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News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WASHINGTON (May 25, 2017) -- Disruptions in a protein folding process occurring in the brain, known as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, may cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, independent of other factors. A research team at the George Washington University (GW) published their results in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight. "Nearly 75 percent of obese adults experience non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. However, its underlying causes are unclear," said Colin Young, Ph.D., senior author and assistant professor of pharmacology and physiology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences. "Recent findings have pointed to ER stress as central to its development. What our research shows is that ER stress in the brain is a key contributor." As the primary site of cellular protein folding, the ER plays a critical role in maintaining cellular function. When there is nutritional excess, the protein load exceeds the ER folding capacity and a collection of conserved signaling pathways, termed the unfolded protein response (UPR), are activated to preserve ER function. While beneficial in the short-term, chronic UPR activation, known as ER stress, is a major pathological mechanism in metabolic disease, such as obesity. Young's research team demonstrated that UPR activation in the brain, specifically in the forebrain, is causally linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Also known as hepatic steatosis, the research shows that brain ER stress can cause the disease independent of changes in body weight, food intake, and other factors. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease impairs normal liver function and is linked to other diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The next step is to determine how and why ER stress occurs in the brain and how it causes fat build up in the liver. "Further research may give us another possible avenue for targeting fatty liver disease," said Young. "The field has been focused on how we can improve the liver, for example, by developing drugs that target the liver. Our research suggests that we may also need to think about targeting the brain to treat non-alcoholic fatty liver disease." The study, "Obesity-induced Hepatic Steatosis is Mediated by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Subfornical Organ of the Brain," published by the Journal of Clinical Investigation can be found at http://insight. . Media: To interview Dr. Young, please contact Ashley Rizzardo at amrizz713@gwu.edu or 202-994-8679. About the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences: Founded in 1824, the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) was the first medical school in the nation's capital and is the 11th oldest in the country. Working together in our nation's capital, with integrity and resolve, the GW SMHS is committed to improving the health and well-being of our local, national and global communities. smhs.gwu.edu


DUBLIN, May 25, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Unsaturated Polyester Resin in Automotive Composites Market" report to their offering. UPR in the global automotive composites market is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 5.3% from...


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Disruptions in a protein folding process occurring in the brain, known as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, may cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, independent of other factors. A research team at the George Washington University (GW) published their results in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight. "Nearly 75 percent of obese adults experience non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. However, its underlying causes are unclear," said Colin Young, Ph.D., senior author and assistant professor of pharmacology and physiology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences. "Recent findings have pointed to ER stress as central to its development. What our research shows is that ER stress in the brain is a key contributor." As the primary site of cellular protein folding, the ER plays a critical role in maintaining cellular function. When there is nutritional excess, the protein load exceeds the ER folding capacity and a collection of conserved signaling pathways, termed the unfolded protein response (UPR), are activated to preserve ER function. While beneficial in the short-term, chronic UPR activation, known as ER stress, is a major pathological mechanism in metabolic disease, such as obesity. Young's research team demonstrated that UPR activation in the brain, specifically in the forebrain, is causally linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Also known as hepatic steatosis, the research shows that brain ER stress can cause the disease independent of changes in body weight, food intake, and other factors. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease impairs normal liver function and is linked to other diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The next step is to determine how and why ER stress occurs in the brain and how it causes fat build up in the liver. "Further research may give us another possible avenue for targeting fatty liver disease," said Young. "The field has been focused on how we can improve the liver, for example, by developing drugs that target the liver. Our research suggests that we may also need to think about targeting the brain to treat non-alcoholic fatty liver disease."


