Newtownabbey, United Kingdom

University of Ulster

www.ulster.ac.uk
Newtownabbey, United Kingdom

Ulster University is a multi-campus, co-educational university located in Northern Ireland. It is the second largest university in Ireland, after the federal National University of Ireland. The university was established in 1968 as the New University of Ulster, merged with Ulster Polytechnic in 1984, and can trace its roots back to 1845 when Magee College was endowed in Londonderry, and 1849, when the School of Art and Design was inaugurated in Belfast. The University held the name University of Ulster for a number of years before rebranding itself in October 2014 as Ulster University .The university incorporated its four campuses in 1984 under the University of Ulster banner; these are located in Belfast, Coleraine , Magee College in Derry, and Jordanstown. A fifth distance learning campus, Campus One, delivers online programmes; mainly at graduate level.Ulster is a member of the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the European University Association, Universities Ireland and Universities UK.The university has one of the highest further study and/or employment rates in the UK, with 95% of graduates being in work or undertaking further study six months after they have completed their degree. In the 2008 RAE 86% of research activity at the university was rated as being of international quality, with 20% being classified as world-leading. Of particular note are the submissions within Biomedical science, the Institute of Nursing and Health Research and Celtic Studies which were all ranked within the top three UK universitiesThe Research Excellence Framework 2014 exercise identified Ulster University as one of the top five universities in the UK for world-leading research in law, biomedical science, nursing and art and design; under some metrics, it ranked Ulster University top in Northern Ireland for research into biomedical science, law, business and management, architecture and built environment, art and design, social policy, sport, media studies and nursing. Wikipedia.

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Patent
University of Ulster | Date: 2017-03-08

The invention relates to a peptide analogue comprising at least residues 2 13 of SEQ ID NO: 1 and further comprising at least a substitution or modification at residue 13 of SEQ ID NO: 1. The invention also relates to a pharmaceutical composition comprising the peptide analogue of the present invention and methods of treatment of diabetes, stimulating insulin release and moderating blood glucose excursions comprising administering the peptide analogue of the present invention to a patient in need thereof.


Patent
University of Ulster | Date: 2015-04-29

The invention relates to a peptide analogue comprising at least residues 2-13 of SEQ ID NO: 1 and further comprising at least a substitution or modification at residue 13 of SEQ ID NO: 1. The invention also relates to a pharmaceutical composition comprising the peptide analogue of the present invention and methods of treatment of diabetes, stimulating insulin release and moderating blood glucose excursions comprising administering the peptide analogue of the present invention to a patient in need thereof.


Patent
University of Ulster | Date: 2015-02-02

The present invention relates to an esculentin-2CHa peptide and analogues thereof, and the use each thereof in the treatment of diabetes, for example type 2 diabetes; insulin resistance; obesity, and/or hypercholesterolemia. Also disclosed is a pharmaceutical composition comprising peptides and analogues according to the present invention; use of peptides and analogues according to the present invention for the manufacture of a medicament for the treatment of diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity, and/or hypercholesterolemia; and methods of treating diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity, and/or hypercholesterolemia.


Patent
University of Ulster | Date: 2015-03-31

A method of extracting oil from oilseed comprising pressing seeds within a screw press including a screw auger rotatably mounted within a cylindrical expeller body, wherein the expeller body comprises a feed section, a compression section, and a discharge section, wherein at least one outlet is provided in the expeller body, preferably in or adjacent the feed section of the expeller, said method comprising the step of controlling the temperature of at least the compression section of the expeller by means such that the temperature of the material within the compression section does not exceed the glass transition temperature of the seeds.


Patent
University of Ulster | Date: 2017-02-08

A method of extracting oil from oilseed comprising pressing seeds within a screw press including a screw auger rotatably mounted within a cylindrical expeller body, wherein the expeller body comprises a feed section, a compression section, and a discharge section, wherein at least one outlet is provided in the expeller body, preferably in or adjacent the feed section of the expeller, said method comprising the step of controlling the temperature of at least the compression section of the expeller by means such that the temperature of the material within the compression section does not exceed the glass transition temperature of the seeds.


Tognoli E.,Florida Atlantic University | Kelso J.,Florida Atlantic University | Kelso J.,University of Ulster
Neuron | Year: 2014

Neural ensembles oscillate across a broad range of frequencies and are transiently coupled or "bound" together when people attend to a stimulus, perceive, think, and act. This is a dynamic, self-assembling process, with parts of the brain engaging and disengaging in time. But how is it done? The theory of Coordination Dynamics proposes a mechanism called metastability, a subtle blend of integration and segregation. Tendencies for brain regions to express their individual autonomy and specialized functions (segregation, modularity) coexist with tendencies to couple and coordinate globally for multiple functions (integration). Although metastability has garnered increasing attention, it has yet to be demonstrated and treated within a fully spatiotemporal perspective. Here, we illustrate metastability in continuous neural and behavioral recordings, and we discuss theory and experiments at multiple scales, suggesting that metastable dynamics underlie the real-time coordination necessary for the brain's dynamic cognitive, behavioral, and social functions. How does the transient coupling of neural ensembles that supports cognitive function occur? Tognoli and Kelso consider a mechanism known as metastability, discussing theory and data at multiple scales that suggest that metastable dynamics underlies the coordination necessary for the brain's dynamic functions. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-04-2016 | Award Amount: 7.35M | Year: 2017

