Charlottesville, VA, United States
Charlottesville, VA, United States

The University of Virginia , often referred to as simply Virginia, is a public research university in Charlottesville, Virginia. UVA is known for its historic foundations, student-run honor code, and secret societies.Its initial Board of Visitors included U.S. Presidents Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe. President Monroe was the sitting President of the United States at the time of the founding; Jefferson and Madison were the first two rectors. UVA was established in 1819, with its Academical Village and original courses of study conceived and designed entirely by Jefferson. UNESCO designated it a World Heritage Site in 1987, an honor shared with nearby Monticello.The first university of the American South elected to the Association of American Universities in 1904, UVA is classified as Very High Research Activity in the Carnegie Classification. The university is affiliated with 7 Nobel Laureates, and has produced 7 NASA astronauts, 7 Marshall Scholars, 4 Churchill Scholars, 29 Truman Scholars, and 50 Rhodes Scholars, the most of any state-affiliated institution in the U.S. Supported in part by the Commonwealth, it receives far more funding from private sources than public, and its students come from all 50 states and 147 countries. It also operates a small liberal arts branch campus in the far southwestern corner of the state.Since 1953, Virginia's athletic teams have competed in the Atlantic Coast Conference of Division I of the NCAA and are known as the Virginia Cavaliers. Virginia won its 7th men's soccer national title in December 2014, bringing its collective total to 24 National Championships, and 63 ACC Championships since 2002 , the most of any conference member during that time. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: COMPUTER SYSTEMS | Award Amount: 270.00K | Year: 2011

Over the past decade or more, microprocessors have faced increasing challenges in achieving high-performance for current and emerging software applications while abiding by severe power and thermal limits. In response, industry has turned to approaches that use specialized graphics and computational hardware and complex memory organizations. The end result is that computer systems have become more heterogeneous and complex, in ways that make it difficult for programmers to write efficient and high-performance software. Software tuned to run on one implementation will often not run at all or will perform poorly or unpredictably when ported to even a different implementation in the same chip family. The objective of this research effort is to design and evaluate system and hardware support that tailors memory and data access/movements to improve performance and power efficiency, while also easing the issues of programmability and of tuning software for individual chip characteristics.
The two key themes of this work are ShapeShifting and PubSub data abstractions. ShapeShifting refers to optimizations and hardware support structures that allow data to be transformed in layout, in order to support faster access, more efficient use of memory, and other attributes that improve power and performance. In some preliminary experiments, even a software-only implementation of ShapeShifting improves performance by 15%-2.8X. PubSub data abstractions offer methods for individual processors to indicate interest (or disinterest) in updates regarding other program variables. These abstractions form the underpinning for memory optimizations that are tailored to the application?s memory usage patterns. By mitigating false sharing, encouraging coarse-grained fetches, and reducing coherence broadcasts to uninterested cores, PubSub has the potential to improve the power and performance efficiency of multi-core implementations by a factor of 2X or more.
The research program is targeting several types of broad impact. First, the simulators and tools developed by this project will be released as free, open-source software. Second, the results can enhance performance and energy efficiency of future parallel hardware. Energy-efficiency is of particular concern from a national economic and strategic standpoint, given the growing electricity consumption of computer systems and the important role of the memory hierarchy in influencing computer power consumption.


Patent
University of Virginia and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center | Date: 2016-08-03

Methods, systems, and computer-readable media for rapid 3D dynamic arterial spin labeling with a sparse model-based image reconstruction are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method includes acquiring magnetic resonance data associated with an area of interest of a subject. The magnetic resonance data includes associated with arterial spin labeling (ASL) of the area of interest. The method also includes performing image reconstruction on the acquired resonance data. The image reconstruction includes compressed sensing enforcing a model-based sparsity constraint, where the model-based sparsity constraint is based on an ASL signal prototype dictionary.


Patent
University of Virginia | Date: 2016-10-17

Systems and methods for epicardial electrophysiology and other procedures are provided in which the location of an access needle may be inferred according to the detection of different pressure frequencies in separate organs, or different locations, in the body of a subject. Methods may include inserting a needle including a first sensor into a body of a subject, and receiving pressure frequency information from the first sensor. A second sensor may be used to provide cardiac waveform information of the subject. A current location of the needle may be distinguished from another location based on an algorithm including the pressure frequency information and the cardiac waveform information.


A gait device and method for rehabilitating or developing a subjects lower extremity. The device may include a movable belt configured for the subject to ambulate thereon; a track provided above the movable belt that is generally aligned with the movable belt; and a coupler that is configured to travel along the track and attach to the distal portion of the lower extremity of the subject while the subject is ambulating on the movable belt.


Patent
Technion Research And Development Foundation Ltd. and University of Virginia | Date: 2016-10-17

There are provided methods and compositions useful in cell-cell fusion using Fusion Family (FF) proteins of nematode origin. There are further provided antinematodal methods and compositions, utilizing fusogenic proteins of the nematode Fusion Family.


Patent
University of Virginia | Date: 2015-03-17

The present invention encompasses the use of adipose tissue derived cells, or conditioned medium of such cells, to treat and prevent vascular related injuries, diseases, disorders, and conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, where, in one aspect, pericytes such as retinal pericytes have been lost or damaged. The present application further discloses compositions and methods useful for enhancing the function and activity of the adipose tissue derived cells in the treatment and prevention of injuries, diseases, disorders, and conditions including the use of TGF to condition the cells to enhance their activity.


A technique for treating diabetes that recognizes patient insulin sensitivity is a time-varying physiological parameter. The described techniques for treating diabetes include measuring interstitial fluid glucose concentration, reading insulin delivery data, determining patient insulin sensitivity based on the interstitial fluid glucose concentration and insulin delivery data, and a time-varying physiological parameter, and dispensing an insulin dose from an insulin delivery device based on the determined patient insulin sensitivity.


Patent
University of Virginia | Date: 2015-04-15

Provided are isolated TCRs, TCR-like molecules, and portions thereof that bind to phosphopeptide-HLA-A2 complexes. The isolated TCRs, TCR-like molecules, or portions are optionally soluble TCRs, TCR-like molecules, or portions. Also provided are isolated nucleic acids encoding the disclosed TCRs, TCR-like molecules, or portions; host cells that contain the disclosed TCRs, TCR-like molecules, or portions; pharmaceutical compositions that include the disclosed TCRs, TCR-like molecules, portions, nucleic acids, and/or T cells; kits; and methods of using the same.


A graphene composite, and method of making and using the graphene composite.


Patent
University of Iowa and University of Virginia | Date: 2016-09-16

A method for treating intractable pain via electrical stimulation of the spinal cord. Remote, non-contact stimulation of a selected region of spinal cord is achieved by placement of a transceiver patch directly on the surface of that region of spinal cord, with said patch optionally being inductively coupled to a transmitter patch of similar size on either the outer or inner wall of the dura surrounding that region of the spinal cord. By inductively exchanging electrical power and signals between said transmitter and transceiver patches, and by carrying out the necessary electronic and stimulus signal distribution functions on the transceiver patch, the targeted dorsal column axons can be stimulated without the unintended stray stimulation of nearby dorsal rootlets. Novel configurations of a pliable surface-sheath and clamp or dentate ligament attachment features which realize undamaging attachment of the patch to the spinal cord are described.


A low voltage crystal oscillator (XTAL) driver with feedback controlled duty cycling for ultra low power biases an amplifier for an XTAL in the sub-threshold operating regime. A feedback control scheme can be used to bias the amplifier for an XTAL biased in the sub-threshold operating regime. The amplifier of a XTAL oscillator can be duty cycled to save power, e.g., the XTAL driver can be turned off to save power when the amplitude of the XTAL oscillation reaches a maximum value in range; but be turned back on when the amplitude of the XTAL oscillation starts to decay, to maintain the oscillation before it stops. In addition or alternatively, a feedback control scheme to duty cycle the amplifier of a XTAL oscillator can be used to monitor the amplitude of the oscillation.


Patent
University of Virginia | Date: 2016-09-01

A pulse train comprising chirped pulses can be used to excite a sample, such as for spectroscopic analysis. The respective chirped pulses can include a frequency sweep to establish a first frequency-domain comb. A width of frequency-domain comb peaks can be established at least in part by a total duration of the pulse train, and a bandwidth of the first frequency-domain comb can be determined at least in part by a bandwidth of the frequency sweep of the respective chirped pulses. A free-space or enclosed sample interaction region can be used.


Patent
The Regents Of The University Of Colorado and University of Virginia | Date: 2016-11-14

Disclosed are biomarkers, methods and assay systems for the identification of cancer patients who are predicted to respond, or not respond to the therapeutic administration of radiation therapy to treat cancer. Thus, the invention provides a diagnostic paradigm to select cancer patients who will benefit from radiation therapy. In particular, the invention provides a novel 41-gene biomarker model associated with clinical outcome following radiotherapy across multiple histological tumor types, including the biomarker Cyclophilin B (PPIB).


Patent
University of Virginia | Date: 2016-11-18

The invention provides methods to assess protein stability and to obtain sizing information. In one aspect, the screen comprises a 94 detergent panel and a series of MWCO filtered microplates. A protein of interest is bound to an affinity matrix and aliquoted into a 96-well microplate. Wells containing the immobilized protein are washed in the new detergent and then eluted in the new detergent into a collection plate. Protein not stable in the new detergent is precipitated on the resin and not present in the elutions. Half of the elution is passed through a high (i.e., 300 kDa) MWCO microplate and the other half through a low (i.e., 100 kDa) MWCO microplate. Elutions from the microplates are spotted on a nitrocellulose membrane, visualized by Western analysis (or by some other method), and quantified. The high MWCO provides stability readout and the ratio of low/high kDa provides sizing information.


Patent
University of Virginia | Date: 2015-04-14

Cellular materials and methods of making and using the cellular materials.


Patent
University of Virginia | Date: 2016-09-23

A flexible electrode comprises an activated cotton textile composite comprising activated carbon fibers, nickel sulfide nanoparticles and graphene and a process for making the flexible electrode. The process may comprise preparing a cotton textile containing Ni(NO_(3))_(2). Then, the cotton textile containing Ni(NO_(3))_(2 )may be heated at a first temperature to produce an activated cotton textile composite comprising activated carbon fibers, nickel nanoparticles and graphene. The activated cotton textile composite may be then treated with sulfur to produce an activated cotton textile composite comprising activated carbon fibers, nickel sulfide nanoparticles and graphene. The nickel sulfide particles may be NiS_(2 )nanoparticles in a form of nanobowls, and distributed on a surface and inside the activated carbon fibers. The activated carbon fibers and the nickel sulfide nanoparticles may be coated with graphene. Banana peels may be activated and treated with the similar processes to form electrodes for both supercapacitor and battery applications.


Patent
University of Virginia | Date: 2015-09-30

The present invention discloses a heterogeneous computation framework, of Association. Rule Mining (ARM) using Microns Autotmata Processor (AP). This framework is based on the Apriori algorithm. Two Automaton designs are proposed to match and count the individual itemset. Several performance improvement strategies are proposed including minimizing the number of reporting vectors and reduce reconfiguration delays. The experiment results show up to 94 speed ups of the proposed AP-accelerated Apriori on six synthetic and real-world datasets, when compared with the Apriori single-core CPU implementation. The proposed AP-accelerated Apriori solution also outperforms the state-of-the-art multicore and GPU implementations of Equivalence Class Transformation (Eclat) algorithm on big datasets.


Patent
University of Virginia | Date: 2016-09-16

In one aspect, the disclosed technology relates to a method which, in one example embodiment, includes acquiring magnetic resonance imaging data for a plurality of images of the heart of a subject during free breathing of the subject. The method also includes generating an additional plurality of images with high tissue-blood contrast over the region of interest, and selecting a subset of images from the plurality of images, based upon a pre-determined quality metric of image similarity, to be used for non-rigid image registration. The method also includes aligning the subset of images by non-rigid image registration using a combination of the plurality of images and the additional plurality of images, and creating a parametric map from the aligned images.


Teo J.C.Y.,University of Virginia | Hughes T.L.,Urbana University
Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics | Year: 2017

The phenomena associated with topological defects have had an enormous impact in condensed matter physics for more than 50 years. Beginning with an understanding of topological defects in ordered phases, the field is now sharply focused on defects in topological phases of matter. In this review, we cover aspects of defects in conventional ordered media, bound states on defects in strong topological insulators (TIs) and topological superconductors (TSCs), and bound states on defects in crystalline topological phases protected by spatial symmetries. As a unifying theme, we present the structure of many types of index theorems that relate the existence of topological bound states to the bulk topology of the host phase of matter and the topological charge of the relevant defects. © 2017 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Bullock T.N.,University of Virginia
Current Opinion in Immunology | Year: 2017

The capacity of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors has been appreciated for over 100 years. However, clinical success has largely depended on the elucidation of the positive and negative regulators of effector cells after their activation via the antigen cell receptor. On the one hand, effector cells upregulate checkpoint molecules that are thought to play a role in limiting immunopathology. On the other, second and third waves of costimulation are often required to promote the expansion, survival and differentiation of effector cells. While it is clear that the immune system can be unleashed by blocking checkpoint molecules, this approach is most effective when pre-existing responses exist in patients’ tumors. Thus, coordinating checkpoint blockade with costimulation could potentially expand the patient population that receives benefit from cancer immunotherapy. This review will discuss how the costimulatory molecule CD27 sculpts immunity and preclinical/clinical data indicating its potential for cancer immunotherapy and its clinical translation. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd


Carey R.M.,University of Virginia
Current Hypertension Reports | Year: 2017

Angiotensin type-2 receptors (AT2Rs) in the renal proximal tubule inhibit sodium (Na+) reabsorption by inducing renal cyclic GMP formation and internalizing and inhibiting major Na+ transporters Na+-H+ exchanger-3 (NHE-3) and Na+/K+ATPase (NKA). Instead of angiotensin II (Ang II), angiotensin III (Ang III) is the predominant endogenous agonist for this response. Exogenous non-peptide AT2R agonist Compound-21 induces natriuresis and lowers blood pressure (BP) in normal and Ang II-infused hypertensive rodents. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR; both pre-hypertensive and hypertensive) have defective natriuretic responses to Ang III, suggesting a defect in AT2R-mediated natriuresis in SHR that leads to hypertension. The mechanisms of deficient AT2R-mediated natriuresis in SHR are unknown but could involve either pre-receptor or receptor/post-receptor defects. © 2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Santen R.J.,University of Virginia
Menopause | Year: 2017

ABSTRACT: The Womenʼs Health Initiative studies and others have suggested that menopausal hormone therapy may enhance the risk of new cardiovascular (CV) events in older women and diminish the development of coronary atherosclerosis in younger women. The underlying mechanisms to explain these findings are encapsulated in the term “Timing Hypothesis.” Extensive pathophysiologic studies have provided mechanistic evidence for the dichotomous effects of estrogen on coronary artery vasculature. Early in the atherosclerotic disease process, estrogen exerts protective effects on the endothelium and retards plaque formation. Late in the process, estrogen causes plaque erosion or rupture with subsequent thrombosis and acute coronary events. Analysis of the Timing Hypothesis in women examined in the Womenʼs Health Initiative primarily used chronologic age to assess divergent effects of estrogen. The complexity of the data underlying coronary pathophysiology has resulted in controversy whether MHT can be used in older women or those with prior CV disease. In a debate of this issue at a recent International Menopause Society meeting, the concept of using CV age rather than chronologic age was discussed as a practical method of resolving this issue and facilitating therapeutic decisions in older women. This “Personal Perspective” will review the concepts underlying CV age, describe how it is determined, provide support for its utility, and propose future studies using this parameter. © 2017 by The North American Menopause Society.


Moss T.J.,University of Virginia
Critical Care Medicine | Year: 2017

OBJECTIVE:: To determine the association of new-onset atrial fibrillation with outcomes, including ICU length of stay and survival. DESIGN:: Retrospective cohort of ICU admissions. We found atrial fibrillation using automated detection (≥ 90s in 30 min) and classed as new-onset if there was no prior diagnosis of atrial fibrillation. We identified determinants of new-onset atrial fibrillation and, using propensity matching, characterized its impact on outcomes. SETTING:: Tertiary care academic center. PATIENTS:: A total of 8,356 consecutive adult admissions to either the medical or surgical/trauma/burn ICU with available continuous electrocardiogram data. INTERVENTIONS:: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:: From 74 patient-years of every 15-minute observations, we detected atrial fibrillation in 1,610 admissions (19%), with median burden less than 2%. Most atrial fibrillation was paroxysmal; less than 2% of admissions were always in atrial fibrillation. New-onset atrial fibrillation was subclinical or went undocumented in 626, or 8% of all ICU admissions. Advanced age, acute respiratory failure, and sepsis were the strongest predictors of new-onset atrial fibrillation. In propensity-adjusted regression analyses, clinical new-onset atrial fibrillation was associated with increased hospital mortality (odds ratio, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.01–2.63) and longer length of stay (2.25 d; CI, 0.58–3.92). New-onset atrial fibrillation was not associated with survival after hospital discharge (hazard ratio, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.76–1.28 and hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.67–1.83, respectively, for subclinical and clinical new-onset atrial fibrillation). CONCLUSIONS:: Automated analysis of continuous electrocardiogram heart rate dynamics detects new-onset atrial fibrillation in many ICU patients. Though often transient and frequently unrecognized, new-onset atrial fibrillation is associated with poor hospital outcomes.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. Copyright © by 2017 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


Antonovics J.,University of Virginia
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences | Year: 2017

This article overviews the dynamics of disease transmission in one-host-one-parasite systems. Transmission is the result of interacting host and pathogen processes, encapsulated with the environment in a ‘transmission triangle’. Multiple transmission modes and their epidemiological consequences are often not understood because the direct measurement of transmission is difficult. However, its different components can be analysed using nonlinear transmission functions, contact matrices and networks. A particular challenge is to develop such functions for spatially extended systems. This is illustrated for vector transmission where a ‘perception kernel’ approach is developed that incorporates vector behaviour in response to host spacing. A major challenge is understanding the relative merits of the large number of approaches to quantifying transmission. The evolution of transmission mode itself has been a rather neglected topic, but is important in the context of understanding disease emergence and genetic variation in pathogens. Disease impacts many biological processes such as community stability, the evolution of sex and speciation, yet the importance of different transmission modes in these processes is not understood. Broader approaches and ideas to disease transmission are important in the public health realm for combating newly emerging infections. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.


Jackson S.L.,University of Virginia
Aggression and Violent Behavior | Year: 2017

Adult protective services (APS) is designated in each state to respond to elder abuse. As elder abuse is increasingly conceptualized as a crime, and victim services expands to encompass victims of elder abuse, these two fields will increasingly cross paths. The fields of APS and victim services are each guided by federal legislation, although the path to that legislation differed for each field. The historical development of each field helps to explain the existence of a sometimes challenging relationship between these two fields. A literature review was undertaken to compare these two fields across three domains: 1) the service providers, 2) the recipients of those services, and 3) how a case typically flows from reporting to outcomes. Four areas of possible contention were identified: mandatory reporting, APS investigation, cognitive capacity of victims, and involuntary interventions. It is anticipated that by illuminating these differences and providing an explanation for them, some tension between the fields may be assuaged. This article concludes, however, that in the myriad other ways in which comparisons were made, no meaningful differences emerged. Increasing an understanding of each other's field is intended to facilitate building relationships between these two fields, with the ultimate goal of benefiting victims. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.


Adler P.N.,University of Virginia | Wallingford J.B.,University of Texas at Austin
Trends in Cell Biology | Year: 2017

Why some genes are more popular than others remains an open question, but one example of this phenomenon involves the genes controlling planar cell polarity (PCP), the polarization of cells within a plane of a tissue. Indeed, the so-called 'core' PCP genes such as dishevelled, frizzled, and prickle have been extensively studied both in animal models and by human genetics. By contrast, other genes that influence PCP signaling have received far less attention. Among the latter are inturned, fuzzy, and fritz, but recent work should bring these once obscure regulators into the limelight. We provide here a brief history of planar polarity effector (PPE) and CPLANE (ciliogenesis and planar polarity effector) proteins, discuss recent advances in understanding their molecular mechanisms of action, and describe their roles in human disease. The PPE/CPLANE proteins are evolutionarily conserved proteins that govern PCP in Drosophila but predominantly control ciliogenesis in vertebrates.At least one CPLANE protein also controls PCP in vertebrates.PPE/CPLANE proteins strongly interact in both Drosophila and in vertebrates, arguing that they function as a complex.PPE and CPLANE proteins are implicated in control of actin assembly.CPLANE proteins are required for normal intraflagellar transport.CPLANE proteins are mutated in human birth defects. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.


