Nay Pyi Taw, Myanmar

The University of Veterinary Science, Yezin ), located in Yezin in the outskirts of Naypyidaw, is the only university of veterinary science in Myanmar . The university offers a six-year Bachelor of Veterinary Science program, and accepts about 100 students a year. It also offers graduate degree programs. The language of instruction at UVS is English. Wikipedia.


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Ichikawa M.,Iwate University | Ichikawa M.,Gifu University | Bawn S.,University of Veterinary Science, Yezin | Htun L.L.,University of Veterinary Science, Yezin | And 3 more authors.
Parasitology International | Year: 2011

Fasciola spp. in Myanmar were characterized on the basis of spermatogenesis status and DNA markers of nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1). We collected 88 adult flukes from Yangon, Lashio, and Myitkyina. Spermatogenesis status was analyzed by the presence of sperm in the seminal vesicles, and 8 aspermic and 80 spermic flukes were detected. The flukes were identified on the basis of spermatogenesis status and ITS1 types which were analyzed by a PCR-RFLP method, and 80 spermic flukes were identified as F. gigantica. A very low detection rate of aspermic Fasciola sp. indicated that they are not established in Myanmar. In phylogenetic analyses, the 7 aspermic Fasciola sp. from Myitkyina displayed a haplotype in nad1 sequence, which was identical to that of aspermic Fasciola sp. from other Asian countries including China. Therefore, they were probably introduced from China through an infected domestic ruminant. On the other hand, 17 nad1 haplotypes detected in F. gigantica belonged to 2 clades unique to Myanmar, each with a distinct founder haplotype in a network analysis. This indicated a unique history of F. gigantica introduction into Myanmar involving ancient artificial movements of domestic ruminants. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Bawm S.,Hokkaido University | Bawm S.,University of Veterinary Science, Yezin | Shimizu K.,Hokkaido University | Hirota J.-I.,Hokkaido University | And 5 more authors.
Parasitology International | Year: 2014

Theileria orientalis is a causative agent of benign theileriosis in cattle and distributed in mainly Asian countries. In the present study, we examined the prevalence of T. orientalis infection by PCR based on the major piroplasm surface protein gene (MPSP) sequences in cattle in Myanmar, followed by phylogenetic analysis of the MPSP genes. The MPSP gene was amplified in 258 of 713 (36.2%) cattle blood DNA samples collected from five cities in different geographical regions of Myanmar. Phylogenetic analysis of MPSP sequences from 54 T. orientalis-positive DNA samples revealed the presence of six allelic genotypes, including Types 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, and N-3. Types 5 and 7 were the predominant types detected. Sequences of the MPSP genes detected in Myanmar were closely related to those from Thailand, Vietnam or Mongolia. These findings suggest that movement of animals carrying T. orientalis parasites between Southeast Asian countries could be a reason for the similar genotype distribution of the parasites in Myanmar. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Sarsaifi K.,University Putra Malaysia | Rosnina Y.,University Putra Malaysia | Ariff M.,University Putra Malaysia | Wahid H.,University Putra Malaysia | And 5 more authors.
Reproduction in Domestic Animals | Year: 2013

Contents: This study was conducted to evaluate the response of Bali bulls (Bos javanicus) to different semen collection methods and their effects on fresh and post-thawed semen quality. The collection methods employed were electro-ejaculation (EE), transrectal massage (RM) and RM followed by EE (RM + EE). A total of 25 untrained Bali bulls (age between 2 and 4 years old) were subjected to the different semen collection methods. Fresh semen samples from all the 25 bulls were evaluated for volume, pH, general motility, live/dead ratio and abnormality using the conventional method. For fresh and frozen samples collected by EE and RM from 10 bulls, computer-assisted semen analysis system was used for precise quantitative measurement of motility, velocity and forward progression. Accucell photometer was used to measure sperm concentration in all samples, regardless fresh and frozen. Semen samples were obtained 100% of the attempts using EE, 84% using RM and 96% using RM + EE. There were no differences among the collection methods for fresh semen quality characteristics, including motility, morphology and viability, but pH and volume were higher for EE than RM and RM + EE. Higher sperm concentration was observed in semen collected by RM than the other two methods. Different age groups (2-3 and >3-4 years old) of the bulls did not show significant differences in volume, pH, sperm concentration, percentages in motility, live/dead ratio and normal sperm morphology. The quality of semen for general and progressive motility, VAP, VSL and VCL and acrosomal integrity after thawing was higher for RM than EE. In conclusion, Bali bulls appeared to respond best to EE and the combination of RM + EE than RM, as a method of semen collection, with a shorter time of stimulation required. Differences in age of the Bali bulls did not affect the semen quality. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.