Over 130,000 children born in Europe every year will have a congenital anomaly (CA; birth defect). These CAs, which are often rare diseases, are a major cause of infant mortality, childhood morbidity and long-term disability. EUROCAT is an established European network of population-based registries for the epidemiologic surveillance of CAs. EUROlinkCAT will use the EUROCAT infrastructure to support 21 EUROCAT registries in 13 European countries to link their CA data to mortality, hospital discharge, prescription and educational databases. Each registry will send standard aggregate tables and analysis results to a Central Results Repository (CRR) thus respecting data security issues surrounding sensitive data. The CRR will contain standardised summary data and analyses on an estimated 200,000 children with a CA born from 1995 to 2014 up to age 10, enabling hypotheses on their health and education to be investigated at an EU level. This enhanced information will allow optimisation of personalised care and treatment decisions for children with rare CAs. Registries will be supported in using social media platforms to connect with families who live with CAs in their regions. A novel sustainable e-forum, ConnectEpeople, will link these families with local, national and international registries and information resources. ConnectEpeople will involve these families in setting research priorities and ensuring a meaningful dissemination of results. Findings will provide evidence to inform national treatment guidelines, such as concerning screening programs, to optimise diagnosis, prevention and treatment for these children and reduce health inequalities in Europe. An economic evaluation of the hospitalisation costs associated with CA will be provided. The CRR and associated documentation, including linkage and standardisation procedures and ConnectEpeople forum will be available post-EUROlinkCAT thus facilitating future local and EU level analyses.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-22-2016 | Award Amount: 12.56M | Year: 2016

The ZikaPLAN initiative combines the strengths of 25 partners in Latin America, North America, Africa, Asia, and various centres in Europe to address the urgent research gaps (WP 1-8) in Zika, identifying short-and long term solutions (WP 9-10) and building a sustainable Latin-American EID Preparedness and Response capacity (WP 11-12). We will conduct clinical studies to further refine the full spectrum and risk factors of congenital Zika syndrome (including neurodevelopmental milestones in the first 3 years of life), and delineate neurological complications associated with Zika due to direct neuroinvasion and immune-mediated responses. Laboratory based research to unravel neurotropism, investigate the role of sexual transmission, determinants of severe disease, and viral fitness will envelop the clinical studies. Burden of disease and modelling studies will assemble a wealth of data including a longitudinal cohort study of 17,000 subjects aged 2-59 in 14 different geographic locations in Brazil over 3 years. Data driven vector control and vaccine modelling as well as risk assessments on geographic spread of Zika will form the foundation for evidence-informed policies. The Platform for Diagnostics Innovation and Evaluation will develop novel ZIKV diagnostic tests in accordance with WHO Target Product Profiles. Our global network of laboratory and clinical sites with well-characterized specimens is set out to accelerate the evaluation of the performance of such tests. Based on qualitative research, we will develop supportive, actionable messages to affected communities, and develop novel personal protective measures. Our final objective is for the Zika outbreak response effort to grow into a sustainable Latin-American network for emerging infectious diseases research preparedness. To this end we will engage in capacity building in laboratory and clinical research, collaborate with existing networks to share knowledge and tackle regulatory and other bottlenecks.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FCT-01-2015 | Award Amount: 11.99M | Year: 2016

ASGARD has a singular goal, contribute to Law Enforcement Agencies Technological Autonomy and effective use of technology. Technologies will be transferred to end users under an open source scheme focusing on Forensics, Intelligence and Foresight (Intelligence led prevention and anticipation). ASGARD will drive progress in the processing of seized data, availability of massive amounts of data and big data solutions in an ever more connected world. New areas of research will also be addressed. The consortium is configured with LEA end users and practitioners pulling from the Research and Development community who will push transfer of knowledge and innovation. A Community of LEA users is the end point of ASGARD with the technology as a focal point for cooperation (a restricted open source community). In addition to traditional Use Cases and trials, in keeping with open source concepts and continuous integration approaches, ASGARD will use Hackathons to demonstrate its results. Vendor lock-in is addressed whilst also recognising their role and existing investment by LEAs. The project will follow a cyclical approach for early results. Data Set, Data Analytics (multimodal/ multimedia), Data Mining and Visual Analytics are included in the work plan. Technologies will be built under the maxim of It works over Its the best. Rapid adoption/flexible deployment strategies are included. The project includes a licensing and IPR approach coherent with LEA realities and Ethical needs. ASGARD includes a comprehensive approach to Privacy, Ethics, Societal Impact respecting fundamental rights. ASGARD leverages existing trust relationship between LEAs and the research and development industry, and experiential knowledge in FCT research. ASGARD will allow its community of users leverage the benefits of agile methodologies, technology trends and open source approaches that are currently exploited by the general ICT sector and Organised Crime and Terrorist organisations.


Elsaesser A.,University of Ulster | Howard C.V.,University of Ulster
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews | Year: 2012

While nanotechnology and the production of nanoparticles are growing exponentially, research into the toxicological impact and possible hazard of nanoparticles to human health and the environment is still in its infancy. This review aims to give a comprehensive summary of what is known today about nanoparticle toxicology, the mechanisms at the cellular level, entry routes into the body and possible impacts to public health.Proper characterisation of the nanomaterial, as well as understanding processes happening on the nanoparticle surface when in contact with living systems, is crucial to understand possible toxicological effects. Dose as a key parameter is essential in hazard identification and risk assessment of nanotechnologies. Understanding nanoparticle pathways and entry routes into the body requires further research in order to inform policy makers and regulatory bodies about the nanotoxicological potential of certain nanomaterials. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

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