Boyle A.,University of Virginia
Obstetrics and Gynecology | Year: 2017

OBJECTIVE:: To describe delivery management of singleton stillbirths in a population-based, multicenter case series. METHODS:: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 611 women with singleton stillbirths at 20 weeks of gestation or greater from March 2006 to September 2008. Medical and delivery information was abstracted from medical records. Both antepartum and intrapartum stillbirths were included; these were analyzed both together and separately. The primary outcome was mode of delivery. Secondary outcomes included induction of labor and indications for cesarean delivery. Indications for cesarean delivery were classified as obstetric (abnormal fetal heart tracing before intrapartum demise, abruption, coagulopathy, uterine rupture, placenta previa, or labor dystocia) or nonobstetric (patient request, repeat cesarean delivery, or not documented). RESULTS:: Of the 611 total cases of stillbirth, 93 (15.2%) underwent cesarean delivery, including 43.0% (46/107) of women with prior cesarean delivery and 9.3% (47/504) of women without prior cesarean delivery. No documented obstetric indication was evident for 38.3% (18/47) of primary and 78.3% (36/46) of repeat cesarean deliveries. Labor induction resulted in vaginal delivery for 98.5% (321/326) of women without prior cesarean delivery and 91.1% (41/45) of women with a history of prior cesarean delivery, including two women who had uterine rupture. Among women with a history of prior cesarean delivery who had spontaneous labor, 74.1% (20/27) delivered vaginally, with no cases of uterine rupture. CONCLUSION:: Women with stillbirth usually delivered vaginally regardless of whether labor was spontaneous or induced or whether they had a prior cesarean delivery. However, 15% underwent cesarean delivery, often without a documented obstetric indication. © 2017 by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Nosek B.A.,University of Virginia | Errington T.M.,Center for Open Science
eLife | Year: 2017

The first results from the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology suggest that there is scope for improving reproducibility in pre-clinical cancer research. © 2017, eLife Sciences Publications Ltd. All rights reserved.


Pearson W.R.,University of Virginia
Current protocols in bioinformatics | Year: 2016

The FASTA programs provide a comprehensive set of rapid similarity searching tools (fasta36, fastx36, tfastx36, fasty36, tfasty36), similar to those provided by the BLAST package, as well as programs for slower, optimal, local, and global similarity searches (ssearch36, ggsearch36), and for searching with short peptides and oligonucleotides (fasts36, fastm36). The FASTA programs use an empirical strategy for estimating statistical significance that accommodates a range of similarity scoring matrices and gap penalties, improving alignment boundary accuracy and search sensitivity. The FASTA programs can produce "BLAST-like" alignment and tabular output, for ease of integration into existing analysis pipelines, and can search small, representative databases, and then report results for a larger set of sequences, using links from the smaller dataset. The FASTA programs work with a wide variety of database formats, including mySQL and postgreSQL databases. The programs also provide a strategy for integrating domain and active site annotations into alignments and highlighting the mutational state of functionally critical residues. These protocols describe how to use the FASTA programs to characterize protein and DNA sequences, using protein:protein, protein:DNA, and DNA:DNA comparisons. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.


BACKGROUND:: Optimal analgesia for total knee arthroplasty remains challenging. Many modalities have been used, including peripheral nerve block, periarticular infiltration, and epidural analgesia. However, the relative efficacy of various modalities remains unknown. The authors aimed to quantify and rank order the efficacy of available analgesic modalities for various clinically important outcomes. METHODS:: The authors searched multiple databases, each from inception until July 15, 2016. The authors used random-effects network meta-analysis. For measurements repeated over time, such as pain, the authors considered all time points to enhance reliability of the overall effect estimate. Outcomes considered included pain scores, opioid consumption, rehabilitation profile, quality of recovery, and complications. The authors defined the optimal modality as the one that best balanced pain scores, opioid consumption, and range of motion in the initial 72 postoperative hours. RESULTS:: The authors identified 170 trials (12,530 patients) assessing 17 treatment modalities. Overall inconsistency and heterogeneity were acceptable. Based on the surface under the cumulative ranking curve, the best five for pain at rest were femoral/obturator, femoral/sciatic/obturator, lumbar plexus/sciatic, femoral/sciatic, and fascia iliaca compartment blocks. For reducing opioid consumption, the best five were femoral/sciatic/obturator, femoral/obturator, lumbar plexus/sciatic, lumbar plexus, and femoral/sciatic blocks. The best modality for range of motion was femoral/sciatic blocks. Femoral/sciatic and femoral/obturator blocks best met our criteria for optimal performance. Considering only high-quality studies, femoral/sciatic seemed best. CONCLUSIONS:: Blocking multiple nerves was preferable to blocking any single nerve, periarticular infiltration, or epidural analgesia. The combination of femoral and sciatic nerve block appears to be the overall best approach. Rehabilitation parameters remain markedly understudied. Copyright © by 2017, the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc. Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


Thiele R.H.,University of Virginia
Anesthesia and Analgesia | Year: 2017

Part I of this review discussed the similarities between embryogenesis, mammalian adaptions to hypoxia (primarily driven by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 [HIF-1]), ischemia-reperfusion injury (and its relationship with reactive oxygen species), hibernation, diving animals, cancer, and sepsis, and it focused on the common characteristics that allow cells and organisms to survive in these states. Part II of this review describes techniques by which researchers gain insight into subcellular energetics and identify potential future tools for clinicians. In particular, P nuclear magnetic resonance to measure high-energy phosphates, serum lactate measurements, the use of near-infrared spectroscopy to measure the oxidation state of cytochrome aa3, and the ability of the protoporphyrin IX-triplet state lifetime technique to measure mitochondrial oxygen tension are discussed. In addition, this review discusses novel treatment strategies such as hyperbaric oxygen, preconditioning, exercise training, therapeutic gases, as well as inhibitors of HIF-1, HIF prolyl hydroxylase, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. © 2017 International Anesthesia Research Society


Mazimba S.,University of Virginia
International Journal of Obesity | Year: 2017

Background:The ‘obesity paradox’ refers to the fact that obese patients have better outcomes than normal weight patients. This has been observed in multiple cardiovascular conditions, but evidence for obesity paradox in pulmonary hypertension (PH) remains sparse.Methods:We categorized 267 patients from the National Institute of Health-PH registry into five groups based on body mass index (BMI): underweight, normal weight, overweight, obese and morbidly obese. Mortality was compared in BMI groups using the χ2 statistic. Five-year probability of death using the PH connection (PHC) risk equation was calculated, and the model was compared with BMI groups using Cox proportional hazards regression and Kaplan–Meier (KM) survival curves.Results:Patients had a median age of 39 years (interquartile range 30–50 years), a median BMI of 23.4 kg m- 2 (21.0–26.8 kg m-2) and an overall mortality at 5 years of 50.2%. We found a U-shaped relationship between survival and 1-year mortality with the best 1-year survival in overweight patients. KM curves showed the best survival in the overweight, followed by obese and morbidly obese patients, and the worst survival in normal weight and underweight patients (log-rank P=0.0008). In a Cox proportional hazards analysis, increasing BMI was a highly significant predictor of improved survival even after adjustment for the PHC risk equation with a hazard ratio for death of 0.921 per kg m-2 (95% confidence interval: 0.886–0.954) (P<0.0001).Conclusion:We observed that the best survival was in the overweight patients, making this more of an ‘overweight paradox’ than an ‘obesity paradox’. This has implications for risk stratification and prognosis in group 1 PH patients.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 21 March 2017; doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.45. © 2017 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has released its picks for Virginia’s best online colleges and universities in 2017. Of the 18 four-year schools that made the list, George Mason University, University of Virginia, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia Commonwealth University and Hampton University took the top five spots. Of the 16 two-year colleges that also made the list, Tidewater Community College, Southwest Virginia Community College, Central Virginia Community College, Northern Virginia Community College and Piedmont Virginia Community College were top schools. “There are more opportunities than ever for students to earn a certificate or degree from an accredited school by going online,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “These Virginia colleges and universities distinguished themselves by offering an quality, accredited education in an online format that allows students with busy schedules or geographical limitations to earn a degree on their own schedule.” To earn a spot on the “Best Online Schools in Virginia” list, colleges and universities must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also judged based on additional metrics including financial aid availability, the number of student services, academic counseling student/teacher ratios and graduation rates. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: Virginia’s Best Online Four-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Bluefield College Eastern Mennonite University George Mason University Hampton University James Madison University Jefferson College of Health Sciences Liberty University Longwood University Lynchburg College Marymount University Norfolk State University Old Dominion University Regent University Shenandoah University University of Virginia-Main Campus Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Virginia University of Lynchburg Virginia’s Best Online Two-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Central Virginia Community College John Tyler Community College Lord Fairfax Community College Mountain Empire Community College New River Community College Northern Virginia Community College Patrick Henry Community College Piedmont Virginia Community College Rappahannock Community College Reynolds Community College Southside Virginia Community College Southwest Virginia Community College Thomas Nelson Community College Tidewater Community College Virginia Western Community College Wytheville Community College About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


STOCKHOLM, 18-Apr-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — Skanska has signed a contract with existing client University of Virginia Health System to renovate and expand the current University Hospital in Virginia, USA. The contract is worth USD 45M, about SEK 400M, which will be included in the US order bookings for the first quarter 2017. The contract consists of early site work, utility relocations, make ready renovations, plinth, tower and renovation construction. Construction services began in the June 2015 and the entire multi-phased hospital expansion and renovation project is slated for completion in December 2020. Skanska is one of the leading development and construction companies in USA, specialized in building construction, civil infrastructure and developing commercial properties in select U.S. markets. Skanska also offers services in public-private partnerships. Skanska USA had sales of SEK 59 billion in 2016 and had about 9,300 employees in its operations.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va., April 13, 2017 - For Mazhar Adli, the little glowing dots dancing about on the computer screen are nothing less than the fulfillment of a dream. Those fluorescent dots, moving in real time, are set to illuminate our understanding of the human genome, cancer and other genetic diseases in a way never before possible. Adli, of the University of Virginia School of Medicine's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, has developed a way to track genes inside living cells. He can set them aglow and watch them move in three dimensions, allowing him to map their positions much like star charts record the shifting heavens above. And just as the moon influences the tides, the position of genes influences the effects they have; thus, 3D maps of gene locations could lead scientists to a vastly more sophisticated appreciation of how our genes work and interact -- and how they affect our health. "This has been a dream for a long time," Adli said. "We are able to image basically any region in the genome that we want, in real time, in living cells. It works beautifully. ... With the traditional method, which is the gold standard, basically you will never be able to get this kind of data, because you have to kill the cells to get the imaging. But here we are doing it in live cells and in real time." DNA is often depicted as tidy strands stretched out in straight lines. But in reality, our DNA is clumped up inside the nuclei of our cells like cooked spaghetti. "We have two meters of DNA folded into a nucleus that is so tiny that 10,000 of them will fit onto the tip of a needle," Adli explained. "We know that DNA is not linear but forms these loops, these large, three-dimensional loops. We want to basically image those kind of interactions and get an idea of how the genome is organized in three-dimensional space, because that's functionally important." Thinking about DNA as a neat line, he noted, can create misconceptions about gene interactions. Two genes that are far apart in a linear diagram may actually be quite close when folded up inside the cell's nucleus, and that can affect what they do. He used a map analogy: "That's how we believe an element that appears to be in Los Angeles is regulating an element in Virginia - [when the DNA is folded up,] they're not actually that far apart." Adli's new approach, developed in conjunction with colleagues at UVA and the University of California, Berkeley, uses the CRISPR gene editing system that has proved a sensation in the science world. The researchers flag specific genomic regions with fluorescent proteins and then use CRISPR to do chromosome imaging. If they want, they can then use CRISPR to turn genes on and off, using the imaging approach to see what happens. The new method overcomes longstanding limitations of gene imaging. "We were told we would never be able to do this," Adli said. "There are some approaches that let you look at three-dimensional organization. But you do that experiment on hundreds of millions of cells, and you have to kill them to do it. Here, we can look at the single-cell level, and the cell is still alive, and we can take movies of what's happening inside." The business of growing cells just to kill them is both time consuming and a poor way to figure out what was happening with the DNA inside them, he said. It is like trying to figure out the rules of football by looking at blurry pictures of a game. Adli's new approach, on the other hand, lets him sit back and watch the plays unfold in real time. "It's a super exciting thing to be able to do," he said. Adli and his team have described their new method in an article in the scientific journal Nature Communications, making it available to scientists around the world. The paper was authored by Peiwu Qin, Mahmut Parlak, Cem Kuscu, Jigar Bandaria, Mustafa Mir, Karol Szlachta, Ritambhara Singh, Xavier Darzacq, Ahmet Yildiz and Adli. The work was supported by the V Foundation for Cancer Research; the UVA Cancer Center; the National Institutes of Health, grants U54-DK107980, U01-EB021236 and GM094522; the National Science Foundation; and the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The ability of some Western conifer forests to recover after severe fire may become increasingly limited as the climate continues to warm, scientists from the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) and Harvard Forest found in a new study published today in Global Change Biology. Although most of these cone-bearing evergreen trees are well adapted to fire, the study examines whether two likely facets of climate change -- hotter, drier conditions and larger, more frequent and severe wildfires -- could potentially transform landscapes from forested to shrub-dominated systems. As part of the study, which was funded by the National Science Foundation, scientists examined conifer forests in the richly diverse Klamath region of northern California and southwestern Oregon. The Klamath region is a botanical hotspot, home to 29 species of conifers and a suite of plant species that exist nowhere else on earth. The researchers sampled sites that burned severely in wildfires between 1987 and 2008. They found that, after fire, hardwood trees and shrubs quickly established by either re-sprouting from surviving root systems or growing rapidly from seeds that persisted in the soil. These plants dominated the vegetation for at least the first few decades after fire. Most conifers, on the other hand, were slow to compete, relying on establishment of new seedlings borne by trees in less severely burned patches or from outside the fire perimeter. As a result, conifers had only a few years to establish before the regenerating hardwoods and shrubs grew dense enough to suppress them. "If they miss that window there's much less chance of successful establishment and their growth will be slower," says study author Kristina Anderson-Teixeira, a forest ecologist at SCBI and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. In fact, the study found that the longer the interval between the fire and the conifer's establishment, the slower the tree's growth. "The Klamath ecosystem is an important transition zone separating the shrubs of the California chaparral from the Pacific Northwest's temperate rainforest," says Jonathan Thompson, a Senior Ecologist at Harvard Forest and co-author on the study. "Our work suggests climate change will push the chaparral north at the expense of the Klamath's existing conifer forests." Because most conifers depend on seed dispersal from surviving trees, larger patches of high-severity fire could put a growing portion of the landscape at risk of poor post-fire conifer regeneration. The study suggests this trend could be even more pronounced because under drier conditions more abundant seed sources are needed to support conifer seedlings at densities sufficient for forest recovery. In addition, previous research by Thompson and others suggests the young, shrub-dominated vegetation that develops after severe fire tends to burn more severely in subsequent fires than older conifer forests, meaning that once severe fire converts a conifer forest to a shrub-dominated system, the non-forested vegetation could be perpetuated almost indefinitely through a cycle of repeated burning. "We see climate change affecting the system from two directions," says Thompson. "First, it is slowing conifer growth, keeping them low to the ground and more vulnerable to future fires for a longer period of time. Second, climate change is making fire more frequent. This phenomenon, which researchers call the 'interval squeeze,' threatens to transform this and other arid, fire-prone forests worldwide." Still, portions of the landscape may be relatively resilient. For example, conifers were able to regenerate in wetter sites, even amid relatively large high-severity patches with few surviving trees. "The Klamath region has supported conifers for thousands of years," says Thompson. "Some patches will surely survive no matter what climate throws at them." The researchers hope these findings could help provide information needed to prioritize management efforts. "Our study helps to identify the places that are at greatest risk of forest loss, where managers could either target management to promote post-fire forest recovery, or accept that we're going to see some degree of landscape transformation in the coming decades and learn to meet ecological objectives under the new climate and disturbance regimes," says Alan Tepley, a forest ecologist with SCBI and the study's lead author. These findings could also be applied in a broader context to other forest ecosystems. "There are concerns for much of the western U.S. and other similar landscapes that under climate change, forests may be less likely to regenerate," says Anderson-Teixeira. "And that can then reduce forest cover on the landscape and result in big losses of carbon storage." According to Anderson-Teixeira, the fate of the Klamath region depends in part on societal carbon emissions, where increased emissions lead to more warming, which ultimately could result in more forest loss. An additional author on this paper is Howard Epstein from the University of Virginia. The study is part of a large collaborative effort that includes the US Forest Service and Portland State University. The Harvard Forest, founded in 1907 and located in Petersham, Mass., is Harvard University's outdoor laboratory and classroom for ecology and conservation, and a Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site funded by the National Science Foundation. Its 4,000 acre property is one of the oldest and most intensively studied research forests in the U.S. In addition to studying New England landscapes, research scientists at the Forest study ecosystems around the U.S. and the globe. More information can be found at http://harvardforest. . SCBI plays a leading role in the Smithsonian's global efforts to save species from extinction and train future generations of conservationists. SCBI spearheads research programs at its headquarters in Front Royal, Va., the Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington, D.C., and at field research stations and training sites worldwide. SCBI scientists tackle some of today's most complex conservation challenges by applying and sharing what they learn about animal behavior and reproduction, ecology, genetics, migration and conservation sustainability. For interviews with a Harvard Forest scientist or contacts for SCBI scientists, contact Clarisse Hart, hart3@fas.harvard.edu; 978-756-6157.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New Apress book explains technical foundations of the Ethereum project -- view to new products and services Cryptocurrencies are on the rise, and blockchain protocols are taking the world by storm. Ethereum is an open-source public blockchain featuring smart contracts and which uses the Turing-complete scripting language Solidity. The open source Ethereum protocol was first proposed in 2013, along with its native cryptocurrency ether. Since then ether has grown to become the second largest cryptocurrency by market capitalization after bitcoin. Introducing Ethereum and Solidity, written by Chris Dannen and published by Apress, compiles the basic technical principles underlying Ethereum and situates the project within the existing world of hardware and software. The book familiarizes readers with blockchain programming paradigms, and introduces the programming language Solidity. With this book as their guide, readers will be able to learn the foundations of smart contract programming and distributed application development. The author starts out by reviewing the fundamentals of programming and networking, and describing how blockchains can solve long-standing technology challenges. The book also outlines the new discipline of crypto-economics, the study of game theoretical systems written in pure software. Readers are then guided into deploying smart contracts of their own, and learning how those can serve as a back-end for JavaScript and HTML applications on the web. "Unlike other tutorials, Introducing Ethereum and Solidity is written for both technology professionals, financial services professionals, and enthusiasts of all levels. It provides creative technologists with a gateway from concept to deployment," says the author. Chris Dannen graduated from the University of Virginia. He is founder and partner at Iterative Instinct, a hybrid investment fund focused on cryptocurrency trading and seed-stage venture investments. He worked previously as a business journalist and corporate strategist. A self-taught programmer, he holds one computer hardware patent. Chris Dannen was formerly a Senior Editor at Fast Company and today consults on technical content for major publishers. Chris Dannen Introducing Ethereum and Solidity Foundations of Cryptocurrency and Blockchain Programming for Beginners 2017, 206 p. 34 illus. 31 illus. in colour Softcover € 36.99 (D) | £ 27.99 | $ 39.99 ISBN 978-1-4842-2534-9 Also available as an eBook


