Upa Laboratorio Of Mirmecologia

Itabuna, Brazil

Upa Laboratorio Of Mirmecologia

Itabuna, Brazil
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Groc S.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Delabie J.H.C.,Upa Laboratorio Of Mirmecologia | Fernandez F.,National University of Colombia | Petitclerc F.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | And 5 more authors.
Ecological Indicators | Year: 2017

One of the greatest threats to biodiversity and the sustainable functioning of ecosystems is the clearing of forests for agriculture. Because litter-dwelling ants are very good bioindicators of man-made disturbance, we used them to compare monospecific plantations of acacia trees, cocoa trees, rubber trees and pine trees with the surrounding Neotropical rainforest (in contrast to previous studies on forest fragments embedded in industrial monocultures). Although the global level of species turnover was weak, species richness decreased along a gradient from the forest (including a treefall gap) to the tree plantations among which the highest number of species was noted for the cocoa trees, which are known to be a good compromise between agriculture and conservation. Species composition was significantly different between natural habitats and the plantations that, in turn, were different from each other. Compared to the forest, alterations in the ant communities were (1) highest for the acacia and rubber trees, (2) intermediate for the cocoa trees, and, (3) surprisingly, far lower for the pine trees, likely due to very abundant litter. Functional traits only separated the rubber tree plantation from the other habitats due to the higher presence of exotic and leaf-cutting ants. This study shows that small monospecific stands are likely sustainable when embedded in the rainforest and that environmentally-friendly strategies can be planned accordingly. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd


Soares P.A.O.,Federal University of Viçosa | Delabie J.H.C.,Upa Laboratorio Of Mirmecologia | Zanuncio J.C.,Federal University of Viçosa | Serratildo J.E.,Federal University of Viçosa
Sociobiology | Year: 2011

This study examined post-embryonic brain development in workers and males of the ant Camponotus rufipes (Fabricius, 1775) and its associations with ecdysteroid titers in haemolymph. Ecdysteroid levels were lower in the prepupae and the early pupae of workers, whereas they were higher in the prepupae and early pupae of males. In workers, brain volume increased 25% from the prepupal to the adult stages. In contrast, the brain volume of males decreased from the prepupal to weakly-pigmented eyed pupal stages, which followed a volume increase from the medium-pigmented eyed pupal to adult stages. These results suggest that ecdysteroids might be related to the brain development ofpupae, as the high titers in early pupae followed by its decrease at the end of pupal development coincided with brain crescent development in workers and males.


da Hora R.R.,Federal University of Viçosa | da Hora R.R.,Upa Laboratorio Of Mirmecologia | Delabie J.H.C.,Upa Laboratorio Of Mirmecologia | Santos dos C.G.,Federal University of Viçosa | Serrao J.E.,Federal University of Viçosa
PLoS ONE | Year: 2010

The wax layer covering the insect's cuticle plays an important protective role, as for example, uncontrolled water loss. In social insects, wax production is well-known in some bees that use it for nest building. Curiously, mated-fertile queens of the ant Ectatomma tuberculatum produce an uncommon extra-wax coat and, consequently queens (mated-fertile females) are matte due to such extra cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) coat that covers the cuticle and masks the brightness of the queens' cuticle while gynes (virgin-infertile queens) are shiny. In this study, histological analysis showed differences in the epidermis between fertile (i.e., queens or gynes with highly ovarian activity) and infertile females (gynes or workers with non developed ovaries). In fertile females the epidermis is a single layer of cubic cells found in all body segments whereas in infertile females it is a thin layer of flattened cells. Ultrastructural features showed active secretory tissue from fertile females similar to the glandular epithelium of wax-producing bees (type I gland). Different hypotheses related to the functions of the glandular epithelium exclusive to the E. tuberculatum fertile queens are discussed. © 2010 Hora et al.


