Trier, Germany

University of Trier

www.uni-trier.de
Trier, Germany

The University of Trier , in the German city of Trier, was founded in 1473. Closed in 1798 by order of the then French administration in Trier, the university was re-established in 1970 after a hiatus of some 172 years. The new university campus is located on top of the Tarforst heights, an urban district on the outskirts of the city. The university has six faculties with around 470 faculty members. In 2006 around 14,000 students were matriculated, with 43.5% of the student body male and 56.5% female; the percentage of foreign students was approximately 15.5%. Wikipedia.

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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2012-1.1.1. | Award Amount: 6.45M | Year: 2013

Referring to the increasingly challenging EU2020-ambition of Inclusive Growth, the objectives of the InGRID project are to integrate and to innovate existing, but distributed European social sciences research infrastructures on poverty and living conditions and working conditions and vulnerability by improving the transnational data access, organising mutual knowledge exchange and improving methods and tools for comparative research. This integration will provide the related European scientific community with new and better opportunities to fulfil its key role in the development of evidence-based European policies for Inclusive Growth. In this regard specific attention is paid to a better measurement of related state policies, to high-performance statistical quality management, and to dissemination/outreach activities with the broader stakeholder community-of-interest, including European politics, civil society and statistical system. For this purpose key actors of the related European Research Area are coupled in the InGRID consortium, representing specific data infrastructures and cumulated know-how. Pan-European optimisation of the infrastructure is created by organising an open, harmonised high-performance on-site access with an extensive visiting grant system. Joint research activities are conducted for the innovation and optimisation of the infrastructure. Key issues tackled in this respect include: the multidimensionality as a standard for poverty research; the problem of hard-to-identify and hard-to-reach vulnerable groups in data collection; the improvement of longitudinal and regional poverty mapping; the survey technology for linking vulnerability in working conditions with economic change and employers behaviour; the harmonisation of classifying jobs and skills; improving tools to generate comparative policy indicators; optimising the micro-simulation of policy impacts; and statistical quality management.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: COMPET-5-2016 | Award Amount: 1.57M | Year: 2016

This proposal intends to make a ground-breaking advance in magnetometry with the development of a new portable and compact multi-sensor instrument for on ground exploration which measures the complex susceptibility with high resolution. The combination of complex susceptibility and vector measurements would provide for the first time a complete and non-invasive in situ magnetic characterization of rocks from planetary surface and subsurfaces. These topics represent a challenge since present magnetic prospectionsare principally based on measurements of magnetic field intensities and on ground surveys have never been complemented with in situ measurements of complex susceptibility. In the design of such an instrument the consortium will include two important innovative developments: on the one hand a challenging system of frequency generation and measurement (ultra precise and with accuracies better than 1:106), and on the other hand an original system for the power generation of multiple voltages based on magnetic amplifiers which apart from being intrinsically immune to radiation, are expected to improve the energy efficiency. NEWTON project will open a breach for magnetic instrumentation on board landers and rovers with the inclusion of novel instrument in short-term and mid-term future missions.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.46M | Year: 2017

The joint research in this programme will study important aspectsboth theoretical as well as appliedof computing with infinite objects. A central aim is laying the grounds for the generation of efficient and verified software in engineering applications. A prime example for infinite data is provided by the real numbers, most commonly conceived as infinite sequences of digits. While most applications in science and engineering substitute the reals with floating point numbers of fixed finite precision and thus have to deal with truncation and rounding errors, the approach in this project is different: exact real numbers are taken as first-class citizens and while any computation can only exploit a finite portion of its input in finite time, increased precision is always available by continuing the computation process. This project aims to bring together the expertise of specialists in mathematics, logic, and computer science to push the frontiers of our theoretical and practical understanding of computing with infinite objects. Three overarching motivations drive the proposed collaboration: Representability. Cardinality considerations tell us that it is not possible to represent arbitrary mathematical objects in a way that is accessible to computation. We will enlist expertise in topology, logic, and set theory, to address the question of which objects are representable and how they can be represented most efficiently. Constructivity. Working in a constructive mathematical universe can greatly enhance our understanding of the link between computation and mathematical structure. Not only informs us which are the objects of relevance, it also allows us to devise always correct algorithms from proofs. Efficient implementation. We also aim to make progress on concrete implementations. Theoretical insights from elsewhere will be tested in actual computer systems; obstacles encountered in the latter will inform the direction of mathematical investigation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: SSH.2011.6.2-1 | Award Amount: 1.68M | Year: 2012

