Upper Assam Advisory Center

Dibrugarh, India

Upper Assam Advisory Center

Dibrugarh, India
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Karak T.,Upper Assam Advisory Center | Sonar I.,Upper Assam Advisory Center | Paul R.K.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Das S.,Dibrugarh Polytechnic | And 2 more authors.
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2014

The present study reports the suitability of termite mounds as a bulking agent for composting with crop residues and cow dung in pit method. Use of 50kg termite mound with the crop residues (stover of ground nut: 361.65kg; soybean: 354.59kg; potato: 357.67kg and mustard: 373.19kg) and cow dung (84.90kg) formed a good quality compost within 70days of composting having nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium as 20.19, 3.78 and 32.77gkg-1 respectively with a bulk density of 0.85gcm-3. Other physico-chemical and germination parameters of the compost were within Indian standard, which had been confirmed by the application of multivariate analysis of variance and multivariate contrast analysis. Principal component analysis was applied in order to gain insight into the characteristic variables. Four composting treatments formed two different groups when hierarchical cluster analysis was applied. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Karak T.,Upper Assam Advisory Center | Sonar I.,Upper Assam Advisory Center | Nath J.R.,Upper Assam Advisory Center | Paul R.K.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | And 3 more authors.
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2015

Although, compost is the store house of different plant nutrients, there is a concern for low amount of major nutrients especially nitrogen content in prepared compost. The present study deals with preparation of compost by using agricultural wastes with struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) along with termite mound. Among four composting mixtures, 50kg termite mound and 2.5kg struvite with crop residues (stover of ground nut: 361.65kg; soybean: 354.59kg; potato: 357.67kg and mustard: 373.19kg) and cow dung (84.90kg) formed a good quality compost within 70days of composting having nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium as 21.59, 3.98 and 34.6gkg-1, respectively. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant differences among the composts. The four composts formed two (pit 1, pit 2 and pit 3, pit 4) different groups. Two principal components expressed more than 97% of the total variability. Hierarchical cluster analysis resulted two homogeneous groups of composts. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Karak T.,Upper Assam Advisory Center | Sonar I.,Upper Assam Advisory Center | Paul R.K.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Frankowski M.,Adam Mickiewicz University | And 2 more authors.
Chemosphere | Year: 2015

Application of municipal solid waste compost (MSWC) in tea (Camellia sinensis L.) cultivation can increase the fertility status of soils and thus enhance the plant growth. The present study attempts at application of MSWC in tea (TV1 and TV23 clones) cultivation to assess the effect of different doses of MSWC on growth and translocation potential of Al on this plant as well as fate of Al in soil, through the calculation of a risk assessment code (RAC). The sequential extraction of Al in MSWC amended soils showed that the fractionation of Al in soil changed after compost application, with an overall increase of the fractions associated to with Fe-Mn oxides, organic and of the residual fraction. The accumulation of Al in different parts of. C. sinensisL., grown on MSWC amended soil effected an overall increased growth of the plant with increasing doses of MSWC. According to RAC, Al falls in medium to high risk, though no adverse effect on plant health was observed. Tea plants were found to adapt well to MSWC amended soils. However, long term field trials are necessary to completely assess the risk of Al accumulation in soils upon MSWC application. Hierarchical cluster analysis was applied aiming to check for the presence of homogenous groups among different treatments. It was found that in both TV1 and TV23, treatments formed two different groups. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Upper Assam Advisory Center and Indian Agricultural Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Environmental monitoring and assessment | Year: 2016

Two alkaline soils collected from the surface horizon (0-15cm) of two agricultural fields Lakshmikantapur (LKP; 22 06 03 N and 88 18 19 E) and Diamond Harbour (DHB; 22 11 N and 88 14 E) of West Bengal, India were studied to observe the stability of cadmium (Cd) chelate complexes with diethylenetriaminepentaacetatic acid (DTPA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), removing organic matter (OM). The objective of the present study is determination of the stability constants and the thermodynamic parameters of Cd-DTPA and Cd-EDTA complexes at different pH and temperatures at the soil-water interface. Complex formation of soil Cd with DTPA and EDTA at the soil-water interface was studied under different ligand-to-metal ratios, pHs and temperatures. Apparent conditional stability constants (log k) were calculated from the concentrations of Cd chelates and free Cd