UPR in the global automotive composites market is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 5.3% from 2016 to 2021. The future of global unsaturated polyester resin in automotive composites market looks promising with opportunities in various applications, including closure panels, body panels, fenders, GOR(grille opening reinforcement), heat shields, headlamp reflectors, pickup box and others. The major drivers for market growth are the increasing demand for lightweight materials, and performance benefits of reinforced composites over rival materials. UPR Composites with properties such as easy to process, high tensile strength, lightweight, good corrosion resistance and surface tension are ideal for manufacturing lightweight and fuel-efficient vehicles. Emerging trends, which has a direct impact on the dynamics of the industry is avoiding the usage of styrene as the major raw material for manufacturing UPR because it is hazardous for health. Within the global automotive composites market, sheet molding compound (SMC) and bulk molding compound (BMC) are the major intermediates materials. Within this market, polyester resin is used to make sheet molding compound and bulk molding compound for automotive parts. SMC is expected to remain the largest market by value and volume, mainly because of its greater flexural strength and tensile strength than BMC. SMC also has longer fiber length and higher fiber content components in body and closure panel applications and these qualities will spur growth for this segment over the forecast period. North American is expected to remain the largest market due to growing demand for lightweight and environmentally sustainable composite materials from the automotive industry. The study includes a forecast for global unsaturated polyester resin in automotive composites marketby application, intermediate material type, by country and by region as follows: Unsaturated Polyester Resin in Automotive Composites Market by Application Type (Value ($M) and Volume (M lbs) from 2010 to 2021): Unsaturated Polyester Resin in Automotive Composites Market by Material Type (Value ($M) and Volume (M lbs) from 2010 to 2021): 3. Market Trends and Forecast Analysis from 2010 to 2021 For more information about this report visit Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716 To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/global-automotive-composites-unsaturated-polyester-resin-smc--bmc-market-2011-2021---research-and-markets-300463829.html


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Part of the answer lies in quality control for newly-minted proteins, which takes place in the sub-cellular compartments of the 'endoplasmic reticulum', or ER. An over-burdened -- or 'stressed' -- ER can result in proteins becoming disorganized, a condition which cells seek to rectify by undertaking 'unfolded protein response', or UPR. During this reorganization, 'UPR transducers' in the ER sort the proteins for correction. Humans are known to have ten types of these transducers, but for years, scientists have not been able to explain why so many varieties are needed for the process to work. Now in an article published in the Journal of Cell Biology, Tokiro Ishikawa and Kazutoshi Mori of Kyoto University describe how different UPR transducers are used selectively, depending on the developmental stage of the cell and the type of stress. "We started by looking for proteins that cause ER stress during the development of medaka fish embryos, which are known to have the same ten transducers," explains first author Ishikawa. "We found that at first the production of short chain collagen causes a certain transducer to be activated for quality control." Collagen is the most abundant protein in vertebrates, providing external support for cells. In the next stage of development, cells received a signal from main actor proteins and started to produce longer-chain collagen. In response to this new ER stress, a new UPR transducer was activated to produce components to export the larger collagen out of the ER. Without this, larger collagen would be unable to leave the cells and do its job. "This showed us that different UPR transducers are activated to cope with different ER stresses caused by different proteins," says Ishikawa. Senior researcher Mori continues, "We see UPR working 'backstage', so to speak, to support the main actors during cell differentiation and thereby orchestrating various biological processes" The team is next seeking to understand how cells discriminate between lengths of collagen to activate different transducers, further deepening understanding of UPR's role in cellular processes and development. The paper "UPR Transducer BBF2H7 Allows Export of Type II Collagen in a Cargo- and Developmental Stage-Specific Manner" appeared 12 May 2017 in the Journal of Cell Biology, with doi: 10.1083/jcb.201609100 Kyoto University is one of Japan and Asia's premier research institutions, founded in 1897 and responsible for producing numerous Nobel laureates and winners of other prestigious international prizes. A broad curriculum across the arts and sciences at both undergraduate and graduate levels is complemented by numerous research centers, as well as facilities and offices around Japan and the world. For more information please see: http://www.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

