Toledo, OH, United States
Toledo, OH, United States

The University of Toledo, commonly referred to as Toledo or UT, is a public research university located in Toledo, Ohio, United States. The university also operates a 450-acre Health Science campus, also known as the University of Toledo Medical Center, in the West Toledo neighborhood of Toledo; a 160-acre satellite campus in the Scott Park neighborhood of Toledo; the Center for the Visual Arts is located in downtown Toledo at the Toledo Museum of Art; and a research and education facility, known as the The Lake Erie Center, is at the Maumee Bay State Park.The university was founded in 1872 in downtown Toledo as the Toledo University of Arts and Trades. The first would eventually be turned over to the city of Toledo and reopened in 1884 as the Toledo Manual Training School and developed from a vocational school into a university through the late 1800s. The university moved to its current location in the Ottawa neighborhood in 1931. Since its establishment, the university has physically expanded to include more than 100 major buildings with a combined area of more 1,400 acres and transformed its academic program from a vocational and secondary education into a comprehensive research university, known for its curriculum in the science, engineering, and medical fields. Toledo has over 100,000 living alumni and has a current enrollment of over 20,000 students. The university has a vibrant campus life, with over 300 student organizations. Its athletic teams, called the Rockets, are members of the Mid-American Conference. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Scripps Research Institute and University of Toledo | Date: 2015-04-16

The invention provides methods of treatment of a progressive bone disease, such as osteoporosis, Pagets Disease, multiple myeloma, or hyperparathyroidism, comprising administration of an effective amount of a non-agonist PPARG modulator to a patient afflicted with the disease.


Patent
University of Toledo | Date: 2016-11-28

Compositions, methods of making, and methods of using, xenoantigen-displaying anti-cancer vaccines are described.


Patent
University of Toledo | Date: 2015-05-05

Biodegradable, magnesium alloys and composites, articles produced therefrom, methods of making the same, and methods of using the same are described.


Patent
University of Toledo | Date: 2016-09-13

A harvesting device and methods of harvesting (i.e., dewatering) algae are described. The harvesting device and methods involve the use of stimuli-sensitive hydrogels.


Sanchez E.R.,University of Toledo
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Cell Research | Year: 2012

The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is abundant, ubiquitous, and catholic to biological processes in eukaryotes, controlling phosphorylation cascades, protein stability and turnover, client localization and trafficking, and ligand-receptor interactions. Not surprisingly, Hsp90 does not accomplish these activities alone. Instead, an ever-growing number of cochaperones have been identified, leading to an explosion of reports on their molecular and cellular effects on Hsp90 chaperoning of client substrates. Notable among these clients are many members of the steroid receptor family, such as glucocorticoid, androgen, estrogen and progesterone receptors. Cochaperones typically associated with the mature, hormone-competent states of these receptors include p23, the FK506-binding protein 52 (FKBP52), FKBP51, protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) and cyclophilin 40 (Cyp40). The ultimate relevance of these cochaperones to steroid receptor action depends on their physiological effects. In recent years, the first mouse genetic models of these cochaperones have been developed. This work will review the complex and intriguing phenotypes so far obtained in genetically-altered mice and compare them to the known molecular and cellular impacts of cochaperones on steroid receptors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90). © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Gao B.,University of Toledo
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2010

We present some of the universal properties in ion-atom interaction derived from a newly formulated quantum-defect theory for the -1/r4 type of long-range interactions. For bound states, we present the universal bound spectrum, namely, the equivalent of the Rydberg formula, for ion-atom systems. For scattering, we introduce the concept of a universal resonance spectrum to give a systematic understanding of many resonances present in ion-atom scattering. The theory further provides a method for an accurate spectroscopic determination of the atomic polarizability. It also suggests the existence of atomlike molecules, in which multiple atoms orbit around a heavy ion. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Gao B.,University of Toledo
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2010

From a rigorous multichannel quantum-defect formulation of bimolecular processes, we derive a fully quantal and analytic model for the total rate of exoergic bimolecular reactions or inelastic processes that is applicable over a wide range of temperatures including the ultracold regime. The theory establishes a connection between the ultracold chemistry and the regular chemistry by showing that the same theory that gives the quantum threshold behavior agrees with the classical Gorin model at higher temperatures. In between, it predicts that the rates for identical bosonic molecules and distinguishable molecules would first decrease with temperature outside of the Wigner threshold region, before rising after a minimum is reached. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING | Award Amount: 224.94K | Year: 2016

1605185/1605161
Seo / Mou

Threats to drinking water supplies as a result of increased frequency and duration of harmful algal blooms has been on the rise nationally and globally, for example the Lake Erie cyanobacteria bloom. To protect the public from emerging contaminants like cyanotoxins in drinking water sources, various advanced water treatment processes are considered and adopted by water utilities. This project is exploring a sustainable treatment approach using bacterially active filters to remove harmful algal bloom toxins and other chemicals of emerging concern as the first step in drinking water treatment. However, biological filtration systems for emerging contaminants are not well adopted as they commonly show either low or unmaintained biofilm activities for target pollutants. To enhance the performance of biological filtration systems, bioaugmentation and bio-stimulation were considered, but still regarded as uncontrollable as engineering approaches for consistent results. Accordingly, systematic studies are greatly needed to understand and control biofilm dynamics in biological filtration systems for emerging contaminants.

