London, United Kingdom

University of the Arts London

www.arts.ac.uk
London, United Kingdom

University of the Arts London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom specialised in art, design, fashion and media. It is a collegiate university comprising six constituent colleges: Camberwell College of Arts, Central Saint Martins, Chelsea College of Art and Design, London College of Communication, London College of Fashion and Wimbledon College of Art.The university is Europe's largest provider of education in art, design, fashion, communication and the performing arts. It brings together 19,000 students from over 100 different countries, including 2,250 further education students, 14,000 undergraduates and 2,700 postgraduate and research students. It is also a leading provider of short courses on creative subjects, with around 20,000 people aged 10 to 82 taking a course across the academic year.The University wholly owns the UAL Awarding Body, which designs, assesses and awards pre-university arts and design qualifications, and validates more than half of the UK's foundation diplomas. Wikipedia.

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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: NMP-18-2014 | Award Amount: 8.93M | Year: 2015

Within Trash-2-Cash, growing problems with paper fibre waste from the paper industry and textile fibre waste, originating from a continuously increasing textile consumption, will be solved through design-driven innovation. This will be performed by using the wastes to regenerate fibres that will be included into fashion, interior and other products. The cotton production suffers from non-sustainable environmental and socio-economical issues and the polyester fibre manufacture produces waste that to date has no viable deposition. Designers will lead the recycling initiative, defining the material properties, and will feed the material scientists to evaluate newly developed eco-efficient cotton fibre regeneration and polyester recycling techniques. The future exploitation will be ascertained through a two-sided exchange between the designers and the end-product manufacturers, also taking into account the consumer-related product needs, and prototypes will be produced in a realistic test production environment. The objectives are to: Integrate design, business and technology to a coherent discipline to establish new creative industries Develop new material and product opportunities via creative design from waste or process by-product Reduce the utilization of virgin materials; improve material efficiency; decrease landfill volumes and energy consumption Use design for recycling with the vision of closing the material loop Create new business opportunities by adding the return loop of the discarded goods to be reused into attractive products Promote development of the creative sector by providing technological solutions for exploitation of waste streams Europes creative industry will be strengthened through Trash-2-Cash taking the lead worldwide in the design for recycled materials area. Moreover, Trash-2-Cash will support a better waste utilization and contribute to reduction of landfill area needs.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 384.51K | Year: 2015

It is widely understood that the public sector in general and public services in particular need to be radically reshaped inorder to meet the needs of citizens in the context of diminishing public financing. Less well understood are the ways andmeans by which to do so. This one-year project explores the potential for, and value of, design-led research to addresssocietal challenges and to inform policy. It does this through establishing a Public Collaboration Lab (PCL), a strategicresearch collaboration between local government (London Borough of Camden), the citizens they serve, and an HigherEducation institution (University of the Arts London). The project will use social innovation approaches to engage citizens and other societal actors in the co-design and co-delivery of some aspects of public services. These public and collaborative approaches to service delivery (servicesdelivered with and by citizens and other agencies) seek to mobilise citizens as active collaborative people rather thanpassive individual people, service participants rather than service users and recognise citizens as both people withneeds and people as assets in meeting their own and each others needs. However, despite the growing interest in therole, objectives and impact of design in strategic public sector contexts, there is also an acknowledged gap inunderstanding designs contribution to such situations. This project is designed to address that gap. Two interrelated action research activities will be delivered in parallel. The first will deliver a citizen-centred exploration ofexactly how such collaboration plays out in specific service contexts. For the pilot we propose to take the reform of LondonBorough of Camdens Library Services as our starting point. The second will explore the models, mechanisms andmeasurement of impact of the Public Collaboration Lab, evaluating the model and its wider potential as a means ofdemocratizing social and service innovation and informing policy. The project aims to: - Undertake a demonstrator social innovation project within a specially created public collaboration lab to redesign publicservices through the application of collaborative design led approaches. - Increase understanding of HEI institutions roles in supporting innovation practices within local government throughdesign led action research. - Explore the potential for co-design to democratize public service reform and improve pubic outcomes. - Co-design evaluative frameworks for assessing the role of design in local government service reform. - Propose means by which the pilot study could be upscaled within other contexts A process of examination and distillation will create a body of material which will serve as the basis for a series ofcoordinated outputs, including journal articles, conference papers, a research blog, case study material, service and socialinnovations, as well as a public collaboration lab model, framework and tools for HE/LG collaboration. The PCL team willwork closely with Nesta, Public Service Transformation Network, the international DESIS Network of over 40 DESIS labs,Impact Hub Network, Social Innovation Exchange, Kings Cross Knowledge Quarter, Age UK and others to disseminateand maximise real-world impact of the project outputs. Dissemination will be integrated within the collaborativemethodology of the project, by involving relevant users, practitioners and policy makers in research, ideation andimplementation. To disseminate the findings, the project team will target major events and publications in the localgovernment, public policy, design research, and design HE communities. The final evaluation report will be designed in aforward-looking manner so that the lessons and opportunities arising from this pilot can be applied in other contexts.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 36.19K | Year: 2014