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

UC interdisciplinary researchers and global collaborators dig into the past to inspire modern water management strategies that can save time and money and may avoid negative effects on our climate Tucked away in a laboratory in University of Cincinnati's Braunstein Hall are tubes of rock and dirt that quietly tell a story -- a story that looks back on ancient society's early water conservation. UC researchers hope the story will aid in the future preservation of our planet's most precious resource. In an effort to help manage the world's water supply more efficiently, an interdisciplinary team of University of Cincinnati researchers from the departments of anthropology, geography and geology have climbed through rainforests, dug deep under arid deserts and collaborated with scientists around the world to look at how ancient humans manipulated their environment to manage water. "We begin by asking, 'What is water to humans, how do we engage with it and how does the environment engage us?" asks Vernon Scarborough, professor and department head in UC's Department of Anthropology. "When we look at the trajectory of our changing climate, we realize that the issue is not just climate change but also water change. Climate and water work synergistically and can affect one another in critical ways. "Given the current climate patterns, in this and the next century, we will likely face further rising sea levels, less potable water and a compromised availability of freshwater as a result of drought in many areas and unusually heavy rains and runoff in others. "So we are looking at how the past can inform the present," adds Scarborough. To face future sustainability and water management issues, UC's interdisciplinary team of real-world "Indiana Jones" employ modern technology to peek inside ancient irrigation communities in obscure places around the globe like the arid American Southwest and humid rainforests in Central America and Southeast Asia. "The point of these projects is to help, in part, create effective modern water policy," says Scarborough, who also works closely with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). "Exploring all these unique points on the globe is the only way we're going to get at it, and it's our teamwork, communication and cooperation that will make this project so successful." As a result of their collaboration, several members of UC's research team will be presenting the outcome of their field work at one or both of two upcoming prestigious scientific annual meetings: the 77th annual Society for Applied Science meeting in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the 82nd annual Society for American Archaeology meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Both are meeting this week. For more than two decades, the researchers worked intricately together in remote areas that are known for their seasonal water and environmental challenges. One core investigation lies deep in the ancestral Puebloan community in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico -- the ancestors of modern Puebloans that thrived for more than 300 years in a dry desert in the middle of the American Southwest. Scientists have long debated whether this area was truly a sustainable thriving community based on local resource access or an occasional gathering spot for ceremonial rituals dependent on importing food and related supplies. To create a comprehensive snapshot for how ancestral Native American Puebloans managed water and survived in the ancient desert, UC's research team used aerial surface imaging technology, mass spectrometry and geochemical soil sampling, as well as anthropological behavioral and DNA studies and soil excavations around ancient structures to help shed significant light on that mystery. Nicholas Dunning and Christopher Carr, both UC professors of geography, looked broadly at the geographic area documenting and sampling the stratified layers of rock and sediment, while Lewis Owen, also a UC professor of geology, used optical-stimulated luminescence, a unique technique to accurately determine the age of core sand and soil samples. "We found geochemical evidence for corn grown in the area during this time, which is a very water-intensive crop, as well as sophisticated irrigation and water-management techniques," says Kenneth Tankersley, UC associate professor of anthropology and geology. To get a 3-D look at the surface of the canyon, Carr used sophisticated LIDAR technology, or light, imaging, detection and ranging technology, to measure the surface elevation of the ground from an airplane. "This technology uses a laser beam to measure the morphology of the surface and is totally revolutionizing archaeology," says Carr. "The key thing LIDAR gives us is elevation so we know how the water flows off the mesa tops into the drainage ditches and into the valley floors. "LIDAR ultimately tells the archaeologists where to excavate and look for evidence of agriculture, canals and water control gates beneath the surface." To uncover the thousand-year-old secrets for survival held in the geochemical deep core soil samples, Tankersley, along with Owen and Warren Huff, UC professor of geology, employed laboratory sampling techniques to reveal that the high level of salt in the soil -- once thought by scientists to be harmful -- was in fact a form of a calcium sulfate mineralization that may have functioned to enhance the soil for the maize (corn) grown in that area. "The surrounding mesas provided water in their springs after the snow melted," says Tankersley. "During the rainy season when floodwaters hit, the Puebloans would capture runoff water from small canyons known as the rincons and local periodic streams such as Chaco Wash and Escavada Wash." The researchers consider this strategy a reflection of risk aversion. "When it rained in one spot over here the Ancestral Puebloans took advantage of it, and when it rained over there they took advantage of that," Scarborough says. Under this expeditious use of landscape, two key members of the Chaco water management project, Stephen Plog, professor of archaeology from the University of Virginia, and Adam Watson at the American Museum of Natural History were also part of the collaborative team that utilized DNA sampling techniques on human remains to reveal a remarkable matrilineal family line connected through the female lineage. "To effectively manage water requires flexibility and creativity as rainfall is unpredictable in the Southwest," says Samantha Fladd, an advanced doctoral student from the University of Arizona, also working on the Chaco project here at UC. "The presence of a hierarchical matriline helps to explain how Chaco residents coordinated these activities in order to practice successful water management and agriculture." In contrast to Chaco Canyon's desert aridity many of the researchers also spent a significant amount of time in the Guatemalan rainforests around Tikal -- a Central American site that coexisted at about the same time as Chaco Canyon more than a thousand years ago. While the two environments couldn't be more opposite in climate the researchers found Tikal's water issues just as challenging. David Lentz, UC professor of biology, with the assistance of Scarborough, Huff, Tankersley, Carr, Owen and NSF-funded Dunning, discovered how the Maya civilization survived in Tikal after suffering several droughts. "Similar to Chaco Canyon, we found geochemical evidence for corn fields situated in specific environmental niches at Tikal," says Dunning. Scarborough speculates the Maya channeled runoff during the rainy season and created elaborate water storage systems, allowing their civilization to thrive for more than three centuries. Eventually the Maya not only suffered from a changing climate, but they had added to their own demise, say the researchers. "Essentially, they may have affected a change in their own climate," says Scarborough. "After several years of deforestation -- clearing out trees and forests to make room for crops -- the Maya unintentionally, but perhaps dramatically upset their annual rainfall, which precipitated degrees of drought that ultimately forced them to abandon the once fertile environment. Sound familiar?" With recent funding by the National Science Foundation, Dunning, along with Scarborough and other researchers, will spend a fifth season this summer as a co-principal investigator on the Yaxnohcah project along with Carr and four UC students. The focus of this study looks at the development of ancient urbanism in relation to water, land and forest management in the Maya lowlands and will be a presentation topic by Dunning and by Carr at the upcoming annual Society for American Archaeology meeting in Vancouver. "Our collaborative research as a team is critical -- each one of us is an important cog in this investigation," says Scarborough. "It takes each one of us and our individual expertise to effectively measure how well these early urban and rural communities adapted to climate change and managed their water resources." "We still have to deal with those same issues in our environment today. From an archaeological perspective, our changing climate is immediate, but it may be several years before the damage is fully apparent at a truly global scale," Scarborough adds. "We will begin to see sea levels rise by a good meter. Because over two-thirds of the largest cities on the planet occupy coastal margins, with estimates suggesting that an anticipated 80 percent of human population will gravitate toward urban settings in the near term, we really are approaching a truly 'perfect storm.'" While the researchers look at future water management as the direction of this research, they also focus on the constant changes to the landscape and the creatures that occupy these environments. Scarborough adds that If we are not careful, we will instigate even further change to a wide array of plant and animal species all over the world. "If you don't design for that appropriately, you can be building management networks and ways to capture and control water that will wind up getting buried like the build-up behind modern dams, or plans can get abandoned altogether as a river changes," say Scarborough and Jon-Paul McCool, UC doctoral student under Dunning's mentorship. "How past populations dealt with variable precipitation like that identified at Tikal, Chaco Wash or drainage patterns overall has been very dynamic. Such investments in building massive dam projects today is a costly expenditure of money and time that might well benefit from views of the past. "We don't want to waste that money on high-priced water infrastructure if we can engage in smaller scale, lower investment strategies like our ancestors did."


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: news.europawire.eu

BIRMINGHAM, 19-Apr-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — A new study has identified novel mechanisms whereby T cells may be able to distinguish an emerging class of targets specifically increased on cancer cells. The study, carried out by researchers from the University of Birmingham and the University of Virginia, and published today in Oncotarget, focuses on how the immune system recognises protein targets that are modified by phosphorylation, a process that is known to be commonly increased in cancer cells. Phosphorylation plays a key role in cell signalling pathways, and involves small phosphate groups being added by kinase enzymes onto particular amino acid groups within a protein. While it is widely recognised as being key to the control of a wide range of cellular pathways, including those that regulate cell division, it has also become clear that such pathways become heavily dysregulated in cancer. Previous research published by the authors has revealed that such phosphorylated protein fragments can be presented on the surface of cancer cells for immune recognition, however the ways in which such small modifications affect how T cells recognise them have remained unclear. The team’s results have shed new light on this issue. One of the lead authors of the study, Dr Daniel Stones from the Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy Centre at the University of Birmingham, explained the key findings: ‘We have found that this small modification – phosphorylation – is likely to have a major effect on how our T cells can recognise these cancer-associated targets in two ways. Firstly, our results show that phosphorylation can induce a major change in the overall structure of these peptides. Secondly, we directly show that the critical receptor involved on the T cell – the T cell receptor – is very sensitive at directly discriminating modified from non-modified peptides – even when the changes induced are relatively small.’ Overall, the findings underline growing interest in the area of targeting modified antigens in cancer. The study’s senior author, Professor Ben Willcox explained: ‘Our study supports the idea that the abnormal patterns of phosphorylation observed in cancer cells may translate into a distinctive cancer-specific signature that can be targeted by the immune system.  There might be a number of ways to go about targeting such phosphorylated peptides therapeutically, including vaccination, cellular therapies, and protein therapeutics.’ For more information please contact the Press Office, University of Birmingham, 0121 414 2772.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has determined its list of Virginia’s best colleges and universities for 2017. Of the four-year schools that were analyzed, 40 made the list, with University of Richmond, University of Virginia, Virginia Military Institute, Washington and Lee University and Hampton University ranked as the top five. Of the 23 two-year schools that were also included, Tidewater Community College, Lord Fairfax Community College, Southwest Virginia Community College, Danville Community College and Central Virginia Community College were the top five. A full list of schools is included below. “Virginia’s unemployment rate recently reached its lowest point since before the Great Recession, which is great news for career-minded students,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “The schools on our list have shown that they offer the educational experience and resources that leave their students career-ready.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Virginia” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also scored on additional data that includes employment and academic resources, annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college, opportunities for financial aid and such additional statistics as student/teacher ratios and graduation rates. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Virginia” list, visit: Best Four-Year Colleges in Virginia for 2017 include: Averett University Bluefield College Bridgewater College Christopher Newport University College of William and Mary Eastern Mennonite University Emory & Henry College Ferrum College George Mason University Hampden-Sydney College Hampton University Hollins University James Madison University Jefferson College of Health Sciences Liberty University Longwood University Lynchburg College Mary Baldwin College Marymount University Norfolk State University Old Dominion University Radford University Randolph College Randolph-Macon College Regent University Roanoke College Shenandoah University Southern Virginia University Sweet Briar College The University of Virginia's College at Wise University of Mary Washington University of Richmond University of Virginia-Main Campus Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Military Institute Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Virginia State University Virginia Union University Virginia Wesleyan College Washington and Lee University Best Two-Year Colleges in Virginia for 2017 include: Blue Ridge Community College Central Virginia Community College Dabney S Lancaster Community College Danville Community College Eastern Shore Community College Germanna Community College John Tyler Community College Lord Fairfax Community College Mountain Empire Community College New River Community College Northern Virginia Community College Patrick Henry Community College Paul D Camp Community College Piedmont Virginia Community College Rappahannock Community College Reynolds Community College Southside Virginia Community College Southwest Virginia Community College Thomas Nelson Community College Tidewater Community College Virginia Highlands Community College Virginia Western Community College Wytheville Community College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new study has identified novel mechanisms whereby T cells may be able to distinguish an emerging class of targets specifically increased on cancer cells. The study, carried out by researchers from the University of Birmingham and the University of Virginia, and published today in Oncotarget, focuses on how the immune system recognises protein targets that are modified by phosphorylation, a process that is known to be commonly increased in cancer cells. Phosphorylation plays a key role in cell signalling pathways, and involves small phosphate groups being added by kinase enzymes onto particular amino acid groups within a protein. While it is widely recognised as being key to the control of a wide range of cellular pathways, including those that regulate cell division, it has also become clear that such pathways become heavily dysregulated in cancer. Previous research published by the authors has revealed that such phosphorylated protein fragments can be presented on the surface of cancer cells for immune recognition, however the ways in which such small modifications affect how T cells recognise them have remained unclear. The team's results have shed new light on this issue. One of the lead authors of the study, Dr Daniel Stones from the Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy Centre at the University of Birmingham, explained the key findings: "We have found that this small modification - phosphorylation - is likely to have a major effect on how our T cells can recognise these cancer-associated targets in two ways. Firstly, our results show that phosphorylation can induce a major change in the overall structure of these peptides. "Secondly, we directly show that the critical receptor involved on the T cell - the T cell receptor - is very sensitive at directly discriminating modified from non-modified peptides - even when the changes induced are relatively small." Overall, the findings underline growing interest in the area of targeting modified antigens in cancer. The study's senior author, Professor Ben Willcox explained: "Our study supports the idea that the abnormal patterns of phosphorylation observed in cancer cells may translate into a distinctive cancer-specific signature that can be targeted by the immune system. There might be a number of ways to go about targeting such phosphorylated peptides therapeutically, including vaccination, cellular therapies, and protein therapeutics."


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

The past few decades have seen intensive efforts to find the genetic roots of neurological disorders, from schizophrenia to autism. But the genes singled out so far have provided only sketchy clues. Even the most important genetic risk factors identified for autism, for example, may only account for a few percent of all cases. Much frustration stems from the realization that the key mutations elevating disease risk tend to be rare, because they are less likely to be passed on to offspring. More common mutations confer only small risks (although those risks become more significant when calculated across an entire population). There are several other places to look for the missing burden of risk, and one surprising possible source has recently emerged—an idea that overturns a fundamental tenet of biology and has many researchers excited about a completely new avenue of inquiry. Accepted dogma holds that—although every cell in the body contains its own DNA—the genetic instructions in each cell nucleus are identical. But new research has now proved this assumption wrong. There are actually several sources of spontaneous mutation in somatic (nonsex) cells, resulting in every individual containing a multitude of genomes—a situation researchers term somatic mosaicism. “The idea is something that 10 years ago would have been science fiction,” says biochemist James Eberwine of the University of Pennsylvania. “We were taught that every cell has the same DNA, but that's not true.” There are reasons to think somatic mosaicism may be particularly important in the brain, not least because neural genes are very active. A paper published April 27 in Science by a group founded two years ago—The Brain Somatic Mosaicism Network (BSMN)—outlines a research agenda for using new technologies to explore the genetic diversity found in each cell, and to investigate what links, if any, tie such mutations to a variety of neurological conditions. “The field was abuzz with interest in exploring mosaicism but there was no money,” says Thomas Lehner, director of the Office of Genomics Research Coordination at the National Institute of Mental Health, which is now devoting $30 million in funding to BSMN over the first three years, two of which have elapsed. The consortium consists of 18 research teams at 15 U.S. institutions with access to repositories of postmortem brain tissue taken from healthy people and others with schizophrenia, autism, bipolar disorder, Tourette’s syndrome or epilepsy. Each team is tackling different samples. “There’s a lot of new technology application and development involved, and a ton of data that will become a resource,” Lehner says. We also wanted to understand if there's an association with new technology, so we encouraged researchers to include brain banks of individuals with mental disorders." Studies that preceded the consortium have confirmed mosaicism is commonplace. One report estimated there may be hundreds of changes in single letters of genetic code (single nucleotide variants, or SNVs) in each neuron in mouse brains. Another found over a thousand in human neurons. These findings suggest somatic mosaicism is the rule, not the exception, with every neuron potentially having a different genome than those to which it is connected. A primary cause of somatic mutations has to do with errors during the DNA replication that occurs when cells divide—neural progenitor cells undergo tens of billions of cell divisions during brain development, proliferating rapidly to produce the 80 billion neurons in a mature brain. The image of each cell carrying a carbon copy of the genetic material of all other cells is starting to fade—and for good reason. Genetic sequencing does not normally capture the somatic mutations in each cell. “You get a sort of average of the person's genome, but that doesn’t take into account any brain-specific mutations that might be in that person,” says study lead author Michael McConnell of the University of Virginia. A 2012 study found somatic mutations in the brains of children with hemimegalencephaly, a developmental disorder in which one hemisphere is enlarged, causing epilepsy and intellectual disability. The mutations were found in brain tissue, but not always in blood nor in cells from unaffected brain areas, and only in a fraction (around 8 to 35 percent) of cells from affected areas. Such studies, showing somatic mutations can cause specific populations of cells to proliferate, leading to cortical malformations, has researchers wondering whether somatic mutations may also play roles in more complex conditions. Mature neurons stop dividing and are among the longest-living cells in the body, so mutations will stick around in the brain. “In the skin or gut, cells turn over in a month or week so somatic mutations aren’t likely to hang around unless they form cancer,” McConnell says. “These mutations are going to be in your brain forever.” This could alter neural circuits, thereby contributing to the risk of developing neuropsychiatric disorders. “In psychiatric disease we don't know that much yet, and that’s largely the goal [to find an answer],” McConnell says. “It’s a good hypothesis but it’s going to require this big, multi-team effort to really address it.” To investigate, the consortium will sequence brain DNA from control and patient samples. “Before you can get to your destination you have to have a map, and this is going to help build that map of somatic mutations that have potential for influencing neural functioning and disease,” says Eberwine, who was not involved in the new research. “So this consortium is critically important for neuroscience.” One question to be explored is whether genes associated with a brain disorder may harbor somatic mutations. The fact specific genes only explain a small proportion of cases may be because researchers have only been looking in the germ line (sex cells), McConnell says. “Maybe the person doesn’t have the mutation in their germ line, but some percentage of their neurons have it.” Somatic mosaicism may also contribute to neural diversity in general. “It might explain why everybody’s different—it’s not all about the environment or genome. There’s something else,” says neuroscientist Alysson Muotri of the University of California, San Diego, who is not part of the consortium. “As we understand more about somatic mosaicism, I think the contribution to individuality as well as the spectrum [of symptoms] you find in, for example, autism, will become clear.” Somatic mutations can occur in multiple circumstances. They may emerge during DNA replication or from DNA damage (caused by free radicals or environmental stresses) combined with imperfect repair machinery. In addition to SNVs, mutations known as “indels,” involving insertions and deletions of small DNA sequences (typically tens of nucleotides), also occur frequently. Larger, rarer mutations include structural changes in chromosomes, either in the form of gains or losses of whole chromosomes or copy number variants (CNVs), in which the number of repetitions of long chunks of DNA (covering multiple genes) is altered. Within genomes there are also “mobile genetic elements” that act almost like parasites, jumping around or making copies of themselves and inserting themselves elsewhere in the genome, seemingly to ensure their survival. These strange entities are an active field of research in their own right: they are important here because they can cause somatic mutations, including a type known as mobile genetic element insertions, or MEIs. They are switched on in the same way as genes involved in producing new neurons, making them especially active in the brain during development. The paper outlines three methods for studying these mutations: The first involves using technologies to sequence a whole genome from bulk brain tissue. This technique can detect many variants but the rarest types are diluted by the mass of cells in bulk tissue. “Large CNVs and mobile elements are much more difficult to detect in bulk tissue than SNVs,” McConnell says. Also, this method cannot reveal how mutations vary between cell types. This can be partly solved using a technique known as “sorted pools,” which sorts out neurons from other unwanted cell types. The most important recent advance that will aid the consortium, however, is the advent of technologies that allow the genomes of individual cells to be sequenced. “By going into single cells we can compare [what we find] to the neighboring cell, and say: ‘Aha, they’re different!’ That’s the advance that allows us to really move forward,” Muotri says. “I'm very excited—this is the beginning of something completely new in biology and neuroscience.” The project is funded until 2020, and will make all data publicly available—and for some results that should be in 12 to 24 months. “Around 10,000 sequencing data sets will be generated, and we’ll be making that available in a database for the scientific community to dig in more deeply,” McConnell says. There are also plans to collaborate with other NIMH initiatives including BrainSpan, which maps gene expression during brain development, and psychENCODE, which is mapping the brain epigenome (environmentally driven modifications of DNA that influence gene activity without changing the genetic code). “This is supposed to initiate an important area of research,” Lehner says. “We hope it will give us a landscape of mosaicism in the brain and insights into the contribution of mosaicism to mental disorders, but I don't expect to have all the answers.” Such insights may ultimately lead to the discovery of new genetic targets for treating a range of hard to treat disorders. “This is exploratory research, we’re learning about the phenomenon,” Muotri says. How important it will be is not clear at this stage but “by figuring out how it works we may reveal new therapeutic opportunities.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

A new technique developed at the University of Virginia School of Medicine will let a single cancer research lab do the work of dozens, dramatically accelerating the search for new treatments and cures. And the technique will benefit not just cancer research but research into every disease driven by gene mutations, from cystic fibrosis to Alzheimer's disease - ultimately enabling customized treatments for patients in a way never before possible. The new technique lets scientists analyze the effects of gene mutations at an unprecedented scale and speed, and at a fraction of the cost of traditional methods. For patients, this means that rather than thinking about the right drug for a certain disease, doctors will think about the right drug to treat the patient's specific gene mutation. "Every patient shouldn't receive the same treatment. No way. Not even if they have the same syndrome, the same disease," said UVA researcher J. Julius Zhu, PhD, who led the team that created the new technique. "It's very individual in the patient, and they have to be treated in different ways." Understanding the effect of gene mutations has, traditionally, been much like trying to figure out what an unseen elephant looks like just by touching it. Touch enough places and you might get a rough idea, but the process will be long and slow and frustrating. "The way we have had to do this is so slow," said Zhu, of UVA's Department of Pharmacology and the UVA Cancer Center. "You can do one gene and one mutation at a time. Now, hopefully, we can do like 40 or 100 of them simultaneously." Zhu's approach uses an HIV-like virus to replace genes with mutant genes, so that scientists can understand the effects caused by the mutation. He developed the approach, requiring years of effort, out of a desire to both speed up research and also make it possible for more labs to participate. "Even with the CRISPR [gene editing] technology we have now, it still costs a huge amount of money and time and most labs cannot do it, so we wanted to develop something simple every lab can do," he said. "No other approach is so efficient and fast right now. You'd need to spend 10 years to do what we are doing in three months, so it's an entirely different scale." To demonstrate the effectiveness of his new technique, Zhu already has analyzed approximately 50 mutations of the BRaf gene, mutations that have been linked to tumors and to a neurodevelopmental disorder known as cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome. The work sheds important light on the role of the mutations in disease. Zhu's new technique may even let researchers revisit failed experimental treatments, determine why they failed and identify patients in which they will be effective. It may be that a treatment didn't work because the patient didn't have the right mutation, or because the treatment didn't affect the gene in the right way. It's not as simple as turning a gene on or off, Zhu noted; instead, a treatment must prompt the right amount of gene activity, and that may require prodding a gene to do more or pulling on the reins so that it does less. "The problem in the cancer field is that they have many high-profile papers of clinical trials [that] all failed in some way," he said. "We wondered why in these patients sometimes it doesn't work, that with the same drug some patients are getting better and some are getting worse. The reason is that you don't know which drugs are going to help with their particular mutation. So that would be true precision medicine: You have the same condition, the same syndrome, but a different mutation, so you have to use different drugs."


