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News Article | August 7, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

MADRID & LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Xella International GmbH, a leading European building materials provider, announced the acquisition of URSA from its shareholders, including funds managed by KKR as majority owners. Financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed. Headquartered in Madrid and with turnover of around €450m, URSA is one of the major insulation providers in Europe, focused on mineral wool and extruded polystyrene (XPS) as solutions for insulating residential and non-residential buildings, both new and those being renovated. The Xella Group develops, manufactures and markets building materials, dry lining panels and lime and limestone products. URSA will complement Xella’s portfolio as a separate business unit. KKR Credit has been a major shareholder in URSA since 2015 and has supported the business in driving sustainable growth in the face of challenging market conditions. Following a sharp decline in the Russian market, KKR strengthened URSA's management team and reorganised and streamlined operations. This allowed the business to pursue growth initiatives, including capacity extensions in various manufacturing sites, and thanks to the operational improvements, significantly increased profitability. Mark Brown, Co-Head of Special Situations in Europe at KKR Credit, said: "The combination of KKR's long-term capital and an outstanding management team was instrumental in URSA's strong performance over the past years. We would like to thank all of URSA's employees for their tremendous work in delivering this excellent result, and wish them well as part of the Xella Group." Alejo Vidal-Quadras, Head of Madrid office at KKR, said: "This transaction continues KKR's strong track record of supporting leading Spanish businesses to develop and grow their operations, even in challenging market conditions. We are convinced that the business will continue to flourish and grow as a key part of Xella's broader portfolio." Pepyn Dinandt, CEO of URSA, said: "KKR's financial support and operational expertise has proven invaluable in the face of challenging market conditions over the last years. We have built a stronger, more stable business that, together with Xella, is perfectly positioned for continued profitable growth." The transaction is expected to close by the end of 2017. The investment in URSA comes from funds managed or advised by KKR Credit. KKR Credit was advised by Lazard & Co., Limited on the transaction. KKR is a leading global investment firm that manages multiple alternative asset classes, including private equity, energy, infrastructure, real estate, credit and, through its strategic partners, hedge funds. KKR aims to generate attractive investment returns by following a patient and disciplined investment approach, employing world-class people, and driving growth and value creation with KKR portfolio companies. KKR invests its own capital alongside its partners' capital and provides financing solutions and investment opportunities through its capital markets business. References to KKR’s investments may include the activities of its sponsored funds. For additional information about KKR & Co. L.P. (NYSE: KKR), please visit KKR's website at www.kkr.com and on Twitter @KKR_Co. URSA is a leading European insulation provider with the headquarters in Madrid. With approximately 450 Million Euros turnover, URSA is one of the major insulation players in Europe, focused on mineral wool and extruded polystyrene (XPS) as solutions for insulating residential and non-residential buildings, both new and being renovated. With 13 production sites in 9 countries and a commercial presence in around 40 markets in Europe, Middle East and Northern Africa. URSA employs around 1,800 people in countries such as Germany, France, Russia, Poland, Slovenia, Austria, Czech Republic, Italy, Spain, Belgium, UK, etc.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: cerncourier.com

Completion of the preliminary design phase for the High-Luminosity LHC last year paves the way for civil-engineering work to begin. Le HL-LHC sera composé de plusieurs technologies et aimants innovants, et ces nouveaux éléments de l’accélérateur auront besoin de services supplémentaires tels que transmission de courant, distribution électrique, refroidissement, ventilation et cryogénie. Afin d’héberger les nouvelles infrastructures et les nouveaux éléments, des structures de génie civil, notamment des bâtiments, des puits, des cavernes et des galeries souterraines sont nécessaires. L’achèvement, l’année passée, de la phase de conception préliminaire du HL-LHC a permis le commencement des travaux de génie civil, et des contrats avec des entreprises externes vont à présent être conclus. The High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project at CERN is a major upgrade that will extend the LHC’s discovery potential significantly. Approved in June 2014 and due to enter operation in the mid-2020s, the HL-LHC will increase the LHC’s integrated luminosity by a factor 10 beyond its original design value. The complex upgrade, which must be implemented with minimal disruption to LHC operations, demands careful study and will take a decade to achieve. The HL-LHC relies on several innovative and challenging technologies, in particular: new superconducting dipole magnets with a field of 11 T; highly compact and ultra-precise superconducting “crab” cavities to rotate the beams at the collision points and thus compensate for the larger beam crossing angle; beam-separation and recombination superconducting dipole magnets; beam-focusing superconducting quadrupole magnets; and 80 m-long high-power superconducting links with zero energy dissipation. These new LHC accelerator components will be mostly integrated at Point 1 and Point 5 of the ring where the two general-purpose detectors ATLAS and CMS are located (see diagram). The new infrastructure and services consist mainly of power transmission, electrical distribution, cooling, ventilation, cryogenics, power converters for superconducting magnets and inductive output tubes for superconducting RF cavities. To house these large elements, civil-engineering structures including buildings, shafts, caverns and underground galleries are required. The definition of the civil engineering for the HL-LHC began in 2015. Last year, the completion of a concept study allowed CERN to