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Adame-Garcia J.,Ursulo Galvan Institute of Technology | Adame-Garcia J.,University of Veracruz | Rodriguez-Guerra R.,Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares | Iglesias-Andreu L.G.,University of Veracruz | And 2 more authors.
Botanical Sciences | Year: 2015

Although vanilla originated from Mexico and an important pathogen for this plant is Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vanilla, studies concerning their association are limited. Previous reports on agents that cause root and stem rot in vanilla clearly indicate that Fusarium species are associated with this disease. During 2009 and 2010 in Papantla, which is the greatest vanilla-producing region of Mexico, the fungus was isolated from vanilla roots and stems that showed symptoms of the disease. From 189 isolates of Fusarium, 11 morphologically different colonies were selected to verify the species of each colony by microscopic observation of their morphological characteristics when cultivated on SNA and PDA media and by amplifying and sequencing their ITS regions. The detected species corresponded to F. proliferatum, Fusarium sp., F. oxysporum f. sp. vanillae (which was the most numerous and most pathogenic to vanilla stems and leaves), an undetermined species of Fusarium, and F. proliferatum, which showed no evidence of producing disease symptoms.


Perez-Lopez E.,University of Veracruz | Olivier C.Y.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Luna-Rodriguez M.,University of Veracruz | Adame-Garcia J.,Ursulo Galvan Institute of Technology | And 2 more authors.
Tropical Plant Pathology | Year: 2016

Catharantus roseus, known as periwinkle, is highly susceptible to phytoplasma infection. Periwinkle plants showing proliferation symptoms were detected during 2013–2014 in four geographically distant states in Mexico. The presence of phytoplasmas was confirmed through the amplification of 16S F2nR2 and cpn60 UT sequences from symptomatic plants. Sequencing, phylogenetic analysis and in vitro RFLP revealed that the isolates were ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris’-related strains and members of the 16SrI-B subgroup, confirming the association of this phytoplasma group with periwinkle proliferation disease in Mexico. We also demonstrated that the use of the approximately 550 pb cpn60 universal target sequences allow the differentiation of two 16SrI-B strains, designated here as MePP-Centre, and MePP-South. © 2016, Sociedade Brasileira de Fitopatologia.


Adame-Garcia J.,Ursulo Galvan Institute of Technology | Adame-Garcia J.,University of Veracruz | Luna-Rodriguez M.,University of Veracruz | Iglesias-Andreu L.G.,University of Veracruz
International Journal of Agriculture and Biology | Year: 2016

Pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum strongly affect the health of various agricultural crops like vanilla. However, despite significant economic losses caused by this pathogen there is no efficient method for its control. Therefore, we propose using rhizobacteria obtained from vanilla roots against F. oxysporum f. sp. vanillae. The results showed that there was no positive correlation between the antagonism expressed under in vitro conditions and those expressed under greenhouse conditions. The 16S rDNA gene analysis indicated that the bacterial genera tested corresponded to Sphingobacterium, Staphylococcus, Serratia, Psychrobacter, Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas. The in vitro antifungal activity was evaluated using three culture media (Potato Dextrose Agar, Nutrient Agar and Czapek) using the empty box technique (antagonism). Isolates of Staphylococcus xylosus BAC-JAG15, Serratia sp. BAC-JAG4 and Stenotrophomonas sp. BAC-JAG1 showed 90% in vitro antagonism against F. oxysporum in the three media tested. In the greenhouse evaluation, plants treated with these isolates initially showed symptoms of chlorosis without developing characteristic symptoms of disease produced by F. oxysporum f. sp. vanillae. This demonstrates protection provided by rhizobacteria against infection from F. oxysporum f. sp. vanillae in vanilla plants. © 2016 Friends Science Publishers.


del Angel-Perez A.L.,Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares | Adame-Garcia J.,Ursulo Galvan Institute of Technology | Villagomez-del Angel T.E.,University of Veracruz
Revista de la Facultad de Agronomia | Year: 2014

Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.) is a non-traditional fruit that offers an opportunity to diversify the Mexican fruit sector. The purpose of this study was to compare six clones of rambutan by determining the physicochemical traits of their fruits (total soluble solid content or TSS, titrable acidity, pulp yield, fruit biomass, fruit length, fruit diameter, spinterns or “soft thorns” length, fruit shape, rind biomass, aryl (edible portion) biomass, seed biomass, rind thickness and number of spinterns), and sensorial perceptions through a panel of experts in order to identify clones exhibiting the highest potential to promote its cultivation. Physicochemical traits were compared by analyses of variance and Tukey test (P≤0.05). Clone 15 performed statistically better than others in nine of the 12 measured variables, showing the best quality standards for the fresh market. Sensory variables were compared by Kruskal- Wallis test (P≤0.01), and showed agreement with most of the physicochemical traits. It is concluded that integrating both types of analysis should be considered as a basis for undertaking any commercial crop. © 2014 Universidad del Zulia. All rights reserved.


