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Williamsburg, KY, United States

For other institutions called "Cumberland College," see Cumberland College .University of the Cumberlands is a private, liberal arts college located in Williamsburg, Kentucky, with an enrollment of approximately 3,200 students. The school, known as Cumberland College until January 7, 2005, is affiliated with the Kentucky Baptist Convention, the Kentucky affiliate of the Southern Baptist Convention. Wikipedia.


Hockert J.A.,Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center | Hockert J.A.,University of the Cumberlands | Yeh H.-J.,Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center | MacDonald C.C.,Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
Journal of Biological Chemistry | Year: 2010

Because polyadenylation is essential for cell growth, in vivo examination of polyadenylation protein function has been difficult. Here we describe a new in vivo assay that allows structure-function assays on CstF-64, a protein that binds to pre-mRNAs downstream of the cleavage site for accurate and efficient polyadenylation. In this assay (the stem-loop luciferase assay for polyadenylation, SLAP), expression of a luciferase pre-mRNA with a modified downstream sequence element was made dependent upon co-expression of an MS2-CstF-64 fusion protein. We show here that SLAP accurately reflects CstF-64-dependent polyadenylation, confirming the validity of this assay. Using SLAP, we determined that CstF-64 domains involved in RNA binding, interaction with CstF-77 (the "Hinge" domain), and coupling to transcription are critical for polyadenylation. Further, we showed that the Hinge domain is necessary for CstF-64 interaction with CstF-77 and consequent nuclear localization, suggesting that nuclear import of a preformed CstF complex is an essential step in polyadenylation. © 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc. Source


Mookerjee S.,Bloomsburg University | Welikonich M.J.,University of the Cumberlands | Ratamess N.A.,The College of New Jersey
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research | Year: 2016

Mookerjee, S, Welikonich, MJ, and Ratamess, NA. Comparison of energy expenditure during single-set vs. multiple-set resistance exercise. J Strength Cond Res 30(5): 1447-1452, 2016 - The purpose of this study was to compare energy expenditure (EE) of single-set and multiple-set resistance exercise protocols using indirect calorimetry. Twelve men and twelve women (age 21.4 ± 1.3 years) performed a single-set (SS) and multiple-set (MS) resistance exercise protocol in random order. The subjects performed two protocols at 70% of their 1-repetition maximum. The protocols consisted of 5 upper-body exercises of either 1 or 3 sets per exercise performed in random order. Metabolic and cardiorespiratory data were recorded over the entire exercise session and during 5 minutes of recovery by a portable metabolic measurement system. Gross (167.9 ± 58.7 kcal) and net (88.3 ± 41.6 kcal) EE for the MS protocol were significantly greater (p < 0.001) than gross (71.3 ± 26.5 kcal) and net (36.3 ± 18.7 kcal) EE of the SS protocol. Conversely, there was no significant difference in the rate of EE between both protocols. Significant gender differences (p < 0.001) in absolute and relative EE were observed for both protocols where values in men were higher than women. Heart rate, respiratory rate, relative Vo 2, respiratory exchange ratio, and minute ventilation values were significantly higher during the MS than the SS protocol. The results of this study indicated that MS protocols yield greater metabolic and cardiovascular demands than SS protocols when the number of exercises performed is the same. © 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association. Source


Yang L.,Shenyang Pharmaceutical University | Wang Z.,University of the Cumberlands | Wang J.,Shenyang Pharmaceutical University | Jiang W.,Shenyang Pharmaceutical University | And 5 more authors.
Nanoscale | Year: 2016

Carbon dots (CDs) have shown great potential in imaging and drug/gene delivery applications. In this work, CDs functionalized with a nuclear localization signal peptide (NLS-CDs) were employed to transport doxorubicin (DOX) into cancer cells for enhanced antitumor activity. DOX was coupled to NLS-CDs (DOX-CDs) through an acid-labile hydrazone bond, which was cleavable in the weakly acidic intracellular compartments. The cytotoxicity of DOX-CD complexes was evaluated by the MTT assay and the cellular uptake was monitored using flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cell imaging confirmed that DOX-CDs were mainly located in the nucleus. Furthermore, the complexes could efficiently induce apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The in vivo therapeutic efficacy of DOX-CDs was investigated in an A549 xenograft nude mice model and the complexes exhibited an enhanced ability to inhibit tumor growth compared with free DOX. Thus, the DOX-CD conjugates may be exploited as promising drug delivery vehicles in cancer therapy. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2016. Source


Kolympiris C.,Wageningen University | Kalaitzandonakes N.,University of Missouri | Miller D.,University of the Cumberlands
Research Policy | Year: 2014

A long stream of academic literature has established that public funding towards research and development matters for economic growth because it relates to increases in innovation, productivity and the like. The impact of public funding on the creation of new firms has received less attention in this literature despite theoretical constructs that support such association. In the present paper we study whether indeed there is a relationship between public research funds and local firm births in the context of the U.S. biotechnology industry. In doing so, we introduce a number of changes that strengthen the robustness of our findings when compared with existing literature. These changes include a direct measure of research expenditures and a considerably lengthier longitudinal dataset which allows us to capture a structural relationship and not a chance event. We empirically demonstrate that increases in the level of research funding from the National Institutes of Health towards biotechnology associate with increases in the number of biotechnology firm births at the Metropolitan Statistical Area level. Further, we reveal that public funds towards established firms associate with local firm births considerably more strongly when compared with funds towards universities and research institutes/hospitals. We conclude the paper with academic and policy implications of the present work that highlight the complexity of factors that underlie the creation of local firms in high technology industries. JEL classification*C23*L26*O18*R3*R12. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source


Deyrup M.,Archbold Biological Station | Deyrup L.,University of the Cumberlands | Carrel J.,University of Missouri
Southeastern Naturalist | Year: 2013

Gastrophryne carolinensis (Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad) is known to be an ant specialist, but prey identification has rarely progressed beyond family level. There are no prey records from Florida scrub, a rare upland habitat type. This study identifies species of 4859 individual ants retrieved from stomachs of 146 G. carolinensis collected in Florida scrub. All toads had consumed ants; ants comprised about 95% of all food items. Forty-three species of ants were recorded. About 77% were various species of Pheidole or Nylanderia. The ants consumed were mostly small (4 mm or less in length) and nocturnally active. Species that were eaten belong to ant genera known to contain venoms, chemical repellents, or other organic substances in exocrine glands. This finding suggests the possibility that Narrow-mouthed Toads have opportunities to sequester exocrine secretions of ants, in the manner of some other anurans. The diversity of ant species consumed by G. carolinensis suggests that this species might be able to subsist on disturbed-site ants, including exotic species such as Solenopsis invicta. . Source

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