Buenaventura, Colombia

University of the Pacific of Colombia

www.pacificu.edu/
Buenaventura, Colombia

Pacific University is a private university located in Oregon, United States. The first campus began more than 160 years ago and is located about 38 km west of Portland in Forest Grove. Pacific University has four campuses within Oregon in the cities of Forest Grove, Eugene, Hillsboro and Woodburn.Established as Tualatin Academy in 1849, the school has an enrollment of more than 3,500 students. Founded by the United Church of Christ , the university's motto is Pro Christo et Regno Ejus, which is Latin for "For Christ and His Kingdom." Although the university is no longer formally associated with the UCC, it still maintains a close working relationship with the organization. The university is now a small private, independent liberal arts school, offering graduate programs in education, optometry, writing, health professions and business.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Beltran W.,University of the Pacific of Colombia | Wunderle J.M.,International Institute of Tropical Forestry
Journal of insect science (Online) | Year: 2014

The seasonal dynamics of foliage arthropod populations are poorly studied in tropical dry forests despite the importance of these studies for understanding arthropod population responses to environmental change. We monitored the abundance, temporal distributions, and body size of arthropods in five naturalized alien and one native tree species to characterize arthropod seasonality in dry novel Prosopis-Leucaena woodlands in Puerto Rico. A branch clipping method was used monthly to sample foliage arthropod abundance over 39 mo. Seasonal patterns of rainfall and abundance within various arthropod taxa were highly variable from year to year. Abundance for most taxa did not show significant seasonality over the 3 yr, although most taxa had abundance peaks each year. However, Homoptera displayed high seasonality with significant temporal aggregations in each year. Formicidae, Orthoptera, and Coleoptera showed high variation in abundance between wet and dry periods, whereas Hemiptera were consistently more abundant in the wet period. Seasonal differences in mean abundance were found only in a few taxa on Tamarindus indica L., Bucida buceras L., Pithecellobium dulce, and (Roxburgh) Benth. Mean arthropod abundance varied among tree species, with highest numbers on Prosopis juliflora, (Swartz) De Candolle, Pi. dulce, Leucaena leucocephala, and (Lamarck) de Wit. Abundance of Araneae, Orthoptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera larvae, and all arthropods showed weak relationships with one or more climatic variables (rainfall, maximum temperature, or relative humidity). Body size of arthropods was usually largest during the dry periods. Overall, total foliage arthropod abundance showed no consistent seasonality among years, which may become a more common trend in dry forests and woodlands in the Caribbean if seasonality of rainfall becomes less predictable. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.


Boeve B.F.,Mayo Medical School | Parisi J.E.,Mayo Medical School | Sossi V.,University of British Columbia | Stoessl A.J.,University of the Pacific of Colombia
Parkinsonism and Related Disorders | Year: 2014

Objective: To describe the clinical, positron emission tomography (PET), pathological, and genetic findings of a large kindred with progressive neurodegenerative phenotypes in which the proband had autopsy-confirmed corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Methods: Five family members, including the proband, were examined neurologically. Clinical information from the other family members was collected by questionnaires. Three individuals underwent PET with 11C-dihydrotetrabenazine and 18F-fludeoxyglucose. The proband was examined post-mortem. Genetic studies were performed. Results: The pedigree contains 64 individuals, including 8 affected patients. The inheritance is likely autosomal dominant with reduced penetrance. The proband developed progressive speech and language difficulties at the age of 64 years. Upon examination at the age of 68 years, she showed non-fluent aphasia, word-finding difficulties, circumlocution, frontal release signs, and right-sided bradykinesia, rigidity, and pyramidal signs. She died 5 years after disease onset. The neuropathology was consistent with CBD, including many cortical and subcortical astrocytic plaques. Other family members had progressive neurodegenerative phenotypes - two were diagnosed with parkinsonism and behavioral problems, two with parkinsonism alone, one with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alone, one with dementia, and one with progressive gait and speech problems. PET on three potentially affected individuals showed no significant pathology. Genetic sequencing of DNA from the proband excluded mutations in known neurodegenerative-related genes including MAPT, PGRN, LRRK2, and C9ORF72. Conclusions: Families with such complex phenotypes rarely occur. They are usually associated with MAPT mutations; however, in this family, MAPT mutations have been excluded, implicating another causative gene or genes. Further genetic studies on this family may eventually disclose the etiology. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | University of British Columbia, Mayo Medical School and University of the Pacific of Colombia
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Parkinsonism & related disorders | Year: 2014