PubMed | Nay Pyi Taw Development Committee and University of Veterinary Science, Yezin
Type: | Journal: Journal of veterinary medicine | Year: 2015

Cross-sectional surveys were conducted to determine the prevalence and associated risk factors of Taenia solium cysticercosis in pigs within Nay Pyi Taw area, Myanmar. Meat inspection in three slaughterhouses, ELISA test, and questionnaire surveys were conducted in this study. Three hundred pigs were inspected in slaughterhouses and 364 pigs were randomly selected and examined from 203 households from three townships in Nay Pyi Taw area. The prevalence of porcine cysticercosis in meat inspection was 23.67% (71/300). Seroprevalence of T. solium cysticercosis in pigs in the study area was 15.93% (58/364). Significant associated risk factors with T. solium cysticercosis were gender (OR = 3.0; 95% CI = 1.7-5.4), increased age (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.2-4.2), husbandry system (OR = 5.1; 95% CI = 2.4-11.2), feed type (OR = 16.9; 95% CI = 2.3-124.3), not using anthelmintics in pigs (OR = 11.9; 95% CI = 5.0-28.5), not using anthelmintics in owner (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.4-4.4), no hand-washing before feeding (OR = 31.5; 95% CI = 4.3-230.9), and pork consumption of owner (OR = 37.4; 95% CI = 9.0-156.1) in the study area. This is the first report of porcine cysticercosis in Myanmar.


Pielsticker C.,University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover | Glunder G.,University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover | Aung Y.H.,University of Veterinary Science, Yezin | Rautenschlein S.,University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover
Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology | Year: 2016

Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is the most frequently reported bacterial food-borne pathogen. Poultry is regarded to be the main reservoir for human campylobacteriosis. By some authors C. jejuni is considered as a commensal of the chicken gut, but clinical signs may be observed indicating host-pathogen interaction. Little is known about C. jejuni strain dependent differences in stimulation of the immune response in chicken. Therefore we investigated the colonization pattern as well as humoral and cell-mediated immune parameters in three-week old specific pathogen-free (SPF) layer-type (LT) chicken after inoculation with different human and avian derived C. jejuni isolates between three and 21 dpi. In a subsequent experiment we investigated earlier time points and additionally compared commercial broilers with SPF-LT chicken to identify possible differences after inoculation of selected C. jejuni strains from prior experiments. No clinical symptoms were observed during the experiments. The colonization pattern did not correlate with the strain origin or magnitude of circulating C. jejuni specific antibodies. Only minor changes were observed in caecal T cell populations after C. jejuni inoculation compared to non-inoculated controls. Interestingly the mRNA expression of IL-6 and IFN-gamma was down regulated at some time points after inoculation suggesting a possible immunomodulatory effect of some C. jejuni strains in the gut. Furthermore, broilers were colonized to a higher extend and the local immune cell response was different compared to the SPF -LT birds indicating an influence of genotype on C. jejuni colonization pattern.Overall, our study demonstrates that the outcome of C. jejuni infection in chicken is influenced by genotype and partially by the C. jejuni isolate, leading to differences in the early immune response and thereafter the control of colonization and infection. © 2015 Elsevier B.V..


PubMed | University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover and University of Veterinary Science, Yezin
Type: | Journal: Veterinary immunology and immunopathology | Year: 2016

Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is the most frequently reported bacterial food-borne pathogen. Poultry is regarded to be the main reservoir for human campylobacteriosis. By some authors C. jejuni is considered as a commensal of the chicken gut, but clinical signs may be observed indicating host-pathogen interaction. Little is known about C. jejuni strain dependent differences in stimulation of the immune response in chicken. Therefore we investigated the colonization pattern as well as humoral and cell-mediated immune parameters in three-week old specific pathogen-free (SPF) layer-type (LT) chicken after inoculation with different human and avian derived C. jejuni isolates between three and 21dpi. In a subsequent experiment we investigated earlier time points and additionally compared commercial broilers with SPF-LT chicken to identify possible differences after inoculation of selected C. jejuni strains from prior experiments. No clinical symptoms were observed during the experiments. The colonization pattern did not correlate with the strain origin or magnitude of circulating C. jejuni specific antibodies. Only minor changes were observed in caecal T cell populations after C. jejuni inoculation compared to non-inoculated controls. Interestingly the mRNA expression of IL-6 and IFN-gamma was down regulated at some time points after inoculation suggesting a possible immunomodulatory effect of some C. jejuni strains in the gut. Furthermore, broilers were colonized to a higher extend and the local immune cell response was different compared to the SPF -LT birds indicating an influence of genotype on C. jejuni colonization pattern. Overall, our study demonstrates that the outcome of C. jejuni infection in chicken is influenced by genotype and partially by the C. jejuni isolate, leading to differences in the early immune response and thereafter the control of colonization and infection.