PubMed | Upper Assam Advisory Center, Dibrugarh Polytechnic and Indian Agricultural Research Institute
Type: | Journal: Bioresource technology | Year: 2014

The present study reports the suitability of termite mounds as a bulking agent for composting with crop residues and cow dung in pit method. Use of 50 kg termite mound with the crop residues (stover of ground nut: 361.65 kg; soybean: 354.59 kg; potato: 357.67 kg and mustard: 373.19 kg) and cow dung (84.90 kg) formed a good quality compost within 70 days of composting having nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium as 20.19, 3.78 and 32.77 g kg(-1) respectively with a bulk density of 0.85 g cm(-3). Other physico-chemical and germination parameters of the compost were within Indian standard, which had been confirmed by the application of multivariate analysis of variance and multivariate contrast analysis. Principal component analysis was applied in order to gain insight into the characteristic variables. Four composting treatments formed two different groups when hierarchical cluster analysis was applied.


PubMed | Upper Assam Advisory Center, Dibrugarh Polytechnic and Indian Agricultural Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Environmental monitoring and assessment | Year: 2015

A study on the sorption kinetics of Cd from soil solution to soils was conducted to assess the persistence of Cd in soil solution as it is related to the leaching, bioavailability, and potential toxicity of Cd. The kinetics of Cd sorption on two non-contaminated alkaline soils from Canning (22 18 48.02 N and 88 39 29.0 E) and Lakshmikantapur (22 06 16.61 N and 88 19 08.66 E) of South 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India, were studied using conventional batch experiment. The variable soil suspension parameters were pH (4.00, 6.00, 8.18, and 9.00), temperatures (308, 318, and 328 K) and Cd concentrations (5-100 mg L(-1)). The average rate coefficient (kavg) and half-life (t1/2) values indicate that the persistence of Cd in soil solution is influenced by both temperature and soil suspension pH. The concentration of Cd in soil solution decreases with increase of temperature; therefore, Cd sorption on the soil-solution interface is an endothermic one. Higher pH decreases the t 1/2 of Cd in soil solution, indicating that higher pH (alkaline) is not a serious concern in Cd toxicity than lower pH (acidic). Based on the energy of activation (Ea) values, Cd sorption in acidic pH (14.760.29 to 64.454.50 kJ mol(-1)) is a surface control phenomenon and in alkaline pH (9.330.09 to 44.602.01 kJ mol(-1)) is a diffusion control phenomenon The enthalpy of activation (H) values were found to be between 7.28 and 61.73 kJ mol(-1). Additionally, higher positive energy of activation (G) values (46.822.01 to 94.472.36 kJ mol(-1)) suggested that there is an energy barrier for product formation.


PubMed | Adam Mickiewicz University, Upper Assam Advisory Center and Indian Agricultural Research Institute
Type: | Journal: Chemosphere | Year: 2014

Application of municipal solid waste compost (MSWC) in tea (Camellia sinensis L.) cultivation can increase the fertility status of soils and thus enhance the plant growth. The present study attempts at application of MSWC in tea (TV1 and TV23 clones) cultivation to assess the effect of different doses of MSWC on growth and translocation potential of Al on this plant as well as fate of Al in soil, through the calculation of a risk assessment code (RAC). The sequential extraction of Al in MSWC amended soils showed that the fractionation of Al in soil changed after compost application, with an overall increase of the fractions associated to with Fe-Mn oxides, organic and of the residual fraction. The accumulation of Al in different parts ofC. sinensisL., grown on MSWC amended soil effected an overall increased growth of the plant with increasing doses of MSWC. According to RAC, Al falls in medium to high risk, though no adverse effect on plant health was observed. Tea plants were found to adapt well to MSWC amended soils. However, long term field trials are necessary to completely assess the risk of Al accumulation in soils upon MSWC application. Hierarchical cluster analysis was applied aiming to check for the presence of homogenous groups among different treatments. It was found that in both TV1 and TV23, treatments formed two different groups.