Historians Monday valiantly tried, and mostly failed, to understand and interpret President Trump’s remarks about President Andrew Jackson. Among other comments, Trump seemed to assert that Jackson, who died in 1845, could have prevented the Civil War, which began in 1861, and that the causes of the bloodiest conflict in the nation’s history have not been addressed or discussed. “I mean, had Andrew Jackson been a little later, you wouldn’t have had the Civil War,” said Trump in an interview with the Washington Examiner’s Salena Zito. “He was a very tough person, but he had a big heart, and he was really angry that he saw what was happening with regard to the Civil War. He said, ‘There’s no reason for this.’ People don’t realize, you know, the Civil War, you think about it, why? People don’t ask that question. But why was there the Civil War? Why could that one not have been worked out?” The comments, published Monday morning and broadcast on SiriusXM Radio, led to confusion over Trump’s understanding of Jackson’s beliefs and general American history. “First of all, historians have actually talked about the reasons for the Civil War quite a bit,” said Kevin Kruse, a professor of history at Princeton, in an email to Yahoo News. “Second, there’s an overwhelming consensus among historians that the Civil War came about because of slavery. Simply put, the war came because the southern states seceded, and they seceded — as they quite clearly said themselves at the time, over and over again — because of slavery. Mississippi’s secession declaration, to take just one, is quite direct here: ‘Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery — the greatest material interest of the world.’” “The question of why the Civil War should have happened is not only central to the study of U.S. history but to our entire national mythology,” said Eric Rauchway, a professor of history at UC Davis, in an interview with Yahoo News, “and Lincoln’s answer to that question is literally chiseled on the walls of the Lincoln Memorial about a mile’s walk from the White House.” “Historians of the U.S. were surprised to learn that nobody asks why the Civil War happened, as it’s one of the central questions of American history,” said Nicole Hemmer, assistant professor at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center, to Yahoo News. “It’s even featured on the test for American citizenship. But when Donald Trump marvels at the ignorance or incuriosity of the masses, what he’s really doing is expressing his own ignorance and incuriosity. He’s saying that he’s never asked about the origins of the Civil War.” Jon Meacham, author of “American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House,” attempted to parse Trump’s historical commentary. “The president seems to be conflating two things,” said Meacham in an email to Yahoo News. “The first is Andrew Jackson’s determined stand for the Union against South Carolina nullifiers in 1832-33; Old Hickory believed in the primacy of his federal government and faced down John C. Calhoun and others over the supremacy of federal law. The second is Trump’s thought — one he first expressed to me in an interview for Time last year — that perhaps a deal of some kind could have averted the Civil War.” “The problem with the latter,” added Meacham, “is that any accommodation with the South would have to have ratified the continued existence of slavery in the old slaveholding states — which, to be fair, was a mainstream possibility in the prewar days. What finally drove secession was Lincoln’s refusal to allow the expansion of slavery westward. All fascinating, complicated stuff — but one has to wonder why the 45th president, who has plenty to do, is blithely relitigating what Shelby Foote called ‘the crossroads of our being.'” Rauchway also suggested  that Trump might have been thinking about Jackson’s actions against former Vice President Calhoun. “To give the president the benefit of the doubt,” said Rauchway, “I imagine he is thinking there of the Nullification Crisis where Jackson faced down John C. Calhoun over the South Carolinian attempts to nullify a federal tariff law and that therefore Jackson is sometimes referred to as being a strong Unionist, which I suppose is fair enough. But at that point the issue of slavery wasn’t directly at issue or its expansion wasn’t directly an issue, and I don’t think Jackson would have been effective in dealing with that issue in any way.”


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

“Before the Fall”, a gay re-imagining of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice", will be available online to rent or purchase via iTunes, Googly Play, Amazon and Vudu May 30, 2017. Comcast Xfinity will also showcase the film on demand May 30, 2017. Those interested can pre-order the film now on iTunes. “Before the Fall”, the first gay-themed film shot in Appalachia, is a Washington House, LLC production. In this inverted version of the classic story, Elizabeth Bennet, now reimagined as the male character Ben Bennett (Ethan Sharrett), is a dashing attorney at the top of the genteel social set in southern Virginia. This placid existence is turned upside down when the rough-hewn Lee Darcy (Chase Conner) comes to town. Lee is a brooding, beaten-down welder with a secret he tries to drink away. After an altercation with his girlfriend, Lee is wrongfully charged with domestic abuse. Ben inadvertently insults Lee at the courthouse and the two men form a strong dislike for each other. This awkward situation is made worse when the two are repeatedly forced to encounter one another in their close-knit town. As the friends around them struggle through romantic misunderstandings, Ben discovers that he has a secret of his own - he has fallen in love with Lee. “Before the Fall is an extraordinarily beautiful film... immensely romantic and wonderfully constructed... so ambitious and admirable that you'll find yourself surrendering to the film's romantic spirit and complete and utter charm.” - Richard Propes “The Independent Critic” “Fans of the novel find themselves awash in a sea of contradictory characters and situations, a chimeric scope which seems to turn the novel, its characters, and its situations inside out. This works to create a new experience of the familiar work.” - Andrea Press, Professor of Media Studies and Professor of Sociology at the University of Virginia, former Executive Director of the Virginia Film Festival “Before the Fall” made its world premiere as an official selection of  Chicago's Reeling Film Festival and played alongside “Moonlight” at the Virginia Film Festival. “Before the Fall” was selected as the opening film at Out at the Movies Film Festival in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Washington House, LLC was founded in 2012 to develop and produce high-quality feature films. "Before the Fall" was written and directed by Byrum Geisler. Brandon Garza served as Director of Photography. The film was produced by Alex Bice, Brandon Garza, Byrum Geisler, and Wes Ross.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

Pres. Donald Trump’s administration has announced plans to dismantle an array of federal efforts to fight global warming, including a program to reduce carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants, a rule limiting methane gas leaks and a mandate that aggressively boosts auto emissions standards. But Trump officials face a major roadblock in their efforts, legal scholars say. It is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2009 formal “endangerment finding,” which states carbon dioxide and five other greenhouse gases emitted from smokestacks and other man-made sources “threaten the public health and welfare of current and future generations.” This agency rule, supported by two Supreme Court decisions, legally compels the government to do exactly what its new leaders want to avoid: regulate greenhouse gases. Although EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt publicly doubts a connection between human-produced carbon emissions and global warming, any attempt to undo this rule “would be walking into a legal buzz saw,” says Michael Gerrard, faculty director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia University. Endangerment is “the linchpin for everything—all of the carbon regulation under the Clean Air Act,” says Patrick Parenteau, a professor of environmental law at Vermont Law School. The rule’s fundamental power is exactly why Pruitt has to remove it, says Myron Ebell, who oversaw the Trump transition team at the EPA. “You can’t just take out the flowers—you have to take out the roots—starting with the endangerment finding,” says Ebell, a senior fellow at the conservative think tank the Competitive Enterprise Institute. “You can undo the Obama climate agenda on the surface by reopening the Clean Power Plant rule, the methane rule, rescinding the [auto emissions] standards and so on. But the underlying foundation remains.” The conservative Web site Breitbart, read widely among Trump’s supporters and still tied to its former publisher, White House adviser Steve Bannon, has attacked Pruitt as a political careerist for reportedly resisting pressure to revoke the finding. The rule rests on a 2007 Supreme Court decision in the case Massachusetts v. EPA, which determined the agency has the authority under the Clean Air Act to regulate greenhouse gases. When the finding itself was later challenged, the Court upheld it. The endangerment finding prevents Pruitt from ignoring climate change or eliminating greenhouse gas regulations outright. The EPA can attempt to water down these standards and regulations, perhaps substantially. But Pruitt “would have to come up with a scientific basis for saying that greenhouse gas emissions do not in fact pose a threat to public health and welfare,” Gerrard says. “That would be a very difficult finding, considering every court that has addressed the issue of the science of climate change has found there to be a solid factual, scientific basis for it.” To begin to remove the endangerment rule, the EPA would have to go through a formal rule-making process. That means inviting public comments, reviewing available evidence and scientifically justifying every point. Formulating and then defending such a document in court would be a big challenge, given it cuts against the legal and scientific consensus linking carbon to climate change. Even Ebell concedes this is a formidable obstacle. “That’s why a lot of people on our side say it’s not worth the trouble,” he says. “The people who disagree with me are not nuts—they are making substantial arguments for why we should not do it.” The endangerment finding has its roots in the waning days of the Clinton administration, when then–EPA General Counsel Jonathan Cannon drafted a legal memo stating the agency had the authority to regulate carbon emissions. At the time this was a novel and counterintuitive idea. CO is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring gas, essential to photosynthesis and other basic processes of life on Earth. It’s not poisonous like smog and other dangerous pollutants targeted by the Clean Air Act. “CO is a different sort of pollutant than many that the EPA regulates,” says Cannon, now a professor at the University of Virginia School of Law. “Its effects are felt over time through the climate system, not as immediate effects on one’s lungs or physical systems.” But the Clean Air Act “has a very broad definition of what a pollutant can be and what harm a pollutant causes,” says George Kimbrell, legal director of the International Center for Technology Assessment and the Center for Food Safety, two related groups among a coalition of environmental organizations that formally petitioned the EPA to regulate carbon in 1999. The law defines “air pollutant” as "any air pollution agent or combination of such agents, including any physical, chemical, biological, radioactive...substance or matter, which is emitted into or otherwise enters the ambient air.” According to Kimbrell, “The breadth of that language suggested greenhouse gas emissions would qualify under the statute.” The language prompted a lawsuit from states and small environmental groups, during the George W. Bush administration, to sue the EPA to force it to regulate carbon. The result was the Supreme Court’s 5–4 2007 Massachusetts decision. Following that ruling, the endangerment finding then spelled out the legal rationale and the scientific basis for regulation. What can the Trump administration do to get out of this regulatory box? It could push Congress to amend the Clean Air Act to explicitly exclude carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases from the list of air pollutants. But even if it passed the Republican-dominated House, Parenteau notes, such a bill could be effectively opposed by Democrats in the Senate, who have enough votes to hold up or change legislation. . The EPA could also target climate rules not based on the endangerment finding, such as procedures for monitoring and reporting greenhouse gases, according to Gerrard. The most likely outcome, legal scholars say, is a series of incremental battles in which the administration and Congress try to weaken individual climate rules and enforcement—while those efforts are repeatedly challenged in court by states and environmental groups hoping to run out the clock on the Trump administration. “One reason the endangerment finding is important,” Cannon says, “is that, should administrations change, it provides the basis for further climate initiatives.”


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.sciencenews.org

Cancer prevention isn’t the first thing that comes to many parents’ minds when they consider vaccinating their preteens against human papillomavirus, or HPV. And the fact that HPV is transmitted sexually gives the vaccine more baggage than a crowded international flight. But what gets lost in the din is the goal of vaccination, to protect adolescents from infection with HPV types that are responsible for numerous cancers. Newly released estimates show just how prevalent HPV infections are in the United States. In April, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported for 2013-2014 that among adults ages 18 to 59, 25 percent of men and 20 percent of women had genital infections with HPV types that put them at risk of developing cancer. That’s just a snapshot in time. For those who are sexually active, more than 90 percent of men and 80 percent of women can expect to become infected with at least one type of HPV during their lives. About half of those infections will be with a high-risk HPV type. “People who think, ‘I’m not at risk,’ are really not understanding the magnitude of this virus,” says cancer epidemiologist Electra Paskett of Ohio State University in Columbus. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. The HPV group of viruses includes low-risk and high-risk types. Low-risk types 6 and 11 are responsible for 90 percent of all genital warts. The high-risk types of HPV can cause cancer, and the two behind most HPV-related cancers are types 16 and 18. Seventy percent of cervical cancers can be traced back to types 16 and 18, while type 16 also causes cancers of the anus, vagina, penis and the oropharynx, the part of the throat at the back of the mouth. HPV spreads by sexual contact, either vaginal, anal or oral. Nationally, from 2011 to 2014, 11 percent of men ages 18 to 69 had an oral infection with any type of HPV, and for nearly 7 percent of men, it was a high-risk type, the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics estimated in its April report. For women in this age group, it was 3 percent and 1 percent, respectively. The numbers are far worse when it comes to genital HPV infections. During 2013 to 2014, 45 percent of men and 40 percent of women ages 18 to 59 had genital infections with any type of HPV. One in four men and one in five women in this age group were infected with a high-risk type. “It’s a wake-up call for both genders, but particularly for males,” says Jessica Keim-Malpass, a nurse scientist at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. For an estimated 19,200 women and 11,600 men each year, HPV infections result in a cancer diagnosis. Vaccination could greatly relieve this cancer burden. Three different HPV vaccines have been available in the United States. The first, introduced in 2006, covered low-risk types 6 and 11 and high-risk types 16 and 18. The most recent HPV vaccine protects against these four types as well as five more high-risk types, and is the only vaccine currently distributed nationally. A federal advisory committee recommended routine vaccination against HPV at 11 or 12 years of age in 2006 for girls and in 2011 for boys. But the HPV-cancer prevention message doesn’t seem to be getting through in the United States. HPV vaccination rates lag behind the national coverage goal of 80 percent for 13- to 15-year-olds. In 2015, among U.S. adolescents ages 13 to 17, six out of 10 girls and five out of 10 boys had gotten at least one shot in a three-shot series. But only four out of 10 girls and three out of 10 boys had completed the series. Parents are part of the issue. “They don’t know about the vaccine, or they have fears about safety, or they say ‘My child is not going to be at risk for HPV infections,’” Paskett says. The safety of all three vaccines was established in large clinical trials before approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Since 2006, almost 90 million doses of HPV vaccines have been administered nationally, and the most common side effects are soreness or swelling at the site of the shot. Some parents think that “by giving the vaccine, you are saying it’s OK to have sex,” notes Keim-Malpass. Research doesn’t back this up. A 2012 study in Pediatrics of 11- to 12-year-old girls found that HPV vaccination was not tied to increased sexual activity, as measured by medical records of sexually-transmitted infection or pregnancy. A 2015 study in JAMA Internal Medicine of 12- to 18-year-old girls found no evidence to link HPV vaccination with higher rates of sexually transmitted infections. The recommended age for vaccination ensures that preteens are protected before they are exposed to HPV, whenever that may be. “The whole reason the vaccine is targeted to 11- and 12-year-olds is to get kids vaccinated before they enter a sexual relationship,” says Keim-Malpass. Lack of urgency is a problem, too. The delay between an infection and a future cancer can make people complacent about HPV. “You are protecting yourself from an infection, but it has ramifications years, decades later,” Keim-Malpass says. “It’s not about something you get tomorrow, it’s about something you could get 20 to 30 years from now.” Another difficulty has been the vaccination schedule. The initial recommendation was for three doses, with the second shot one to two months after the first, and the third shot six months after the first. This schedule was challenging for busy adolescents, notes Keim-Malpass. Now there is a new dosing regimen. For adolescents who begin vaccination before turning 15, only two shots are required, with the second one coming six to 12 months after the first. This should be easier to accommodate in yearly well-child visits. Even with the suboptimal vaccination rates, there has been an impact on infections. A 2016 Pediatrics study found that, within six years of the first vaccine’s introduction in 2006, infections with the four HPV types covered decreased 64 percent among 14- to 19-year-old girls. There are also fewer cases of genital warts among U.S. teens since 2006. Any decline in infection rates is a good thing. But “it’s not to the extent we could have, if from the get- go, people realized this was a cancer vaccine,” says Paskett. “If there was a vaccine for breast cancer, moms would be lining up around the corner with their daughters.”


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

A new technique developed at the University of Virginia School of Medicine will let a single cancer research lab do the work of dozens, dramatically accelerating the search for new treatments and cures. And the technique will benefit not just cancer research but research into every disease driven by gene mutations, from cystic fibrosis to Alzheimer's disease -- ultimately enabling customized treatments for patients in a way never before possible. The new technique lets scientists analyze the effects of gene mutations at an unprecedented scale and speed, and at a fraction of the cost of traditional methods. For patients, this means that rather than thinking about the right drug for a certain disease, doctors will think about the right drug to treat the patient's specific gene mutation. "Every patient shouldn't receive the same treatment. No way. Not even if they have the same syndrome, the same disease," said UVA researcher J. Julius Zhu, PhD, who led the team that created the new technique. "It's very individual in the patient, and they have to be treated in different ways." Understanding the effect of gene mutations has, traditionally, been much like trying to figure out what an unseen elephant looks like just by touching it. Touch enough places and you might get a rough idea, but the process will be long and slow and frustrating. "The way we have had to do this is so slow," said Zhu, of UVA's Department of Pharmacology and the UVA Cancer Center. "You can do one gene and one mutation at a time. Now, hopefully, we can do like 40 or 100 of them simultaneously." Zhu's approach uses an HIV-like virus to replace genes with mutant genes, so that scientists can understand the effects caused by the mutation. He developed the approach, requiring years of effort, out of a desire to both speed up research and also make it possible for more labs to participate. "Even with the CRISPR [gene editing] technology we have now, it still costs a huge amount of money and time and most labs cannot do it, so we wanted to develop something simple every lab can do," he said. "No other approach is so efficient and fast right now. You'd need to spend 10 years to do what we are doing in three months, so it's an entirely different scale." To demonstrate the effectiveness of his new technique, Zhu already has analyzed approximately 50 mutations of the BRaf gene, mutations that have been linked to tumors and to a neurodevelopmental disorder known as cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome. The work sheds important light on the role of the mutations in disease. Zhu's new technique may even let researchers revisit failed experimental treatments, determine why they failed and identify patients in which they will be effective. It may be that a treatment didn't work because the patient didn't have the right mutation, or because the treatment didn't affect the gene in the right way. It's not as simple as turning a gene on or off, Zhu noted; instead, a treatment must prompt the right amount of gene activity, and that may require prodding a gene to do more or pulling on the reins so that it does less. "The problem in the cancer field is that they have many high-profile papers of clinical trials [that] all failed in some way," he said. "We wondered why in these patients sometimes it doesn't work, that with the same drug some patients are getting better and some are getting worse. The reason is that you don't know which drugs are going to help with their particular mutation. So that would be true precision medicine: You have the same condition, the same syndrome, but a different mutation, so you have to use different drugs."


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

HOUSTON -- (April 26, 2017) -- In a new book spanning more than 640 pages, Rice University's eminent scholar of the American South, John Boles, takes a fresh, nuanced look at one of America's most talented, enigmatic and complex Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson. Not since the 1970 book "Thomas Jefferson and the New Nation" by Boles' mentor Merrill Peterson has a scholar published a comprehensive biography of the third president of the U.S. Boles' fascination with Jefferson dates back to the fall semester of his senior year at Rice in 1964 when he took a course on Jeffersonian and Jacksonian Democracy taught by Sanford W. Higginbotham, who was the managing editor of the Rice-based Journal of Southern History from 1965 to 1983. "We read a lot of Jefferson's letters and read a great book on Jefferson by Merrill Peterson, and I decided on the basis of that Merrill Peterson book to go to the University of Virginia the next fall to study Jefferson," Boles said, noting that Peterson was a professor of history there. However, when Boles arrived at Virginia, he got "sidetracked," as he put it, and he subsequently researched and wrote books on various topics, including books on Southern history and on the history of Rice. It wasn't until 2013, when Boles retired from his position as managing editor of the Journal of Southern History, that his full attention turned to Jefferson. "My goal was to write a comprehensive biography of Jefferson," Boles said during an interview in his office on the fifth floor of Fondren Library, which includes an entire bookshelf filled with books about and relating to Jefferson. "And I say that because there have been dozens of dozens of books on Jefferson as architect, Jefferson as lawyer, Jefferson and the West ... all focused on narrow aspects of Jefferson. The last significant full biography of Jefferson was written in 1970." Boles was able to draw extensively on Jefferson's edited papers, which expanded from about 15 volumes in 1970 to more than 50 volumes today. Boles said that by delaying his study for 50 years, he benefited from "all the editing of Jefferson's correspondence, his two-volume account book, a wonderful range of scholarship in Southern history that made us think differently about the history of slavery, the history of Southern religion, the history of early politics, and dozens of monographic studies of Jefferson." "I thought it was time to see if one person could write about Jefferson not just as a politician or architect or political philosopher but as the whole person," Boles said. "I talk about Jefferson in art and architecture, in science and music, in diplomacy and politics; Jefferson as father and grandfather; and as gardener and slaveholder. It really is a comprehensive biography of Jefferson that is fully conversant with the last 50 years of scholarship." Boles, the William P. Hobby Professor of History, has taught at Rice since 1981 and currently teaches an undergraduate seminar, Jefferson and His Age. This year he is also serving as president of the Southern Historical Association. Boles details Jefferson's political and religious ideas, his complicated relationship with France, his on, off and on-again friendship with John Adams, his complicated and tragic involvement with slavery and his fascination with the West, exemplified by his negotiation of the Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark expedition. He was a copious and skilled letter writer -- readers also witness him drafting the Declaration of Independence -- who was dedicated to his state and Monticello homestead. Jefferson possessed a profound, lifelong intellectual curiosity, starting from his studies of philosophy and science at the College of William and Mary, and later law, continuing through his years living in Paris as the U.S. minister, and later secretary of state, the vice presidency and presidency, and culminating in his creation of the University of Virginia, where Boles earned his doctorate. A man of his time, Jefferson was steeped in the revolutionary ideals of the Enlightenment, such as the need for religious tolerance and the belief (ultimately struck from the Declaration) that slaves "had natural rights identical to those of the rest of the American people" -- and yet he notoriously held on to his own slaves, Boles said. Paradoxically, he spoke out more against slavery than any other Founding Father. Boles devotes a chapter to Jefferson's "Living with Paradox" and reminds readers not to judge "the sage of Monticello" solely by 21st-century terms. Regarding emancipation, "in no other aspect of his life does Jefferson seem more distant from us or more disappointing," Boles wrote. "In some sense, he believed in what he called the 'illimitable' freedom of the human mind," Boles said. "The Declaration of Independence represented political liberty, (Virginia's) statute of religious freedom guaranteed religious liberty and the University of Virginia provided freedom from ignorance. Of course, there's a paradox there: He was a slaveholder. That's a huge problem in the book, explaining the central paradox." Publishers Weekly wrote in its review of the book, "Boles, an accomplished scholar well-versed in the source material, deftly paints a picture of the world as Jefferson knew it, taking care not to mix up understanding with excusing, especially with the Virginian's relationship with Sally Hemings. This is a gem of a biography."