A new study describes how different UPR transducers are used selectively for protein correction.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: phys.org

Part of the answer lies in quality control for newly-minted proteins, which takes place in the sub-cellular compartments of the 'endoplasmic reticulum', or ER. An over-burdened—or 'stressed'—ER can result in proteins becoming disorganized, a condition which cells seek to rectify by undertaking 'unfolded protein response', or UPR. During this reorganization, 'UPR transducers' in the ER sort the proteins for correction. Humans are known to have ten types of these transducers, but for years, scientists have not been able to explain why so many varieties are needed for the process to work. Now in an article published in the Journal of Cell Biology, Tokiro Ishikawa and Kazutoshi Mori of Kyoto University describe how different UPR transducers are used selectively, depending on the developmental stage of the cell and the type of stress. "We started by looking for proteins that cause ER stress during the development of medaka fish embryos, which are known to have the same ten transducers," explains first author Ishikawa. "We found that at first the production of short chain collagen causes a certain transducer to be activated for quality control." Collagen is the most abundant protein in vertebrates, providing external support for cells. In the next stage of development, cells received a signal from main actor proteins and started to produce longer-chain collagen. In response to this new ER stress, a new UPR transducer was activated to produce components to export the larger collagen out of the ER. Without this, larger collagen would be unable to leave the cells and do its job. "This showed us that different UPR transducers are activated to cope with different ER stresses caused by different proteins," says Ishikawa. Senior researcher Mori continues, "We see UPR working 'backstage', so to speak, to support the main actors during cell differentiation and thereby orchestrating various biological processes" The team is next seeking to understand how cells discriminate between lengths of collagen to activate different transducers, further deepening understanding of UPR's role in cellular processes and development. Explore further: Synthetic collagen from maize has human properties More information: "UPR Transducer BBF2H7 Allows Export of Type II Collagen in a Cargo- and Developmental Stage-Specific Manner" Journal of Cell Biology, DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201609100


This new report is focused on how the market for AR and VR headsets is going to evolve in the next decade, based on the exciting research and developments efforts of recent years along with the high visibility some projects and collaborations have enjoyed. The amount of visibility this space is experiencing is exciting developers of a range of allied technologies into fast-tracking/focusing their efforts, as well as creating devices and components designed specifically to serve this emerging industry: microdisplays, optical engines and haptic feedback components are some of the main components that are seeing significant growth alongside the growth in interest in augmented and virtual reality. Some of the newest headsets that have ignited interest in smart eyewear are going above and beyond the conventional definition of a smart object; they are in effect, portable, wearable computers with a host of functionalities, specially designed apps etc. that add new ways for the wearer to interact with the world along with smartphone capabilities, health tracking options and many other features. The features of some of the more advanced devices have been based on and have sparked worldwide innovation efforts aiming to create an ecosystem of components that will enable what is bound to be a revolution in form factor for wearables. Wearable sensors, innovative user interfaces, but also near-eye displays and optics as well as energy storage devices that represent some of the examples of technology tool kits that are evolving and improving in performance. They are hence constituting the pieces that are falling into place in order to enable new functionalities and form factors, both necessary to create products as innovative as near-eye and