University of Valle dAosta

Valle, Italy

University of Valle dAosta

Valle, Italy

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Cacciamani S.,University Of Valle Daosta
Journal of E-Learning and Knowledge Society | Year: 2017

Progressive Design Method (PDM) attempts to connect the Experiential Learning perspective with Knowledge Building model. The aim of the present study was to analyse the implementation of PDM in terms of patterns of online participation and interaction, and the relationship between online participation and interaction with participation in F2F meetings. The implementation was introduced in a Guided Practical Experience at the University of Valle d’Aosta, involving 17 students in their 2nd year of a Psychological Sciences and Techniques degree course. Following PDM, the students worked in teams to create a project about the use of digital technology in school or other formative contexts. An online environment, Knowledge Forum (KF), supported the activity with specific areas (views) where students could present themselves, analyse the KB model and share their project. The project was developed in different steps and after each step each team received a feedback from all the members of the community via KF. The results for participation show a positive correlation between notes written and read in each view, as well as a correlation between notes read between different views. We also found a correlation between Weighted Indregree and Outdegree in each view. Finally, F2F participation correlated with the total number of notes written and read and with the total number of Weighted Indegree and Weighted Outdegree. Implications of these results for PDM implementations are discussed. © 2017, Italian e-Learning Association. All rights reserved.


Cesareni D.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Cacciamani S.,University Of Valle Daosta | Fujita N.,University of Windsor
International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning | Year: 2016

Role taking is an established approach for promoting social cognition. Playing a specific role within a group could lead students to exercise collective cognitive responsibility for collaborative knowledge building. Two studies explored the relationship of role taking to participation in a blended university course. Students participated in the same knowledge-building activity over three consecutive, five-week modules and enacted four roles designed in alignment with knowledge building pedagogy (Scardamalia and Bereiter 2010). In Study 1, 59 students were distributed into groups with two conditions: students who took a role in Module 2 and students who did not take a role, using Module 1 and 3 as pre and post tests. Results showed no differences in participation in Module 1, higher levels of writing and reading for role takers in Module 2, and this pattern was sustained in Module 3. Students with the Synthesizer role were the most active in terms of writing and the second most active for reading; students with the Social Tutor role were the most active for reading. In Study 2, 143 students were divided into groups with two conditions: students who took a role in Module 1 and students who did not take a role. Content analysis revealed that role takers tended to vary their contributions more than non-role takers by proposing more problems, synthesizing the discourse, reflecting on the process and organization of activity. They also assumed appropriate responsibilities for their role: the Skeptic prioritizes questioning of content, the Synthesizer emphasizes synthesizing of content, and the Social Tutor privileges maintaining of relationships. Implications of designing role taking to foster knowledge building in university blended courses are discussed. © 2015, International Society of the Learning Sciences, Inc.


Lenzi M.,University of Padua | Vieno A.,University of Padua | Altoe G.,University of Padua | Scacchi L.,University Of Valle Daosta | And 3 more authors.
American Journal of Community Psychology | Year: 2015

The findings on the association between Social Networking Sites and civic engagement are mixed. The present study aims to evaluate a theoretical model linking the informational use of Internet-based social media (specifically, Facebook) with civic competencies and intentions for future civic engagement, taking into account the mediating role of civic discussions with family and friends and sharing the news online. Participants were 114 Italian high school students aged 14–17 years (57 % boys). Path analysis was used to evaluate the proposed theoretical model. Results showed that Facebook informational use was associated with higher levels of adolescent perceived competence for civic action, both directly and through the mediation of civic discussion with parents and friends (offline). Higher levels of civic competencies, then, were associated with a stronger intention to participate in the civic domain in the future. Our findings suggest that Facebook may provide adolescents with additional tools through which they can learn civic activities or develop the skills necessary to participate in the future. © 2015, Society for Community Research and Action.


Canale N.,University of Padua | Scacchi L.,University of Valle dAosta | Griffiths M.D.,Nottingham Trent University
Addictive Behaviors | Year: 2016

The aim of the present study was to examine the potential moderating relationships between adolescent gambling and impulsivity traits (negative urgency, positive urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance and sensation seeking) with employment status. High-school students (N = 400; 69% male; mean age = 18.35 years; SD = 1.16; past year gamblers) were surveyed to provide data on impulsivity and employment. Multiple linear regression analysis was applied to examine associations with gambling and related problems. Positive urgency was associated with stronger scores of both gambling frequency and problem gambling. Students in employment had substantially higher frequency of gambling and greater problem gambling. Moreover, the combination of having a job and low perseverance was associated with a particularly high frequency on gambling. These findings further support the importance of positive urgency and employment status in adolescent gambling. The study highlights unique moderating relationship between gambling and lack of perseverance with employment status. Youth with a low perseverance and having a job may have particular need for interventions to reduce gambling. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.