The principal research objectives of this study are: 1) to understand the composition, activity and dynamics of biofilm community and their impact on the effectiveness of biological filtration systems in cyanotoxin removal, and, 2) to provide optimum operational parameters and monitoring tools for effective biological filtration systems operations under the pressure of source water contaminated with harmful algal bloom organisms. Research emphasis will be placed on understanding how the bacterial biofilm formation and activity, can be enhanced and maintained by engineered approaches such as bioaugmentation and bio-stimulation in order to improve performances of biological filtration systems for cyanotoxin removal. Specific objectives and hypotheses proposed are: 1) To understand the degradation dynamics (adaptation and evolution) of cyanobacteria toxin degrading bacteria for bioaugmentation or bio-stimulation applications. Hypothesis: The concentration variation of cyanotoxins and the presence of other natural organic matter and nutrients in water will affect the community and function of cyanotoxin degrading bacteria. 2) To investigate surface interactions between bioaugmented bacteria and indigenous biofilm formed on filter media (physical, chemical, and biologically mediated interactions by microbial biofilms). Hypothesis: The formation of biofilm(s) may affect not only hydrodynamics and physical properties (e.g. effective size of media) of biological filtration systems, but also the adhesion and growth of bioaugmented bacteria in biological filtration systems. 3) To determine the impact of filter operational parameters on biofilm formation, growth, and subsequent degradation of cyanotoxins in biological filtration systems. Hypothesis: Optimized operational parameters of biological filtration systems (backwashing frequency and intensity, filtration rate, and bio-stimulation) can be obtained to address various environmental factors. In addition, the proposed project will provide training and education for three graduate students as well as summer research opportunities for undergraduate and high school students. Furthermore, research findings will be introduced in PIs outreach and service activities, for example, educational programs for under-represented K-12 students and public outreach via Lake Erie Center.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: DMREF | Award Amount: 235.03K | Year: 2016

In applications where moving parts must be protected from excessive wear, hard coatings are often applied to components. The class of hard ceramic materials known as nitrides are often used for these coatings, but the performance of nitride coatings is limited and often insufficient, leading to breakdown of important components. New nitride materials have been predicted that are expected to have the significantly improved properties for wear resistance and corrosion resistance. Fabrication of these materials, however, remains a challenge. This award supports research to systematically determine the conditions that will enable the manufacture of these desired new nitride materials. The results of this research will accelerate discovery of hard, wear-resistant and corrosion-resistant coatings through a targeted synthesis approach, yielding new coating materials for emerging applications including fuel-efficient jet engines and gas turbines, environmentally-friendly lubricant-free cutting tools, high-temperature concentrating solar power plants, and wind turbines.

The coatings-by-design approach in this work facilitates the introduction of promising new nitrides, which have remained unexplored because the traditional approach of simultaneously optimizing composition, microstructure, and deposition process is too costly and slow. This method enables a deterministic pathway to ascertain the processing parameter space to achieve the desired composition and microstructure from thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, and then synthesize the coating experimentally. This method is based on an iterative combination of experiments and density functional theory calculations, to determine nitrogen incorporation kinetics and phase formation during deposition of transition metal nitride coatings. The research effort focuses primarily on the systematic determination of reaction and diffusion rates and local equilibria at the surface of growing transition metal nitride layers during coating synthesis. A quantitative model will be developed that predicts composition and phase of deposited nitrides as a function of incident ion energetics and growth temperature and pressure, using both measured and calculated values. The model will be verified by experimental coating deposition. Deposition of new super-hard, tough, and vacancy-stabilized nitride phases will be explored. Data collected in this research will be made publicly available through an open online database.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: I-Corps | Award Amount: 50.00K | Year: 2017

The broader impact/commercial potential of this I-Corps project is to explore application opportunities for video-based performance evaluation. Performance evaluation plays a significant role in any setting where the quality of performing specific actions is important to the desired outcome. Businesses and organizations use evaluation to assess employee/individual performance. Performance evaluations are commonly a written assessment completed by a superior or expert at the time the actions occur. This I-Corps project will support the discovery and understanding of how this video-based technology could lead to improvements in existing evaluation practices. The technology has the potential to advance the use of video data for evaluation, further the design and development of expert frameworks for evaluation and evolve training development for businesses and organizations.

This I-Corps project will explore the potential demand for a video-based performance evaluation tool. This technology allows a user to observe and evaluate an individuals performance using recorded video. The video is compared to best practices resulting in an evaluation of the performance. The results are used to identify and target intervention/training with the goal of improved performance. The innovation is designed to improve performance evaluation. The effects of this technology have been demonstrated through research and development of a performance evaluation instrument for teacher education that successfully evaluates performance and informs the development of interventions for further improvement.

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