Ramos-Lacau L.S.,State University of Southwest Bahia | Silva P.S.D.,Upa Laboratorio Of Mirmecologia | Lacau S.,State University of Southwest Bahia | Lacau S.,Upa Laboratorio Of Mirmecologia | And 2 more authors.
Annales de la Societe Entomologique de France | Year: 2012

The present study provides valuable information about the nesting biology and demographics of Cyphomyrmex transversus (Formicidae: Myrmicinae: Attini). This species has been observed nesting under and inside dry coconuts on the forest ground in the Brazilian coastal zone of Ilhéus, state of Bahia. To investigate the association between C. transversus and coconuts, we surveyed 153 coconuts. Of the surveyed ones, 62 (40.5%) exhibited associated colonies of Cyphomyrmex transversus (one colony per coconut): 53 (85.5%) of the 62 colonies nested under the coconut, and nine (14.5%) nested inside. Distributed among 57 of the coconuts, 17 other ant species were found. The ants most frequently found were Paratrechina longicornis and Camponotus atriceps. Nests of C. transversus were structurally simple, with one principal chamber with small depressions located on the base. Inside the nest cavities, yeast-like fungi formed in polygonal masses. More than one dealate queen was observed in several C. transversus colonies. The population of C. transversus individuals per colony increased according the coconut size. We conclude that the use by the ants of coconut pieces as a part of their nest structure and the occurrence of multiple dealate queens per colony show adaptive fl exibility in C. transversus. It may confer a greater capacity for colonization and maintenance of competitive nest densities in the harsh environmental conditions of Brazilian coastal zones. Further studies should consider the social organization of all ant species that nest in coconuts and its effect on colony survival rates and competitive relationships. © Société Entomologique de France.


Dejean A.,CNRS Functional Ecology & Environment Laboratory | Groc S.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Herault B.,CIRAD UMR CIRAD 93 | Rodriguez-Perez H.,French National Center for Scientific Research | And 4 more authors.
Comptes rendus biologies | Year: 2015

In the Guianese rainforest, we examined the impact of the presence of guano in and around a bat roosting site (a cave). We used ant communities as an indicator to evaluate this impact because they occupy a central place in the functioning of tropical rainforest ecosystems and they play different roles in the food web as they can be herbivores, generalists, scavengers or predators. The ant species richness around the cave did not differ from a control sample situated 500m away. Yet, the comparison of functional groups resulted in significantly greater numbers of detritivorous fungus-growing and predatory ant colonies around the cave compared to the control, the contrary being true for nectar and honeydew feeders. The role of bats, through their guano, was shown using stable isotope analyses as we noted significantly greater δ(15)N values for the ant species captured in and around the cave compared to controls. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.


Dejean A.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Dejean A.,Toulouse 1 University Capitole | Corbara B.,CNRS Microorganisms Laboratory: Genome and Environment | Corbara B.,University Blaise Pascal | And 6 more authors.
Insect Science | Year: 2015

Supercolonies of the red fire ant Solenopsis saevissima (Smith) develop in disturbed environments and likely alter the ant community in the native range of the species. For example, in French Guiana only 8 ant species were repeatedly noted as nesting in close vicinity to its mounds. Here, we verified if a shared set of biological, ecological, and behavioral traits might explain how these 8 species are able to nest in the presence of S. saevissima. We did not find this to be the case. We did find, however, that all of them are able to live in disturbed habitats. It is likely that over the course of evolution each of these species acquired the capacity to live syntopically with S. saevissima through its own set of traits, where colony size (4 species develop large colonies), cuticular compounds which do not trigger aggressiveness (6 species) and submissive behaviors (4 species) complement each other. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.


Dejean A.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Dejean A.,Ecolab | Delabie J.H.C.,Upa Laboratorio Of Mirmecologia | Corbara B.,University Blaise Pascal | And 5 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Here we show that Daceton armigerum, an arboreal myrmicine ant whose workers are equipped with hypertrophied trap-jaw mandibles, is characterized by a set of unexpected biological traits including colony size, aggressiveness, trophobiosis and hunting behavior. The size of one colony has been evaluated at ca. 952,000 individuals. Intra- and interspecific aggressiveness were tested and an equiprobable null model used to show how D. armigerum colonies react vis-à-vis other arboreal ant species with large colonies; it happens that D. armigerum can share trees with certain of these species. As they hunt by sight, workers occupy their hunting areas only during the daytime, but stay on chemical trails between nests at night so that the center of their home range is occupied 24 hours a day. Workers tend different Hemiptera taxa (i.e., Coccidae, Pseudococcidae, Membracidae and Aethalionidae). Through group-hunting, short-range recruitment and spread-eagling prey, workers can capture a wide range of prey (up to 94.12 times the mean weight of foraging workers). © 2012 Dejean et al.


