Abbotsford, Canada
Abbotsford, Canada

The University of the Fraser Valley , is a Canadian public university with campuses in Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Mission and Hope, British Columbia. Founded in 1974 as Fraser Valley College, it was a response to the need for expanded vocational training in the communities of the Fraser Valley. In 1988, it became a university college, with degree-granting status. As the University College of the Fraser Valley, it grew rapidly, becoming one of the largest university colleges in Canada.In recognition of the growing needs for higher education within the region and in the province, the provincial government granted full university status on 21 April 2008. Student enrollment is now over 15,000 students annually.In the 2010 The Globe and Mail Canadian University Report, UFV earned the most "A Range" grades of any post-secondary institution in British Columbia, receiving A grades in quality of education, student-faculty interaction, and ease of registration. Wikipedia.


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Tania N.,Smith College | Vanderlei B.,University of the Fraser Valley | Heath J.P.,University of British Columbia | Edelstein-Keshet L.,University of British Columbia
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America | Year: 2012

The dynamics of resource patches and species that exploit such patches are of interest to ecologists, conservation biologists, modelers, and mathematicians. Here we consider how social interactions can create unique, evolving patterns in space and time. Whereas simple prey taxis (with consumable prey) promotes spatial uniform distributions, here we show that taxis in producer-scrounger groups can lead to pattern formation. We consider two types of foragers: those that search directly ("producers") and those that exploit other foragers to find food ("scroungers" or exploiters). We show that such groups can sustain fluctuating spatiotemporal patterns, akin to "waves of pursuit." Investigating the relative benefits to the individuals, we observed conditions under which either strategy leads to enhanced success, defined as net food consumption. Foragers that search for food directly have an advantage when food patches are localized. Those that seek aggregations of group mates do better when their ability to track group mates exceeds the foragers' food-sensing acuity. When behavioral switching or reproductive success of the strategies is included, the relative abundance of foragers and exploiters is dynamic over time, in contrast with classic models that predict stable frequencies. Our work shows the importance of considering two-way interaction - i.e., how food distribution both influences and is influenced by social foraging and aggregation of predators.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwired - Nov. 23, 2016) - Affinor Growers (CSE:AFI)(CSE:AFI.CN)(OTCQB:RSSFF)(FRANKFURT:1AF) ("Affinor" or the "Corporation"), a diversified agriculture and biotechnology company with proprietary vertical farming systems, is pleased to update shareholders on the progress of the BioPod Initiative strawberry growing towers and product testing analysis. Affinor is pleased to announce that the small, 4 level, 8 arm prototype, produced over 130 pounds of strawberries over three and half months in an area of only 100 square feet. This production of strawberries met Affinor's initial objectives and Affinor plans to double production again, in the same footprint area, by installing a second tower with 4 levels but increasing to 16 arms. Affinor also sent a sample of strawberries to an independent accredited laboratory for pesticide and heavy metal analysis. For comparative purposes, a second sample from a popular strawberry name brand was purchased from a local retail grocery store for benchmark analysis. The strawberries were screened for over 300 pesticides and 4 heavy metals. Affinor's sample tested negative for all pesticides with no trace amounts of heavy metals. The strawberries purchased from the local grocery store tested positive for 4 pesticides and contained trace levels of one heavy metal. Jarrett Malnarick, President & CEO, comments, "We are very happy our initial growth trials and the product analysis prove the technology can grow strawberries efficiently and naturally in soil without the use of chemicals or pesticides. Strawberries are traditionally a difficult fruit to grow, and we are excited to be changing the way strawberries will be commercially produced." The BioPods are a City of Surrey vision and agricultural initiative designed as a catalyst for agricultural research and innovation. Under the supervision of the University of the Fraser Valley, the BioPods provide a testing ground for new agriculture technologies and techniques. In April 2016, Affinor installed a vertical growing system within the BioPod research center to validate the technology by growing strawberries throughout the summer months and coming winter. Affinor's board of directors has also approved the grant of 1,550,000 stock options exercisable at $0.15 per share and expiring November 22, 2019 to its directors, officers and consultants. Affinor Growers is a publicly traded company on the Canadian Securities Exchange under the symbol ("AFI"). Affinor is focused on growing high quality crops such as romaine lettuce, spinach, strawberries using its vertical farming techniques. Affinor is committed to becoming a pre-eminent supplier and grower, using exclusive vertical farming techniques. On Behalf of the Board of Directors The CSE has not reviewed and does not accept responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. This News Release contains forward-looking statements. The use of any of the words "anticipate", "continue", "estimate", "expect", "may", "will", "project", "should", "believe" and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Although the Company believes that the expectations and assumptions on which the forward-looking statements are based are reasonable, undue reliance should not be placed on the forward-looking statements because the Company can give no assurance that they will prove to be correct. Since forward-looking statements address future events and conditions, by their very nature they involve inherent risks and uncertainties. These statements speak only as of the date of this News Release. Actual results could differ materially from those currently anticipated due to a number of factors and risks including various risk factors discussed in the Company's disclosure documents which can be found under the Company's profile on www.sedar.com. This News Release contains "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended and such forward-looking statements are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.


VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwired - Dec. 5, 2016) - Affinor Growers (CSE:AFI)(CSE:AFI.CN)(FRANKFURT:1AF)(OTCQB:RSSFF) ("Affinor" or the "Corporation), is pleased to announce it has installed the second vertical growing tower with the University of the Fraser Valley Agriculture Training and Research Demonstration Greenhouse at the John Volken Academy in Surrey, British Columbia. The four level automated tower will allow Affinor Growers to continue to demonstrate and validate various crop models, and continue selling license agreements. The tower will be planted with strawberries in January 2017 and holds 265 plants in a little over 100 square feet. The new equipment will double the production of the first tower installed last April 2016 and more than triples the production per square meter when compared to the traditional soil beds within the same greenhouse. The nature of the install is to continue to grow and confirm yields and viability of the technology with commercial plant density conditions. Jarrett Malnarick, President and CEO "Affinor is excited with our on-going work at the UFV BC Agriculture Center of Excellence and continuing our relationship for agri-tech innovation and research to validate agriculture crop models for our technology while providing valuable agriculture skills training opportunities." Affinor Growers is a publicly traded company on the Canadian Securities Exchange under the symbol ("AFI"). Affinor is focused on growing high quality crops such as romaine lettuce, spinach, strawberries using its vertical farming techniques. Affinor is committed to becoming a pre-eminent supplier and grower, using exclusive vertical farming techniques. On Behalf of the Board of Directors The CSE has not reviewed and does not accept responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. This News Release contains forward-looking statements. The use of any of the words "anticipate", "continue", "estimate", "expect", "may", "will", "project", "should", "believe" and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Although the Company believes that the expectations and assumptions on which the forward-looking statements are based are reasonable, undue reliance should not be placed on the forward-looking statements because the Company can give no assurance that they will prove to be correct. Since forward-looking statements address future events and conditions, by their very nature they involve inherent risks and uncertainties. These statements speak only as of the date of this News Release. Actual results could differ materially from those currently anticipated due to a number of factors and risks including various risk factors discussed in the Company's disclosure documents which can be found under the Company's profile on www.sedar.com. This News Release contains "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended and such forward-looking statements are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.


Maschek M.K.,University of the Fraser Valley
Computational Economics | Year: 2016

This work is concerned with the possible impact binary encoding of strategies may have on the performance of genetic algorithms popular in agent-based computational economic research. In their recent work, Waltman et al. (J Evol Econ 21(5): 737–756, 2011) consider binary encoding and its possible contribution to a phenomenon referred to as premature convergence; the observation that different individual runs of the genetic algorithm can lead to very different results. While Alkemade et al. (Comput Econ 28(4): 355–370, 2006), (Comput Intell 23(2): 162–175, 2007), (Comput Econ 33(1): 99–101, 2009) argue that premature convergence is caused by insufficient population size, Waltman et al. argue that this phenomenon depends crucially on strategies being encoded in binary form. This conclusion is based on their illustration that premature convergence can be avoided even in simulations with small populations so long as real, rather than binary, encoding of strategies is utilized. Utilizing their methodology, we return to the consideration of the cause of premature convergence. After robustness checks with respect to the length of the binary string used for encoding, the fitness function, and the form of mutation, it is concluded that an alternative specification of mutation may also alleviate the occurrence of premature convergence. It is argued that this alternative form of mutation may be more appropriate in a wider range of problems where real encoding of strategies may not prove sufficient. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Landolfi E.,University of the Fraser Valley
Sports Medicine | Year: 2013

