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Epperly M.W.,UPCI Cancer Institute | Smith T.,UPCI Cancer Institute | Zhang X.,UPCI Cancer Institute | Goff J.P.,UPCI Cancer Institute | And 6 more authors.
Gene Therapy | Year: 2011

To determine the effects of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) plasmid liposome (PL) maternal radioprotection on fetal mice, timed pregnant female mice (E14 gestation) were irradiated to 3.0 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) dose, and the number, weight and growth and development over 6 months after birth of newborn mice was quantitated compared with irradiated controls. Maternal MnSOD-PL treatment at E13 improved pup survival at birth (5.40.9 per litter) compared with non-irradiated 3.0 Gy controls 4.91.1. There was no statistically significant difference in newborn abnormalities, male to female ratio in newborn litters, or other evidence of teratogenesis in surviving newborn mice from MnSOD-PL treated compared with irradiated controls. However, E14 3 Gy irradiated pups from gene therapy-treated mothers showed a significant increase in both growth and overall survival over 6 months after birth (P0.0022). To determine if transgene product crossed the placenta pregnant E13 mice were injected intravenously with hemagglutinin-epitope-tagged MnSOD (100 g plasmid in 100 l liposomes), then after 24 h, fetal mice, placentas and maternal tissues were removed and tested by both immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase-PCR for transgene and product. There was no evidence of transgene or product in placenta or any fetal tissue while maternal liver was positive by both assays. The data provide evidence for fetal radioprotection by maternal MnSOD-PL gene therapy before irradiation, which is mediated by an indirect bystander effect and is associated with a significant improvement in both survival at birth and growth and development of newborn mice. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


PubMed | UPCI Cancer Institute and University of Pittsburgh
Type: Journal Article | Journal: In vivo (Athens, Greece) | Year: 2014

To determine whether Gramicidin S (GS)-nitroxide, JP4-039, esophageal radiation protection protected lung tumors in a transgenic model, LoxP-Stoop-LoxP Kristen Rat Sarcoma Viral oncogene (LSL-K-RAS) mice were administered intra-tracheal- Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) recombinase, bilateral lung tumors were confirmed at 11 weeks, then thoracic irradiation was delivered.Mice received single-fraction 15 Gy or 24 Gy to both lungs, in subgroups receiving intraesophageal administration 10 min before irradiation of JP4-039 (in F15 emulsion) tumor size reduction and survival were investigated. Mice were followed for survival, and reduction in tumor size.There was no evidence of tumor radioprotection in mice receiving JP4-039/F15.Intraesophageal radioprotective small-molecule antioxidant therapy protects normal tissue but not tumor tissue in mice with transgenic lung tumors.


To determine the effects of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) plasmid liposome (PL) maternal radioprotection on fetal mice, timed pregnant female mice (E14 gestation) were irradiated to 3.0Gy total body irradiation (TBI) dose, and the number, weight and growth and development over 6 months after birth of newborn mice was quantitated compared with irradiated controls. Maternal MnSOD-PL treatment at E13 improved pup survival at birth (5.40.9 per litter) compared with non-irradiated 3.0Gy controls 4.91.1. There was no statistically significant difference in newborn abnormalities, male to female ratio in newborn litters, or other evidence of teratogenesis in surviving newborn mice from MnSOD-PL treated compared with irradiated controls. However, E14 3Gy irradiated pups from gene therapy-treated mothers showed a significant increase in both growth and overall survival over 6 months after birth (P=0.0022). To determine if transgene product crossed the placenta pregnant E13 mice were injected intravenously with hemagglutinin-epitope-tagged MnSOD (100g plasmid in 100l liposomes), then after 24h, fetal mice, placentas and maternal tissues were removed and tested by both immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase-PCR for transgene and product. There was no evidence of transgene or product in placenta or any fetal tissue while maternal liver was positive by both assays. The data provide evidence for fetal radioprotection by maternal MnSOD-PL gene therapy before irradiation, which is mediated by an indirect bystander effect and is associated with a significant improvement in both survival at birth and growth and development of newborn mice.

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