on-eye computers. The report includes insight into how different entities are addressing these challenges: developments such as foveated rendering and focus tunable displays, efforts in increasing FOV while keeping display resolution high in order to improve the immersiveness of the VR experience or the seamless integration of an AR layer of information. In addition, company and research activities in the space for smart glasses as well as company profiles of players actively involved in this space, concluding with market forecasts for both AR and VR headsets for the next decade. Key Topics Covered: 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1.1. Virtual and augmented reality: the beginning 1.2. Motion blur explained 1.3. The key elements of presence in VR 1.4. The rise of augmented reality 1.5. Pokémon Go: The first "killer app" for AR 1.6. Categories of AR and VR headsets 1.7. Applications for VR headsets: Social apps & VR cafes 1.8. Applications for AR headsets: Niche B2C & social AR emerging 1.9. Display requirements for AR & VR 1.10. Innovation in head mounted displays: Projecting virtual content in multiple focal planes 1.11. Innovation in head mounted displays: Foveated image rendering 1.12. Haptics in mainstream VR today 1.13. Market forecasts for AR & VR: Volumes 1.14. Market forecasts for AR & VR: Value 2. INTRODUCTION 2.1. Introduction: electronic functionality in eyewear 2.2. Nomenclature in the smart eyewear world: virtual (VR) and augmented (AR) reality 2.3. Nomenclature in the smart eyewear world: variations of AR and VR 2.4. Some examples of AR and VR headsets by category 2.5. Functional (Smart) contact lenses 2.6. Applications for smart eyewear- addressing the B2B and B2C markets 2.7. Applications of AR & VR 2.8. Applications for smart eyewear - design 2.9. Applications for smart eyewear - medical 2.10. Applications for smart eyewear - collaboration 2.11. Development work: areas of focus 2.12. Development work: displays and optics, user interfaces 2.13. Development work: focus tunable & foveated displays 2.14. Development work in functional contact lenses 3. AR & VR DEVICES 3.1. AR headsets 3.2. Microsoft Hololens 3.3. Meta 2 3.4. Kopin Solos 3.5. Kopin Golden-i 3.8D 3.6. Epson Moverio BT-300 3.7. Epson Moverio Pro BT-2000 3.8. Atheer Labs, AiR Glasses 3.9. ODG R8 3.10. ODG R9 3.11. ODG R7 3.12. DAQRI Smart Helmet 3.13. DAQRI Smart Glasses 3.14. Brother 3.15. Cinoptics 3.16. Penny C-Wear 30 3.17. Lumus DK50 3.18. Evena 3.19. Vuzix M100 and M300 3.20. IMMY NEO iC 60 3.21. Oakley Radar Pace 3.22. OrCam MyEye 3.23. Snapchat Spectacles 3.24. Google Glass 3.25. Picavi - A Google partner example 3.26. Magic Leap 3.27. Avegant 3.28. VR headsets 3.29. PC VR 3.30. Oculus Rift CV1 3.31. Sony Playstation VR 3.32. HTC Vive 3.33. Avegant Glyph 3.34. Windows 10 compatible VR headsets 3.35. Some Windows 10 compatible VR headset designs unveiled 3.36. Standalone VR 3.37. Royole X & Royole Moon: portable theatres by Royole 3.38. Alcatel Vision 3.39. Upcoming Standalone VR merging with AR: Intel Alloy - Sulon q 3.40. Mobile VR 3.41. Samsung Gear VR 3.42. Google Daydream View 3.43. Zeiss VR One Plus 3.44. Alcatel VR15 3.45. Non-electronic VR 3.46. Google Cardboard 3.47. Google Cardboard and other non-electronic headsets 3.48. Discussion: the first wave of VR products and the VR experience 4. DISPLAYS AND MICRODISPLAYS 4.1. Displays and Microdisplays for AR & VR 4.2. Head mounted displays for VR headsets 4.3. Microdisplays for VR? 4.4. Head mounted displays for AR headsets - microdisplays 4.5. Transmissive LCDs 4.6. Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS) microdisplays 4.7. Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS) microdisplays - operating principle 4.8. Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS) microdisplays - generating color in a three-panel configuration 4.9. Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS) microdisplays - generating color in a single-panel configuration 4.10. Digital Light Processing (DLP) - Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) 4.11. microOLED 4.12. Emerging options: microLEDs 4.13. Technology suppliers 4.14. Microdisplay technologies: comparative summary 4.15. Microdisplay technologies: investment & acquisitions 4.16. Microdisplay technologies: comparison discussion 4.17. Microdisplay technologies: incumbent vs emerging options 4.18. Microdisplays: the future of micro-OLED 4.19. Microdisplays: will micro-LED win in the longterm? 