would stop the work it does from happening, either. Environmental disasters on federal land or in waters that affect many states, like the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, could be handled by other agencies like the Department of the Interior or the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Cohen says. “This is a symbolic gesture,” he says. “There’s really deep and general support over protecting the environment. Disagreements are over the means rather than the ends.” Moves to eliminate the agency may be politically ill-advised, Cohen says, given that Republicans control the White House and Congress so they can set the agencies’ agendas. “It doesn’t make sense to give your opponents such a visible symbol,” he says. Those that support the EPA’s environmental protection can use this to rally their own base, Cohen says, while abolishing the agency won’t immediately have the desired effect of reducing regulations that Gaetz has said are burdensome. “I sympathise. I think the EPA has overreached in some areas,” says Jeff Holmstead, former assistant administrator of the EPA for Air and Radiation. “But I think the answer is to fix those problems rather than eliminate the agency.” Holmstead says some states have the capability to handle most environmental regulation on their own, but when it comes to multi-state environmental disasters, federal oversight is appropriate. “It would be very inefficient to try to have all the individual states doing things differently and potentially at cross purposes, so it makes sense to have the EPA step in,” he says. He also thinks the passage of the bill is unlikely, mostly due to widespread public support for the EPA’s mission. It is likely to be more about making a statement than enacting a law, he says. New Scientist did not receive a response to a request for comment from Gaetz’s office. There is no information on how a termination of the EPA would be enacted. Read more: US Congress just made it easier to ditch science for politics


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

ZURICH, SWITZERLAND / ACCESSWIRE / February 22, 2017 / Today, an update on the rare earths market and Commerce Resources Corp. (TSX-V: CCE) has been published. According to John Moody from FoxNews, Republican member of the US House of Representatives, Duncan Hunter, plans to introduce legislation this month to require the US military to obtain rare earth elements ("REEs") that are produced in the US, even if it means subsidizing those industries. More specifically, he said: "This is of critical importance to our national security and ability to stay ahead of everyone else. Rare earth metals are crucial. We've closed down mines in my own state of California, which is the leading edge of stupid. We need to have our own rare earths. The big sticking part of the bill is this. You have to put money in to subsidize our own product to create a market, because now there’s no market. We’ve got to put American manufacturing back in competition." However, as Moody asserts correctly: "The problem is that US production capacity in this area has been allowed to wither to almost nothing, due to plentiful supplies from China that can be produced at a lower price than US made rare earths." Commerce Resources Corp.'s Ashram Rare Earth Project in Québec is firmly in the mainstream of the majority of REE producing mines in the world in that it is a carbonatite hosted project with monazite and bastnaesite as the dominant REE bearing minerals. The importance of this must be stressed in that Commerce is not looking for, nor does it need to find, a new processing technique to concentrate the REEs contained in its Ashram Deposit. The full report can be accessed with the following links: ZURICH, SWITZERLAND / ACCESSWIRE / February 22, 2017 / Today, an update on the rare earths market and Commerce Resources Corp. (TSX-V: CCE) has been published. According to John Moody from FoxNews, Republican member of the US House of Representatives, Duncan Hunter, plans to introduce legislation this month to require the US military to obtain rare earth elements ("REEs") that are produced in the US, even if it means subsidizing those industries. More specifically, he said: "This is of critical importance to our national security and ability to stay ahead of everyone else. Rare earth metals are crucial. We've closed down mines in my own state of California, which is the leading edge of stupid. We need to have our own rare earths. The big sticking part of the bill is this. You have to put money in to subsidize our own product to create a market, because now there’s no market. We’ve got to put American manufacturing back in competition." However, as Moody asserts correctly: "The problem is that US production capacity in this area has been allowed to wither to almost nothing, due to plentiful supplies from China that can be produced at a lower price than US made rare earths." Commerce Resources Corp.'s Ashram Rare Earth Project in Québec is firmly in the mainstream of the majority of REE producing mines in the world in that it is a carbonatite hosted project with monazite and bastnaesite as the dominant REE bearing minerals. The importance of this must be stressed in that Commerce is not looking for, nor does it need to find, a new processing technique to concentrate the REEs contained in its Ashram Deposit. The full report can be accessed with the following links:


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.accesswire.com

ZURICH, SWITZERLAND / ACCESSWIRE / February 22, 2017 / Today, an update on the rare earths market and Commerce Resources Corp. (TSX-V: CCE) has been published. According to John Moody from FoxNews, Republican member of the US House of Representatives, Duncan Hunter, plans to introduce legislation this month to require the US military to obtain rare earth elements ("REEs") that are produced in the US, even if it means subsidizing those industries. More specifically, he said: "This is of critical importance to our national security and ability to stay ahead of everyone else. Rare earth metals are crucial. We've closed down mines in my own state of California, which is the leading edge of stupid. We need to have our own rare earths. The big sticking part of the bill is this. You have to put money in to subsidize our own product to create a market, because now there’s no market. We’ve got to put American manufacturing back in competition." However, as Moody asserts correctly: "The problem is that US production capacity in this area has been allowed to wither to almost nothing, due to plentiful supplies from China that can be produced at a lower price than US made rare earths." Commerce Resources Corp.'s Ashram Rare Earth Project in Québec is firmly in the mainstream of the majority of REE producing mines in the world in that it is a carbonatite hosted project with monazite and bastnaesite as the dominant REE bearing minerals. The importance of this must be stressed in that Commerce is not looking for, nor does it need to find, a new processing technique to concentrate the REEs contained in its Ashram Deposit. The full report can be accessed with the following links:


