Toulouse, France
Toulouse, France

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Blanc J.,University of Paris Pantheon Sorbonne | Blanc J.,Haiti State University | Rahill G.J.,University of South Florida | Laconi S.,4156 University of Toulouse | Mouchenik Y.,University of Paris 13
Journal of Affective Disorders | Year: 2016

Background This study examines relationships between religious beliefs regarding the origin of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and posttraumatic symptomatology as well as depressive symptoms and resilience among its survivors. Method We used convenient sampling to recruit participants (n=167). They completed six scales, which had been translated into Haitian Creole, including measures such as the Earthquake Experiences Exposure (EEE), the Peritraumatic Distress Inventory (PDI), the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experience Questionnaire (PDEQ), the PTSD Checklist (PTSD-CL), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD- RISC) Results Among our participants, 51% were male, (mean age=30.5, SD=11.03), 92% (n=155) were believers in some sort of supernatural force and 65% (n=108) endorsed the earthquake as a natural phenomenon. There was significant difference in average scores at peritraumatic distress, PTSD symptoms and Resilience measures between those perceiving a divine origin and/or a punishment through the event and those who did not. Peritraumatic responses were best predictors for PTSD (β=.366, p<.001) and Depression symptoms (β=.384, p<.001). Voodoo adherents appeared to be vulnerable to depression, but reported superior resilience factors. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | University of Paris 13, 4156 University of Toulouse, University of South Florida and Haiti State University
Type: | Journal: Journal of affective disorders | Year: 2015

This study examines relationships between religious beliefs regarding the origin of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and posttraumatic symptomatology as well as depressive symptoms and resilience among its survivors.We used convenient sampling to recruit participants (n=167). They completed six scales, which had been translated into Haitian Creole, including measures such as the Earthquake Experiences Exposure (EEE), the Peritraumatic Distress Inventory (PDI), the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experience Questionnaire (PDEQ), the PTSD Checklist (PTSD-CL), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD- RISC) RESULTS: Among our participants, 51% were male, (mean age=30.5, SD=11.03), 92% (n=155) were believers in some sort of supernatural force and 65% (n=108) endorsed the earthquake as a natural phenomenon. There was significant difference in average scores at peritraumatic distress, PTSD symptoms and Resilience measures between those perceiving a divine origin and/or a punishment through the event and those who did not. Peritraumatic responses were best predictors for PTSD (=.366, p<.001) and Depression symptoms (=.384, p<.001). Voodoo adherents appeared to be vulnerable to depression, but reported superior resilience factors.

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