PubMed | Upper Assam Advisory Center, Dibrugarh Polytechnic and Indian Agricultural Research Institute
Type: | Journal: Bioresource technology | Year: 2015

Although, compost is the store house of different plant nutrients, there is a concern for low amount of major nutrients especially nitrogen content in prepared compost. The present study deals with preparation of compost by using agricultural wastes with struvite (MgNH4PO46H2O) along with termite mound. Among four composting mixtures, 50kg termite mound and 2.5kg struvite with crop residues (stover of ground nut: 361.65kg; soybean: 354.59kg; potato: 357.67kg and mustard: 373.19kg) and cow dung (84.90kg) formed a good quality compost within 70days of composting having nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium as 21.59, 3.98 and 34.6gkg(-1), respectively. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant differences among the composts. The four composts formed two (pit 1, pit 2 and pit 3, pit 4) different groups. Two principal components expressed more than 97% of the total variability. Hierarchical cluster analysis resulted two homogeneous groups of composts.


Karak T.,Tocklai Experimental Station | Karak T.,Upper Assam Advisory Center | Bhattacharyya P.,Indian Statistical Institute | Paul R.K.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute
Clean - Soil, Air, Water | Year: 2014

The dynamic parameters of the transformation of fresh cow dung (FCD), municipal solid waste (MSW), pond sediment (PST), tea pruning litter (TPL), tea waste (TWE), and water hyacinth (WHH) into a manure using a co-composting process were investigated. Among the six different modes of compost, it was observed that the best quality of compost can be produced where the substrate was FCD/MSW/TPL/PST/TWE/WHH 1:1.5:1.5:2.5:2.5:1 with respect to Indian compost standard. Hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis (HCA) for physical and chemical variables during composting yielded a dendrogram and formed two clusters, one of which includes temperature, amount of cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, MSW, nickel, phosphorus, and zinc and the other includes cation exchange capacity, FCD, germination index of chickpea, germination index of green gram, mercury, nitrogen, organic carbon (OC), pH, TPL, potassium, PST, TWE, and WHH. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to all the data sets, which resulted in nine, four, four, three, and two latent factors of the total variance in compost quality. Varifactors of PCA implied that the parameters responsible for metals and P were MSW and temperature variation, N was mainly related to PST and TWE whereas OC was influenced by TPL and FCD. Therefore, on application of HCA and PCA, a meaningful classification of the above-mentioned parameters has been obtained. Thus, these results should be effective measures for future in using tea garden waste materials for the preparation of valued eco-friendly compost. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Karak T.,Upper Assam Advisory Center | Paul R.K.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Sonar I.,Upper Assam Advisory Center | Nath J.R.,Upper Assam Advisory Center | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology | Year: 2016

Effects of municipal solid waste compost application on tea (Camellia sinensis L.) cultivation (Tocklai Vegetative clone 1 and Tocklai Vegetative clone 23) was studied with respect to biomass yield, soil nickel risk, nickel uptake and transfer to tea infusion. Application of municipal solid waste compost @ 2–6 t ha−1 in soil lowered the risk assessment code of nickel by increasing non-labile nickel pool. Reduced Ni translocation factor from root to stem to leaf led to low nickel accumulation in leaf indicating high nickel tolerance ability of tea. Tea infusions from Tocklai Vegetative clone 1 and Tocklai Vegetative clone 23 with municipal solid waste compost application in soil up to 10 t ha−1 showed leaf nickel contents below permissible limit, i.e., from 0.002 to 1.2 and 0.01 to 1.1 μg L−1, respectively. Municipal solid waste compost could therefore be a valuable alternative for soil amendment subject to non-enhancement of soil nickel storage on long-term use. The one-way analysis of variance along with Duncan’s multiple range tests showed significant differences between pair of treatments. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed formation of three different groups between the clones and treatments imposed. © 2015, Islamic Azad University (IAU).

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