5. OPTICAL ENGINES 5.1. Optical engines in near eye computing - purpose 5.2. Optical engines for AR headsets: I want it all! 5.3. Pupil forming and non-pupil forming optical engines 5.4. Optical engines for AR & VR headsets 5.5. Magnifier architectures: Rift, Vive and Playstation VR 5.6. Immersion displays: Magnifier architectures 5.7. Immersion displays: Virtual retina display 5.8. See through displays: combiners 5.9. See through displays: waveguides & lightguides 5.10. See through displays: other approaches - IMMY - Olympus 5.11. See through displays: other approaches 5.12. Field of View for different headsets 5.13. Achieving high angular resolution 5.14. FOV vs. resolution 5.15. FOV vs. resolution in AR & VR 5.16. Innovation in AR and VR: the conflict of accommodation and vergence 5.17. Innovation in AR and VR: Resolving the Vergence-Accommodation Conflict in Head Mounted Displays 5.18. Monovision vs. focus-tunable displays 5.19. Deep Optics: dynamically focus-tunable displays 5.20. Innovation in AR and VR: Addressing the conflict of accommodation and Vergence - the concept of focus tunable displays 5.21. Innovation in AR and VR: addressing the conflict of accommodation and Vergence - the concept of foveated rendering 5.22. Innovation in AR and VR: eye tracking & foveated rendering SMI 5.23. Innovation in AR and VR: eye tracking & foveated rendering Nvidia 5.24. Innovation in AR and VR: eye tracking & foveated rendering Fove - QiVARI 5.25. Innovation in AR and VR: eye tracking & foveated rendering Tobii - The Eye Tribe 6. HAPTICS IN VR 6.1. Case Study: Haptics in VR 6.2. Stimulating the senses: Sight, sound, touch and beyond 6.3. Haptics in mainstream VR today 6.4. Categories for the technology today 6.5. Haptics in controllers: inertial and surface actuation 6.6. Example: Surface actuation on a controller 6.7. Motion simulators and vehicles: established platforms 6.8. New motion simulators are still used to show off VR 6.9. Examples: personal VR motion simulators and vehicles 6.10. Wearable haptic interfaces 6.11. Wearable haptic interfaces - rings 6.12. Commercial examples: GoTouchVR 6.13. Wearable haptic interfaces - gloves 6.14. Examples: Virtuix, NeuroDigital Technologies 6.15. Wearable haptic interfaces - shoes 6.16. Commercial examples: Nidec, CEREVO, and others 6.17. Wearable haptic interfaces - harnesses and apparel 6.18. Wearable haptic interfaces - exoskeletons 6.19. Commercial examples: Dexta Robotics 6.20. Kinaesthetic haptics 6.21. Kinaesthetic devices: types and process flow 6.22. Exoskeletons 6.23. Manipulandums 6.24. FundamentalVR - haptics for training surgeons in VR 6.25. Robotics: Hacking existing platforms to build kinaesthetic haptics 6.26. The case for contactless haptics in VR 6.27. Forecast: Haptics in VR & AR by haptic technology 6.28. Related topic: Power-assist exoskeletons and apparel 6.29. Power assist exoskeletons 6.30. The relationship between assistive devices and kinaesthetic haptics 6.31. Example: Ekso Bionics 6.32. Power assist suits - UPR 6.33. Power assist apparel - Superflex 6.34. Geographical and market trends 7. POWER 7.1. Initial observations on energy storage for smart eyewear 7.2. Size reduction strategies for energy storage devices 7.3. Existing shapes: thin film and coin cell batteries 7.4. Energy storage fit for purpose: Kopin- Hitachi Maxell 7.5. Energy storage design: effect of packaging 8. MARKET FORECASTS 2017-2027 8.1. Market forecasts for AR & VR: Volumes 8.2. Market forecasts for VR: VR will plateau 2022 onwards 8.3. What markets will follow the gaming market's growth? Social VR C& VR cafes 8.4. Market forecasts for AR: Growth from 2020 onwards 8.5. OLED microdisplays for VR: Facilitating the transition to VR-capable AR headsets 8.6. Market forecasts for AR & VR: Value 8.7. Pricing evolution in different AR & VR headsets 8.8. Market forecasts for AR & VR: Headset market value 9. COMPANY PROFILES 9.1. Atheer Labs 9.2. Avegant 9.3. Dispelix 9.4. FlexEl, LLC 9.5. HAP2U 9.6. Immersion Corporation 9.7. Imprint Energy, Inc 9.8. Jenax 9.9. Kopin Corporation 9.10. MicroOLED 9.11. mLED 9.12. Nidec Motor Corporation 9.13. Novasentis 9.14. Oculus 9.15. Optinvent 9.16. Ostendo Technologies 9.17. Osterhout Design Group 9.18. Ricoh 9.19. Royole Corporation 9.20. Seiko Epson Corporation 9.21. Sony Europe (SES) 9.22. Syndiant 9.23. Vuzix For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/zwm7z5/ar_and_vr Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716 To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/26-billion-ar--vr-smartglasses-and-functional-contact-lenses-market-2017---projections-to-2027---research-and-markets-300454215.html


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: cerncourier.com