Perez-Lopez E.,University of Veracruz | Olivier C.Y.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Luna-Rodriguez M.,University of Veracruz | Rodriguez Y.,Puebla Institute of Technology | And 5 more authors.
European Journal of Plant Pathology | Year: 2016

In the 2013–2014 growing season, field surveys were conducted in native corn fields located in high altitude agricultural communities in the ‘Sierra Norte de Puebla’ in Mexico. Symptoms typical of maize bushy stunt (MBS) disease were observed and DNA extracted from symptomatic native corn plants was used as template to confirm the presence of phytoplasmas. Amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA-encoding sequences and chaperonin 60 universal target (cpn60 UT) sequences followed by in vitro restriction fragment length polymorphism and phylogenetic analyses revealed that the phytoplasma detected belongs to the subgroup 16SrI-B, ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris’. Based on 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequence analysis and on a single nucleotide polymorphism within the cpn60 UT sequence, two MBS strains, MBS-Puebla and MBS-Veracruz, were identified. This is the first detection of MBS phytoplasma (MBSP) affecting native corn and the first molecular survey made in corn fields in Mexico to detect and characterize MBSP. We discuss these results in light of the potential evolutionary relationship between corn and MBSP. © 2016 The Author(s)


Manriquez-Mendoza L.Y.,Colegio de Mexico | Lopez-Ortiz S.,Colegio de Mexico | Perez-Hernandez P.,Colegio de Mexico | Ortega- Jimenez E.,Colegio de Mexico | And 2 more authors.
Tropical and Subtropical Agroecosystems | Year: 2011

Native trees are an important source of forage for livestock, particularly in regions having prolonged dry periods. Some tree species have fast growth rates, good nutritional quality, and the ability to produce forage during dry periods when the need for forage is greater. Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. is a tree native to tropical America that has a high forage potential. This species is mentioned in a number of studies assessing the forage potential of trees in a diverse array of environments and vegetation communities, but little is known about its agronomic management and there is a lack of published information on adequate management and cultivation of this species as a forage tree. There is enough information on the nutritional value of the species, but supplementation with this forage and resulting animal responses have not been extensively studied. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the available literature for information on the presence, management, and forage quality of G. ulmifolia in production systems with domestic ruminants.


Murillo F.D.,Colegio de Mexico | Murillo F.D.,Ursulo Galvan Institute of Technology | Liedo P.,Colegio de Mexico | Nieto-Lopez M.G.,Colegio de Mexico | And 3 more authors.
Arthropod Structure and Development | Year: 2016

The morphology of the first instars of the Opiinae braconids Diachasmimorpha longicaudata, Doryctobracon areolatus, Doryctobracon crawfordi, Utetes anastrephae and Opius hirtus (the first is exotic, and the others are natives to Mexico), parasitoids of Anastrepha fruit flies, are described and compared. The possible implications on interspecific competition among these species are discussed. The most significant adaptations found were: (1) the mouth apparatus, where the large mandibles and fang-shaped maxillary lobes present in D. longicaudata and U. anastrephae larvae were absent in O. hirtus, D. areolatus and D. crawfordi larvae, and (2) the degree of mobility for exploration and escape, such as the lateral and caudal appendages that were only present in D. longicaudata (ventrolateral appendages in the base of the head capsule), U. anastrephae (caudal lobe with two appendages) and D. areolatus (caudal lobe with a round apex with a globular shape). The first instar larvae of the species D. longicaudata show morphological adaptations that apparently confer competitive advantages against the larvae of D. areolatus, D. crawfordi and O. hirtus. However, the first instar larvae of U. anastrephae show larger mandibles, an adaptation that could enable this species to resist competition from D. longicaudata. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Colegio de Mexico, Ursulo Galvan Institute of Technology and Programa Moscafrut
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Arthropod structure & development | Year: 2016

The morphology of the first instars of the Opiinae braconids Diachasmimorpha longicaudata, Doryctobracon areolatus, Doryctobracon crawfordi, Utetes anastrephae and Opius hirtus (the first is exotic, and the others are natives to Mexico), parasitoids of Anastrepha fruit flies, are described and compared. The possible implications on interspecific competition among these species are discussed. The most significant adaptations found were: (1) the mouth apparatus, where the large mandibles and fang-shaped maxillary lobes present in D.longicaudata and U.anastrephae larvae were absent in O.hirtus, D.areolatus and D.crawfordi larvae, and (2) the degree of mobility for exploration and escape, such as the lateral and caudal appendages that were only present in D.longicaudata (ventrolateral appendages in the base of the head capsule), U.anastrephae (caudal lobe with two appendages) and D.areolatus (caudal lobe with a round apex with a globular shape). The first instar larvae of the species D.longicaudata show morphological adaptations that apparently confer competitive advantages against the larvae of D.areolatus, D.crawfordi and O.hirtus. However, the first instar larvae of U.anastrephae show larger mandibles, an adaptation that could enable this species to resist competition from D.longicaudata.


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Ursulo Galvan Institute of Technology | Entity website

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Ursulo Galvan Institute of Technology | Entity website

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