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

While the parapsychology explored in Netflix's "Stranger Things" may not be realistic, the popular TV series has inspired a politician to speak out against President Donald Trump and his most recent actions. Representative David Cicilline (D-RI) delivered a speech on the floor of the US House of Representatives that compared the White House to the fictional alternate dimension from the Netflix series. In the CSPAN video posted on February 16 to YouTube, Cicilline stood in front of a "Trump Things" poster and challenged the Trump administration's relationship with Russia, the proposed Mexican border wall and the firing of US Attorney General Sally Yates. The speech was peppered with "Stranger Things" references and lasted a little over a minute. "Like the main characters in 'Stranger Things,' we are now stuck in the Upside Down," Cicilline said in his speech. "Right is wrong, up is down, black is white. The White House deceives the American public for weeks about their conduct with Russia, but an Attorney General who follows her conscience is fired. Executive orders are signed to ban Muslims in order to keep us safe, while top national security conversations are held out in the open." "President Trump showers praise on a thug like Vladimir Putin while threatening and bullying our long-standing allies," Cicilline continued. "President Trump signs an executive order to spend 20 billion dollars on a border wall, while Flint, Michigan still goes without clean drinking water." Cicilline went on to refer to "Stranger Things" by saying, "Mornings might be for coffee and contemplation, but Chief Jim Hopper is not coming to rescue us. We have a president unlike we have ever known, and just like Mike, Dustin, Lucas and Eleven we must remain focused on the task at hand, and hold this administration accountable so we can escape from our own version of the Upside Down." The speech has already gone viral on YouTube, with over 28,000 views and counting. Batteries Not Included: The CNET team shares experiences that remind us why tech stuff is Solving for XX: The industry seeks to overcome outdated ideas about "women in tech."


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwired - March 2, 2017) - RewardStream Solutions Inc., ("RewardStream" or the "Company"), (TSX VENTURE:REW)(FRANKFURT:JL4L) (WKN Number A2APX1) a world leader in automated referral marketing solutions has announced that experienced public market and technology executive, Juan Vegarra, has joined the RewardStream Board of Directors. Vegarra's career in technology began in the late 1980s in information technology with the US House of Representatives. Vegarra transitioned into a senior technology evangelist role at Microsoft followed by a successful tenure as the Worldwide Director of Channel Programs for Microsoft Solution Provider Partners. In his roles with Microsoft, Vegarra travelled to over 54 countries, and significantly expanded product revenues and reach in the Americas, Africa, India, Middle East and Europe. Since 1999 Vegarra has managed Vegarra Investments LLC, where he has lead investments in internet, software and cloud computing companies, while also serving as an active advisor and Board member. Vegarra was also the founder, CEO and Chairman of the Board of Vena Resources, a TSX listed mining company. During his tenure at Vena Resources, Vegarra raised over $54 million and signed over $15 million in joint venture deals, resulting in a market capitalization of over $160 million. Vegarra has also been an active investor, Board member and advisor to several TSX-Venture listed companies. "We are very pleased to have Juan join our Board of Directors and help guide the company's future direction," said Rob Goehring, Chief Executive Officer of RewardStream. "Juan has a unique combination of skills and experiences that make him an ideal Board member for RewardStream. With his passion for software companies, experience in scaling sales channels and a strong public market background, we look forward to working with Juan on the next stage of the company's growth." "I am excited to join the RewardStream Board of Directors at this important time in the company's lifecycle," stated Vegarra. "I believe in the Company, management team and long term vision, and believe that my skills and experience can positively contribute to accelerating the growth of the business." Vegarra is currently the CEO and a member of the Board of Directors of VuSay Technologies, a leader in socially enhanced online video services. Vegarra also acts as a mentor and advisor to MBA students at the Foster School of Business at the University of Washington. In addition, the Company is also announcing the resignation of Norman Brewster P.Geo from the Company's Board of Directors. The Board would like to thank Mr. Brewster for his contributions to the Company and his ongoing support. RewardStream specializes in the execution of automated referral marketing programs that help brands to acquire, engage, and retain their most valuable stakeholders - customers. By utilizing an innovative blend of marketing insight and proprietary technology, RewardStream turns an existing customer base into a powerful new sales channel for all of our clients. RewardStream delivers a scalable, real-time technology platform as the foundation of our client's referral program. The platform provides customer acquisition programs that deliver new, highly loyal customers at very low cost per acquisition rates. Our award-winning marketing solutions have powered loyalty and referral marketing programs across 39 countries for brands including Boost Mobile, Virgin Mobile, Envision Financial, Koodo Mobile and more. For more information please visit www.rewardstream.com. This news release contains forward-looking information, which involves known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual events to differ materially from current expectation. Important factors - including the availability of funds and the results of financing efforts - that could cause actual results to differ materially from the Company's expectations are disclosed in the Company's documents filed from time to time on SEDAR (see www.sedar.com). Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this press release. The Company disclaims any intention or obligation, except to the extent required by law, to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


Stark P.,US House of Representatives
The American journal of managed care | Year: 2010

The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, which was enacted as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, calls for an unprecedented federal investment in health information technology (IT). Incentive payments will be made available through the Medicare programs and Medicaid to doctors and hospitals that use health IT in a meaningful way (ie, to advance delivery of high-quality healthcare). These IT systems have to be certified as meeting certain technological standards. The Congressional Budget Office has projected that HITECH will reduce federal and private sector spending on health services during the next decade by tens of billions of dollars by increasing efficiency.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.ogj.com

The US House of Representatives approved legislation under the Congressional Review Act that would nullify a Securities and Exchange requirement for US oil and gas and other extractive industries to disclose payments to foreign governments.

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