Completion of the preliminary design phase for the High-Luminosity LHC last year paves the way for civil-engineering work to begin. Le HL-LHC sera composé de plusieurs technologies et aimants innovants, et ces nouveaux éléments de l’accélérateur auront besoin de services supplémentaires tels que transmission de courant, distribution électrique, refroidissement, ventilation et cryogénie. Afin d’héberger les nouvelles infrastructures et les nouveaux éléments, des structures de génie civil, notamment des bâtiments, des puits, des cavernes et des galeries souterraines sont nécessaires. L’achèvement, l’année passée, de la phase de conception préliminaire du HL-LHC a permis le commencement des travaux de génie civil, et des contrats avec des entreprises externes vont à présent être conclus. The High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project at CERN is a major upgrade that will extend the LHC’s discovery potential significantly. Approved in June 2014 and due to enter operation in the mid-2020s, the HL-LHC will increase the LHC’s integrated luminosity by a factor 10 beyond its original design value. The complex upgrade, which must be implemented with minimal disruption to LHC operations, demands careful study and will take a decade to achieve. The HL-LHC relies on several innovative and challenging technologies, in particular: new superconducting dipole magnets with a field of 11 T; highly compact and ultra-precise superconducting “crab” cavities to rotate the beams at the collision points and thus compensate for the larger beam crossing angle; beam-separation and recombination superconducting dipole magnets; beam-focusing superconducting quadrupole magnets; and 80 m-long high-power superconducting links with zero energy dissipation. These new LHC accelerator components will be mostly integrated at Point 1 and Point 5 of the ring where the two general-purpose detectors ATLAS and CMS are located (see diagram). The new infrastructure and services consist mainly of power transmission, electrical distribution, cooling, ventilation, cryogenics, power converters for superconducting magnets and inductive output tubes for superconducting RF cavities. To house these large elements, civil-engineering structures including buildings, shafts, caverns and underground galleries are required. The definition of the civil engineering for the HL-LHC began in 2015. Last year, the completion of a concept study allowed CERN to issue a call for tender for two civil-engineering consultant contracts, which were adjudicated in June 2016. These consultants are in charge of the preliminary, tender and construction design phases of the civil-engineering work, in addition to managing the construction and defect-liability phase. At Point 1, which is located in Switzerland just across from the main CERN entrance, the consultant contract involves a consortium of three companies: SETEC TPI (France), which is the consortium leader, together with CSD Engineers (Switzerland) and Rocksoil (Italy). A similar consortium has been appointed at Point 5, in France. Here, the consultant contract is shared between consortium-leader Lombardi (Switzerland), Artelia (France) and Pini Swiss (Switzerland). In November 2016, the two consultant consortia completed the preliminary design phase including cost and construction-schedule estimates for the civil-engineering work. In parallel with the preliminary design, and with the help of external architects, CERN has submitted building-permit applications to the Swiss and French authorities with a view to start construction work by mid-2018. CERN has also performed geotechnical investigations to better understand the underground conditions (which consist of glacial moraines overlying a local type of soft rock called molasse), and has placed a contract with independent engineers ARUP (UK) and Geoconsult (Austria). These companies will confirm that the consultant designs have been performed with the appropriate skill, care and diligence in accordance with applicable standards. In addition, a panel comprising lawyers, architects and civil engineers is in place to resolve any disputes between parties. At ground level, the HL-LHC civil engineering consists of five buildings at each of the two LHC points, technical galleries, access roads, concrete slabs and landscaping. At each point, the total surface corresponds to about 20,000 m2 including 3300 m2 of buildings. A cluster of three buildings is located at the head of the shaft and will house the helium-refrigerator cold box (SD building, see images above), water-cooling and ventilation units (SU building) and also the main electrical distribution for high and low voltage (SE building). Completing the inventory at each point are two stand-alone buildings that will house the primary water-cooling towers (SF building) and the warm compressor station of the helium refrigerator (SHM building). Buildings housing noisy equipment (SU, SF, SHM) will be constructed with noise-insulating concrete walls and roofs. In terms of underground structures, the civil-engineering work consists of a shaft, a service cavern, galleries and vertical cores (see image above left). The total volume to be excavated is around 50,000 m3 per point. The PM shaft (measuring 9.7 m in diameter and 70–80 m deep) will house a secured access lift and staircase as well as the associated services. The