issue a call for tender for two civil-engineering consultant contracts, which were adjudicated in June 2016. These consultants are in charge of the preliminary, tender and construction design phases of the civil-engineering work, in addition to managing the construction and defect-liability phase. At Point 1, which is located in Switzerland just across from the main CERN entrance, the consultant contract involves a consortium of three companies: SETEC TPI (France), which is the consortium leader, together with CSD Engineers (Switzerland) and Rocksoil (Italy). A similar consortium has been appointed at Point 5, in France. Here, the consultant contract is shared between consortium-leader Lombardi (Switzerland), Artelia (France) and Pini Swiss (Switzerland). In November 2016, the two consultant consortia completed the preliminary design phase including cost and construction-schedule estimates for the civil-engineering work. In parallel with the preliminary design, and with the help of external architects, CERN has submitted building-permit applications to the Swiss and French authorities with a view to start construction work by mid-2018. CERN has also performed geotechnical investigations to better understand the underground conditions (which consist of glacial moraines overlying a local type of soft rock called molasse), and has placed a contract with independent engineers ARUP (UK) and Geoconsult (Austria). These companies will confirm that the consultant designs have been performed with the appropriate skill, care and diligence in accordance with applicable standards. In addition, a panel comprising lawyers, architects and civil engineers is in place to resolve any disputes between parties. At ground level, the HL-LHC civil engineering consists of five buildings at each of the two LHC points, technical galleries, access roads, concrete slabs and landscaping. At each point, the total surface corresponds to about 20,000 m2 including 3300 m2 of buildings. A cluster of three buildings is located at the head of the shaft and will house the helium-refrigerator cold box (SD building, see images above), water-cooling and ventilation units (SU building) and also the main electrical distribution for high and low voltage (SE building). Completing the inventory at each point are two stand-alone buildings that will house the primary water-cooling towers (SF building) and the warm compressor station of the helium refrigerator (SHM building). Buildings housing noisy equipment (SU, SF, SHM) will be constructed with noise-insulating concrete walls and roofs. In terms of underground structures, the civil-engineering work consists of a shaft, a service cavern, galleries and vertical cores (see image above left). The total volume to be excavated is around 50,000 m3 per point. The PM shaft (measuring 9.7 m in diameter and 70–80 m deep) will house a secured access lift and staircase as well as the associated services. The service cavern (US/UW, measuring 16 m in diameter and 45 m long) will house cooling and ventilation units, a cryogenic box, an electrical safe room and electrical transformers. The UR gallery (5.8 m diameter, 300 m long) will house the power converters and electrical feed boxes for the superconducting magnets as well as cryogenic and service distribution. Two transverse UA galleries (6.2 m diameter, 50 m long) will house the RF equipment for the powering and controls of the superconducting crab cavities. At the end of the UA galleries, evacuation galleries (UPR) are required for personnel emergency exits. Two transversal UL galleries (3 m diameter, 40 m long) will house the superconducting links to power the magnets and cryogenic distribution system. Finally, the HL-LHC underground galleries are connected to the LHC tunnel via 16 vertical cores measuring 1 m in diameter and approximately 7 m long. The next important milestone will be the adjudication in March 2018 of the two contracts (one per point) for the civil-engineering construction work. In December 2016, CERN launched a market survey for the construction tender, which will be followed by invitations to tender to qualified firms by June 2017. The main excavation work, which may generate harmful vibrations for the LHC accelerator performance, must be performed during the second long shutdown of the LHC accelerator scheduled for 2019–2020. Handover of the final building is scheduled by the end of 2022, while the vertical cores connecting the HL-LHC galleries to the LHC tunnel will be constructed at the start of the third LHC long shutdown beginning in 2024. Realising the HL-LHC is a major challenge that involves more than 25 institutes from 12 countries, and in addition to civil-engineering work it demands several cutting-edge magnet and other accelerator technologies. The project is the highest priority in the European Strategy for Particle Physics, and will ensure a rich physics programme at the high-energy frontier into the 2030s.


Dublin, Feb. 27, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "5G Planning, Strategy, and Market for Next Generation Apps and Services" report to their offering. The fifth generation (5G) of cellular networks is poised to transform communications, applications, digital content and commerce. What was once slow or perhaps bearable in terms of end-user Quality of Experience (QoE) will be lightning fast with 5G. Leading applications that will realize the benefits of ultra-low latency include industrial automation, robotics, and virtual reality. These apps and services are considered next generation as they will embody a completely different QoE for end-users, leading to new feature/functionality and monetization through enhanced capabilities such as Haptic Internet. However, 5G will not be commercially available until 2020, and will take even longer to make a substantive commercial impact. Along will happen along the road to 5G will be based largely on ongoing efforts to optimize 4G apps and services via evolution of the LTE standard. A portion of these efforts are standards-driven while some of them are based on innovative proprietary efforts of leading infrastructure vendors. Meanwhile, supporting technologies such as MIMO, Digital Signal Processing, Cognitive Radio, and Self Organizing Networks continue to improve, further extending the lifecycle of LTE and paving the way for optimized 5G networks. This report investigates the evolution of wireless networks towards 5G including architecture, network strategy, planning, and standardization. The report evaluates R&D