Wuppertal, Germany

University of Wuppertal

www.uni-wuppertal.de
Wuppertal, Germany

The University of Wuppertal is a German scientific institution, located in Wuppertal, North Rhine-Westphalia.The university, the full German name of which is Bergische Universität Wuppertal , was formed in 1972 and is located in the city of Wuppertal, within the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. In 2014/15 it had almost 20,000 students in a wide range of subjects with many interdisciplinary linkages in 7 faculties:Division A: Humanities and Cultural StudiesDivision B: Schumpeter School of Business and EconomicsDivision C: Mathematics and Natural scienceDivision D: Architecture, Civil Engineering Mechanical Engineering, SafetyDivision E: Electrical Engineering, Information Technology, Media TechnologyDivision F: Design and ArtDivision G: Education and Social scienceThe main building of the BU Wuppertal is located in the suburb of Elberfeld on Grifflenberg and is a massive, cut honeycomb concrete purpose. The university now has 3 campuses: Campus Grifflenberg in Elberfeld, Wuppertal Campus Freudenberg in Elberfeld, Wuppertal Campus Haspel in Unterbarmen, WuppertalAll three campuses hold specific parts of the University Library of Wuppertal, the main library at Campus Grifflenberg holds five specific libraries.From 2004 until 2010, the University of Wuppertal had the second supercomputer at a German university. ALiCEnext, the supercomputer, is designed as a cluster and consists of 512 so-called Blades. ALiCEnext used in the field of elementary particle physics, applied computer science, astro-particle physics and experimental high energy physics. Wikipedia.

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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: SGA-RIA | Phase: FETFLAGSHIP | Award Amount: 89.00M | Year: 2016

Understanding the human brain is one of the greatest scientific challenges of our time. Such an understanding can provide profound insights into our humanity, leading to fundamentally new computing technologies, and transforming the diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders. Modern ICT brings this prospect within reach. The HBP Flagship Initiative (HBP) thus proposes a unique strategy that uses ICT to integrate neuroscience data from around the world, to develop a unified multi-level understanding of the brain and diseases, and ultimately to emulate its computational capabilities. The goal is to catalyze a global collaborative effort. During the HBPs first Specific Grant Agreement (SGA1), the HBP Core Project will outline the basis for building and operating a tightly integrated Research Infrastructure, providing HBP researchers and the scientific Community with unique resources and capabilities. Partnering Projects will enable independent research groups to expand the capabilities of the HBP Platforms, in order to use them to address otherwise intractable problems in neuroscience, computing and medicine in the future. In addition, collaborations with other national, European and international initiatives will create synergies, maximizing returns on research investment. SGA1 covers the detailed steps that will be taken to move the HBP closer to achieving its ambitious Flagship Objectives.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRAIA-01-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 9.29M | Year: 2016

Atmospheric simulation chambers are the most advanced tools for elucidating processes that occur in the atmosphere. They lay the foundations for air quality and climate models and also aid interpretation of field measurements. EUROCHAMP-2020 will further integrate the most advanced European atmospheric simulation chambers into a world-class infrastructure for research and innovation. A co-ordinated set of networking activities will deliver improved chamber operability across the infrastructure, as well as standard protocols for data generation and analysis. Outreach and training activities will foster a strong culture of cooperation with all stakeholders and users. Collaborative links will be established with other environmental research infrastructures to promote integration and sustainability within the European Research Area. Cooperation with private sector companies will be actively promoted to exploit the innovation potential of the infrastructure by supporting development of scientific instruments, sensor technologies and de-polluting materials. Trans-national access will be extended to sixteen different chambers and four calibration centres. A new, upgraded data centre will provide virtual access to a huge database of experimental chamber data and advanced analytical resources. Joint research activities will enhance the capability of the infrastructure to provide improved services for users. Measurement techniques and experimental protocols will be further developed to facilitate new investigations on climate change drivers, impacts of air quality on health and cultural heritage, while also stimulating trans-disciplinary research. Advanced process models will be developed for interpretation of chamber experiments and wider use in atmospheric modelling. Overall, EUROCHAMP-2020 will significantly enhance the capacity for exploring atmospheric processes and ensure that Europe retains its place as the world-leader in atmospheric simulation chamber research.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: ICT-2013.9.9 | Award Amount: 72.73M | Year: 2013

Understanding the human brain is one of the greatest challenges facing 21st century science. If we can rise to the challenge, we can gain profound insights into what makes us human, develop new treatments for brain diseases and build revolutionary new computing technologies. Today, for the first time, modern ICT has brought these goals within sight. The goal of the Human Brain Project, part of the FET Flagship Programme, is to translate this vision into reality, using ICT as a catalyst for a global collaborative effort to understand the human brain and its diseases and ultimately to emulate its computational capabilities. The Human Brain Project will last ten years and will consist of a ramp-up phase (from month 1 to month 36) and subsequent operational phases.\nThis Grant Agreement covers the ramp-up phase. During this phase the strategic goals of the project will be to design, develop and deploy the first versions of six ICT platforms dedicated to Neuroinformatics, Brain Simulation, High Performance Computing, Medical Informatics, Neuromorphic Computing and Neurorobotics, and create a user community of research groups from within and outside the HBP, set up a European Institute for Theoretical Neuroscience, complete a set of pilot projects providing a first demonstration of the scientific value of the platforms and the Institute, develop the scientific and technological capabilities required by future versions of the platforms, implement a policy of Responsible Innovation, and a programme of transdisciplinary education, and develop a framework for collaboration that links the partners under strong scientific leadership and professional project management, providing a coherent European approach and ensuring effective alignment of regional, national and European research and programmes. The project work plan is organized in the form of thirteen subprojects, each dedicated to a specific area of activity.\nA significant part of the budget will be used for competitive calls to complement the collective skills of the Consortium with additional expertise.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: DRS-14-2015 | Award Amount: 4.96M | Year: 2016