This article examines the nature of exercise addiction. It presents a broad, congruent and discerning narrative literature review with the aim of providing a deeper understanding of the condition 'exercise addiction', including symptoms and options for treatment. In addition, guidelines are provided with respect to 'healthy' levels of exercise. Criteria used for determining the eligibility of studies evaluated in the review included the provision of relevant information in studies identified using pertinent search terms. The review highlights some of the key distinctions between healthy levels of exercise and exercise addiction. The findings suggest that an individual who is addicted to exercise will continue exercising regardless of physical injury, personal inconvenience or disruption to other areas of life including marital strain, interference with work and lack of time for other activities. 'Addicted' exercisers are more likely to exercise for intrinsic rewards and experience disturbing deprivation sensations when unable to exercise. In contrast, 'committed' exercisers engage in physical activity for extrinsic rewards and do not suffer severe withdrawal symptoms when they cannot exercise. Exercisers must acquire a sense of life-balance while embracing an attitude conducive to sustainable long-term physical, psychological and social health outcomes. Implementation of recommendations by the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, which states that all apparently healthy adults between 18 and 64 years of age should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate (5 or 6 on a scale of 0-10) to vigorous (7 or 8 on a scale of 0-10) intensity aerobic physical activity per week in bouts of 10 minutes or more, also expressed as 30 minutes per day distributed over 5 days per week, would be a good start. © 2012 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.


Hanson M.A.,Simon Fraser University | Lian O.B.,University of the Fraser Valley | Clague J.J.,Simon Fraser University
Quaternary Science Reviews | Year: 2012

Glacial Lake Missoula formed when the Purcell Trench lobe of the Cordilleran ice sheet dammed Clark Fork River in Montana during the Fraser Glaciation (marine oxygen isotope stage 2). Over a period of several thousand years, the lake repeatedly filled and drained through its ice dam, and floodwaters coursed across the landscape in eastern Washington. In this paper, we describe the stratigraphy and sedimentology of a significant new section of fine-grained glacial Lake Missoula sediment and compare this section to a similar, previously described sequence of sediments at Ninemile Creek, 26km to the northwest. The new exposure, which we informally term the rail line section, is located near Missoula, Montana, and exposes 29units, each of which consists of many silt and clay couplets that we interpret to be varves. The deposits are similar to other fine-grained sediments attributed to glacial Lake Missoula. Similar varved sediments overlie gravelly flood deposits elsewhere in the glacial Lake Missoula basin. Each of the 29units represents a period when the lake was deepening, and all units show evidence for substantial draining of glacial Lake Missoula that repeatedly exposed the lake floor. The evidence includes erosion and deformation of glaciolacustrine sediment that we interpret happened during draining of the lake, desiccation cracks that formed during exposure of the lake bottom, and fluvial sand deposited as the lake began to refill.The floods date to between approximately 21.4 and 13.4cal ka ago based on regional chronological data. The total number of varves at the rail line and Ninemile sites are, respectively, 732 and 583. Depending on lake refilling times, each exposure probably records 1350-1500 years of time. We present three new optical ages from the rail line and Ninemile sites that further limit the age of the floods. These ages, in calendar years, are 15.1±0.6 ka at the base of the Ninemile exposure, and 14.8±0.7 and 12.6±0.6 ka midway through the rail line exposure. The sediment at the two sections was deposited during later stages of glacial Lake Missoula, after the largest outburst events. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Antonishen K.,University of the Fraser Valley
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies | Year: 2015

There has not been a uniform method for the practice of Baduanjin, and most published research reports involving this set of traditional Chinese exercise have provided incomplete descriptions of the movements used for those studies. This paper reviews elements of past research methodologies of Baduanjin intervention studies and provides considerations for future research. Ambiguities and inconsistencies in the descriptions of the movements, along with some implications which arise from this are discussed. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Pechlaner G.,University of the Fraser Valley | Otero G.,Simon Fraser University
Rural Sociology | Year: 2010