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Kidney research at the University of Virginia School of Medicine has unexpectedly led to a discovery about the formation of the heart, including the identification of a gene responsible for a deadly cardiac condition. UVA scientists were surprised to discover that the heart's inner lining forms from the same stem cells, known as "precursor cells," that turn into blood. That means a single type of stem cell turns into both our blood and a portion of the organ that will pump it. The researchers determined that a particular gene, S1P1, is vital for the proper formation of the heart. Without it, the heart tissue produced by the precursor cells develops a sponginess that compromises the heart's ability to contract tightly and pump blood efficiently. In people, that is known as ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy, a dangerous condition that often leads to early death. "Many patients who suffer from untreatable chronic diseases, including heart and kidney diseases, are in waiting lists for limited organ transplantation. Therefore, there is an urgent need to understand what happens to the cells during disease and how can they be repaired," said researcher Yan Hu, PhD. "Every organ is a complex machine built by many different cell types. Knowing the origin of each cell and which genes control their normal function are the foundations for scientists to decipher the disease process and eventually to find out how to guide the cells to self-repair or even to build up a brand new organ using amended cells from the patients." The researchers, led by Maria Luisa S. Sequeira-Lopez, MD, of UVA's Child Health Research Center, were investigating how the kidney forms when they noted that the deletion of the S1P1 gene in research mice had deadly consequences elsewhere in the body. "We were studying the role of these genes in the development of the vasculature of the kidney," she recalled. "The heart is the first organ that develops, and so when we deleted this gene in these precursor cells, we found that it resulted in abnormalities of the heart, severe edema, hemorrhage and low heart rate." That led them to look more closely at the heart. It was then that they discovered the gene deletion had caused thin heart walls and other cardiac problems in developing mice embryos. "So then we had to study the heart when the kidneys were still not even formed," she said. "We had to go far outside our comfort zone." Their findings would prove unexpected even for scientists who specialize in the development of the heart. "For a long time, scientists believed that each organ developed independently of other organs, and the heart developed from certain stem cells and blood developed from blood stem cells," explained researcher Brian C. Belyea, MD, of the UVA Children's Hospital. "A number of studies done in this lab and others, including this work, shows that there's much more plasticity in these precursor cells. What we found is that cardiac precursor cells that are present in the embryonic heart do indeed give rise to components of the heart in adults but also give rise to the blood cells." The researchers were so surprised by their discovery that they went back and validated their findings repeatedly, using multiple techniques, including new techniques that they developed. Belyea said that the discovery about the important role of the S1P1 gene may one day lead to better treatments for that condition. "We hope," he said, "that this is a stepping stone for our clinical colleagues." The researchers have described their discovery in an article published in the journal Scientific Reports. The research team consisted of Hu, Belyea, Minghong Li, Joachim R. Göthert, R. Ariel Gomez and Sequeira-Lopez. The work was supported by the National Institutes of Health, grants DK-091330, DK-096373, DK-096373 and HL-096735.


Patent
University of Virginia | Date: 2017-03-08

Provided are isolated TCRs, TCR-like molecules, and portions thereof that bind to phosphopeptide-HLA-A2 complexes. The isolated TCRs, TCR-like molecules, or portions are optionally soluble TCRs, TCR-like molecules, or portions. Also provided are isolated nucleic acids encoding the disclosed TCRs, TCR-like molecules, or portions; host cells that contain the disclosed TCRs, TCR-like molecules, or portions; pharmaceutical compositions that include the disclosed TCRs, TCR-like molecules, portions, nucleic acids, and/or T cells; kits; and methods of using the same.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

-- Researchers have developed a large-scale method for calculating the nitrogen footprint of a university in the pursuit of reducing nitrogen pollution, which is linked to a cascade of negative impacts on the environment and human health, such as biodiversity loss, climate change, and smog. The first completed university-wide nitrogen footprint results are reported in a special issue of, a publication of. The issue is available free online on thewebsite until June 19, 2017.The special issue introduces a network of institutions participating in a coordinated and collaborative effort to utilize this novel nitrogen (N) footprint calculation method. Teams of authors provide original research, case studies, and commentaries on their experiences using the N footprint as a tool for education, research, and sustainability efforts.In the article entitled "The Nitrogen Footprint Tool Network: A Multi-Institution Program to Reduce Nitrogen Pollution ( http://online.liebertpub.com/ doi/pdfplus/ 10.1089/sus.2017... )" Guest Editor, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, and coauthors, describe the results of employing the newly created tool to determine the amount of nitrogen released from seven higher education institutions across the United States.Guest Editor, University of New Hampshire, Durham, and coauthors, present the methodology for utilizing a combined carbon and nitrogen footprint assessment method in the article, "An Integrated Tool for Calculating and Reducing Institution Carbon and Nitrogen Footprints ( http://online.liebertpub.com/ doi/pdfplus/ 10.1089/sus.2017... )." The researchers discuss the results of applying this tool across institutions, comparing and correlating the findings for carbon and nitrogen consumption.In an Editorial,, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, past winner of the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement for his findings on nitrogen's wide-ranging effects on local and global ecosystems, states: "This special issuereports on the findings of the first cohort—seven schools that have completed the calculation and analysis of their N footprints."Why focus on universities initially? "A university is an interesting blend of consumers that are part of an entity that is itself a consumer of resources," explains Dr. Galloway. "A university can use their N footprint to educate the students. It provides research opportunities for the entire community and it can be used as a planning and management tool for institutional operations.""The Guest Editors and the authors from the NFT Network have put forth a tool for institutions worldwide to first measure then mitigate their nitrogen loss to the environment,"says, Editor of. "This measure of an N footprint is equally important as understanding an overall carbon footprint, and the tool created and tested by this group will pave the way for others."documents the implementation of cutting-edge sustainability programs and provides the central forum for academic institutions, the business community, government agencies, and leaders within the sustainability field to share and learn about one another's progress and programs.fosters collaborations among all stakeholders for attaining mutually supportive objectives. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on thewebsite.is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science, medicine, and law, includingandIts biotechnology trade magazine, GEN, was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on thewebsite.140 Huguenot St., New Rochelle, NY 10801-5215Phone: (914) 740-2100 (800) M-LIEBERT Fax: (914) 740-2101www.liebertpub.com


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Each year, Compliance Week highlights the best and brightest in the governance, risk, ethics, and compliance profession with the Top Minds award. -- Compliance Week is pleased to announce the recipients of the Top Minds 2017 award. Launched in 2016, Top Minds is an annual recognition of the best and brightest thought leaders in the fields of governance, risk, compliance, and ethics.The Top Minds 2017 winners are:, CEO, Informed360, CEO, Front-Line Anti-Bribery, Senior Vice President & Associate General Counsel, Chief Compliance Officer, Univision Communications, VP, Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer, Kimberly-Clark, Acting Director, Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations, Securities and Exchange Commission, Chief Compliance Officer, Risk and Insurance Services, Marsh & McLennan Cos., Executive Director, Center for Audit Quality, Creator/Director, Giving Voice to Values, and Professor of Practice, University of Virginia Darden School of Business, Group CEO, International Centre for Sport Security, SVP and Chief Compliance Officer, Fannie Mae, Head Group Compliance & Security, Syngenta AG, Partner, Phillips & CohenThis year's winners were selected from more than 150 nominations from organizations representing a wide range of disciplines, including financial services, media & communications, law, insurance, education, and government regulation. All were nominated by their peers and were selected by the Compliance Week editorial staff."This year's Top Minds represent some of the most amazing people working in the compliance and ethics space today," said Bill Coffin, editor in chief of Compliance Week. "All of them have long and successful careers and have incredible stories to tell. But what we noticed is how much they displayed best practices in compliance and ethics today, such as being great communicators, measuring the success of their programs, and having a vision for how their efforts can build organizational value."The Top Minds will be honored at a reception on Monday, May 23, at the Compliance Week 2017 annual conference at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. More information about the conference can be found at: events.complianceweek.com/cw2017


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A research team led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital immunologists has revealed a previously unknown immune machinery that goes awry to trigger the inflammatory disease neutrophilic dermatosis. Neutrophilic dermatoses are a heterogeneous group of autoinflammatory skin disorders that include Sweet's syndrome, pyoderma gangrenosum, and subcorneal pustular dermatosis and may occur with cancers such as leukemia as well as infections or inflammatory bowel disease. Mapping the biological machinery underlying the disease's inflammation is important because there are no drugs that specifically target the wide array of similar autoinflammatory diseases. Autoinflammatory diseases occur when the hyperactive innate immune system attacks the body. Currently, the only treatments for such disorders are strong immunosuppressive drugs that also render patients susceptible to infection. The study was led by Thirumala-Devi Kanneganti, Ph.D., a member of the St. Jude Department of Immunology. The findings appear today in the journal Immunity. First authors were Prajwal Gurung, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Kanneganti laboratory, and Gaofeng Fan, Ph.D., of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Abnormalities in the PTPN6 gene have been implicated in human diseases such as pyoderma gangrenosum, multiple sclerosis, leukemia and psoriatic arthritis. The researchers used a strain of gene-altered mouse in which the activity of a protein encoded by the Ptpn6 gene was "dialed down." The mice developed inflammatory skin disease similar to neutrophilic dermatosis in humans. Like humans with the disorder, the mice appear normal when first born, but as they age, they developed the inflammatory disease. How does disease ensue in the Ptpn6 mutant mice? What are the key pathways that are regulated by the Ptpn6 gene? Kanneganti and her colleagues previously discovered in a seminal study published in Nature that IL-1 alpha is the key master regulator that provokes uncontrolled immune response in the Ptpn6 mutant mice. But the machinery linking Ptpn6 and IL-1 alpha was a "black box," Kanneganti said. To map the machinery, the researchers took a genetic approach and painstakingly produced mice defective in Ptpn6 that additionally lacked candidate genes in the pathway. Here, the researchers knew that if the Ptpn6 mutant mice crossed with the mouse deficient in a candidate gene do not develop disease, they would be able to identify the gene that triggers aberrant inflammation and disease. After creating some 50 different combinations with different candidate genes, the researchers pieced together the puzzle of the immune machinery underlying the inflammation. The picture they revealed further confirmed that IL-1 alpha is a master immune switch that activates the machinery. In addition, they also identified several key molecules including RIPK1, TNF, TAK1 and SYK that drive inflammation and tissue damage. "This is quite an important finding," Kanneganti said. "IL-1 alpha was discovered more than 45 years ago, but we have not known how it is regulated and how it functions. And our lab is one of the very few in the country studying IL-1 alpha." The finding of IL-1 alpha's role, as well as many other molecular switches in the immune machinery, will offer multiple targets for developing drugs to switch off the uncontrolled immune response in inflammatory diseases, Kanneganti said. "In this particular study, we have identified several prime drug targets for molecules involved in the pathway, especially IL-1 alpha," she said. Another important finding is how different "cellular compartments" interact to trigger autoinflammatory disease. While the abnormal Ptpn6 gene functions in the bone marrow--a major source of disease instigating innate immune cells--the IL-1 alpha master switch functions in the skin. "This told us that cross talk between cells is really critical in mediating this disease," Kanneganti said. "It gives us important information about how the immune system works both to drive autoinflammatory disease and to fight infection. And it illustrates why we could not have studied this process in a cell culture system but needed to study it in a mouse model." Finally, the study unraveled how the Ptpn6 gene regulates IL-1 alpha mediated aberrant inflammation and disease. The researchers identified that Ptpn6 inhibited activation of a critical tyrosine kinase called SYK to modulate activation of a central adaptor protein MyD88, a previously unknown signaling node. Given the central role of MyD88 in inflammation, these data are relevant not only to neutrophilic dermatosis but also to several other inflammatory diseases and will spur several new studies. The other authors were John Lukens of the University of Virginia Charlottesville, Peter Vogel of St. Jude and Nicholas Tonks of Cold Spring Harbor. Their work was supported in part by grants (CA53840, GM55989, CA163507, AR056296, AI124346, AI101935, CA021765-35) from the National Institutes of Health and ALSAC, the fundraising and awareness arm of St. Jude.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Boston, MA, April 27, 2017 --( The Top Minds 2017 winners are: Brian Beeghly, CEO, Informed360 Richard Bistrong, CEO, Front-Line Anti-Bribery Mara Davis, Senior Vice President & Associate General Counsel, Chief Compliance Officer, Univision Communications Kurt Drake, VP, Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer, Kimberly-Clark Peter Driscoll, Acting Director, Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations, Securities and Exchange Commission Rob Easton, Chief Compliance Officer, Risk and Insurance Services, Marsh & McLennan Cos. Cindy Fornelli, Executive Director, Center for Audit Quality Mary Gentile, Ph.D., Creator/Director, Giving Voice to Values, and Professor of Practice, University of Virginia Darden School of Business Michael Hershman, Group CEO, International Centre for Sport Security Nancy Jardini, SVP and Chief Compliance Officer, Fannie Mae Roman Mazzotta, Head Group Compliance & Security, Syngenta AG Sean McKessy, Partner, Phillips & Cohen This year’s winners were selected from more than 150 nominations from organizations representing a wide range of disciplines, including financial services, media & communications, law, insurance, education, and government regulation. All were nominated by their peers and were selected by the Compliance Week editorial staff. “This year’s Top Minds represent some of the most amazing people working in the compliance and ethics space today,” said Bill Coffin, editor in chief of Compliance Week. “All of them have long and successful careers and have incredible stories to tell. But what we noticed is how much they displayed best practices in compliance and ethics today, such as being great communicators, measuring the success of their programs, and having a vision for how their efforts can build organizational value.” The Top Minds will be honored at a reception on Monday, May 23, at the Compliance Week 2017 annual conference at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. More information about the conference can be found at: events.complianceweek.com/cw2017 Read more & download the digital edition: https://www.complianceweek.com/top-minds Boston, MA, April 27, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Compliance Week is pleased to announce the recipients of the Top Minds 2017 award. Launched in 2016, Top Minds is an annual recognition of the best and brightest thought leaders in the fields of governance, risk, compliance, and ethics.The Top Minds 2017 winners are:Brian Beeghly, CEO, Informed360Richard Bistrong, CEO, Front-Line Anti-BriberyMara Davis, Senior Vice President & Associate General Counsel, Chief Compliance Officer, Univision CommunicationsKurt Drake, VP, Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer, Kimberly-ClarkPeter Driscoll, Acting Director, Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations, Securities and Exchange CommissionRob Easton, Chief Compliance Officer, Risk and Insurance Services, Marsh & McLennan Cos.Cindy Fornelli, Executive Director, Center for Audit QualityMary Gentile, Ph.D., Creator/Director, Giving Voice to Values, and Professor of Practice, University of Virginia Darden School of BusinessMichael Hershman, Group CEO, International Centre for Sport SecurityNancy Jardini, SVP and Chief Compliance Officer, Fannie MaeRoman Mazzotta, Head Group Compliance & Security, Syngenta AGSean McKessy, Partner, Phillips & CohenThis year’s winners were selected from more than 150 nominations from organizations representing a wide range of disciplines, including financial services, media & communications, law, insurance, education, and government regulation. All were nominated by their peers and were selected by the Compliance Week editorial staff.“This year’s Top Minds represent some of the most amazing people working in the compliance and ethics space today,” said Bill Coffin, editor in chief of Compliance Week. “All of them have long and successful careers and have incredible stories to tell. But what we noticed is how much they displayed best practices in compliance and ethics today, such as being great communicators, measuring the success of their programs, and having a vision for how their efforts can build organizational value.”The Top Minds will be honored at a reception on Monday, May 23, at the Compliance Week 2017 annual conference at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. More information about the conference can be found at: events.complianceweek.com/cw2017Read more & download the digital edition: https://www.complianceweek.com/top-minds Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Compliance Week


-- The use of human hair-derived keratin biomaterials to regenerate skeletal muscle has shown promise in new research that documents significant increases in both new muscle tissue formation and muscle function among mouse models of volumetric muscle loss. Two new studies that compare muscle regeneration following treatment with keratin hydrogels, no repair, or an alternative tissue matrix are published in in, a peer-reviewed journal from(http://www.liebertpub.com/). The articles are available free on the(http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/ten.tea.2016.0457)website until May 27, 2017.In "Cell and Growth Factor-Loaded Keratin Hydrogels for Treatment of Volumetric Muscle Loss (VML) in  Mouse Model (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/ten.tea.2016.0457),"and coauthors from University Maryland (College Park), University of Virginia (Charlottesville), Wake Forest University and KeraNetics, LLC (Winston-Salem, NC), and Miami University (Oxford, OH) report that mice with an area of substantial muscle mass loss that were treated with keratin hydrogels and growth factors had the best recovery of muscle contraction force. Examination of the affected muscle two months after treatment showed that mice with greater recovery of muscle function also had more extensive new muscle.In a second study, entitled "Keratin Hydrogel EnhancesSkeletal Muscle Function in a Rat Model of Volumetric Muscle Loss ( http://online.liebertpub.com/ doi/full/10.1089/ ten.tea.201... )," Passipieri, Baker, Christ, et al. compared the results of treating a substantial muscle injury in rats using keratin hydrogels with or without growth factors or skeletal muscle progenitor cells versus control animals treated with no repair or an alternative tissue matrix. Keratin hydrogel-treated animals recovered up to 90% of the maximum possible muscle function."The authors have identified a novel permissive environment for muscle development in a region of loss." saysCo-Editor-in-Chief, Principal, MedSurgPI, LLC and President and CEO, Scintellix, LLC, Raleigh, NC. "Further study to identify the optimal application of this technology and its mechanism of action is warranted." http://www.liebertpub.com/ ten ) is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly online and in print in three parts: Part A, the flagship journal published 24 times per year; Part B: Reviews, published bimonthly, and Part C: Methods, published 12 times per year. Led by Co-Editors-In-Chief, Louis Calder Professor at Rice University, Houston, TX, and, Principal, MedSurgPI, LLC and President and CEO, Scintellix, LLC, Raleigh, NC, the Journal brings together scientific and medical experts in the fields of biomedical engineering, material science, molecular and cellular biology, and genetic engineering.is the official journal of the Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS). Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed online at thewebsite.(http://www.liebertpub.com/)is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including, and. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN ((http://www.genengnews.com/)), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on thewebsite.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

U.S. Dermatology Partners (“USDP”), formerly known as Dermatology Associates, is pleased to announce that it recently partnered with North Texas Dermatology (“NTD”), with locations in Plano and Richardson, TX. The transaction closed in early May 2017. U.S. Dermatology Partners is a dermatology-focused physician services and management organization providing premier dermatologic care. Located in Plano, TX, NTD cares for patients via four board-certified dermatologists and three physician assistants. NTD’s providers offer a full suite of clinical, surgical and cosmetic services. NTD has served patients in greater North Texas for more than 15 years. With the addition of NTD, USDP now has [27] board-certified dermatologists and [15] locations in the Dallas-Forth Worth area, further extending its leading market share. Dr. Susanne Lockhart, a board-certified dermatologist, has been in private practice in North Dallas since 2000. She earned her Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, TX, and was awarded membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society. Dr. Lockhart then went on to complete her internal medicine internship at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, TX, and completed her dermatology residency at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston where she served as chief resident. Dr. Christie Matter received her medical degree from the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, TX, where she graduated with honors and was awarded membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society. She completed an internal medicine internship at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, before receiving her dermatology training at Duke University Medical Center and Southwestern Medical School. She served as Chief Dermatology Resident at Parkland Hospital. Dr. Matter is a board-certified dermatologist and has been in private practice in Plano, TX since 1999. A native Texan,Dr. Rachel Quinby is a board-certified dermatologist who joined North Texas Dermatology in 2005. Before that time, she spent a year as a visiting assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, VA. Prior to that, she was an assistant professor of dermatology at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, IL. She earned her Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, and completed her dermatology residency at Northwestern University in Chicago, where she served as Chief Resident during her last year. Dr. Carla Gustovich, a board-certified dermatologist, grew up in Dallas, TX and has been in private practice since 2004. She received her Doctor of Medicine degree from The University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, TX, and then remained in Houston to complete her internship at LBJ Hospital before returning to Dallas to complete her residency. Dr. Gustovich completed her dermatology residency at the University of Texas at Southwestern in Dallas at Parkland Hospital, where she served as Chief Resident. Joining the physicians of North Texas Dermatology are their highly experienced Physician Assistants: Pam Murray, PA; Julie Darby, MPAS, PA-C; and Kristine Kucera, PA-C, MPAS, DHS. “We are honored to partner with the outstanding team at NTD,” said Geoff Wayne, CEO of U.S. Dermatology Partners. “Joining together will improve the patient experience and strengthen our market-leading position in the DFW metroplex. Our mission is to ensure improved access to the best dermatology care in our communities, and NTD bolsters our ability to do just so by adding such well-respected providers and convenient locations.” If you would like more information about U.S. Dermatology Partners, or if you have any questions regarding the partnership with NTD, please contact one of the team members listed below: About U.S. Dermatology Partners Headquartered in Dallas, TX, U.S. Dermatology Partners provides comprehensive practice management services to over 85 board-certified dermatologists across 58 locations in Texas, Kansas and Missouri. U.S. Dermatology Partners is focused solely on supporting providers so that they can focus exclusively on delivering high-quality, medically-focused care to patients. U.S. Dermatology Partners is making it easier for people to connect with a dermatologist and gain access to the very latest in dermatology care for the entire family and state-of-the-art treatment for diseases of the skin. As the 3rd largest physician-owned dermatology practice in the United States, patients not only have access to general medical, surgical and cosmetic skin treatments through its coordinated care network, but also benefit from the practice’s strong dermatology subspecialty thought leaders and medical advisory board. To be the best partners to its patients, U.S. Dermatology Partners is fervently focused on providing the highest level of patient-first care, and its team therefore includes recognized national leaders in sub-specialties including psoriasis and Mohs surgery. To learn more visit usdermatologypartners.com About ABRY Partners Founded in 1989 and headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts, ABRY Partners is an experienced and successful private equity investment firm focused on media, communications, healthcare services, insurance services, business and information services. Since its founding, ABRY has completed more than $62 billion of transactions, representing investments in more than 550 properties.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

