University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics

University, Wisconsin, United States

University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics

University, Wisconsin, United States

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PubMed | University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics
Type: | Journal: Gynecologic oncology case reports | Year: 2013

Ovarian angiosarcomas are rare and clinically aggressive neoplasms. In addition to surgery, taxol is the most studied adjuvant chemotherapy. Anti-angiogenic therapies can be considered as an option.


Ibele A.R.,University of Wisconsin - Madison | Kennedy G.D.,University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics | Lund D.P.,University of Wisconsin - Madison | Nichol P.F.,University of Wisconsin - Madison
Journal of Pediatric Surgery | Year: 2010

In adults, mesenteric venous thrombosis with extension into the portal system is a known complication of total proctocolectomy with pouch ileoanal anastomosis. Although frequently reported in adults, this complication is rare in pediatric patients undergoing this operation. We report 2 cases of adolescent patients with ulcerative colitis who experienced portal vein thrombosis after this procedure. Both were treated with systemic anticoagulation therapy with complete resolution of their clots. We recommend that mesenteric/portal venous thrombosis be considered in the differential diagnosis in any child presenting with fever, abdominal pain, and leukocytosis after restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch anastomosis and that imaging obtained to evaluate abdominal complaints in this population be directed toward ruling out this complication. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Larson J.D.,University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics | Gutowski K.A.,University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics | Marcus B.C.,University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics | Rao V.K.,University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics | And 3 more authors.
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery | Year: 2010

Background: Current rates of postoperative nausea and vomiting experienced by outpatient surgery patients are as high as 20 to 30 percent. Electroacustimulation therapy has been demonstrated to be effective in controlling these symptoms, but trials identifying its efficacy in the outpatient surgery population are lacking. Methods: One hundred twenty-two patients undergoing surgical procedures at an outpatient surgery center were randomized to two treatment arms. The first arm received the standardized pharmacologic postoperative nausea and vomiting prevention typical for patients undergoing outpatient surgery, whereas in the second arm, the ReliefBand and pharmacologic measures were used. The ReliefBand is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved electroacustimulation device. Electroacustimulation is a derivative of acupuncture therapy that uses a small electrical current to stimulate acupuncture points on the human body and is thought to relieve nausea, vomiting, and pain. Outcomes measured were pain and nausea symptoms, emetic events, the need for rescue medications, and the time to discharge. Results: The electroacustimulation arm reported statistically significant lower nausea scores at 30 minutes and 120 minutes postoperatively (p < 0.05). In addition, subgroup analysis demonstrated significant findings in favor of the experimental group, with anatomical subsets of surgical patients requiring less pain medication and shorter times from surgery to discharge when compared with the standard treatment. However, electroacustimulation did not have a significant effect on the amount of pain experienced by patients in any group. Conclusion: The authors' study demonstrates that electroacustimulation offers added protection against symptoms of postoperative nausea and vomiting in an outpatient cosmetic surgery population, representing a safe and cost-effective addition to current pharmacologic preventive measures. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.


PubMed | University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics
Type: Case Reports | Journal: WMJ : official publication of the State Medical Society of Wisconsin | Year: 2010

Metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting with immune thrombocytopenic purpura is a very rare association. To date, only 1 case report found in the literature delineates such an association. We present a case of a patient with newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma with new-onset immune thrombocytopenic purpura. The patients platelet count returned to normal limits after being treated with oral corticosteroid therapy. In conclusion, immune thrombocytopenic purpura can be associated with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma and responds well to corticosteroid therapy.

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