Lenzi M.,University of Padua | Vieno A.,University of Padua | Sharkey J.,University of California at Santa Barbara | Mayworm A.,University of California at Santa Barbara | And 3 more authors.
American Journal of Community Psychology | Year: 2014

Civic engagement, defined as involvement in community life, is influenced by reciprocal relationships between individuals and contexts and is a key factor that contributes to positive youth development. The present study evaluates a theoretical model linking perceived democratic school climate with adolescent civic engagement (operationalized as civic responsibility and intentions for future participation), taking into account the mediating role of civic discussions and perceived fairness at school. Participants were 403 adolescents (47.9 % male) ranging in age from 11 to 15 years old (mean age = 13.6). Path analysis results partially validated the proposed theoretical model. Higher levels of democratic school climate were associated with higher levels of adolescent civic responsibility; the association was fully mediated by civic discussions and perceived fairness at school. Adolescents’ civic responsibility, then, was positively associated with a stronger intention to participate in the civic domain in the future. © 2014, Society for Community Research and Action.


PubMed | University of Padua, Nottingham Trent University and University of Valle dAosta
Type: | Journal: Addictive behaviors | Year: 2016

The aim of the present study was to examine the potential moderating relationships between adolescent gambling and impulsivity traits (negative urgency, positive urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance and sensation seeking) with employment status. High-school students (N=400; 69% male; mean age=18.35years; SD=1.16; past year gamblers) were surveyed to provide data on impulsivity and employment. Multiple linear regression analysis was applied to examine associations with gambling and related problems. Positive urgency was associated with stronger scores of both gambling frequency and problem gambling. Students in employment had substantially higher frequency of gambling and greater problem gambling. Moreover, the combination of having a job and low perseverance was associated with a particularly high frequency on gambling. These findings further support the importance of positive urgency and employment status in adolescent gambling. The study highlights unique moderating relationship between gambling and lack of perseverance with employment status. Youth with a low perseverance and having a job may have particular need for interventions to reduce gambling.


Cacciamani S.,University of Valle dAosta | Cesareni D.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Martini F.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Ferrini T.,Regina Maria Adelaide High School Institute | Fujita N.,Copenhagen Business School
Computers and Education | Year: 2012

Understanding how to foster knowledge building in online and blended learning environments is a key for computer-supported collaborative learning research. Knowledge building is a deeply constructivist pedagogy and kind of inquiry learning focused on theory building. A strong indicator of engagement in knowledge building activity is the socio-cognitive dynamic of epistemic agency, in which students exercise a higher level of agency for setting forth their ideas and negotiating fit with those of others rather than relying on their teacher. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of (a) levels of participation, (b) facilitator styles and (c) metacognitive reflection on knowledge building in two blended, post-secondary education contexts. A study of a total of 67 undergraduate students suggest that high levels of participation, a supportive facilitator style, and ample opportunities for metacognitive reflection on the students' own participation strategies are most conducive for fostering epistemic agency for knowledge building. Implications of these results for research and instructional design of online courses are discussed. © 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Cacciamani S.,University of Valle dAosta | Perrucci V.,University of Valle dAosta | Khanlari A.,University of Toronto
Proceedings of International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS | Year: 2016

The aim of this study was to develop a coding scheme to analyze on line interactions in terms of "conversational functions", rooted in a KB model perspective. The coding scheme was created and used to analyze 10 messages written by 8 students in the first module of an online course. The inter-coder agreement was 76%, with Cohen's K = 0,70 at SCF level. The possible uses for future inquiry of this instrument are discussed. © ISLS.


Lenti Boero D.,University of Valle dAosta
Behavioral and Brain Sciences | Year: 2014

Building a theory on extant species, as Ackermann et al. do, is a useful contribution to the field of language evolution. Here, I add another living model that might be of interest: human language ontogeny in the first year of life. A better knowledge of this phase might help in understanding two more topics among the several building blocks of a comprehensive theory of the evolution of spoken language indicated in their conclusion by Ackermann et al., that is, the foundation of the co-evolution of linguistic motor skills with the auditory skills underlying speech perception, and the possible phylogenetic interactions of protospeech production with referential capabilities. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014.


Piu A.,University of Valle dAosta | Fregola C.,University of L'Aquila
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2014

The paper, starting from the analysis of Italian students' difficulties in Maths learnings, presents a quali-quantitative research carried out with some groups of pupils attending the 4th year of the Primary School in Formia (LT), Italy, in the school year 2011/2012. The aim of the research is to verify if the simulation game about the isometries, designed according to a specific theoretic frame and some methodological choices, with particular reference to the transcoding pattern, can: foster and facilitate the learning of geometrical concepts and their retention over time; affect social and scholastic self-efficacy as well as the motivation to learn. The quantitative analysis, carried out with ANOVA, comparing the simulation game to the traditional lesson, shows significant results in the learning for both groups. As far as motivation and social and scholastic self-efficacy are concerned, instead, no meaningful differences have been recorded. The in-depth analysis of the learning and its retention over time carried out through the qualitative analysis has shown the efficacy of the game with regards to both the concepts comprehension and the achievable abstraction levels. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

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