NEWARK, N.J. and CHARLESTON, S.C., May 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Arkados Group, Inc. (OTC:AKDS), a leading software developer and system integrator enabling Internet of Things (IoT) applications for commercial and industrial customers, today announced it has completed the acquisition of SolBright Renewable Energy, LLC, a renewable energy design and development company based in Charleston, SC. The deal was originally announced on March 17, 2017. In addition, we are pleased to announce that Patrick Hassell has been appointed as the President of Arkados Energy Solutions, LLC, our energy services business.  Mr. Hassell most recently served as the Founder and Managing Director of SolBright Renewable Energy.  Prior to SolBright, Mr. Hassell was President and CEO of AkroMetrix, a prominent microelectronics industry equipment manufacturer. Mr. Hassell received a BS in Civil Engineering from the University of Virginia and later received a Master’s of Science in Management from the Georgia Institute of Technology. SolBright Renewable Energy is a leading provider of turnkey development, engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) services for the commercial/industrial and military solar photovoltaic markets. Arkados paid $15 million in a combination of cash, debt and stock for substantially 100% of the assets of SolBright, including a current backlog of approximately $40 million in distributed generation EPC projects and a substantial pipeline of additional projects throughout the Eastern United States.  This transaction allows Arkados to significantly expand its Arkados Energy Solutions business into the rapidly growing renewable energy industry and is expected to open new customer opportunities for its cutting-edge Internet of Things solutions. “SolBright has been one of the more active super-regional designers and installers of solar systems primarily along the East Coast but as far reaching as California, by completing approximately 30 MW of projects during that time.  SolBright’s strong track record, which is a testament to Patrick and his team, yielded industry leading win rates and a loyal, blue chip customer base,” said Terrence DeFranco, CEO of Arkados Group, Inc.  “The closing of this acquisition marks an important milestone in our growth and is expected to be a tremendous catalyst for revenue and earnings growth.  Our unique model of combining the value of renewable energy services with the vast benefits of our IIoT Arktic™ software platform should create great value for our customers and our shareholders and we have great confidence in Patrick and his team leading this business to new heights.” “We believe that this transaction will allow us to take our business to the next level and realize many more opportunities with our existing and future customer opportunities,” stated Mr. Hassel.  “Over the past 8 years, we’ve built an award-winning business and established our brand that has become known for quality, reliability and excellent service. With Arkados, we can add a cutting-edge set of services that should help to establish us as a clear leader in the industry. The SolBright team is very excited to have access to Arkados’ technology solutions based on our belief that our customers will greatly benefit from them.” AIP Private Capital and AIP Asset Management acted as the lead investors for the acquisition financing, providing $2 million in convertible debt and an additional $500,000 in equity. L2 Capital, LLC and SBI Investments, LLC provided subordinated debt in the amount of $792,000 and the Company secured additional working capital of approximately $600,000 in equity from other investors. Joseph Gunnar & Co., LLC, a leading New York City-based securities and investment bank established in 1997, acted as the placement agent and advisor to Arkados and will continue in this capacity as the Company explores other opportunities. The Capital Corporation, a leading investment bank headquartered out of Greenville, South Carolina and with offices in Spartanburg, South Carolina and Boca Raton, Florida, served as the exclusive investment banking advisor to SolBright on the transaction. Detailed information related to the transaction can be found in the Company’s Current Report on Form 8K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 5, 2017 at www.sec.gov. General Electric estimates that the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), the use of sensing, data gathering, monitoring and controlling commercial and industrial machinery, will reach $60 trillion worldwide in the next 15 years.  IIoT technology and software applications in combination with on-site renewable energy generation and emerging battery storage capabilities provides a complete solutions set for optimizing energy efficiency and corporate energy spend.  In November 2015, Gartner estimated that the Internet of Things will consist of 20.8 billion connected objects in use by 2020, up from 6.4 billion in 2016 and that enterprise customers represent the largest spending on these devices.  Another more recent Gartner report estimates IoT deployment in commercial buildings is on track to reach just over 1 billion in 2018. Arkados Group, Inc. (“Arkados” or the “Company”), through its subsidiaries, is a provider of scalable and interoperable Internet of Things solutions focused on industrial automation and energy management.  We execute our business as a software-as-a-service (SaaS) application developer and energy services firm that helps commercial and industrial facilities owners and managers leverage the Internet of Things to reduce costs and improve productivity with unique, cutting-edge building and machine automation solutions. The Company’s Arktic™ software platform is a scalable and interoperable cloud-based system for sensing, gathering, storing, analyzing data as well as reporting critical information and implementing command and control.  Our applications currently focus on measurement and verification and predictive analytic and are delivered to customers as a complement to our services business, which focuses primarily on reducing energy costs through solar PV, LED lighting and other energy conservation services for the commercial and industrial facilities market. More information is available at our web site at www.arkadosgroup.com. SolBright Renewable Energy is a turnkey developer and EPC of Solar Photovoltaic projects for long term, stable, distributed power solutions. SolBright focuses on military, municipal and commercial/industrial markets, with projects ranging in size from 100 kWp to 5,000 kWp. SolBright’s services include market assessment, design/engineering, installation, operation and maintenance/monitoring, financing and project ownership. SolBright has distinct competitive advantages for ground, parking canopy and roof-top solar applications that ensure integration with existing/new roof warranties. SolBright has a national reach within the United States, with projects successfully delivered throughout the southeast, mid-Atlantic and northeast and as far west as California. AIP is a Toronto-based asset management company, managing hedge and mutual funds and discretionary separately managed accounts. AIP has been named Best Global Macro Hedge Fund in Canada at the Hedge Fund Awards sponsored by Barclay Hedge and was nominated for the Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award. Its core focus is to help clients, be they institutions, hedge funds, mutual funds, family offices, or retail investors, achieve their investment goals. About AIP Private Capital - it is a privately-held investment firm, focuses on emerging growth companies primarily in Financial Services and Technology sectors with unique assets, strong business models and seasoned management teams with the skills and ability to grow the company quickly to profitability. AIPPC provides private equity/debt, VC, special situations investments and short-term financing as well as technical, board and managerial leadership. AIPPC is a member of the CVCA, TMA and was recently nominated for the Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award. Forward-Looking Statements This news release contains forward-looking statements as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements include statements concerning plans, objectives, goals, strategies, future events or performance, and underlying assumptions and other statements that are other than statements of historical facts and can be identified by terminology such as "may," "should," "potential," "continue," "expects," "anticipates," "intends," "plans," "believes," "estimates," and similar expressions. These statements are based upon current beliefs, expectations and assumptions and include statements regarding the contributions expected from Mr. Hassell, the expected new customer opportunities for the Company’s cutting-edge Internet of Things solutions, the value for the Company’s customers and shareholders to be derived from the acquisition, the belief that this transaction will allow us to take the Company’s business to the next level and allow it to realize many more opportunities with its existing and future customer opportunities, becoming a clear leader in the industry and the size of the market. These statements are subject to uncertainties and risks many of which are difficult to predict, including the ability to successfully integrate the new business and new management team with the Company’s existing business and managements team.  Product and service demand and acceptance, changes in technology, economic conditions, the impact of competition and pricing, government regulations, and other risks contained in reports filed by the Company with the Securities and Exchange Commission. All such forward-looking statements, whether written or oral, and whether made by or on behalf of the Company, are expressly qualified by this cautionary statement and any other cautionary statements which may accompany the forward-looking statements. In addition, the Company disclaims any obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof.


REDWOOD CITY, CA--(Marketwired - May 4, 2017) - In the news release, "Healthcare Marketing Director Lindsay Neese Burton brings significant healthcare marketing strategy expertise to Reputation.com," issued Tuesday, May 2 by Reputation.com, we are advised by the company that in the third paragraph should read "Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)" rather than "Journal of American Medicine (JAMA)," as originally issued. Complete corrected text follows. REDWOOD CITY, CA -- May 2, 2017 -- Reputation.com, the leading Online Reputation Management (ORM) platform, announced today the addition of a highly experienced Healthcare Marketing Director to further guide the adoption of Online Reputation Management (ORM) technology by hospitals and physicians. Lindsay Neese Burton, who has worked across a broad segment of the healthcare industry, will lead Reputation.com's market engagement with hospitals and healthcare providers to help them capture patient experience data from social media and grow market share. "It is more essential than ever for healthcare providers to become empowered to track their online reputation, especially as more and more patients seek online reviews before deciding where to seek care," said Burton. According to the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), more than half of consumers consider online reviews important as they choose a hospital or provider. Reputation.com helps healthcare organizations: "We are delighted to make such a strategic addition to our team," said Shrey Bhatia, Reputation.com's President and CEO. "Lindsay's role is to help educate customers and prospects in hundreds of hospitals and thousands of clinics, labs and medical practices on how ORM yields operational insights and improves overall patient satisfaction. In the digital world of healthcare, ORM is central to growth, and with recent funding from Heritage Group's second Healthcare Innovation Fund, Reputation.com is well-placed to lead that growth." Burton brings with her more than 10 years of healthcare marketing experience. She was previously the Senior Director of Consumer Marketing at Duke Health, Marketing Manager at Wake Forest Baptist Health, and Manager of Marketing and Public Relations at University of Virginia Health System. "Healthcare professionals have generally accepted the importance of measuring patient satisfaction with Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey data, but it's vital for them to capture the patient experience on social media as well," Burton said. "Hospitals and physicians are receiving patient reviews all over the social web, but have not discovered the most efficient way to monitor and apply that information to improve the patient experience. I look forward to working with healthcare customers to help them develop effective Online Reputation Management strategies." To learn more about how Reputation.com helps healthcare and 77 other industries make operational improvements, improve online reputation and drive revenue, visit www.reputation.com. About Reputation.com Reputation.com, Inc., based in Silicon Valley, pioneered Online Reputation Management (ORM) technology for the enterprise market in 2006. With its SaaS platform, businesses across the Americas, Europe and Asia Pacific gain actionable insights that help them make operational improvements, improve online reputation and drive revenue. Reputation.com technology has managed tens of millions of consumer reviews and interactions across hundreds of thousands of online points of presence for global companies spanning 77 industry verticals, including healthcare, retail, automotive, restaurants and others. Reputation.com is a World Economic Forum Global Growth Company and is funded by the same top-tier venture capital firms that backed Google, Facebook, Cisco and Microsoft. To learn more, visit www.reputation.com


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Piper Jaffray Companies (NYSE: PJC), a leading investment bank and asset management firm, is pleased to announce the hiring of Michael Lavery as a senior research analyst covering packaged food and tobacco companies. He will be based in the firm’s New York office. Previously, Lavery was a senior analyst and director covering tobacco and packaged foods at CLSA Americas LLC, and also spent over three years supporting coverage of beverages. He was named the No. 1 stock picker in tobacco in 2013 by Starmine. Prior to CLSA, he worked at Kraft Foods and covered food manufacturers as a research associate at Citigroup for four years before spending two years in a consulting role at Booz & Co working with consumer companies. Prior to business school, he was in public accounting at PricewaterhouseCoopers. “With the evolving consumer and retail landscape, we look forward to adding Michael’s packaged food, tobacco and beverage coverage to our platform,” said Michael Cox, director of equity research at Piper Jaffray. “We believe the combination of Michael’s industry and sell-side experience of over 11 years brings a differentiated research product that will deliver value to our clients.” Lavery holds a Master of Business Administration degree from Columbia Business School and a bachelor’s degree in commerce from the University of Virginia. The Piper Jaffray equity research group consists of 35 senior analysts covering 659 companies in the following sectors: healthcare, energy, financial institutions, technology, consumer, industrials, agriculture and clean tech & renewables. Piper Jaffray Companies (NYSE: PJC) is a leading investment bank and asset management firm. Securities brokerage and investment banking services are offered in the U.S. through Piper Jaffray & Co., member SIPC and FINRA; in Europe through Piper Jaffray Ltd., authorized and regulated by the U.K. Financial Conduct Authority; and in Hong Kong through Piper Jaffray Hong Kong Limited, authorized and regulated by the Securities and Futures Commission. Asset management products and services are offered through five separate investment advisory affiliates―U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) registered Advisory Research, Inc., Piper Jaffray Investment Management LLC, PJC Capital Partners LLC and Piper Jaffray & Co., and Guernsey-based Parallel General Partners Limited, authorized and regulated by the Guernsey Financial Services Commission.


eMoney Advisor's Technology and Support Opens New Markets for Fast Growing New York-based Advisory Firm David Edwards, founder of Heron Wealth, a New York-based fiduciary investment advisor and wealth management firm, today announced the release of a detailed case study focused on the successful automation of his firm published in conjunction with financial technology company eMoney Advisor (eMoney). The eMoney report reveals how Edwards, previously a one-man shop growing assets at a 5% annual rate, transformed into a hyper-productive team growing AUM 30-40% annually. Heron Wealth grew from $122 million in assets as of January 2013 to $285 million through February 2017. "We plan to double assets over the next three years, and double again within seven years to $1 billion.  We will continue to deliver the high touch experience our clients expect, but also derive the revenues necessary to support our continued investment in human capital, technology, cybersecurity, compliance and operations," added Edwards, who was also recently featured on the cover of Financial Planning magazine in a story related to technology advancements that protect his clients from cyber threats. “As soon as we learned how Heron Wealth was using eMoney to grow their business and creatively serve more clients in new segments, we knew we had to share their success story to bring to life the power of eMoney,” said Drew DiMarino, EVP, Sales, eMoney. “Along with helping David and his team streamline their workflow and improve efficiency in their operations, our technology has helped them deliver unmatched, interactive client experiences that build trust and strengthen relationships with clients in an expanded pipeline, especially those in the younger demographic. That’s the ultimate competitive advantage,” DiMarino said. The case study provides insights into how Heron Wealth: ·      Created a new technology package for their “Bionic Advisor” ·      Adopted a new pricing model to target younger clients and provide an on-ramp to their services Edwards made technology, cybersecurity, operations and compliance the foundation of the firm.  He hired team members to fulfill specific functions so that he went from spending 80% of his work week running the firm to 80% talking to current and prospective clients. Moreover, the firm systematically replaced all legacy client-facing and firm-facing systems. “eMoney – which tightly integrated with our CRM, custodial platform and client reporting – was the breakthrough technology in building the Bionic Advisor,” Edwards said. “Our firm doubled in size in just three years, and eMoney was a big part of that advance.” Edwards inventoried his favorite clients and determined that the people he liked working with best were business executives 40-60 years-old with $1-10 million in investable assets who had a recent transitional life event such as a new job, receipt of stock or stock options, inheritance, marriage, divorce, birth of a child or grandchild. “These people were thinking about their money and looking to make changes,” added Edwards. To achieve this, Edwards systematized the client marketing process. Prior to using eMoney, Heron used a paper-based financial planning tool. Every time a client’s assumptions changed, Heron generated and emailed a new set of PDF reports, which was cost-effective only for the clients with at least $1 million in investable assets. But what could the firm do for the sons and daughters of their current clients? Edwards commented, “If I told a client’s son, ‘Hey Billy, I would love to work with you. Could you circle back to me when you have a million dollars?’ I would never hear from Billy ever again.” Edwards realized there was a rapidly growing market of HENRYs – High Earning, Not Rich Yet individuals – who were typically children of current clients. These prospective clients might earn a six-figure salary engineering phone apps, but struggle to pay off college loans. He needed to find a way to serve those clients as they grew their assets. In response, Edwards created a lower priced service with age-based minimums. “The future is very bright for Heron Wealth, but more importantly, we are now in position to serve a greater number of individuals as they move through the early accumulation years into their peak earning years and what will ultimately be a golden age as they retire with confidence thanks to proper planning, saving and investing over the course of time,” Edwards said. David Edwards is president and founder of Heron Wealth. Founded in 1996, Heron Wealth provides financial planning, investment management and estate planning to individuals and families across the United States and overseas in Europe. Click to watch his video on the Joyful Planning concept. Edwards graduated from Hamilton College with a concentration in History and Mathematics, and holds an MBA in General Management from Darden Graduate School of Business at the University of Virginia. Edwards is as a member of the Investment Adviser Association, serving on the Legislation and Technology committee. Edwards was selected to serve on the eMoney Advisory Board in March 2016. Serving on the Advisory Board allows Edwards to contribute to the ongoing success and development of eMoney's financial planning and digital wealth management technology, while keeping him in the loop on future developments and innovations within the financial services industry. Prior to founding Heron Wealth, Edwards was associated with Morgan Stanley, JP Morgan and Nomura Securities where he developed investment products and quantitative trading models. For fun, Edwards competes frequently in sailing regattas from New England to the Caribbean and coaches a home town team in New York Harbor. Learn more at www.HeronWealth.com. eMoney Advisor, LLC (“eMoney”), based in Radnor, Pennsylvania, is the only wealth-planning system for financial advisors and firms that offers superior transparency, accessibility, security, and organization for everything that affects their clients’ financial lives. A technology envisioned and created by advisors for advisors, eMoney’s award-winning software and resources are tailored to transform the advisor’s ability to implement comprehensive financial plans and prepare their clients for a secure financial future. Through their emX Product Suite, their technology delivers a seamless digital wealth management experience to help advisors and firms differentiate their offering and strengthen their client relationships as the industry landscape shifts, client expectations increase, and competition grows. For more information, visit www.eMoneyAdvisor.com.


Nearly 63% of moms say their adult children are not fully prepared to live on their own. Only 30% of moms say that their adult children who live with them are actively looking for other places to live, and less than half (41%) say their kids pay rent. On the bright side, 67 % of the adult children help around the house, and 65% of them are employed. The mom cohort is very aware that their grown children don't have it easy. Ninety percent are concerned about rising housing costs, with 43% saying they are "very concerned" on their kids' behalf. And nearly 40% of moms worry at least once a day about their adult children's ability to afford desirable housing. Yet, some moms are either unwilling or unable to offer financial help once the kids do move out. Only one-third of moms would co-sign a loan for their children, and even fewer (24%) would help subsidize rent or a mortgage. Nearly 36% say they aren't prepared to help their adult children financially in any way. Fifty-two percent of those surveyed make family financial decisions either alone or with "some input" from a partner. These moms operate as family CFOs, taking a more active role in family finance and investments - not surprising since women make up 47% of the nation's workforce. "Women wield more and more influence in the management of personal and family finances," comments NHPF CEO Richard Burns, "Thirty seven percent of married women are now the breadwinners in their families. That statistic alone made it crucial for us to tap into this group and gauge their thoughts about housing for their family." Many women live with extended family. Seventeen percent of those with a partner and children also report parents or other relatives living with them, emblematic of the modern "sandwich generation." Coined by social worker Dorothy Miller in 1981, the term refers to women in their 30s and 40s who were sandwiched between young children and aging parents as the primary caregiver for both. But The NHP Foundation's Burns has expanded the term's definition beyond health to other basic needs such as housing, finding that those who fall under this new "sandwich generation" bracket have a new set of housing anxieties. Nearly 40% of moms in the survey say they have no confidence that the new administration will make affordable housing a priority. This is coupled with worries about affording rent or mortgage – 56% of those surveyed worry about affording those payments. Nearly 74% are concerned that they or someone they know will find themselves "cost-burdened," defined as spending more than 30% of one's income on housing. Is there a bright side for anxious moms this Mother's Day? According to NHPF President and CEO Burns, his organization is looking to the government to continue such successful programs as LIHTC (Low Income Housing Tax Credit), which gives incentives to private equity for the development of affordable housing. Explains Burns, "LIHTC is vital to enabling providers to offer stable, long-term affordable housing options". The NHP Foundation is going even further to find solutions to help alleviate family concerns about housing. The organization is looking at new private and public partnerships designed to increase its stock of quality affordable housing. NHPF has also been selected by the University of Virginia School of Public Policy as part of a study seeking new models to help ensure that this and future generations are able to afford desirable places to live. Other recent research undertaken by NHPF has found that that 75%  of Americans worry about losing their housing. The organization determined that 76% of millennials have made compromises in order to find affordable housing and, finally, a third of Baby Boomers report "housing affordability" anxiety at least monthly. For more information on this research and The NHP Foundation, please visit www.nhpfoundation.org Headquartered in New York City with offices in Washington, DC, and Chicago, IL, The NHP Foundation (NHPF) was launched on January 30, 1989, as a publicly supported 501(c) (3) not-for- profit real estate corporation.  NHPF is dedicated to preserving and creating sustainable, service-enriched multifamily housing that is both affordable to low and moderate income families and seniors, and beneficial to their communities.  NHPF also provides a robust resident services program to nearly 18,000 community residents. Through partnerships with major financial institutions, the public sector, faith-based initiatives, and other not-for-profit organizations, NHPF has 47 properties, including over 8,000 units, in 15 states and the District of Columbia. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/survey-nearly-63-of-moms-say-their-adult-children-are-unprepared-to-live-on-their-own-over-one-third-unwilling-or-unable-to-pitch-in-financially-300451691.html