Within the framework of the Work Programme 2011 on Socio-economic Science and Humanities e-Frame project builds on the latest political directions of the European Commission, in particular the priorities identified in the Europe 2020 strategy. The project will focus on the following general objectives: stocktaking of available results and of ongoing research activities on progress measurement; foster a European debate over the issue; define guidelines for the use of existing indicators; propose a coherent way of delivering information include advanced ICT tools; identify new research topics for future investigation; harmonize NSIs initiatives in progress measurement area. e-Frame will thus ensure a coordination of Beyond GDP activities putting at the centre of the action the national statisticians so to lead to improved official statistics as suggested by the call. All coordination activities will be supported by a stocktaking of past, recent and ongoing research with special attention to FP and ESSnet projects. The final target of activities will be the European dimension looking at the use of indicators within EU policies and in particular at the Europe 2020 strategy. Guidelines and recommendations will be proposed for future activities within the European Research Area and the European Statistical System. The numerous tasks of the project will lead to identify and develop relevant indicators to be used for the measurement of progress. Guidelines for their use by different stakeholders and future research needs will be disseminated through numerous channels, and in particular through the publication of a handbook on the use of progress indicators. The 19 partners-consortium is formed by major European National Statistical Institutes and, together with universities, research centres and civil society, will see the participation of the International Organization OECD.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: Ocean.2010-3 | Award Amount: 13.98M | Year: 2011

The ECO2 project sets out to assess the risks associated with the storage of CO2 below the seabed. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is regarded as a key technology for the reduction of CO2 emissions from power plants and other sources at the European and international level. The EU will hence support a selected portfolio of demonstration projects to promote, at industrial scale, the implementation of CCS in Europe. Several of these projects aim to store CO2 below the seabed. However, little is known about the short-term and long-term impacts of CO2 storage on marine ecosystems even though CO2 has been stored sub-seabed in the North Sea (Sleipner) for over 13 years and for one year in the Barents Sea (Snhvit). Against this background, the proposed ECO2 project will assess the likelihood of leakage and impact of leakage on marine ecosystems. In order to do so ECO2 will study a sub-seabed storage site in operation since 1996 (Sleipner, 90 m water depth), a recently opened site (Snhvit, 2008, 330 m water depth), and a potential storage site located in the Polish sector of the Baltic Sea (B3 field site, 80 m water depth) covering the major geological settings to be used for the storage of CO2. Novel monitoring techniques will be applied to detect and quantify the fluxes of formation fluids, natural gas, and CO2 from storage sites and to develop appropriate and effective monitoring strategies. Field work at storage sites will be supported by modelling and laboratory experiments and complemented by process and monitoring studies at natural CO2 seeps that serve as analogues for potential CO2 leaks at storage sites. ECO2 will also investigate the perception of marine CCS in the public and develop effective means to disseminate the project results to stakeholders and policymakers. Finally, a best practice guide for the management of sub-seabed CO2 storage sites will be developed applying the precautionary principle and valuing the costs for monitoring and remediation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: INFRA-2011-2.1.1. | Award Amount: 4.94M | Year: 2011

Underwater gliders are intelligent and affordable platforms, useful for long-term, multi parameter marine observations. Because of their remotely controlled navigational capabilities and the high spatial and temporal resolution of their measurements in real-time, gliders have been identified to fill gaps existing in the existing ocean observing systems. Along with there rapidly growing importance in purely science driven applications, the implementation of gliders into the Global Ocean Observing System has been recognized as a key point to improve the observational capabilities of the observing systems. The objective of the GROOM proposal is the design of a new European research infrastructure to use underwater gliders for the benefit of European citizens, researcher, and industry. GROOM will define the scientific, technological and organizational/legal levels, of a European glider capacity for research and sustained observations of the oceans, in line with the other European and international initiatives for marine in-situ observations. The proposal for this new infrastructure strongly relies on EuroARGO and JERICO infrastructures which are emerging and also considers the relevant international coordinating bodies such as GOOS. The proposed technological infrastructures will be based on several dedicated gliderports to maintain and operate a European fleet of gliders in coordination with US, Canadian, Australian and other similar infrastructures. This new infrastructure would be beneficial for both academic oceanographic research and operational oceanography systems on which a large number of marine activities and societal applications now rely.