efforts from major infrastructure providers including the so called fractional versions of 4G such as 4.5G, 4.5G Pro, and 4.9G. The report also analyzes related supporting technologies such as Mobile Edge Computing (MEC). The report includes detailed forecasts for leading 5G apps and services including industrial automation, robotics, and virtual reality. Key Topics Covered: 1 Introduction 1.1 5G Technologies 1.2 Mobile Spectrum Evolution 1.2.1 1G - 2G - 3G - 4G 1.2.2 4G - 4.5G - 4.5G Pro - 4.9G - 5G 1.3 5G Spectrum Options and Utilization via Low Bands, Mid Bands, and High Bands 1.4 5G Ecosystem Architecture and Planning 1.5 5G Ecosystem Planning: Societal vs. Technology Considerations 2 5G Network Planning, Implementation, and Applications 2.1 5G Network Planning and Strategic Considerations 2.1.1 LTE Foundation, Device Ecosystem, LAA, and 5G Readiness 2.1.2 Spectrum Sharing and Utilization 2.1.3 Narrowband 5G for Massive IoT 2.1.4 Multi Connectivity Architecture with Small Cell Deployment 2.1.5 Relevance of Mobile IoT Technology: NB-IoT & eMTC 2.1.6 OSS/BSS Architecture for 5G Service Operation 2.1.7 Multi-Antenna and Beamforming Impact 2.1.8 End to End Network Slicing with NFV and SDN 2.1.9 LTE Continuation in 5G Era 2.1.10 Service Design, ROI and 5G Network 2.2 5G Technology Requirements and Network Impact 2.2.1 Network Coverage and Efficiency 2.2.2 Network Spectrum Efficiency 2.2.3 Data Throughput 2.2.4 Connection Density 2.2.5 UR-LLC (Ultra-Reliable Low Latency Communication) 2.2.6 Network Energy Usage 2.2.7 Improved Battery Life 2.2.8 Improved Flexibility in Air Interface and Versatility 2.2.9 Massive MIMO 2.2.10 mmWave Technology 2.2.11 Integration of Access and Backhaul 2.2.12 D2D Communication 2.2.13 Flexible Duplex: FDD and TDD 2.2.14 Multi-Antenna Transmission Scenario 2.2.15 Decoupling User Data from Control System 2.3 5G Technology and Network Architecture 2.3.1 Massive MIMO and Beamforming 2.3.2 Cloud RAN 2.3.3 Broadband Spectrum and Satellite 2.3.4 5G New Radio (NR) 2.3.5 Software Defined Air Interface 2.3.6 Network Function Virtualization (NFV) 2.3.7 Self Organizing Network (SON) and Self Healing Network (SHN) 2.3.8 HetNet and H-CRAN 2.3.9 Large-Scale Cooperative Spatial Signal Processing (LS-CSSP) 2.3.10 Software Defined Radio (SDR) 2.3.11 Visible Light Communications (VLCs) 2.3.12 Cross Layer Controller 2.3.13 Cognitive Radios (CRs) and Transmission Technologies 2.3.14 Scalable OFDM and Subcarrier Spacing 2.4 5G Network Implementation 2.4.1 Base Stations 2.4.2 Small Cells 2.4.3 Macro Cells 2.4.4 Baseband Units and RF Units 2.4.5 Mobile Core 2.4.6 Remote Radio Heads 2.4.7 Front-haul and Backhaul Networks 2.5 Strategic Relevance of 4.5G, 4.5G Pro, and 4.9G 2.5.1 Mobile IoT and M2M Communication 2.5.2 Broadcast Services and Immersive Entertainment 2.5.3 Vehicular Communication 2.5.4 Public Safety Network 1 2.5.5 Smart City Applications 2.5.6 Private Enterprise Network 3 5G Initiatives, R&D, and Field Trials 3.1 5G Strategic Initiatives in Region 3.1.1 Asia 3.1.1.1 China 3.1.1.1.1 IMT-2020 Promotion Group 3.1.1.1.2 China National Key Project on 5G 3.1.1.2 South Korea 3.1.1.3 Japan 3.1.2 Europe 3.1.2.1 European Union Framework Project 7 (FP7) 3.1.2.2 European Union Framework Project 8 (FP8) /Horizon 2020 3.1.2.3 Celtic Plus 3.1.2.4 EIT and Other projects 3.1.3 America 3.2 5G Standardization Initiatives and Development 3.2.1 3GPP 3.2.2 5G Americas 3.2.3 ATIS 3.2.4 GSMA 3.2.5 IEEE 3.2.6 ITU 3.2.7 NGMN 3.2.8 TIA 3.2.9 FCC TAC 3.3 5G Trial by Mobile Operators 3.4 5G Spectrum Aspects 3.4.1 WRC - 15 and 19 3.4.2 FCC 3.4.3 5G Americas 3.4.4 CITEL 3.4.5 ITU 3.4.6 GSMA 3.4.7 GSA 4 Market Outlook and Forecasts for Next Generation 5G Apps 4.1 5G Industrial Automation Global Forecasts 2020 - 2025 4.1.1 IIoT 5G Automation Market Value 4.1.1.1 Market by Segment 4.1.1.1.1 Hardware and Equipment Market by Types of Device 4.1.1.2 Market by Industry Verticals 4.1.1.3 Market by Technology Application 4.1.2 Wireless IIoT 5G Device Deployments 4.1.2.1 Deployment by Device Type 4.1.2.2 Deployment by Industry Vertical 4.2 5G Industrial Automation Regional Forecasts 2020 - 2025 4.2.1 Market Value by Region 4.2.2 Market Value by Leading Countries 4.2.3 Deployment by Region 4.2.4 Deployment by Leading Countries 4.2.5 Europe Market Forecasts 4.2.5.1 Market Value by Segment, Devices, Industry Vertical, and Technology Application 4.2.5.2 Deployment Base by Devices and Industry Vertical 4.2.6 North America Market Forecasts 4.2.6.1 Market Value by Segment, Devices, Industry Vertical and Technology Application 4.2.6.2 Deployment Base by Devices and Industry Vertical 4.2.7 APAC Market Forecasts 4.2.7.1 Market Value by Segment, Devices, Industry Vertical and Technology Application 4.2.7.2 Deployment Base by Devices and Industry Vertical 4.3 5G Robotics Global Market Revenue 4.3.1 Autonomous Robot Market 4.3.2 5G Enabled Autonomous Robot Market 4.3.3 5G Enabled Autonomous Robot Market by Categories 4.4 5G Robotics Regional Forecasts 4.4.1 5G Enabled Autonomous Robot by Region 4.4.2 North America 5G Enabled Autonomous Robot Market by Categories 4.4.3 Europe 5G Enabled Autonomous Robot Market by Categories 4.4.4 APAC 5G Enabled Autonomous Robot Market by Categories 4.5 Global 5G Enabled Virtual Reality Market 4.5.1 Combined Market Revenue 2021 - 2026 4.5.2 Combined Unit Shipment 2021 - 2026 4.5.3 Combined Active User 2021 - 2026 4.6 5G Accelerated VR Uptake Market 4.6.1 Market by Segments 2021 - 2026 4.6.1.1 Hardware Market 4.6.1.1.1 Full Feature Device including Haptic and Eyewear Devices 4.6.1.1.2 Hardware Components including Haptic Sensors and Semiconductor Components 4.6.1.2 Software and Application Market 4.6.1.3 Professional Service Market 2 4.6.2 VR Shipment Units 2021 - 2026 4.6.3 VR Active Users 2021 - 2026 4.6.4 5G VR Market by Region 2021 - 2026 4.6.4.1 North America Market 4.6.4.2 APAC Market 4.6.4.3 Europe Market 4.6.5 5G Consumer VR Application Market 2021 - 2026 4.6.6 Gaming 4.6.6.1 Pokemon Go Market Learning 4.6.7 Live Events 4.6.8 Video Entertainment 4.7 5G VR Enterprise Application Market 2021 - 2026 4.7.1 Retail Sector 4.7.2 Real Estate 4.7.3 Healthcare 4.7.4 Education 4.8 5G VR Industrial Application Market 2021 - 2026 4.8.1 Military 4.8.2 Engineering 4.8.3 Civil Aviation 4.8.4 Medical Industry 4.8.5 Agriculture 4.8.6 Government and Public Sector 5 Conclusions and Recommendations For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/pshksk/5g_planning


Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "5G Planning, Strategy, and Market for Next Generation Apps and Services" report to their offering. The fifth generation (5G) of cellular networks is poised to transform communications, applications, digital content and commerce. What was once slow or perhaps bearable in terms of end-user Quality of Experience (QoE) will be lightning fast with 5G. Leading applications that will realize the benefits of ultra-low latency include industrial automation, robotics, and virtual reality. These apps and services are considered next generation as they will embody a completely different QoE for end-users, leading to new feature/functionality and monetization through enhanced capabilities such as Haptic Internet. However, 5G will not be commercially available until 2020, and will take even longer to make a substantive commercial impact. Along will happen along the road to 5G will be based largely on ongoing efforts to optimize 4G apps and services via evolution of the LTE standard. A portion of these efforts are standards-driven while some of them are based on innovative proprietary efforts of leading infrastructure vendors. Meanwhile, supporting technologies such as MIMO, Digital Signal Processing, Cognitive Radio, and Self Organizing Networks continue to improve, further extending the lifecycle of LTE and paving the way for optimized 5G networks. This report investigates the evolution of wireless networks towards 5G including architecture, network strategy, planning, and standardization. The report evaluates R&D efforts from major infrastructure providers including the so called fractional versions of 4G such as 4.5G, 4.5G Pro, and 4.9G. The report also analyzes related supporting technologies such as Mobile Edge Computing (MEC). The report includes detailed forecasts for leading 5G apps and services including industrial automation, robotics, and virtual reality. Key Topics Covered: 1 Introduction 1.1 5G Technologies 1.2 Mobile Spectrum Evolution 1.2.1 1G - 2G - 3G - 4G 1.2.2 4G - 4.5G - 4.5G Pro - 4.9G - 5G 1.3 5G Spectrum Options and Utilization via Low Bands, Mid Bands, and High Bands 1.4 5G Ecosystem Architecture and Planning 1.5 5G Ecosystem Planning: Societal vs. Technology Considerations 2 5G Network Planning, Implementation, and Applications 2.1 5G Network Planning and Strategic Considerations 2.1.1 LTE Foundation, Device Ecosystem, LAA, and 5G Readiness 2.1.2 Spectrum Sharing and Utilization 2.1.3 Narrowband 5G for Massive IoT 2.1.4 Multi Connectivity Architecture with Small Cell Deployment 2.1.5 Relevance of Mobile IoT Technology: NB-IoT & eMTC 2.1.6 OSS/BSS Architecture for 5G Service Operation 2.1.7 Multi-Antenna and Beamforming Impact 2.1.8 End to End Network Slicing with NFV and SDN 2.1.9 LTE Continuation in 5G Era 2.1.10 Service Design, ROI and 5G Network 2.2 5G Technology Requirements and Network Impact 2.2.1 Network Coverage and Efficiency 2.2.2 Network Spectrum Efficiency 2.2.3 Data Throughput 2.2.4 Connection Density 2.2.5 UR-LLC (Ultra-Reliable Low Latency Communication) 2.2.6 Network Energy Usage 2.2.7 Improved Battery Life 2.2.8 Improved Flexibility in Air Interface and Versatility 2.2.9 Massive MIMO 2.2.10 mmWave Technology 2.2.11 Integration of Access and Backhaul 2.2.12 D2D Communication 2.2.13 Flexible Duplex: FDD and TDD 2.2.14 Multi-Antenna Transmission Scenario 2.2.15 Decoupling User Data from Control System 2.3 5G Technology and Network Architecture 2.3.1 Massive MIMO and Beamforming 2.3.2 Cloud RAN 2.3.3 Broadband Spectrum and Satellite 2.3.4 5G New Radio (NR) 2.3.5 Software Defined Air Interface 2.3.6 Network Function Virtualization (NFV) 2.3.7 Self Organizing Network (SON) and Self Healing Network (SHN) 2.3.8 HetNet and H-CRAN 2.3.9 Large-Scale Cooperative Spatial Signal Processing (LS-CSSP) 2.3.10 Software Defined Radio (SDR) 2.3.11 Visible Light Communications (VLCs) 2.3.12 Cross Layer Controller 2.3.13 Cognitive Radios (CRs) and Transmission Technologies 2.3.14 Scalable OFDM and Subcarrier Spacing 2.4 5G Network Implementation 2.4.1 Base Stations 2.4.2 Small Cells 2.4.3 Macro Cells 2.4.4 Baseband Units and RF Units 2.4.5 Mobile Core 2.4.6 Remote Radio Heads 2.4.7 Front-haul and Backhaul Networks 2.5 Strategic Relevance of 4.5G, 4.5G Pro, and 4.9G 2.5.1 Mobile IoT and M2M Communication 2.5.2 Broadcast Services and Immersive Entertainment 2.5.3 Vehicular Communication 2.5.4 Public Safety Network 1 2.5.5 Smart City Applications 2.5.6 Private Enterprise Network 3 5G Initiatives, R&D, and Field Trials 3.1 5G Strategic Initiatives in Region 3.1.1 Asia 3.1.1.1 China 3.1.1.1.1 IMT-2020 Promotion Group 3.1.1.1.2 China National Key Project on 5G 3.1.1.2 South Korea 3.1.1.3 Japan 3.1.2 Europe 3.1.2.1 European Union Framework Project 7 (FP7) 3.1.2.2 European Union Framework Project 8 (FP8) /Horizon 2020 3.1.2.3 Celtic Plus 3.1.2.4 EIT and Other projects 3.1.3 America 3.2 5G Standardization Initiatives and Development 3.2.1 3GPP 3.2.2 5G Americas 3.2.3 ATIS 3.2.4 GSMA 3.2.5 IEEE 3.2.6 ITU 3.2.7 NGMN 3.2.8 TIA 3.2.9 FCC TAC 3.3 5G Trial by Mobile Operators 3.4 5G Spectrum Aspects 3.4.1 WRC - 15 and 19 3.4.2 FCC 3.4.3 5G Americas 3.4.4 CITEL 3.4.5 ITU 3.4.6 GSMA 3.4.7 GSA 4 Market Outlook and Forecasts for Next Generation 5G Apps 4.1 5G Industrial Automation Global Forecasts 2020 - 2025 4.1.1 IIoT 5G Automation Market Value 4.1.1.1 Market by Segment 4.1.1.1.1 Hardware and Equipment Market by Types of Device 4.1.1.2 Market by Industry Verticals 4.1.1.3 Market by Technology Application 4.1.2 Wireless IIoT 5G Device Deployments 4.1.2.1 Deployment by Device Type 4.1.2.2 Deployment by Industry Vertical 4.2 5G Industrial Automation Regional Forecasts 2020 - 2025 4.2.1 Market Value by Region 4.2.2 Market Value by Leading Countries 4.2.3 Deployment by Region 4.2.4 Deployment by Leading Countries 4.2.5 Europe Market Forecasts 4.2.5.1 Market Value by Segment, Devices, Industry Vertical, and Technology Application 4.2.5.2 Deployment Base by Devices and Industry Vertical 4.2.6 North America Market Forecasts 4.2.6.1 Market Value by Segment, Devices, Industry Vertical and Technology Application 4.2.6.2 Deployment Base by Devices and Industry Vertical 4.2.7 APAC Market Forecasts 4.2.7.1 Market Value by Segment, Devices, Industry Vertical and Technology Application 4.2.7.2 Deployment Base by Devices and Industry Vertical 4.3 5G Robotics Global Market Revenue 4.3.1 Autonomous Robot Market 4.3.2 5G Enabled Autonomous Robot Market 4.3.3 5G Enabled Autonomous Robot Market by Categories 4.4 5G Robotics Regional Forecasts 4.4.1 5G Enabled Autonomous Robot by Region 4.4.2 North America 5G Enabled Autonomous