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Ed Norris went from being the golden boy of law enforcement with a recurring role on HBO’s critically-acclaimed series, “The Wire,” to a federal prisoner forced to sleep on the floor, using his feet to prop newspaper across the bottom of the cell door to hold the rats at bay. Today, his firsthand story of emerging from the abyss hits shelves. “Way Down in the Hole,” written by Norris and New York Times best-selling author Kevin Cowherd, shares the emotional journey of a man who hit rock bottom and his long journey to redemption. The story begins while Norris is a young boy, then traces the trajectory of his meteoric career path. After 20 years as a crime-fighting savant with the New York Police Department, Norris rose from beat cop to deputy commissioner of operations at the young age of 36. After his career with the NYPD, Norris was recruited and ultimately became police commissioner of Baltimore. He breathed life into a demoralized force that lowered the city’s infamous homicide count for the first time in a decade. After the 911 attacks, he took over the Maryland State Police and pushed innovative anti-terrorism strategies that made him a national leader in the field. At the University of Virginia, they taught a graduate course about how his leadership techniques transformed one of the most violent cities in the country. He was the golden boy of law enforcement, a brash, larger-than-life figure with a taste for fine restaurants, bespoke clothing and fast motorcycles. Then it all came crashing down. An investigation into a little-known Baltimore Police expense account ended in a prison sentence. Thus began the hellish ordeal that ultimately cost him his livelihood, reputation, health and marriage. The book follows Norris from New York to Maryland to three federal prisons, then details his triumphant return as a successful radio personality in Maryland, where his popularity with locals never waned. Throughout, Norris weaves a dark web of politics and corruption that crosses state and party lines, and that charts the course for what it took to reduce the most lauded crime fighter in the country to a convicted felon. “Eddie Norris was a cop’s cop and is a man’s man,” said John Miller, former deputy commissioner of the NYPD and former assistant director of the FBI in his advanced praise of the book. “The story he tells of being one of the nation’s best crime fighters, and then getting caught in the grinding wheels of the very justice system he was raised by is an example of the old adage: he who speaks the truth should have at least one foot in the stirrups. It is the rise and fall and rise story you can’t put down.” Norris is available for media interviews, editorials and as a media resource on key leadership and law enforcement-based issues. Press review copies are available by request. Please contact Andrea Lynn at 410-420-2001 or andrea.lynn(at)fallstongroup(dot)com to request a copy of the book or interview. Learn more about “Way Down in the Hole” and order online at Amazon (Hardcover, ISBN 978-1627201124, $26.99). Follow Norris on Twitter and LinkedIn @EdNorris, and his official author Facebook page at @EdNorrisBook. Join the conversation online using #WDITH or #EdNorrisBook. About the Author A Brooklyn, New York native, Ed began his career with the New York Police Department in 1980. While with the NYPD, he created the Cold Case Squad which inspired a book and television series. In 2000, Ed was recruited by Baltimore’s mayor and became Police Commissioner of the Baltimore Police Department, where his honors included the NAACP President’s Award for police and community relations. Ed’s leadership improved the policing culture and for the first time in more than a decade, helped drive annual homicides below 300. In 2002, Ed was again recruited, this time by Maryland’s governor, and appointed Maryland State Police Superintendent. Ed is widely known for his role as Detective Ed Norris on HBO’s critically acclaimed television series, The Wire. He also played an investigator in the 2009 film, “Jack the Ripper in America.” Currently, in addition to authoring his new book “Way Down in the Hole,” Ed is a popular radio personality and actor. He is the co-host of the weekday morning Norris & Long Show on CBS WJZ-FM (105.7 The FAN) in Baltimore, Maryland and is also featured in weekly news segments on WBFF Fox45 News in Baltimore. For more information, visit facebook.com/ednorrisbook. About the Co-Author Kevin Cowherd is the author, along with Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr., of the New York Times best-seller “Hothead” and five other baseball novels for young readers. Their sixth book, “The Closer,” was published by Disney-Hyperion in March. Cowherd’s last three non-fiction books for Apprentice House Press were “The Art of Crisis Leadership,” how to save time, money, customers and, ultimately, your career, with Rob Weinhold, crisis leadership expert (http://www.FallstonGroup.com), “The Opening Act: Comedy, Life and the Desperate Pursuit of Happiness,” a look at the career of Baltimore comic Larry Noto, and “Hale Storm: The Incredible Saga of Baltimore’s Ed Hale, including a Secret Life with the CIA.” Cowherd was an award-winning sports and features columnist for The Baltimore Sun for 32 years and has also written for Men’s Health, Parenting and Baseball Digest magazines. A collection of his newspaper columns, “Last Call at the 7-Eleven” can still be found in fine remainder bins everywhere. Cowherd travels from the USA.


News Article | April 23, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, center, speaks with Pak Pong Ju, right, and Hwang Pyong So, left, during the opening ceremony of the Ryomyong residential area, a collection of more than a dozen apartment buildings, on Thursday, April 13, 2017, in Pyongyang, North Korea. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E) PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) -- North Korea has detained a U.S. citizen, officials said Sunday, bringing to three the number of Americans now being held there. Tony Kim, who also goes by his Korean name Kim Sang-duk, was detained on Saturday, according to Park Chan-mo, the chancellor of the Pyongyang University of Science and Technology. Park said Kim, who is in his 50s, taught accounting at the university for about a month. He said Kim was detained by officials as he was trying to leave the country from Pyongyang's international airport. The Swedish Embassy in Pyongyang said it was aware of a Korean-American citizen being detained recently, but could not comment further. The embassy looks after consular affairs for the United States in North Korea because the two countries do not have diplomatic relations. Park said Kim had taught at the Yanbian University of Science and Technology in China before coming to Pyongyang. He said he was informed that the detention had "nothing to do" with Kim's work at the university but did not know further details. As of Sunday night, North Korea's official media had not reported on the detention. Though no details on why Kim was detained have been released, the detention comes at a time of unusually heightened tensions between the U.S. and North Korea. Both countries have recently been trading threats of war and having another American in jail will likely up the ante even further. Last year, Otto Warmbier, then a 21-year-old University of Virginia student from suburban Cincinnati, was sentenced to 15 years of hard labor in prison after he confessed to trying to steal a propaganda banner. Kim Dong Chul, who was born in South Korea but is also believed to have U.S. citizenship, is serving a sentence of 10 years for espionage. Another foreigner, a Canadian pastor, is also being detained in North Korea. Hyeon Soo Lim, a South Korean-born Canadian citizen in his 60s, was convicted and sentenced to life in prison in 2015 on charges of trying to use religion to destroy the North Korean system and helping U.S. and South Korean authorities lure and abduct North Korean citizens. For more news videos visit Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.medicalnewstoday.com

A new study has identified novel mechanisms whereby T cells may be able to distinguish an emerging class of targets specifically increased on cancer cells. The study, carried out by researchers from the University of Birmingham and the University of Virginia, and published in Oncotarget, focuses on how the immune system recognises protein targets that are modified by phosphorylation, a process that is known to be commonly increased in cancer cells. Phosphorylation plays a key role in cell signalling pathways, and involves small phosphate groups being added by kinase enzymes onto particular amino acid groups within a protein. While it is widely recognised as being key to the control of a wide range of cellular pathways, including those that regulate cell division, it has also become clear that such pathways become heavily dysregulated in cancer. Previous research published by the authors has revealed that such phosphorylated protein fragments can be presented on the surface of cancer cells for immune recognition, however the ways in which such small modifications affect how T cells recognise them have remained unclear. The team's results have shed new light on this issue. One of the lead authors of the study, Dr Daniel Stones from the Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy Centre at the University of Birmingham, explained the key findings: "We have found that this small modification - phosphorylation - is likely to have a major effect on how our T cells can recognise these cancer-associated targets in two ways. "Firstly, our results show that phosphorylation can induce a major change in the overall structure of these peptides. Secondly, we directly show that the critical receptor involved on the T cell - the T cell receptor - is very sensitive at directly discriminating modified from non-modified peptides - even when the changes induced are relatively small." Overall, the findings underline growing interest in the area of targeting modified antigens in cancer. The study's senior author, Professor Ben Willcox explained: "Our study supports the idea that the abnormal patterns of phosphorylation observed in cancer cells may translate into a distinctive cancer-specific signature that can be targeted by the immune system. There might be a number of ways to go about targeting such phosphorylated peptides therapeutically, including vaccination, cellular therapies, and protein therapeutics." Article: The antigenic identity of human class I MHC phosphopeptides is critically dependent upon phosphorylation status, Fiyaz Mohammed, Daniel H. Stones et al., Oncotarget, doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.16952, published 8 April 2017.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new technique developed at the University of Virginia School of Medicine will let a single cancer research lab do the work of dozens, dramatically accelerating the search for new treatments and cures. And the technique will benefit not just cancer research but research into every disease driven by gene mutations, from cystic fibrosis to Alzheimer's disease - ultimately enabling customized treatments for patients in a way never before possible. The new technique lets scientists analyze the effects of gene mutations at an unprecedented scale and speed, and at a fraction of the cost of traditional methods. For patients, this means that rather than thinking about the right drug for a certain disease, doctors will think about the right drug to treat the patient's specific gene mutation. "Every patient shouldn't receive the same treatment. No way. Not even if they have the same syndrome, the same disease," said UVA researcher J. Julius Zhu, PhD, who led the team that created the new technique. "It's very individual in the patient, and they have to be treated in different ways." Understanding the effect of gene mutations has, traditionally, been much like trying to figure out what an unseen elephant looks like just by touching it. Touch enough places and you might get a rough idea, but the process will be long and slow and frustrating. "The way we have had to do this is so slow," said Zhu, of UVA's Department of Pharmacology and the UVA Cancer Center. "You can do one gene and one mutation at a time. Now, hopefully, we can do like 40 or 100 of them simultaneously." Zhu's approach uses an HIV-like virus to replace genes with mutant genes, so that scientists can understand the effects caused by the mutation. He developed the approach, requiring years of effort, out of a desire to both speed up research and also make it possible for more labs to participate. "Even with the CRISPR [gene editing] technology we have now, it still costs a huge amount of money and time and most labs cannot do it, so we wanted to develop something simple every lab can do," he said. "No other approach is so efficient and fast right now. You'd need to spend 10 years to do what we are doing in three months, so it's an entirely different scale." To demonstrate the effectiveness of his new technique, Zhu already has analyzed approximately 50 mutations of the BRaf gene, mutations that have been linked to tumors and to a neurodevelopmental disorder known as cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome. The work sheds important light on the role of the mutations in disease. Zhu's new technique may even let researchers revisit failed experimental treatments, determine why they failed and identify patients in which they will be effective. It may be that a treatment didn't work because the patient didn't have the right mutation, or because the treatment didn't affect the gene in the right way. It's not as simple as turning a gene on or off, Zhu noted; instead, a treatment must prompt the right amount of gene activity, and that may require prodding a gene to do more or pulling on the reins so that it does less. "The problem in the cancer field is that they have many high-profile papers of clinical trials [that] all failed in some way," he said. "We wondered why in these patients sometimes it doesn't work, that with the same drug some patients are getting better and some are getting worse. The reason is that you don't know which drugs are going to help with their particular mutation. So that would be true precision medicine: You have the same condition, the same syndrome, but a different mutation, so you have to use different drugs." Zhu and his team have described the technique in an article published in the scientific journal Genes & Development, making it available to scientists around the world. The paper was written by Chae-Seok Lim, Xi Kang, Vincent Mirabella, Huaye Zhang, Qian Bu, Yoichi Araki, Elizabeth T. Hoang, Shiqiang Wang, Ying Shen, Sukwoo Choi, Bong-Kiun Kaang, Qiang Chang, Zhiping P. Pang, Richard L. Huganir and Zhu. The work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the National Honor Scientist Program of Korea, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National Institutes of Health, grants MH108321, NS065183, NS089578, HD064743, AA023797, MH64856, NS036715, NS053570, NS091452 and NS092548.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Watts has more than 25 years of equity asset management experience with specific focus on large- and small-cap growth stocks. He started his professional career as an Equity Analyst at Freedom Capital Management in Boston, MA before spending nine years at Westfield Capital Management as an Equity Analyst and then as a Partner and Portfolio Manager overseeing a $500+ million growth stock portfolio. While at The Boston Company, Watts was a Senior Managing Director with responsibility for small- and mid-cap growth investments. He managed $4 billion in long and long/short equity portfolios and hired, trained, and managed a team of investment professionals. During his twelve years at The Boston Company he increased assets in products managed considerably from $200 million to $4 billion. Most recently, Watts ran a $300 million long/short equity portfolio for Folger Hill Asset Management in New York, NY. He is a graduate of University of Virginia and is a Chartered Financial Analyst. "I am thrilled to have the opportunity to work at a company with such a solid history of successfully picking winning stocks," says Watts. "I look forward to building on that by providing the best service possible for our clients." William O'Neil + Co. is a registered investment advisor providing global buy and sell recommendations, independent research, and custom advisory to the world's leading institutional investment managers. Its blended method of stock analysis delivers actionable ideas that accelerate portfolio performance across investing disciplines. Founded in 1963, William O'Neil + Co. is headquartered in Los Angeles with offices in New York, Boston, San Francisco, and London. William O'Neil + Co.'s comprehensive suite of research services includes the U.S. Focus List, domestic buy-side recommendations;  the Global Focus List for developing, emerging, and frontier markets; in-depth research reports on global equities; and custom advisory. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/randy-watts-joins-oneil-as-chief-investment-strategist-300451240.html


News Article | April 30, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - In this April 15, 2017, file photo, demonstrators participate in a march and rally in New York to demand President Donald Trump release his tax returns. New York Democrats have hatched a plan in Albany to get a look at President Donald Trump's tax records by crafting a piece of specific legislation that does everything but mention him by name. The bill in New York's Legislature would require the state to release five years of state tax information for any president or vice president who files a New York state return. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File) ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York Democrats have hatched a plan to get a look at Donald Trump's tax records by crafting a piece of legislation designed to get at his state returns that does everything but mention the Republican president by name. The bill introduced this month in New York's Senate and Assembly would require the state to release five years of state tax information for any president or vice president who files a New York state return. While Trump's state return wouldn't include all the details from his federal return, it would offer the public much more information about the president's potential conflicts of interest or how his finances would be impacted by his own tax cut proposal, according to supporters. Democrats in New York and more than two dozen states have crafted bills that would require presidential candidates to release their federal returns in order to appear on that state's ballot. None of those, however, would require Trump to release old returns. New York state "is in a unique position to change the national conversation," according to Democratic Sen. Brad Hoylman, of Manhattan, because the president is a native New Yorker. "This is drawing a line in the sand: Are you for transparency or not?" Hoylman said. "This is an issue of national security." The Democrat-led state Assembly is likely to support the measure but not the Senate, where Republicans are in charge. "This sounds like a P.R. stunt," said Scott Reif, a spokesman for the Senate GOP. For more news videos visit Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android. The requirement would also apply to the state's two U.S. senators and top state positions like Attorney General Eric Schneiderman and Gov. Andrew Cuomo. Schneiderman and Cuomo, both Democrats, have voluntarily released their tax returns for years. Tax returns — state and federal — are almost always considered personal information and aren't subject to public scrutiny. Every president since Jimmy Carter has released his tax returns. Trump has so far refused, however, saying he would release them when the Internal Revenue Service completes an ongoing audit. On Thursday, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said the president has no intention to release the documents and that Americans already have "plenty of information" about his finances. Trump, a billionaire, owns a global real estate, marketing and property management company, which at the start of his presidency, he placed in a trust that he can revoke at any time. His daughter and son-in-law, both White House advisers, are also holding onto significant business assets. And Trump's adult sons run his Trump Organization. Lawmakers in New York likely have the legal authority to require the state to release tax returns, according to George Yin, a professor of law and taxation at the University of Virginia. Yin is a past chief of staff to Congress' Joint Committee on Taxation. "The larger question is whether getting the state returns will provide the kind of information that people have been seeking, such as information about conflicts of interest and the effects of tax proposals on the president personally," Yin said. Yin also noted that details about Trump's finances may not be included in his personal returns but instead in the returns for his various business entities. The New York legislation would face better odds if not for the state Senate's odd partisan dynamics. The 63-seat chamber is now evenly split between Democrats and Republicans, with one vacant seat that's expected to go Democratic in an upcoming special election. But Republicans are in control thanks to the support of several Democrats, known as the Independent Democrats, who broke ranks with their party to empower the GOP. The IDC supports the bill, according to spokeswoman Candice Giove, though Republicans can still block any effort to bring the bill to a vote. "Our country deserves to know about the business dealings of our president," she said.


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

A Chinese paramilitary policeman stands guard outside of the North Korean Embassy in Beijing, Thursday, April 20, 2017. The U.S. is piling the pressure on Beijing to use its clout with North Korea to rein in its nuclear and missile programs. China is the North's most important trading partner and ally, but Pyongyang has ignored Beijing's calls for a suspension of those programs and its requests for high-level bilateral talks. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein) BEIJING (AP) — China's foreign minister recently likened the U.S. and North Korea to two speeding trains hurtling toward each other, an analogy that would seem to place China in the role of helpless bystander. And indeed, while tensions have risen, Beijing has been frustrated by its declining influence over the Korean Peninsula. China "has a grandstand seat but no control," said University of Virginia China scholar Brantly Womack. The U.S. is piling the pressure on Beijing to use its clout with North Korea to rein in its nuclear and missile programs. China is the North's most important trading partner and ally, but Pyongyang has ignored Beijing's calls for a suspension of those programs and its requests for high-level bilateral talks. China's relations with South Korea, meanwhile, have plummeted over Beijing's vociferous objections to the deployment of a sophisticated anti-missile shield. "China's approach to the peninsula is under the same strains that it's been under before. The difference is that, this time, the Americans appear to be applying more overt, real pressure," said Dean Cheng, senior research fellow at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. A slew of recent missile launches and North Korea's expected test of a sixth nuclear device have heightened concerns that the country is drawing closer to being capable of striking the U.S. with a nuclear weapon — something sure to bring the crisis to a head. Also complicating matters: The unpredictability of President Donald Trump, who earlier this month tweeted that the U.S. welcomed China's help in resolving the crisis, then added, "If not, we will solve the problem without them!" Uncertainties also reside in South Korea's election next month to replace disgraced former President Park Geun-hye; her successor is likely to be more conciliatory toward the North. Meanwhile, China continues to insist that it won't stand idly by while Seoul deploys the missile system, known as THAAD, driving home its point by halting package tours to the South and retaliating against a supermarket chain and other South Korean business interests within China. While THAAD appears to be a done deal, China is playing a long game of reminding South Korea that, as a smaller and weaker nation, it needs to subordinate its security interests to those of China, said Cheng. "South Korea has been put on notice that future defense efforts will likely also incur costs," Cheng said. Such criticisms have been reinforced by state media, with the Communist Party newspaper Global Times writing Wednesday that South Korea was also responsible for "fanning the flames" of tensions on the Korean Peninsula by deploying THAAD and failing to encourage Washington to enter into talks. Beijing is also dealing with divided public opinion domestically. Younger Chinese with only a passing knowledge of the 1950-53 Korean War, in which hundreds of thousands of Chinese troops died fighting alongside their North Korean allies, are increasingly cynical about the traditional friendship between the two countries. Criticisms of North Korea that were once quickly scrubbed from the internet are now being allowed to circulate, including a scathing speech by historian Shen Zhihua in which he accused Pyongyang of directly working against China's interests. Analysts say critics may even include Chinese President Xi Jinping, who is said to be deeply frustrated with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's intransigence since taking power in 2011 following the death of his father, Kim Jong Il. In the years since, Xi and Kim have never met. Liu Yunshan, a member of the ruling Communist Party's Politburo Standing Committee, is the last important Chinese official to visit North Korea. He attended a military parade and mass rally marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the Worker's Party of Korea in October 2015, in what appears to have been a one-off attempt to get relations back on track. Other affronts to Beijing include Kim's execution of his uncle Jang Song Thaek, who had been the regime's main point of contact with China, and the killing earlier this year in Malaysia of Kim's half brother Kim Jong Nam, who was said to live partly under Chinese protection in the gambling enclave of Macau. Malaysia is seeking four North Korean suspects. While it has less reason to fear a North Korean nuclear weapon, China intensely dislikes instability in its neighborhood and worries about South Korea and Japan responding by going nuclear themselves. So while it opposes actions that might topple Kim's regime and possibly send a wave of refugees across the Chinese border, China has agreed to successive rounds of sanctions since 2006. In February, it suspended imports of coal from North Korea, depriving the country of an important source of foreign currency. The U.S. wants Beijing to do more, possibly including cutting off fuel supplies. Trump has floated the idea of offering advantageous trade terms in exchange for help in although no details have been released. "I think Beijing is prepared to tighten the screws — but only so much. There's no question that Xi Jinping strongly dislikes, even probably detests, Kim Jong Un and wants to resolve this issue," said Paul Haenle, director of the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center at Tsinghua University in Beijing. However, the range of China's action remains limited by its priorities on North Korea: "No war, no instability, no nukes," in declining order of importance, said Haenle. "The Chinese are never going to go as far as we would like in terms of putting pressure on the regime in Pyongyang." China has repeatedly called for dialogue between Washington and Pyongyang, either bilaterally or through the six-party process that's been on ice since 2009. China has also urged, to little response, that North Korea suspend its nuclear weapons and missile programs in return for the U.S. and South Korea halting annual wargames that the North considers a prelude to an invasion. "China's sanctions and persuasion have been so far not very effective, but China is still making its best efforts," said Lu Chao, director of the Border Study Institute of the Liaoning Academy of Social Sciences, a government think tank. Lu said China is still hopeful a negotiated settlement can be obtained if the U.S. reaches out to North Korea and the international community convinces Pyongyang that no one is planning to attack it or seek regime change. "As U.S. officials have pointed out, the U.S. is not seeking the collapse of the North Korean regime. That's a very positive expression."