Kilian R.,University of Trier | Lamy F.,Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research
Quaternary Science Reviews | Year: 2012

Southern South America is the only landmass intersecting the southern westerly wind belt (SWW) that influences the large-scale oceanography and controls for example the outgassing of CO 2 in the Southern Ocean. Therefore, paleo-reconstructions from southernmost Patagonia are of global interest and an increasing number of paleoclimate records have been published during the last decades. We provide an overview on the different records mostly covering the Holocene but partly extending into the Late Glacial based on a large variety of archives and proxies. We particularly discuss possible reasons for regionally diverging palaeoclimatic interpretations and summarize potential climate forcing mechanisms. The Deglacial and Holocene temperature evolution of the region including the adjacent Pacific Ocean indicates " Antarctic" pattern and timing consistent with glacier re-advances during the Antarctic Cold Reversal. Some records indicate a significant accumulation control on the glacier fluctuations related to changes in SWW strength and/or position. Reconstructions of Holocene changes in the SWW behaviour provide partly inconsistent and controversially discussed pattern. While records from the hyperhumid side point to a stronger or southward displaced SWW core during the Early Holocene thermal maximum, records from the lee-side of the Andes show either no long term trend or the opposite, suggesting enhanced westerlies during the late Holocene " Neoglacial" Likewise, centennial-scale global or hemispheric cold intervals, such as the Little Ice Age, have been interpreted in terms of enhanced and reduced SWW strength. Some SWW variations can be linked to changes in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) consistent with instrumental climate data-sets and might be ultimately forced by solar variability. Resolving these inconsistencies in southernmost Patagonian SWW records is a prerequisite for improving hemispheric comparisons and links to atmospheric CO 2 changes. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-ADG | Phase: ERC-ADG-2015 | Award Amount: 2.50M | Year: 2016

What exactly are the words which priests recite in the Yasna, the core ritual of one of the most ancient and influential living religions, Zoroastrianism? What is their meaning and how do they relate to the ritual actions? The Yasna is significant for our cultural heritage not only because of its influential thought system which arguably impacted on post-exilic Judaism, nascent Christianity and Islam, but also because with parts of it going back to the 2nd millennium BCE, it is the oldest witness to Iranian languages. Its full appreciation, however, is severely hampered by the presence of outdated editions and translations or by their absence altogether. Moreover, the relationship between the text recited and the action performed during the ritual is unexplored due to a lack of documentary evidence. The Multimedia Yasna proposes to fill these gaps in a methodologically ground-breaking fashion. MUYA combines two different, yet complementary approaches by examining the Yasna both as a ritual performance and as a text attested in manuscripts. The two approaches will be integrated to answer questions about the meaning and function of the Yasna in a historical perspective. The research methods for achieving MUYAs objectives unite cutting edge approaches from Digital Humanities, Philology and Linguistics into four interrelated work-packages. These will involve filming and analyzing the ritual performance and teaching practices in priestly schools, the creation of a suite of electronic tools for editing Avestan texts, a database of transcribed manuscripts of the Yasna and in-depth studies of selected parts of the text by combining datasets produced by electronic processes with philological methods of textual criticism and linguistic analysis. These complementary datasets and methods will be used to produce an online publication of the sub-titled and interactive film of the Yasna ritual, together with print editions, translations and commentaries of the Avestan Yasna.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: MSCA-NIGHT-2016 | Award Amount: 386.75K | Year: 2016

With the slogan Brainwaves the Researchers Night in Trier City Campus meets Illuminale will be showing that science is for everyone. There is a researcher in all of us. You only need a clever mind and a lot of curiosity. Our aim is to organize a public event showing on the one hand the exciting, interesting side of science and on the other hand how science can improve the citizens everyday life. Another main target is to enhance public recognition of researchers and their role in society. Practical results of research will be delivered in a comprehensive and illustrative form, showing that science is all around us. To simulate everyday life situations the City Campus is grouped into seven Science Sceneries in the heart of the City. In these Sceneries different research presentation formats will be organized, using new formats of knowledge transfer. To bring science and researchers into peoples everyday life, the Sceneries will take place in unusual settings representing peoples normal life, e.g. the Science market place with Stage and European Corner, the Scientific Theatre and the area Science goes to school. The City Campus program includes hands on experiments and demonstrations, shows, contests, quizzes, exhibitions and much more. A significant number of researchers will participate in public events to interact face-to-face with the public. The visitors mobilized through an extensive awareness campaign will be given the chance to touch, feel and smell science. To increase the attractiveness the effective event Illuminale will be integrated in the European Researchers Night. Artistic illuminations of buildings and places will be combined with interesting spotlights on several areas of research. These spotlights are a metaphor for science and knowledge. Partners are the Trier University of Applied Sciences, the ttm trier Tourismus & Marketing GmbH and the Municipality of Trier.


Thoai N.V.,University of Trier
Journal of Global Optimization | Year: 2015

We discuss the convergence of a decomposition branch-and-bound algorithm using Lagrangian duality for partly convex programs in the general form. It is shown that this decomposition algorithm has all convergence properties as any known branch-and-bound algorithm in global optimization under usual assumptions. Thus, some strict assumptions discussed in the literature are avoidable. © 2002Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

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