To describe the clinical, positron emission tomography (PET), pathological, and genetic findings of a large kindred with progressive neurodegenerative phenotypes in which the proband had autopsy-confirmed corticobasal degeneration (CBD).Five family members, including the proband, were examined neurologically. Clinical information from the other family members was collected by questionnaires. Three individuals underwent PET with (11)C-dihydrotetrabenazine and (18)F-fludeoxyglucose. The proband was examined post-mortem. Genetic studies were performed.The pedigree contains 64 individuals, including 8 affected patients. The inheritance is likely autosomal dominant with reduced penetrance. The proband developed progressive speech and language difficulties at the age of 64 years. Upon examination at the age of 68 years, she showed non-fluent aphasia, word-finding difficulties, circumlocution, frontal release signs, and right-sided bradykinesia, rigidity, and pyramidal signs. She died 5 years after disease onset. The neuropathology was consistent with CBD, including many cortical and subcortical astrocytic plaques. Other family members had progressive neurodegenerative phenotypes - two were diagnosed with parkinsonism and behavioral problems, two with parkinsonism alone, one with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alone, one with dementia, and one with progressive gait and speech problems. PET on three potentially affected individuals showed no significant pathology. Genetic sequencing of DNA from the proband excluded mutations in known neurodegenerative-related genes including MAPT, PGRN, LRRK2, and C9ORF72.Families with such complex phenotypes rarely occur. They are usually associated with MAPT mutations; however, in this family, MAPT mutations have been excluded, implicating another causative gene or genes. Further genetic studies on this family may eventually disclose the etiology.


PubMed | International Institute of Tropical Forestry and University of the Pacific of Colombia
Type: | Journal: Journal of insect science (Online) | Year: 2014

The seasonal dynamics of foliage arthropod populations are poorly studied in tropical dry forests despite the importance of these studies for understanding arthropod population responses to environmental change. We monitored the abundance, temporal distributions, and body size of arthropods in five naturalized alien and one native tree species to characterize arthropod seasonality in dry novel Prosopis-Leucaena woodlands in Puerto Rico. A branch clipping method was used monthly to sample foliage arthropod abundance over 39 mo. Seasonal patterns of rainfall and abundance within various arthropod taxa were highly variable from year to year. Abundance for most taxa did not show significant seasonality over the 3yr, although most taxa had abundance peaks each year. However, Homoptera displayed high seasonality with significant temporal aggregations in each year. Formicidae, Orthoptera, and Coleoptera showed high variation in abundance between wet and dry periods, whereas Hemiptera were consistently more abundant in the wet period. Seasonal differences in mean abundance were found only in a few taxa on Tamarindus indica L., Bucida buceras L., Pithecellobium dulce, and (Roxburgh) Benth. Mean arthropod abundance varied among tree species, with highest numbers on Prosopis juliflora, (Swartz) De Candolle, Pi. dulce, Leucaena leucocephala, and (Lamarck) de Wit. Abundance of Araneae, Orthoptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera larvae, and all arthropods showed weak relationships with one or more climatic variables (rainfall, maximum temperature, or relative humidity). Body size of arthropods was usually largest during the dry periods. Overall, total foliage arthropod abundance showed no consistent seasonality among years, which may become a more common trend in dry forests and woodlands in the Caribbean if seasonality of rainfall becomes less predictable.


Beltran W.,University of Puerto Rico at San Juan | Beltran W.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Beltran W.,University of the Pacific of Colombia | Wunderle Jr. J.M.,U.S. Department of Agriculture
Biodiversity and Conservation | Year: 2013

The foliage palatability hypothesis predicts that avian insectivores will preferentially forage in tree species with the greatest abundance of their arthropod prey, which in turn are associated with the tree's foliage nutrition and palatability. We tested this hypothesis in a novel Prosopis-Leucaena woodland in Puerto Rico by determining foraging preferences of five insectivorous bird species for six tree species (five alien, one native) and relating preferences to foliage arthropod biomass and leaf chemistry. The most frequently preferred tree species for foraging were the alien Prosopis juliflora (preferred by five bird species) and Pithecellobium dulce (preferred by four bird species). Both species had high foliage arthropod biomass, high N content, low lignin/N ratios, and low hemicellulose content. Compounds, previously known to affect herbivore responses to Albizia lebbeck and Leucaena leucocephala, may explain low arthropod biomass despite high N content in Albizia and avoidance of Leucaena by four bird species despite its high arthropod biomass. The native Bucida buceras had tough leaves with low N content, low arthropod biomass, and only one bird species showed a weak preference for foraging in it. Biomass of predaceous arthropods showed strong negative correlations with the ratios of lignin/N and hemicellulose/N. Some alien tree species had highly palatable foliage with high arthropod biomass and hence were preferred for foraging by avian insectivores as predicted by the foliage palatability hypothesis. High foliage palatability of some alien tree species may weaken the effect of enemy release in some novel plant communities. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


This article is comprised by the description and analysis of the perceptions, customs and answers that poor Afro-Colombian women in the town of Buenaventura have to the problems arising from the assistance given to their reproductive health. Even though events like birth, death and sickness are natural happenings, first and foremost they have to be conceived as sociocultural facts whereby various population groups take action and construct their own techniques and ideologies. It is then from this scope that I approach the situations that lead these women to use the two main systems of health assistance that are in the town; the hegemonic or biomedical system and the traditional system. This article aims at elucidating how the decision of these women to opt for one way of assistance or another is strongly influenced by geographical order, cultural, social and economic factors. The studyholds an interdisciplinary character as it was formulated using several viewpoints such as social anthropology, health anthropology, gender studies and sociology.