Robot Market by Categories 4.4.3 Europe 5G Enabled Autonomous Robot Market by Categories 4.4.4 APAC 5G Enabled Autonomous Robot Market by Categories 4.5 Global 5G Enabled Virtual Reality Market 4.5.1 Combined Market Revenue 2021 - 2026 4.5.2 Combined Unit Shipment 2021 - 2026 4.5.3 Combined Active User 2021 - 2026 4.6 5G Accelerated VR Uptake Market 4.6.1 Market by Segments 2021 - 2026 4.6.1.1 Hardware Market 4.6.1.1.1 Full Feature Device including Haptic and Eyewear Devices 4.6.1.1.2 Hardware Components including Haptic Sensors and Semiconductor Components 4.6.1.2 Software and Application Market 4.6.1.3 Professional Service Market 2 4.6.2 VR Shipment Units 2021 - 2026 4.6.3 VR Active Users 2021 - 2026 4.6.4 5G VR Market by Region 2021 - 2026 4.6.4.1 North America Market 4.6.4.2 APAC Market 4.6.4.3 Europe Market 4.6.5 5G Consumer VR Application Market 2021 - 2026 4.6.6 Gaming 4.6.6.1 Pokemon Go Market Learning 4.6.7 Live Events 4.6.8 Video Entertainment 4.7 5G VR Enterprise Application Market 2021 - 2026 4.7.1 Retail Sector 4.7.2 Real Estate 4.7.3 Healthcare 4.7.4 Education 4.8 5G VR Industrial Application Market 2021 - 2026 4.8.1 Military 4.8.2 Engineering 4.8.3 Civil Aviation 4.8.4 Medical Industry 4.8.5 Agriculture 4.8.6 Government and Public Sector 5 Conclusions and Recommendations For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/zm766t/5g_planning Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Fitch Ratings has affirmed its 'BBB+' rating on the outstanding $21 million series 2015 Missouri Health and Educational Facilities Authority educational facilities revenue bonds, issued on behalf of Maryville University of Saint Louis (Maryville). The bonds are secured by a mortgage and security interest in Maryville's campus property and its unrestricted receivables (UR). UR includes all unrestricted revenue, tuition and unrestricted gifts and is equivalent to a general obligation of the university. The bonds have a fully funded debt service reserve. STRONG FINANCIAL OPERATIONS: The university continued positive operating margins in fiscal 2016, supported by enrollment growth and expense management. The fiscal 2016 operating margin was solid at 6.7%, and management projects positive results for fiscal 2017. ENROLLMENT AND NET TUITION REVENUE GROWTH: FTE enrollment increased about 9% to 4,151 in fall 2016 (fiscal 2017), continuing a growth trend from new on-line and graduate programs. Undergraduate enrollment - most of which is full-time - also grew. Net tuition revenue has increased in each of the last six fiscal years. ADEQUATE BALANCE SHEET: Maryville's fiscal 2016 balance sheet ratios remain consistent with those of peer private universities rated by Fitch. Available funds were 68% of expenses and 79% of debt. MODERATELY HIGH DEBT BURDEN: The university's maximum annual debt service (MADS) burden is moderately high but manageable, and is moderating over time. Strong operating results and pro forma MADS coverage, as well as limited additional debt plans, are partially mitigating factors. ENROLLMENT SUPPORTS OPERATIONS: The rating assumes stable to modest enrollment increases at Maryville University of St. Louis, MO that support growth in net tuition revenue and positive operating margins. Revenues remain highly dependent on net student revenue, making the university vulnerable to enrollment shifts. BALANCE SHEET STABLE: Significant reduction of Maryville's balance sheet ratios relative to either debt or expenses could lead to a negative rating action. Maryville is a non-profit private university affiliated with the Religious of the Sacred Heart. The institution was established in St. Louis in 1872, moved to suburban St. Louis County in 1961, and converted to university status in 1991. The main campus is located about 22 miles from St. Louis, and the university also leases academic space for evening and non-traditional programs. FTE enrollment in fall 2016 was 4,151, up more than 8% from fall 2015 and up about 60% since fall 2011. Growth has primarily come from the graduate and non-traditional programs, including on-line and professional offerings. Undergraduate enrollment has been fairly stable, with modest growth over time at around 2,400 FTE students. Maryville is historically a commuter institution, with a mix of full-time and part-time students. Over the last nine years, undergraduate enrollment has become more residential. A new dormitory opened in fall 2016, and management reports that 69% of traditional freshmen live on campus. The college of health professions enrolls the largest proportion of students, about 64% of FTE enrollment. Undergraduate and graduate programs include nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech and language pathology, and healthcare practice management. Among its online programs, the college includes various business, accounting, cyber security and advanced practice nursing degrees. Maryville's operations rely heavily on student-generated revenues, typically over 90%, which is similar to other liberal arts colleges. The growing graduate/on-line enrollment component adds both revenue diversity and potential cyclicality. GAAP operating results have been strong in recent years. Operating margins were 6.7% in fiscal 2016, 6.2% in fiscal 2015, and 6.4% in 2014. Similar results are projected for the fiscal year ending May 31, 2017. Net tuition revenue increased in each of the last six years, with another increase projected for fiscal 2017. Revenue growth has been driven largely by graduate and on-line enrollment. Management chose not to increase undergraduate tuition in fiscal 2017 and also simplified its fee structure; recent tuition increases had been in the 2.5%-4.5% range. The university budgets conservatively; budgets include depreciation expense, conservative enrollment assumptions, and various expense contingencies. Maryville has posted sound annual MADS coverage for the last seven years, including 2.5x in fiscal 2016, and 2.0x in fiscal 2015. The university has no additional debt plans at this time, and anticipates funding capital projects from gifts and capital budget allocations. Available funds (AF), defined by Fitch as cash and investments less permanently restricted net assets, remain consistent with the rating category. The university has funded various capital improvements with gifts and internal revenues in recent years, including fiscal 2016, essentially constraining AF ratios. AF was $52 million in fiscal 2016, down from $59 million in 2015. This calculation includes quasi endowment (about $30.5 million), but not restricted endowment (about $16 million). Fiscal 2016 AF was 68% of expenses and 79% of outstanding debt (about $65 million). These ratios are consistent with peer Fitch-rated private colleges and universities. MADS is $5.6 million in 2031 due to a double-maturity; this amount will decrease slightly when the series 2006 refunding becomes effective in calendar 2017. Before the 2031 MADS date, however, annual debt service is closer to $4.4 million. MADS burden represented a moderately high 6.8% of fiscal 2016 operating revenues (moderating from 7.5% in fiscal 2015, and 8.3% in fiscal 2014 due to significant budget growth). Annual debt service of $4.4 million was more moderate at 4.4%. Fitch considers the university's debt burden to be mitigated in part by strong operating margins and debt service coverage. In 2015 the university refunded its fixed-rate series 2006 bonds in a fixed-rate private placement. The pricing is locked in but does not become effective until 2017, at the time of the series 2006 call date. The private placement is on parity with the series 2015 bonds and management confirms there are no additional bond covenants. The series 2015 bonds are on parity with outstanding debt, secured under a Master Trust Indenture. Outstanding debt, including some leases but excluding a forward refunding, is about $65 million. Bond covenants include a 1.lx annual debt service coverage covenant, an additional bonds test of two-year historical net income covering pro forma debt service by 1.2x, and a liquidity covenant of 65%. Additionally, the series 2015 bonds have a debt service reserve. When the forward-refunding of the series 2006 bonds becomes effective in calendar 2017, a liquidity escalation provision required by a bond insurance policy will be eliminated. The escalation would have started in fiscal 2018, building by 5% annually from 65% until 100% is achieved. University bonds are fixed-rate with the exception of a privately placed $13.2 million series 2010 variable-rate bond (about 21% of debt is variable rate). The series 2010 bonds are also issued under the Master Trust Indenture, and have a variable- to fixed rate swap contract through 2022 (no collateral posting is required). The bond's variable index rate is fixed through March 2017, at which time a mandatory index tender is possible. Fitch views Maryville as having sufficient liquidity (AF of $52 million in fiscal 2016) relative to a potential put of about $12.6 million at that time. Additional information is available at www.fitchratings.com U.S. College and University Rating Criteria (pub. 12 May 2014) ALL FITCH CREDIT RATINGS ARE SUBJECT TO CERTAIN LIMITATIONS AND DISCLAIMERS. PLEASE READ THESE LIMITATIONS AND DISCLAIMERS BY FOLLOWING THIS LINK: HTTPS://WWW.FITCHRATINGS.COM/UNDERSTANDINGCREDITRATINGS. IN ADDITION, RATING DEFINITIONS AND THE TERMS OF USE OF SUCH RATINGS ARE AVAILABLE ON THE AGENCY'S PUBLIC WEB SITE AT WWW.FITCHRATINGS.COM. PUBLISHED RATINGS, CRITERIA, AND METHODOLOGIES ARE AVAILABLE FROM THIS SITE AT ALL TIMES. 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ODENSE, Denmark--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Learning how to set up and program a collaborative robot – or cobot – no longer depends on real life access to a robot or a training class. Now everybody with a desire to learn the concepts of cobots can log in to the Universal Robots Academy and get the introduction necessary to master basic programming skills. CTO and founder of Universal Robots, Esben Østergaard, explains that it is unusual in the industry to make robot training curriculum of this kind available for free. “But this is a long-term investment for us. We want to raise the robot literacy and the reason for speeding up the entry of cobots is not only to optimize production here and now,” says Østergaard. “We are facing a looming skills gap in the manufacturing industry that we need to bridge by all means possible. Facilitating knowledge creation and access to our robots is an important step in that direction.” The online training modules are available in English, Spanish, German, French and Chinese, consists of six e-learning modules that make up the basic programming training for UR robots. This includes configuring end-effectors, connecting I/Os, creating basic programs in addition applying safety features to an application. One of the early adopters of the Universal Robots Academy is the Whirlpool Corporation where the online training modules now provide the basic foundation for all UR robot training at the company’s plant in Ohio, USA. Tim Hossler, Controls Engineer at Whirlpool, emphasizes the great convenience of being able to offer this resource to employees in-house: “Now we don’t have to wait and send them out for basic training elsewhere. The modules can be completed at our own pace and we can even pick and choose which modules we offer different personnel depending on skill sets and their level of interaction with the robots,” says Hossler. “I really like the interactive approach, it makes learning very hands-on and transferable to what we would actually be doing here at our plant. I was also pleasantly surprised that the modules were free of charge for anyone to use. It definitely increases the accessibility of the UR robots.” Stefan Stubgaard, Global Product Manager at Universal Robots, says that the academy modules have received positive feedback from users around the world: “This learning resource is now also reaching small and medium-sized manufacturers that up until now regarded robotics as costly and complex, says Stubgaard. “By simply logging into the Academy they experience first-hand how simple the setup can be and they can easily envision what production tasks could be automated with the cobots. We will definitely be adding more modules to complement our basic offering going forward.” About Universal Robots Universal Robots is the result of many years of intensive research at Denmark's successful robot cluster, which is located in Odense, Denmark. The company was co-founded in 2005 by the company’s CTO, Esben Østergaard, who wanted to make robot technology accessible to all by developing small, user-friendly, reasonably priced, flexible industrial robots that are safe to work with and on their own can be used to streamline processes in the industry. The product portfolio includes the collaborative UR3, UR5 and UR10 robotic arms named after their payload in kilos. Since the first UR robot launched in December 2008, the company has experienced considerable growth with the user-friendly robots now sold in more than 50 countries worldwide. At just 195 days, the average payback period for UR robots is the fastest in the industry. The company, a part of Boston-based Teradyne Inc., is headquartered in Odense and has subsidiaries and regional offices in the U.S., Spain, Germany, Singapore, Czech Republic, India, and China. Universal Robots has more than 300 employees worldwide. Learn more at: www.universal-robots.com.