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Raisa Ahmad was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which she conducted research and prepared memos for patent litigation cases involving software and security patents, pharmaceuticals, and biomedical devices.  In addition, she has experience preparing claim construction charts, invalidity contentions, and Lanham Act standing memos.  Prior to law school, she was a student engineer and conducted electric-cell substrate impedance sensing analysis for the Center for the Convergence of Physical and Cancer Biology.  Ahmad received her J.D. from the University of Arizona College of Law in 2016 where she was senior articles editor for the Arizona Law Review and received the Dean's Achievement Award Scholarship.  She received her B.S.E., magna cum laude, in biomedical engineering from Arizona State University in 2011.  She is admitted to practice in Texas. Brian Apel practices patent litigation, including post-grant proceedings before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  He has worked for clients in the mechanical, electrical, and chemical industries and has experience in pre-suit diligence including opinion work, discovery, damages, summary judgment, and appeals.  Apel also has experience in patent prosecution, employment discrimination, and First Amendment law.  Before law school, he served as an officer in the U.S. Navy.  Apel received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the University of Michigan Law School in 2016 and his B.A., with honors, in chemistry from Northwestern University in 2008.  He is admitted to practice in Minnesota, the U.S. District Court of Minnesota, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Zoya Kovalenko Brooks focuses her practice on patent litigation, including working on teams for one of the largest high-tech cases in the country pertaining to data transmission and memory allocation technologies.  She was previously a summer associate and law clerk with the firm.  While in law school, she served as a legal extern at The Coca-Cola Company in the IP group.  Prior to attending law school, she was an investigator intern at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, where she investigated over 20 potential discrimination cases.  Brooks received her J.D., high honors, Order of the Coif, from Emory University School of Law in 2016 where she was articles editor for Emory Law Journal and her B.S., high honors, in applied mathematics from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Georgia. Holly Chamberlain focuses on patent prosecution in a variety of areas including the biomedical, mechanical, and electromechanical arts.  She was previously a summer associate with the firm.  She received her J.D. from Boston College Law School in 2016 where she was an editor of Intellectual Property and Technology Forum and her B.S. in biological engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Thomas Chisena previously was a summer associate with the firm where he worked on patent, trade secret, and trademark litigation.  Prior to attending law school, he instructed in biology, environmental science, and anatomy & physiology.  Chisena received his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2016 where he was executive editor of Penn Intellectual Property Group Online and University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Law, Vol. 37.  He also received his Wharton Certificate in Business Management in December 2015.  He received his B.S. in biology from Pennsylvania State University in 2009.  He is admitted to practice in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts. Claire Collins was a legal intern for the Middlesex County District Attorney's Office during law school.  She has experience researching and drafting motions and legal memorandums.  Collins received her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law in 2016 where she was a Dillard Fellow, her M.A. from Texas A&M University in 2012, and her B.A. from Bryn Mawr College in 2006.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts. Ronald Golden, III previously served as a courtroom deputy to U.S. District Judge Leonard P. Stark and U.S. Magistrate Judge Mary Pat Thynge.  He received his J.D. from Widener University School of Law in 2012 where he was on the staff of Widener Law Review and was awarded "Best Overall Competitor" in the American Association for Justice Mock Trial.  He received his B.A. from Stockton University in political science and criminal justice in 2005.  He is admitted to practice in Delaware and New Jersey. Dr. Casey Kraning-Rush was previously a summer associate with the firm, where she focused primarily on patent litigation.  She received her J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2016 where she was managing editor of Penn Intellectual Property Group Online and awarded "Best Advocate" and "Best Appellee Brief" at the Western Regional of the AIPLA Giles Rich Moot Court.  She earned her Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University in 2013 and has extensive experience researching cellular and molecular medicine.  She received her M.S. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University in 2012 and her B.S., summa cum laude, in chemistry from Butler University in 2008.  She is admitted to practice in Delaware. Alana Mannigé was previously a summer associate with the firm and has worked on patent prosecution, patent litigation, trademark, and trade secret matters.  During law school, she served as a judicial extern to the Honorable Judge James Donato of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.  She also worked closely with biotech startup companies as part of her work at the UC Hastings Startup Legal Garage.  Prior to attending law school, Mannigé worked as a patent examiner at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  She received her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law in 2016 where she was senior articles editor of Hastings Science & Technology Law Journal.  She received her M.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan in 2010 and her B.A., cum laude, in chemistry from Clark University in 2007.  She is admitted to practice in California and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Will Orlady was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which he collaborated to research and brief a matter on appeal to the Federal Circuit.  He also analyzed novel issues related to inter partes review proceedings, drafted memoranda on substantive patent law issues, and crafted infringement contentions.  During law school, Orlady was a research assistant to Professor Kristin Hickman, researching and writing on administrative law.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the University of Minnesota Law School in 2016 where he was lead articles editor of the Minnesota Journal of Law, Science and Technology and his B.A. in neuroscience from the University of Southern California in 2012.  He is admitted to practice in Minnesota and the U.S. District Court of Minnesota. Jessica Perry previously was a summer associate and law clerk with the firm, where she worked on patent and trademark litigation.  During law school, she was an IP & licensing analyst, in which she assisted with drafting and tracking material transfer agreement and inter-institutional agreements.  She also worked with the Boston University Civil Litigation Clinic representing pro bono clients with unemployment, social security, housing, and family law matters.  Prior to law school, she was a senior mechanical design engineer for an aerospace company.  She received her J.D. from Boston University School of Law in 2016 where she was articles editor of the Journal of Science and Technology Law, her M.Eng. in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2009, and her B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 2007.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts. Taufiq Ramji was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which he researched legal issues that related to ongoing litigation and drafted responses to discovery requests and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office actions.  Prior to attending law school, Ramji worked as a software developer.  He received his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 2016.  He is admitted to practice in California. Charles Reese has worked on matters before various federal district courts, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and the Patent Trial and Appeal Board.  His litigation experience includes drafting dispositive, evidentiary, and procedural motions; arguing in federal district court; and participating in other stages of litigation including discovery, appeal, and settlement negotiation.  Previously, he was a summer associate with the firm.  He received his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School in 2016 where he was articles editor of Harvard Law Review, his A.M. in organic and organometallic chemistry from Harvard University in 2012, and his B.S., summa cum laude, in chemistry from Furman University in 2010.  He is admitted to practice in Georgia and the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia. Ethan Rubin was previously a summer associate and law clerk with the firm.  During law school, he worked at a corporation's intellectual property department in which he prepared and prosecuted patents relating to data storage systems.  He also worked as a student attorney, advocating for local pro bono clients on various housing and family law matters.  Rubin received his J.D., cum laude, from Boston College Law School in 2016 where he was articles editor of Boston College Law Review, his M.S. in computer science from Boston University in 2013, and his B.A., magna cum laude, in criminal justice from George Washington University in 2011.  He is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Pooya Shoghi focuses on patent prosecution, including portfolio management, application drafting, client counseling, and standard essential patent development.  Prior to joining the firm, he was a patent practitioner at a multinational technology company, where he was responsible for the filing and prosecution of U.S. patent applications.  During law school, he was a legal intern at a major computer networking technology company, where he focused on issues of intellectual property licensing in the software arena.  He received his J.D., with honors, from Emory University School of Law in 2014 where he was executive managing editor of Emory Corporate Governance and Accountability Review.  He received his B.S., summa cum laude, in computer science (2015) and his B.A., summa cum laude, in political science (2011) from Georgia State University.  He is admitted to practice in New York and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Tucker Terhufen focuses his practice on patent litigation in federal district courts as well as before the International Trade Commission for clients in the medical devices, life sciences, chemical, and electronics industries.  Prior to joining Fish, he served as judicial extern to the Honorable David G. Campbell of the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona and to the Honorable Mary H. Murguia of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from Arizona State University, Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law in 2016 where he was note and comment editor of Arizona State Law Journal and received a Certificate in Law, Science, and Technology with a specialization in Intellectual Property.  He received his B.S.E., summa cum laude, in chemical engineering from Arizona State University.  He is admitted to practice in California. Laura Whitworth was previously a summer associate with the firm.  During law school, she served as a judicial intern for the Honorable Judge Jimmie V. Reyna of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.  She received her J.D., cum laude, from American University Washington College of Law in 2016 where she was senior federal circuit editor of American University Law Review and senior patent editor of Intellectual Property Brief.  She received her B.S. in chemistry from the College of William & Mary in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Virginia, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Jack Wilson was previously a summer associate with the firm.  During law school, he served as a judicial extern for the Honorable Mark Davis of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.  Prior to attending law school, he served in the United States Army.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, from William & Mary Law School in 2016 where he was on the editorial staff of William & Mary Law Review and his B.S. in computer engineering from the University of Virginia in 2009.  He is admitted to practice in Virginia and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Fish & Richardson is a global patent prosecution, intellectual property litigation, and commercial litigation law firm with more than 400 attorneys and technology specialists in the U.S. and Europe.  Our success is rooted in our creative and inclusive culture, which values the diversity of people, experiences, and perspectives.  Fish is the #1 U.S. patent litigation firm, handling nearly three times as many cases than its nearest competitor; a powerhouse patent prosecution firm; a top-tier trademark and copyright firm; and the #1 firm at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, with more cases than any other firm.  Since 1878, Fish attorneys have been winning cases worth billions in controversy – often by making new law – for the world's most innovative and influential technology leaders.  For more information, visit https://www.fr.com or follow us at @FishRichardson. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fish--richardson-announces-18-recent-associates-300447237.html


As part of a partnership with APA and Harvard University's Graduate School of Design that brings planning directors from the nation's largest cities to the Lincoln Institute each year, Armando Carbonell, chair of the institute's Department of Planning and Urban Form, will moderate a panel, Big City Planning Directors on Equitable Redevelopment and Food Access, which will examine the economic, planning, and equity issues facing St. Louis, Milwaukee and other cities. The session, from 2:45 to 4:00 p.m. Monday May 8, will include a discussion of redevelopment surrounding the nearly $2 billion National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency facility planned in St. Louis near the site of the former Pruitt-Igoe housing complex. The Lincoln Institute's recently published book Nature and Cities: The Ecological Imperative in Urban Design and Planning will also make its debut at the conference. Featuring essays by leading landscape architects, planners, and urban designers, the book calls for integration of nature more fully into cities as the world urbanizes and the effects of climate change grow more severe. A complete list of the Lincoln Institute's sessions at the conference follows (all sessions at the Javits Convention Center): Fiscal Analysis, Municipal Finance, and the Economy, from 10:45 a.m. to noon Saturday May 6, kicking off the conference's fiscal track with a discussion of the pillars of municipal fiscal health, why they are relevant to the planners, and how cities and towns can make better land use decisions, with George "Mac" McCarthy of the Lincoln Institute and L. Carson Bise of TischlerBise (Room 1E07). Benchmarking and Municipal Fiscal Health, from 1 to 2:15 p.m. Saturday May 6, exploring ways planners can use the Fiscally Standardized Cities (FiSC) database to make meaningful budgetary comparisons across the largest 150 U.S., with Lincoln Institute Senior Research Analyst Adam Langley and Research Fellow Andrew Reschovsky, as well as Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center Senior Fellow Tracy Gordon and Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning Deputy Executive Director for Planning Bob Dean (Room 1E08). Infrastructure Public Finance 101, from 4 to 5:15 p.m. Saturday May 6, surveying the financial avenues available to cities to pay for critical projects and the relationships between finance, project planning, and capital project administration, with Lourdes Germán of the Lincoln Institute and Susan Kendall of FirstSouthwest/Hilltop Securities (Room 1E15). Best Practices for Using Tax Incentives, from 1 to 2:15 p.m. Sunday May 7, detailing the costs and benefits of tax incentives, ways to make incentives more effective, the value of taking a regional approach, and alternative economic development strategies, with Edward Hill of Ohio State University, Daphne Kenyon of the Lincoln Institute, Greg LeRoy of Good Jobs First and Ronald Rakow of the City of Boston (Room E116). Nature and Cities: Ecological Planning and Design, from 1 to 2:15 p.m. Sunday May 7, looking at how ecological understanding can help planners respond to urban challenges like climate change with a focus on resilient urban design, with Timothy Beatley of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Armando Carbonell of the Lincoln Institute, Nina-Marie Lister of Ryerson University, and Forster Ndubisi of Texas A&M University (Room 1E10). Financing NYC's Hudson Yards, from 4 to 5:15 p.m. Sunday May 7, examining how the city of New York used the value of land to finance the multi-billion-dollar Hudson Yards infrastructure project on the city's Far West Side, with Lourdes Germán of the Lincoln Institute, and William Glasgall of the Volcker Alliance (Room 1A07). Applying Big Data to Small Projects, from 4 to 5:15 p.m. Sunday May 7, highlighting projects in California and Virginia to show how to gather and deploy big data to help achieve planning and transportation goals, with Amy Cotter of the Lincoln Institute, Chris McCahill of the State Smart Transportation Initiative, Chris Pangilinan of TransitCenter, and Laura Schewel of StreetLight Data (Room 1A08). Advancing Equity Analysis in Scenario Planning, from 7:30 to 8:45 a.m. Monday May 8, investigating how social equity concepts can be implemented  in planning practice using innovative scenario planning tools, with Colbey Brown of the Manhan Group, LLC, Arnab Chakraborty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Robert Goodspeed of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Jennifer Minner of Cornell University, Peter Pollock of the Lincoln Institute, Alex Steinberger of Fregonese Associates, and Bev Wilson of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Room  1A10). Big City Planning Directors on Equitable Redevelopment and Food Access, from 2:45 to 4:00 p.m. Monday May 8, confronting the economic, planning, and equity issues facing St. Louis, Milwaukee and other cities, with David Rouse of APA, Armando Carbonell of the Lincoln Institute, Vanessa Koster and Tim McCollow of the City of Milwaukee, Donald Roe of the City of St. Louis, Karen Shore of The Food Trust, and Toni Griffin of Urban Planning for the American City (Room 1E10). Scenario Analysis for Urban Planners, from 2:45 to 4 p.m. Monday May 8, on how scenario planning can acknowledge the inherent uncertainty of the future, using case studies that incorporated a wide range of voices, with Arnab Chakraborty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Amy Cotter of the Lincoln Institute, Janae Futrell of the city of Atlanta, and Kenneth Snyder of PlaceMatters (Room 1E07). Using the CIP to Make Plans Happen, from 4:15 to 5:30 p.m. Monday May 8, on how capital improvement plans can be used as vehicles to achieve planning goals, with Jean Gatza of the City of Boulder, Colorado, Julie Herlands of TischlerBise, and Peter Pollock of the Lincoln Institute (Room 1E09). Fiscal Policy and Land Use Interaction, from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. Tuesday May 9, looking at how fiscal policy decisions affect land use outcomes and vice versa, and how to promote cooperation between city planners and public finance experts, with Amy Cotter of the Lincoln Institute, Julie Herlands of TischlerBise, Michael Pagano of the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Andrew Reschovsky of the Lincoln Institute (Room 1A06). Planning Directors' Perspectives on the Region, from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. Tuesday May 9, providing a forum for planning directors form the New York City region to share the results of an all-day retreat, with Purnima Kapur of New York City, Peter Pollock of the Lincoln Institute and a number of planning directors from throughout the region (Room 1A21). Weighing the Future of Buyouts, from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. Tuesday May 9, exploring the structure and function of buyout programs in flood-prone communities, and the improvements that can be made, with Robert Freudenberg of the Regional Plan Association and Deborah Hoffman of the County of Passaic, Totowa, New Jersey (Room 1E15). Improving Fiscal Impacts Analysis, from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. Tuesday May 9, taking a deep dive into traditional methods used in fiscal impact analysis, critiques of traditional fiscal impact analysis, and alternative methodologies, with Peter Angelides, Daniel Miles, and Steven Nelson of Econsult Solutions, Inc. and Sidney Wong of Community Data Analytics (Room 1E14). The Lincoln Institute has been a longstanding partner with the American Planning Association's National Planning Conference, which is in its 109th year. The Lincoln Institute of Land Policy is an independent, nonpartisan organization whose mission is to help solve global economic, social, and environmental challenges to improve the quality of life through creative approaches to the use, taxation, and stewardship of land. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/lincoln-institute-at-the-american-planning-association-2017-national-planning-conference-300446392.html


Saucerman J.J.,University of Virginia | Bers D.M.,University of California at Davis
Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology | Year: 2012

Calmodulin (CaM) acts as a common Ca 2+ sensor for many signaling pathways, transducing local Ca 2+ signals into specific cellular outcomes. Many of CaM's signaling functions can be explained by its unique biochemical properties, including high and low affinity Ca 2+-binding sites with slow and fast kinetics, respectively. CaM is expected to have a limited spatial range of action, emphasizing its role in local Ca 2+ signaling. Interactions with target proteins further fine-tune CaM signal transduction. Here, we focus on only three specific cellular targets for CaM signaling in cardiac myocytes: the L-type Ca 2+ channel, the ryanodine receptor, and the IP 3 receptor. We elaborate a working hypothesis that each channel is regulated by two distinct functional populations of CaM: dedicated CaM and promiscuous CaM. Dedicated CaM is typically tethered to each channel and directly regulates channel activity. In addition, a local pool of promiscuous CaM appears poised to sense local Ca 2+ signals and trigger downstream pathways such as Ca 2+/CaM dependent-protein kinase II and calcineurin. Understanding how promiscuous CaM coordinates multiple distinct signaling pathways remains a challenge, but is aided by the use of mathematical modeling and a new generation of fluorescent biosensors. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Local Signaling in Myocytes.". © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Ioannidis J.P.A.,Stanford University | Munafo M.R.,University of Bristol | Fusar-Poli P.,King's College London | Nosek B.A.,University of Virginia | David S.P.,Stanford University
Trends in Cognitive Sciences | Year: 2014

Recent systematic reviews and empirical evaluations of the cognitive sciences literature suggest that publication and other reporting biases are prevalent across diverse domains of cognitive science. In this review, we summarize the various forms of publication and reporting biases and other questionable research practices, and overview the available methods for probing into their existence. We discuss the available empirical evidence for the presence of such biases across the neuroimaging, animal, other preclinical, psychological, clinical trials, and genetics literature in the cognitive sciences. We also highlight emerging solutions (from study design to data analyses and reporting) to prevent bias and improve the fidelity in the field of cognitive science research. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Wu X.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Lin Z.,University of Virginia
IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control | Year: 2012

This technical note examines the immediate, delayed and anticipatory activation of anti-windup mechanism. Traditional anti-windup compensators are designed for immediate activation. A recent innovation is to delay the activation of the anti-windup mechanism until the degree of saturation reaches to a certain level. By allowing the nominal controller to function undisturbed in the face of modest actuator saturation, delayed activation of the anti-windup mechanism has been shown to lead to improvement in the closed-loop performance. In this technical note, we propose to activate the static anti-windup compensation in anticipation of actuator saturation and show that such a "precautionary" approach has the potential of leading to further improvement in the closed-loop performance, in terms of both the transient quality in reference tracking and the region of stability. © 2011 IEEE.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2015

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is bringing numerous economic and social benefits to the public: advance the security of information and communication, decrease public health risk, and overall increase the quality of life all around the world. VLC has the potential to significantly increase the speed of Internet connection in multiuser indoor environments due to the broad bandwidth of the visible light. Commercializing the VLC technology will not only be a big step toward energy saving and provide stronger justification and desire for implementing economical LED systems, but also will increase the speed and security of wireless data communications. It will offer a huge energy saving for the nation since energy is already used for lighting, and thus does not require separate expenditure for communications. It will also increase the quality of life for those who are concerned about the impacts of Wi-Fi on their health, and any group of people including children and pregnant women can use it for Internet connection without any concern about the effect of electromagnetic waves. VLC can replace the controversial Wi-Fi technology in schools, hospitals, kindergartens and any other place that health issues are of major concerns. This Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) Phase I project is to develop the technology for visible light communication (VLC) system that achieves high data-rates using low-cost commercial light emitting diodes (LED). VLC is a potential alternative data communication technique for wireless applications that uses optical energy to provide simultaneously lighting needs and data transmission. The idea in this technology is to transmit the data using the lighting systems that are already used for the illumination of indoor environments. Spectrally efficient coding and modulation techniques with dimming feature support will be developed based on combinatorial designs to modulate LEDs. Multi-input multi-output (MIMO) will be explored to increase the transmission speeds since each user receives signals from multiple LEDs. Solutions to address technical problems of using LEDs intended for lighting in commercial VLC systems, such as LED heating, LED nonlinearity and controlling large LED-arrays with low-cost small circuits will be explored. The techniques developed in the Phase I of this proposal can also be employed along with faster but more expensive LEDs and photo-detectors to achieve Gbps streaming in VLC systems. Furthermore, tri-chromatic LEDs can be used to achieve a three-fold increase in the data-rate by modulating each color independently.


Oishi S.,University of Virginia | Diener E.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign
Psychological Science | Year: 2014

Using Gallup World Poll data, we examined the role of societal wealth for meaning in life across 132 nations. Although life satisfaction was substantially higher in wealthy nations than in poor nations, meaning in life was higher in poor nations than in wealthy nations. In part, meaning in life was higher in poor nations because people in those nations were more religious. The mediating role of religiosity remained significant after we controlled for potential third variables, such as education, fertility rate, and individualism. As Frankl (1963) stated in Man's Search for Meaning, it appears that meaning can be attained even under objectively dire living conditions, and religiosity plays an important role in this search. © The Author(s) 2013.

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