Bawm S.,University of Veterinary Science, Yezin | Htun L.L.,University of Veterinary Science, Yezin
Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances | Year: 2015

Most parasitic zoonoses are neglected diseases despite causing a considerable global burden of ill health in humans. A review of available literatures indicates that many parasitic zoonoses are endemic in neighbouring countries of Myanmar. However, the information on zoonotic parasitic diseases in Myanmar is very limited. The prevalence of some parasitic zoonoses in livestock of Myanmar and its neighbouring countries has been highlighted in this review. Prevention and control programs against sources and reservoirs of parasitic zoonoses and other zoonoses should be planned by public health and veterinary officers based on reliable information from systematic surveillance. © 2015 Academic Journals Inc.


Naing S.W.,University Putra Malaysia | Wahid H.,University Putra Malaysia | Mohd Azam K.,Ar Raudhah Biotech Farm Sdn. Bhd | Rosnina Y.,University Putra Malaysia | And 6 more authors.
Animal Reproduction Science | Year: 2010

In order to improve Boer goat semen quality during cryopreservation process, the influence of sugar supplementation on semen characteristics of sperm were investigated. Three experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of (a) addition of two monosaccharides (fructose and glucose) and two disaccharides sugars (trehalose and sucrose) (b) sugar combination (fructose and trehalose, sucrose and trehalose, glucose and trehalose), and control (glucose without trehalose) (c) different concentrations of trehalose on cryopreservation using Tris based extender. The total motility, forward motility, viability, normal spermatozoa, acrosome integrity and membrane integrity were assessed subjectively. Differences were not detected among monosaccharides, but glucose increased (P<0.05) sperm forward motility in post-thaw goat semen compared to trehalose or sucrose supplementation. Semen quality did not differ (P>0.05) among disaccharide sugar supplementation. Combination of glucose and trehalose significantly improved the characteristics of Boer spermatozoa after cryopreservation (P<0.05). Supplementation of trehalose (198.24. mM) into the glucose extender significantly increased total motility, forward motility, live spermatozoa, acrosome integrity and membrane integrity following cryopreservation (P<0.05). In conclusion, glucose had the better ability to support Boer sperm motility and movement patterns. Combination of monosaccharide (glucose) and disaccharide (trehalose) improved semen quality following cryopreservation. Trehalose supplementation at the concentration of 198.24. mM to the glucose extender conferred the greater improvement of semen quality for Boer semen cryopreservation. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Jikei University School of Medicine, University of Veterinary Science, Yezin, District Office and Hokkaido University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Ticks and tick-borne diseases | Year: 2015

Cattle babesiosis is one of the most important tick-borne diseases worldwide. The present study reports a molecular survey of Babesia infections in cattle in Myanmar. Nested PCR assays based on the Babesia bigemina apical membrane antigen-1 gene (AMA-1) and B. bovis rhoptry associated protein-1 gene (RAP-1) revealed that the overall percentage of B. bigemina and B. bovis infection were 9.8% (70/713) and 17.1% (122/713), respectively. A mixed infection was detected in 4.6% (33/713) of animals. Animals <1 year (OR=13.66, CI=5.15-36.26) and 1-5 years of age (OR=3.91, CI=1.50-10.17) were identified as potential risk factors for B. bigemina infection. For B. bovis infection, age <1 year (OR=3.06, CI=1.63-5.75) and 1-5 years (OR=2.08, CI=1.21-3.57), Friesian-Zebu crossbreeds (OR=2.04, CI=1.26-3.30) and grazing (OR=1.59, CI=1.06-2.38) were identified as potential risk factors. This is the first report on a nationwide survey of bovine Babesia infections in Myanmar, providing useful information for the management and control of the disease.


PubMed | Myanmar Veterinary Association, Chiang Mai University, University of Veterinary Science, Yezin, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine and Hokkaido University
Type: | Journal: Scientifica | Year: 2016

Goat farming is important for the livelihood of millions of rural people because it contributes to food security and creation of assets. However, infection of goats with Toxoplasma gondii could be a source of parasite transmission to humans. The information on T. gondii infection of goat was not reported yet in Myanmar. A total of 119 goat serum samples were collected from three cities in the central region of Myanmar for T. gondii antibody survey. With the occurrence value obtained in this first study, a second one, more complete, with larger number (162) of animals and properties, was carried out and the risk factors and prevalence were determined. In both studies the samples were analyzed by the LAT. Of these, 32 (11.4%) samples were showed to be positive. The infection was associated with the presence of cats at the farm (odds ratio [OR] = 4.66, 95% confidential interval [CI] = 1.03-21.06), farming with different animal species (sheep, cattle, and pigs) (OR = 4.33, 95% CI = 1.57-11.94), and farming without good management practices (OR = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.06-0.83). This is the first T. gondii prevalence study in goats in the country.

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