Products from new breeding techniques provide major opportunities for making agriculture more sustainable. This makes them a useful addition to common breeding practice, especially for crops where the desired variety improvements are currently very time-consuming, such as potatoes and apples. These findings are contained in a literature review by Wageningen UR published in the renowned magazine Trends in Plant Science.


The potato is the third food crop and offers a relatively high yield and valuable food per hectare. Global potato cultivation is, however, under threat from the pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Farmers who can afford to do so spray their crops against the pathogen with chemicals up to 15 times a year, which is both expensive and harmful to the environment. Farmers without the means for chemical control lose a large part of their yield in some years as a result of the disease. Published in Potato Research, the scientific publication describes the ten-year DuRPh study performed by Wageningen UR commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs. The goal of the research was to find 'proof of principle' for genetically modifying existing potato varieties solely with genes of potato species in order to develop a durable resistance against phytophthora. These potatoes could substantially reduce the global use of crop protection products and make a major contribution to the production of extra food. To foster the durability of the resistance, Wageningen scientists brought combinations of resistance genes from wild potatoes over to cultivated potatoes, and developed a method for managing the use of various resistances. The scientists mapped scores of resistance genes from wild potatoes of which nearly half were 'cloned' so that they could be transformed to existing potato varieties as single genes or in sets of two or three. After the scientists had determined that they could actually make susceptible potato varieties resistant, these potato plants were then multiplied to provide sufficient potatoes for research on trial fields. The resistant potatoes were studied in the field in various ways. In small 'monitoring plots' they also were used to study which types of phytophthora were present on the land. In larger demonstration fields, visitors from the sector and the general public could see the success of the attempt to make vulnerable potatoes resistant to phytophthora for four consecutive years. The DuRPh research also aimed to make an intrinsic contribution to the discussion about genetic modification in society. To achieve this, the Wageningen research team organised meetings for the potato chain, social organisations and the general public. Visitors were able to see the genetically modified potatoes in the field with their own eyes, and note how well they coped against the phytophthora disease. The scientists also delivered many presentations both in the Netherlands and abroad. Explore further: Save Our Spuds: Scientists find shield for potato blight More information: A. J. Haverkort et al. Durable Late Blight Resistance in Potato Through Dynamic Varieties Obtained by Cisgenesis: Scientific and Societal Advances in the DuRPh Project, Potato Research (2016). DOI: 10.1007/s11540-015-9312-6


Nowhere in the world is the average grain yield as high as in the Netherlands, where it is over ten tonnes per hectare. Research by Wageningen UR shows that the introduction of new varieties has caused yields to increase by approximately 8 to 10 per cent per decade. Converted to a hectare of winter wheat, this represents an increase of 800 to 1,000 kilograms; a huge achievement for breeders of new varieties. Wageningen UR scientist Lubbert van den Brink also underlines the importance of independent variety trials. "We make the genetic progress visible in a reliable way, and help arable farmers select varieties that offer the highest yield and, therefore, the best returns on their soil." Wageningen UR performs these variety trials for breeding companies. New varieties are only added to the Recommended List of Varieties (Aanbevelende Rassenlijst) after reliable tests have determined that they perform better than previous varieties. As annual and field conditions impact variety performance, this takes a trial period of at least three years. Each year in September, at the start of the sowing season, CSAR (the Dutch Recommended List Committee) announces which winter wheat varieties are being recommended after including the field test results from that year. As a result of the partial automation of the data processing, the scientists have figures available within one month of harvesting. In addition to a higher yield, the grain sector is constantly looking for varieties with better disease resistance to ensure that the yield is more secure and the use of crop protection products can be minimised. For winter wheat this involves diseases such as yellow rust, mildew, brown rust, leafspot and fusarium in the ear. By selecting varieties with a good disease resistance, breeders therefore minimise costs and benefit the environment due to the reduced use of crop protection products. Including the recommended varieties in the research allows an annual re-evaluation of the susceptibility to the main wheat pathogens. On the long run, it happens that some varieties become more vulnerable because the fungal diseases adapt. A new race of yellow rust appeared in recent years, for instance. Thanks to the variety research, grain breeders can immediately see how existing varieties cope. Different causes for stagnation While Wageningen scientists see a constant increase in the yields on test fields, the annual increase for arable farmers is not as visible. In fact, over the past ten years the yield has barely improved in practice while the potential maximum yield of the new varieties did increase. "Although the exact cause of this stagnation is unknown, it is probably due to changing cultivation conditions," says Van den Brink. "Nowadays, wheat is often sown at a later date and on less favourable fields." Fertilising limitations and decreasing investments in cultivation research may also play a role. "But the crop has been gaining more attention recently. There is a growing group of arable farmers who are dissatisfied with an average yield of ten tonnes per ha and aim to increase it to 15 tonnes. This is theoretically feasible." Explore further: Yields of new varieties of agricultural crops continue to increase