Groc S.,Federal University of Uberlandia | Groc S.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Delabie J.H.C.,Upa Laboratorio Of Mirmecologia | Fernandez F.,National University of Colombia | And 7 more authors.
Myrmecological News | Year: 2014

We compared the ant assemblages from four very heterogeneous habitats over a short-distance elevational gradient of vegetation (due to the presence of an inselberg) at the Nouragues Research Station, French Guiana. We focused on litter-dwelling ants, combining the use of pitfall traps and the Winkler method according to the Ants of the Leaf Litter Proto-col. This permitted us to note (1) a high leaf-litter ant diversity overall and a decreasing diversity gradient from the lowland rainforest to the top of the inselberg, and (2) differences in species density, composition and functional struc-ture. While the ant assemblages on the plateau and inselberg can be considered functionally similar and typical of an Amazonian rainforest, that of the transition forest, relatively homogenous, rather corresponded to an ant fauna typical of open areas. By contrast, the liana forest assemblage was unexpectedly richer and denser than the others, sheltering a litter-dwelling ant fauna dominated by numerous and abundant cryptic species. These taxonomical and functional dissi-milarities may reflect the influence of the environmental heterogeneity, which, through variable abiotic conditions, can contribute to maintaining a notably rich ant biodiversity in these Neotropical habitats.


Groc S.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Delabie J.H.C.,Upa Laboratorio Of Mirmecologia | Longino J.T.,Evergreen State College | Orivel J.,University Paul Sabatier | And 3 more authors.
Biological Conservation | Year: 2010

Insects, particularly ants, are good bioindicators of the state of ecosystems. Nevertheless, incorporating them into conservation surveys is expensive due to problems associated with their identification, which is exacerbated by the fact that there are fewer and fewer taxonomists working today. " Taxonomic sufficiency" (TS), which identifies organisms to a level of taxonomic resolution sufficient enough to satisfy the objectives of a study, has never been applied to Neotropical ant communities. We analysed five Neotropical datasets representing ant assemblages collected with different sampling methods in various habitats. We first treated them using two complementary and cumulative TS methods, higher-taxon and " indicator taxa" surrogacies, before testing a new approach called " mixed-level method" that combines the two previous approaches. For the higher-taxon surrogacy, we showed that, above species, genus is the most informative taxonomic level. Then, mixed-level method provided more information on ant assemblages than did the two others, even though the " indicator taxa" surrogacy was based on relevant indicator genera. Although habitat type has no effect on its efficiency, this new method is influenced by the dataset structure and the type of sampling method used to collect data. We have thus developed a new method for analyzing Neotropical ant faunas that enables the taxonomic work linked to the identification of problematic species to be significantly reduced, while conserving most of the information on the ant assemblage. This method should enhance the work of Neotropical entomologists not specialised in taxonomy, particularly those concerned with biological conservation and indication. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Upa Laboratorio Of Mirmecologia, University of Auvergne, French National Center for Scientific Research, Ecolab and CIRAD UMR CIRAD 93 ; Ecofog
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Comptes rendus biologies | Year: 2015

In the Guianese rainforest, we examined the impact of the presence of guano in and around a bat roosting site (a cave). We used ant communities as an indicator to evaluate this impact because they occupy a central place in the functioning of tropical rainforest ecosystems and they play different roles in the food web as they can be herbivores, generalists, scavengers or predators. The ant species richness around the cave did not differ from a control sample situated 500m away. Yet, the comparison of functional groups resulted in significantly greater numbers of detritivorous fungus-growing and predatory ant colonies around the cave compared to the control, the contrary being true for nectar and honeydew feeders. The role of bats, through their guano, was shown using stable isotope analyses as we noted significantly greater (15)N values for the ant species captured in and around the cave compared to controls.

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