Modern critical infrastructures are becoming increasingly smarter (e.g. cities). Making the infrastructures smarter usually means making them smarter in normal operation and use: more adaptive, more intelligent But will these smart critical infrastructures (SCIs) behave equally smartly and be smartly resilient also when exposed to extreme threats, such as extreme weather disasters or terrorist attacks? If making existing infrastructure smarter is achieved by making it more complex, would it also make it more vulnerable? Would this affect resilience of an SCI as its ability to anticipate, prepare for, adapt and withstand, respond to, and recover? These are the main questions tackled by this proposal. The proposal envisages answering the above questions in several steps. (#1) By identifying existing indicators suitable for assessing resilience of SCIs. (#2) By identifying new smart resilience indicators (RIs) including those from Big Data. (#3) By developing a new advanced resilience assessment methodology (TRL4) based on smart RIs (resilience indicators cube, including the resilience matrix). (#4) By developing the interactive SCI Dashboard tool. (#5) By applying the methodology/tools in 8 case studies, integrated under one virtual, smart-city-like, European case study. The SCIs considered (in 8 European countries!) deal with energy, transportation, health, water Results #2, #3, #4 and #5 are a breakthrough innovation. This approach will allow benchmarking the best-practice solutions and identifying the early warnings, improving resilience of SCIs against new threats and cascading and ripple effects. The benefits/savings to be achieved by the project will be assessed by the reinsurance company participant. The consortium involves 7 leading end-users/industries in the area, 7 leading research organizations, supported by academia and lead by a dedicated European organization. External world leading resilience experts will be included in the CIRAB.


Rief W.,University of Marburg | Martin A.,University of Wuppertal
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology | Year: 2014

The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) changed the term somatoform disorders to somatic symptom and related disorders and further modified diagnostic labels and criteria. We review evidence for the validity of the new criteria, specifically of somatic symptom disorder (SSD), and present a critical discussion of unsolved and new problems. We also provide an update of mechanisms and interventions that have been empirically evaluated in somatoform disorders. For many mechanisms, it is unclear whether their role can be easily transposed to SSD. Therefore more research is needed on the similarities and differences between medically unexplained and medically explained conditions. To overcome the obvious shortcomings of the current classification, we offer a modification of this DSM-5 section as well as a crossover system to apply these criteria for somatic symptom and related disorders. This proposal allows working with DSM-5 but also continuing successful lines of research with concepts such as hypochondriasis/illness anxiety, chronic pain, and medically unexplained versus medically explained syndromes. © 2014 by Annual Reviews.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2013.4.0-2 | Award Amount: 5.40M | Year: 2014

Solar photovoltaic (PV) technology is one of the fastest growing sustainable, renewable energy conversion technologies that can help meet the increasing global energy demands. Organic photovoltaic (OPV) technologies are particularly attractive due to their compatibility with low-cost roll-to-roll and printing processing at low temperatures on a wide variety of substrate materials and the lack of scarce or toxic materials rendering them environmentally friendly. OPVs can also benefit from a larger selection of functional materials as the required properties (high semi-conductor mobility, suitable band-gap, good intrinsic stability, good barrier properties, etc.) can be tuned by careful design and synthesis. Currently, the highest cell efficiencies reported in Europe for solution processed single (>9%), double (8.9%) and triple (9.6%) junction cells as well as the lowest water vapor transmission rates for transparent flexible barriers (WVTR 10-6 g/m2/day) were obtained by the partners of MUJULIMA. In this project we show how with new and innovative materials we will increase the module efficiencies (larger than 15%) and outdoor stability to make OPVs a commercially competitive viable technology. The general objective of MUJULIMA is to develop high performance commercially competitive materials with excellent intrinsic stabilities for the cost-effective production of double and triple junction OPVs, for improved light management and for enhanced outdoor stability to achieve high module efficiencies (larger than 15%) and lifetime (larger than 10 years). The innovative materials and technologies developed within MUJULIMA will be demonstrated via three applications powered by OPVs: (a) in-house electrical automation devices, (b) urban furniture, and (c) flexible OPV modules on bus roof.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-EJD | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-EJD | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2015

Progress in computers and algorithms in the last years has made numerical simulation and modelling a key research methodology in both academia and industry, which in turn drives exascale computing in order to maintain excellence in research and innovation. A disruptive evolution in computer technologies is required for attaining exascale performances in the coming years bringing challenges that urgently need to be addressed across science and engineering fields. Therefore new interdisciplinary strategies are required in order to educate the next generation of scientists to address such challenges enabling them to be at the forefront of their respective research fields. Instead of the traditional domain-specific training, integrated approaches are needed that can be best implemented by collaborative networks of universities, research institutes and industrial partners. We propose a highly interdisciplinary joint doctorate program realized by bringing together world-leading experts in applied mathematics, high performance computing technologies, particle and nuclear physics, fluid dynamics and life sciences to appropriately train researchers in Europe to exploit high performance computing, advance science and promote innovation. Students will be trained in mathematical and computational concepts underpinning current and future numerical simulations in turbulent flows, computational biology and lattice quantum chromodynamics. The research projects are designed to enhance collaborations and interactions across these disciplines, integrating non-academic partners, and to develop methodologies that efficiently use large-scale numerical simulations on future high performance computer systems. Students who complete this training program will be versatile to undertake highly interdisciplinary projects, well positioned to embark on a successful career in academia or the industrial sector.

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