service cavern (US/UW, measuring 16 m in diameter and 45 m long) will house cooling and ventilation units, a cryogenic box, an electrical safe room and electrical transformers. The UR gallery (5.8 m diameter, 300 m long) will house the power converters and electrical feed boxes for the superconducting magnets as well as cryogenic and service distribution. Two transverse UA galleries (6.2 m diameter, 50 m long) will house the RF equipment for the powering and controls of the superconducting crab cavities. At the end of the UA galleries, evacuation galleries (UPR) are required for personnel emergency exits. Two transversal UL galleries (3 m diameter, 40 m long) will house the superconducting links to power the magnets and cryogenic distribution system. Finally, the HL-LHC underground galleries are connected to the LHC tunnel via 16 vertical cores measuring 1 m in diameter and approximately 7 m long. The next important milestone will be the adjudication in March 2018 of the two contracts (one per point) for the civil-engineering construction work. In December 2016, CERN launched a market survey for the construction tender, which will be followed by invitations to tender to qualified firms by June 2017. The main excavation work, which may generate harmful vibrations for the LHC accelerator performance, must be performed during the second long shutdown of the LHC accelerator scheduled for 2019–2020. Handover of the final building is scheduled by the end of 2022, while the vertical cores connecting the HL-LHC galleries to the LHC tunnel will be constructed at the start of the third LHC long shutdown beginning in 2024. Realising the HL-LHC is a major challenge that involves more than 25 institutes from 12 countries, and in addition to civil-engineering work it demands several cutting-edge magnet and other accelerator technologies. The project is the highest priority in the European Strategy for Particle Physics, and will ensure a rich physics programme at the high-energy frontier into the 2030s.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

ZHENJIANG, China, Feb. 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Delta Technology Holdings Limited (NASDAQ: DELT), a manufacturer and seller of specialty chemicals, today announced that it is increasing both the number of core clients it serves and the amount of product sold to these companies. "We are confident that the products we produce for pharmaceutical and pesticide companies, and companies in other sectors including clean energy, food additives, aerospace and agrochemical, allow these major firms to achieve successes. We are very proud of the strategic cooperation these major companies have with Delta Technology," said Chao Xin, Chairman and CEO. Delta Technology services giant international chemical companies including Bayer, BASF Corporation, FMC Corporation as well as several public companies in China listed on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange for example: Jiangsu Flag Chemical Industry Co., Ltd.; Jiangsu Huifeng Agrochemical Co., Ltd., Huapont Life Sciences Co, Ltd. and Jiangsu Changqing Agrochemical Co., Ltd. Founded in 2007, Delta Technology Holdings Ltd. is a leading China-based fine and specialty chemical company producing and distributing organic compound including para-chlorotoluene ("PCT"), ortho-chlorotoluene ("OCT"), PCT/OCT downstream products, unsaturated polyester resin ("UPR"), maleic acid ("MA") and other by-product chemicals. The end application markets of the Company's products include Automotive, Pharmaceutical, Agrochemical, Dye & Pigments, Aerospace, Ceramics, Coating-Printing, Clean Energy and Food Additives. Delta has approximately 300 employees, 25% of whom are highly-qualified experts and technical personnel. The Company serves more than 380 clients in various industries. This press release may contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Statements preceded or followed by or that otherwise include the words "believes," "expects," "anticipates," "intends," "projects," "estimates," "plans," and similar expressions or future or conditional verbs such as "will", "should", "would", "may" and "could" are generally forward-looking in nature and not historical facts. Forward-looking statements in this release also include statements about business and economic trends. Investors should also consider the areas of risk described under the heading "Forward Looking Statements" and those factors captioned as "Risk Factors" in DELT's periodic reports under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or in connection with any forward-looking statements that may be made by DELT. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/delta-technology-holdings-limited-continues-to-expand-revenues-from-core-client-base-300411535.html

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