The objective of this study was to determine the promotional effect of coconut water, gibberellic acid, cold stratification and mechanical scarification on seed germination of Dracontium grayumianum, and the effect of gibberellic acid and coconut water on the sprouting of corms of the same species. The seeds without the inductive treatment were unable to germinate, but the immersion in coconut water had significant effects, producing a germination rate of 50%, higher than the effect achieved with other treatments. The liquid endosperm of coconut also had favorable effect on the sprouting of corms under nursery conditions, like the treatment with gibberellic acid solution. This is the first report of the use of coconut water as a promoter of seed germination with high latency, which places this resource as an additional alternative, highly efficient, and cost-effective, for use in plant propagation strategies of species with seeds of deep dormancy.


Objective: To assess the survival and growth of juvenile Pacific goliath grouper (Epinephelus quinquefasciatus) in captivity at low salinities. Materials and methods: We randomly selected twelve juvenile goliath groupers with an average standard length of 44.2 ± 6.1 cm and 1492 ± 476 g in body weight, and raised them for three months in the laboratory in waters of 32-26, 20, 10 and 5 parts per thousand of salinity. Results: All juvenile Pacific goliath groupers tolerated the initial gradual transfer from full strength seawater to salinities of 32-26, 20, 10, and 5 parts per thousand, which was done over a period of four days. All of them survived and grew in body weight and length during the course of the three-month experiment, in all the treatments of high and low salinity water. The body condition factor (K) for each fish was between 1.5 and 2.4. Conclusions: This is a first time trial that documents a randomized, controlled experiment demonstrating the ability of Pacific juvenile goliath grouper to gradually transfer from full strength seawater to water of lower salinity, and survive and grow well in these brackish waters.


Garcia L.N.,University of the Pacific of Colombia | Sierra C.L.,CVS | Perez J.,CVS | Esquivel F.,CVS | Chapman F.A.,University of Florida
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias | Year: 2013

Background: goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara) is an economically valuable marine species and an excellent candidate for domestication for aquaculture purposes. If this grouper can osmoregulate in lowsalinity water, its cultivation can provide socio-economic benefits, for both coastal communities and the mainland agricultural sector. Objective: to evaluate the osmoregulatory capacity of juvenile goliath grouper when exposed to low-salinity water. Methods: juvenile goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara) were either directly or gradually transferred from seawater to freshwater to test osmoregulatory ability. Body weight was assessed during acclimation and blood samples were taken to measure total osmolality and electrolytes. Results: all fish survived the transfer to freshwater and were maintained for up to 12 days after termination of the acclimation trials which lasted 72 hours. Juvenile goliath grouper were hyposmotic (342-462 mosmol/kg) to seawater and hyperosmotic (272-292 mosmol/kg) to freshwater. The gills and kidneys were found to have principal roles in the osmoregulatory processes. Numerous chloride cells were found on superficial regions of the gill filament epithelium, most likely serving to eliminate the excess of electrolytes while in seawater. The kidneys had numerous nephrons to make urine and retain electrolytes while in freshwater. Conclusions: these observations lead to the conclusions that juvenile goliath grouper have the ability to osmoregulate in freshwater and should be considered a marine euryhaline species. Such adaptability opens for consideration the possibility that goliath grouper could be successfully farmed in brackish water or even in freshwater.


Garcia-Atencia S.,University of the Atlantic | Martinez-Hernandez N.,University of the Atlantic | Pardo-Locarno L.C.,University of the Pacific of Colombia
Revista Mexicana de Biodiversidad | Year: 2015

Dry forests areas in the Caribbean region of Colombia have been deeply impacted lagging far precious few remnants and traces of its original dynamics, so the objective of this research is to study the structure and seasonality variation of phytophagous scarab beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in the Reserva Campesina La Montaña. Nine samples were obtained from January to September 2011. Four points distanced approximately 150 m were marked. In each one, a light trap was settled, for a total of 4 (2 white and 2 violet) operating since 18:00 until 24:00 h. 3,007 individuals and 18 species clustered in 3 subfamilies were collected: Rutelinae (7 species), Melolonthinae (6 species) and Dynastinae (5 species). Melolonthidae were the most abundant and Liogenys quadridens its most abundant specie (1,667 individuals), characterized by an important pest of semestral crops, and wide distribution in the Colombian Caribbean. The highest richness (16) was obtained in May, while April presented higher abundance (1,421), which coincides with the beginning of the rainy season, showing a marked seasonality showed by the analysis of similarity Anosim (R = 0.277, p < 0.003). © 2015 Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Biologia.

Loading University of the Pacific of Colombia collaborators
Loading University of the Pacific of Colombia collaborators