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Kanathur, India

Muthezhilan R.,University of UGC Act 1956 | Jayaprakash K.,University of UGC Act 1956 | Parthiban C.,Annamalai University | Hussain A.A.J.,University of UGC Act 1956
Biosciences Biotechnology Research Asia | Year: 2014

The continuous use of chemical fertilizers in agriculture field is highly toxic to the nature and also disturbs the soil living beneficial microorganisms. Seaweeds are well known commercially available marine plants and it has many eco-friendly applications. Thus the present study was carried out develop a plant growth promoting seaweed liquid fertilizer (SLF) for agricultural crop plants. In this study commercially available eight different seaweeds such as Ulva fasciata, Enteromorpha intestinalis, Dictyota dichotoma, Sargassum wightii, Padina boergesenii, Amphiroa anceps, Avanthopleura spicifera and Spyridia hypnoides, were collected from the rocky shore areas of Mandapam Coast, Rameshwaram District, Tamil Nadu, India. The eight different seaweed liquid fertilizer (SLF) was prepared to determine their plant growth promoting ability in agriculturally important crop plants such as, Green gram, Black gram, Mustard and Paddy by seed germination and soil drenching methods in both sterilized and unsterilized soil at laboratory scale experimental setups. In seed germination assay, 100% germination was observed in seeds soaked with Sargassum wightii, Padina boergesenii and Ulva fasciata. In soil treatment and plant culture study after 15 days of sowing the root length, shoot length and fresh weight of all the seedlings were recorded in all the setups. In that, Sargassum wightii, Padina boergesenii and Ulva fasciata seaweed liquid fertilizer (SLF) have shown the maximum plant growth promoting activity in unsterilized soil than the sterilized soil. The results were well demonstrated the effect of seaweed liquid fertilizer (SLF) in plant growth promotion and suggested to use this fertilizer to enhance the profitability in agricultural field. Source


Muthezhilan R.,University of UGC Act 1956 | Jayaprakash K.,University of UGC Act 1956 | Karthik R.,University of UGC Act 1956 | Hussain A.J.,University of UGC Act 1956
Biosciences Biotechnology Research Asia | Year: 2014

The use of non biodegradable plastic based packaging materials has been stopped in several food industries due to their disadvantages, so bio based polymers like polysaccharides are the alternative source for the preparation of films in food packaging. Thus, the present work was aimed to prepare the carrageenan (polysaccharides) based antibiotics amended films to prevent the food borne microbial pathogen in packed foods to extend its shelf life. In this study, morphologically 25 different endophytic fungal strains were isolated from different salt marsh plants, such as, Sweda monica and S.maritima were collected from Kelambakam Coastal area, East Coast of Tamil Nadu, India and they were named as, AEF51 to AEF75. All the fungal isolates were screened for cellulase activity and the maximum cellulase producing potential strain AEF58 was mass cultured. After the partial purification of cellulase it was lyophilized and stored for further use. The red seaweed Amphiroa anceps was collected from Kootapuli Village, Valliyoor Taluk, Tirunelveli District, Tamil Nadu, India. From that, the carrageenan was extracted by biological method using endophytic fungal cellulase. After the extraction of carrageenan the antibiotics such as Amoxycillin, Tetracycline, Chloroamphenical, Erythromycin, Doxycyoline, Ofloxacin, Cephalexin, Dictoxacilin and Ampicillin were amended and different films were prepared using standard protocols. All the films were tested against different seafood borne pathogens such as, E.coli, Vibrio cholerae, V.parahaemolyticus, Salmonella sp, Shigella sp and Listeria sp (Obtained from AMET Microbial Culture Collection Centre). Among them, the Cephalexin amended film was showed the maximum zone of inhibition (ZOI) against all the tested pathogens. From the results, the study concluded that, the extraction of carragenan by biological substances increase the production and antibiotic amended carrageenan based films will be used for food packaging to control the pathogenic microbes and preserve the foods from spoilage. Source


Muthezhilan R.,University of UGC Act 1956 | Balaji K.,University of UGC Act 1956 | Gopi K.,University of UGC Act 1956 | Hussain A.J.,University of UGC Act 1956
Biosciences Biotechnology Research Asia | Year: 2014

Nowadays, the pharmaceutical market is growing rapidly and continuously in worldwide but, still the demand for new drug discovery is encouraged. Because, the growth of numbers drug resistant infectious disease and more upcoming disorders to human and animals. In general, the marine animals especially mollusks and their compounds constitute a practically unlimited resource of new active substances. Hence, the present study was carried out to determine the bactericidal activity of Crassostrea madrasensis protein against human pathogens. The edible Oyster Crassostrea madrasensis was collected from Rayapuram lnading centre, Tamil Nadu, India. Immediately it was extracted by using phosphate buffer at three different pH (4, 7 and 9) and all the extracts were screened against six different human pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, Salmonella sp, Shigella sp, Streptococcus sp and Staphylococcus sp by agar well diffusion assay. After 24 hrs of incubation the maximum inhibitory effect was observed against Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Streptococcus sp and Staphylococcus sp and the minimum inhibitory effect was observed against Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella sp and Shigella sp respectively. Whereas checking the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), the crude protein extract of Crassostrea madrasensis was inhibited the bacterial strains with the minimum inhibitory concentration of not less than 0.1ml (100 1/4 l). The molecular weight of the crude protein was found from 12.2 to 74.2 kDa and the total protein content of phosphate buffer crude extract of Crassostrea madrasensis was found to be 312 1/4 g/ mg. From, the results, the work has suggested to use this commercially available and protein rich (bactericidal) oyster in therapeutics for the development of novel antibiotics against multiple drug resistance (MDR) pathogenic microbes. Source

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