We undertake a comparative investigation of how neoliberal restructuring characterizes the third food regime in the three North American countries. By contrasting the experience of the two developed countries of the United States and Canada with that of the developing country of Mexico, we shine some empirical light on the differential impact of neoliberal regulatory restructuring on the division of labor in agriculture within the North American Free Trade Agreement region. In particular, we investigate these countries'agricultural production markets, trade, and food vulnerability-with an emphasis on Mexico-as analytical points for comparing and contrasting their experience with this neoliberal restructuring. We start with a synthesis of food-regime theory and outline the key features of what we call the "neoliberal food regime." We then discuss our case-study countries in terms of food vulnerability and resistance in Mexico, their differential relationships to trade lization, and what these trends might mean for the evolution of the neoliberal food regime. We conclude that, while dominant trends are ominous, there is room for an alternative trajectory and consequent reshaping of the emerging regime: sufficient bottom-up social resistance, primarily at the level of the nation-state, may yet produce an alternative trajectory. © 2010, by the Rural Sociological Society.


Shupe S.,University of the Fraser Valley
Environmental Management | Year: 2013

The Greater Vancouver area has undergone significant land use and land cover (LULC) change over the past several decades, often adversely affecting stream health and water quality, particularly in those areas that have undergone the most urbanization. In this study 30 years of historical LULC and water quality data were examined using GIS and statistical analysis to better understand these impacts and to help build a broader understanding of cause and effect relationships of changing LULC, especially since urbanization is increasingly occurring within sensitive watersheds at greater distances from the City of Vancouver. Urban, agriculture, and disturbed LULC data from 1976, 1986, and 2000 were examined within a number of watersheds and related to historical water quality data sampled from streams during similar time frames. Additional higher resolution 2006 LULC data from a smaller number of watersheds were then examined and compared to stream health data to investigate the sensitivity of LULC data resolution on monitoring watershed impact. While LULC impact can be clearly seen at both high and lower resolutions, issues of ambiguous land cover and land use designations can potentially affect the magnitude of the relationship. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

VANCOUVER, BC--(Marketwired - November 15, 2016) - Convenience store retailers are expressing deep frustration following the release of a study showing the rate of illegal tobacco has held steady in British Columbia. The Western Convenience Stores Association (WCSA) commissioned its annual contraband tobacco study which examined discarded cigarette butts at 50 sites throughout B.C to determine if illegal (contraband) cigarettes were being purchased and smoked. Samples were gathered over a two-week period in September. The average rate of contraband use at sites tested across B.C. was 14.7%, suggesting once again that illegal cigarettes are widely available across the province. The rate in 2015 was 14.9%. "Our data shows that illegal tobacco is easily accessible at schools and on college and university campuses throughout the province," says Andrew Klukas, President of the WCSA. "Once a trafficking network and supply chain is established, tobacco can easily be swapped for illicit drugs and that should be of even greater concern to parents." Contraband tobacco is sold without mandated health warnings on packages and without age-verification checks. Poor economic conditions, increased taxes and unintended consequences of regulations drive the tobacco market underground, making these products more affordable and accessible to youth. According to the RCMP, illegal tobacco is also linked with organized crime, thereby impacting public safety. Community safety is a major issue in this election year and retail members of the WCSA are encouraging the Clark government to act. Vancouver, Richmond and Burnaby remain the highest cities in the province with rates of 27.5%, 24.5% and 23.1%, respectively. Notable sites were the University of British Columbia (46.2%), University of the Fraser Valley (28.9%), Vancouver Public Library (27%) and Hugh Boyd Secondary School (23.8%). "The Clark government has to introduce tougher legislation and use existing resources, like the Guns and Gangs strategy, to combat trafficking of tobacco," adds Doug Hartl, a former RCMP officer and Chair of the WCSA board. The WCSA calls on both the B.C Liberals and NDP to incorporate anti-contraband measures in their platforms as the province moves to an election in May 2017. The WCSA is a not-for-profit trade association that represents the interests of over close to 3,000 British Columbia convenience store retailers and gas stations. These retailers employ over 25,000 people and annually collect well over $1 billion in tax revenue for governments. Its mission is to foster the success of the convenience store industry in Western Canada by representing the best interests of its members and the communities they serve.

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