Chicago, IL, February 23, 2017 --( The annual selections are made using a multi-phased process, which includes a statewide survey of lawyers, an independent research evaluation of candidates, and peer reviews by practice area. Only five percent of lawyers in Illinois receive this distinction. Mr. Miller is an accomplished trial attorney who has handled multi-million dollar Construction and Products Liability cases. Additionally, he handles matters involving Retail, Commercial Litigation, Public Entity, Municipality/Governmental Liability, and Workers’ Compensation. His background includes significant experience defending injury claims involving traumatic brain injuries (TBI), wrongful death, burn injuries, cervical and lumbar spine injuries, and catastrophic property damages. Mr. Miller is a published author and contributor in numerous periodicals and bar association publications, including: the Illinois Trial Lawyers Association, Chicago Bar Association’s Young Lawyers Section, Illinois Institute for Continuing Legal Education, UR Chicago, Chicago Tribune Red Eye and the Associated Press. He is also on the Board of Directors of the Hispanic American Construction Industry Association (HACIA), and a member of The Claims and Litigation Management Alliance (CLM), the Chicago Bar Association and the Illinois State Bar Association. Before beginning his legal career, Mr. Miller was the host of “Local 101,” a radio show on Q101. His on-air moniker was “Chris Payne.” He has also served as a Grammy Committee Member for the Chicago Chapter of the Recording Academy. Mr. Miller is licensed to practice law in Illinois’ state and federal courts. He earned his law degree from DePaul University College of Law and his Bachelor of Arts degree from Loyola University Chicago. About Kelley Kronenberg Kelley Kronenberg is a diverse, full-service business law firm that provides litigation and other legal services to established corporations, insurance companies, entrepreneurs and individuals in Florida and other regions of the U.S. More than 115 attorneys strong, the firm offers 25 distinct practice areas throughout its network of ten offices in Florida and Illinois. Founded in 1980, Kelley Kronenberg was built on relationships and continues to grow and excel because of its strength, offering sound legal counsel and exceptional client service. Kelley Kronenberg is ranked in the Top 25 Largest Law Firms in South Florida by the South Florida Business Journal, and has been recognized as a Top Law Firm in Florida by the South Florida Legal Guide and LexisNexis ® Martindale-Hubbell®. More information on practice areas and office locations is available at www.kelleykronenberg.com. Chicago, IL, February 23, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Christopher T. Miller, Managing Partner of Kelley Kronenberg’s Chicago office, was selected to the 2017 Illinois Super Lawyers list. Super Lawyers® is a prestigious rating service that recognizes outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained peer recognition and professional achievement. From 2010 to 2012, Mr. Miller was included on Super Lawyer’s list of Illinois Rising Stars. He has been named to the Illinois Super Lawyers list every year since 2014, and was selected for inclusion on the Top 100: 2016 Illinois Super Lawyers list.The annual selections are made using a multi-phased process, which includes a statewide survey of lawyers, an independent research evaluation of candidates, and peer reviews by practice area. Only five percent of lawyers in Illinois receive this distinction.Mr. Miller is an accomplished trial attorney who has handled multi-million dollar Construction and Products Liability cases. Additionally, he handles matters involving Retail, Commercial Litigation, Public Entity, Municipality/Governmental Liability, and Workers’ Compensation. His background includes significant experience defending injury claims involving traumatic brain injuries (TBI), wrongful death, burn injuries, cervical and lumbar spine injuries, and catastrophic property damages.Mr. Miller is a published author and contributor in numerous periodicals and bar association publications, including: the Illinois Trial Lawyers Association, Chicago Bar Association’s Young Lawyers Section, Illinois Institute for Continuing Legal Education, UR Chicago, Chicago Tribune Red Eye and the Associated Press. He is also on the Board of Directors of the Hispanic American Construction Industry Association (HACIA), and a member of The Claims and Litigation Management Alliance (CLM), the Chicago Bar Association and the Illinois State Bar Association.Before beginning his legal career, Mr. Miller was the host of “Local 101,” a radio show on Q101. His on-air moniker was “Chris Payne.” He has also served as a Grammy Committee Member for the Chicago Chapter of the Recording Academy.Mr. Miller is licensed to practice law in Illinois’ state and federal courts. He earned his law degree from DePaul University College of Law and his Bachelor of Arts degree from Loyola University Chicago.About Kelley KronenbergKelley Kronenberg is a diverse, full-service business law firm that provides litigation and other legal services to established corporations, insurance companies, entrepreneurs and individuals in Florida and other regions of the U.S. More than 115 attorneys strong, the firm offers 25 distinct practice areas throughout its network of ten offices in Florida and Illinois. Founded in 1980, Kelley Kronenberg was built on relationships and continues to grow and excel because of its strength, offering sound legal counsel and exceptional client service. Kelley Kronenberg is ranked in the Top 25 Largest Law Firms in South Florida by the South Florida Business Journal, and has been recognized as a Top Law Firm in Florida by the South Florida Legal Guide and LexisNexis ® Martindale-Hubbell®. More information on practice areas and office locations is available at www.kelleykronenberg.com. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Kelley Kronenberg

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