This network will share knowledge about empathetic tools and processes from 3 different creative communities - Design, Performance and RJ - via 4 planned workshops with international speakers. The ambition is to share case studies, findings and improve knowledge of best practice regarding how best to build empathic processes. Crime, conflict and ineffective delivery of justice detract from the quality of individual/collective life, disrupting social cohesion. One response has been RJ. This brings those harmed by crime or conflict, and those responsible for the harm, into direct communication, enabling all affected to engage in empathetic processes that play a part in repairing harm to find a positive way forward. RJ lets victims tell offenders the real impact of their crime, get answers, receive an apology and get on with their lives. It also lets offenders understand and take responsibility. RJ has some elements in common with co-creation and participatory approaches employed in design, as well as those delivered via performance studies within the criminal justice system by members of the Arts Alliance. How all these different specialists use empathetic processes is the crux and deserves further exploration. The workshops will provide a context that promotes new connections/understandings about empathetic processes by practitioners currently working with diverse communities. In sharing existing insights from different practice-based styles of engagement, the networks workshops will build community capacity and help subject specialists and the communities they engage with better understand the issue of empathy. In particular, how creative strategies may be used in relationships to help deliver conflict management or to aid engagement with building empathy in groups who had previously not shown remorse, for example. Furthermore, sharing information about what have been called proxy processes (traditionally understood as a process whereby some members of a decision-making body delegate their voting power to other members of the same body to vote in their absence) delivered by arts practitioners working within criminal justice system in the UK will occur. Such processes appear to play a significant role in creating empathic opportunities that help kick-start healing, and subsequent engagement with RJ by victims and offenders Sharing good practice is needed because there are real obstacles to implementing RJ, including fear of offenders in being involved in the first place, resistance and suspicion by one or more of the parties involved (offenders, victims, practitioners, other community members with a vested interest) and a lack of the skills to offer empathetic tools or even access to proxy processes. Given that empathy and how to establish and apply it, is often the unspoken question of RJ, the workshops will address how to engage participants in empathetic processes. Design usefully engages with building empathy through role-playing, drawing on tools and techniques from theatre to engage users as partners in participatory design activity. Design and performance go beyond the creation of products and into the field of social innovation, including strategic processes of engagement with hard to reach groups or communities. Cardboard Citizens, Clean Break and the Geese Theatre Company are exemplar theatre organisations that teach empathetic processes to prisoners and have much tacit knowledge to share with other creatives. Different creative communities work using a variety of diverse interventions to reduce alienation, build empathy and/or catalyse effective community connections, but rarely do they have opportunities to share understandings which will be the central focus of this network. It is needed because what works to improve empathetic engagement will also contribute to improving social cohesion.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 27.00K | Year: 2016

Listening Across Disciplines responds to the Highlight notice for Cross-Council Enquiry with a strong commitment to cross-disciplinary research by bringing together artists, musicians, scientists, technologists and social scientists as well as scholars and practitioners from the humanities, stakeholders from press, education and health, as well as Early Career Researchers and the general public, to conduct a cross disciplinary research of listening as a methodology of enquiry and communication. It will provide a network in which culture and science can meet to debate and initiate innovative modes of knowledge production that bring value to the arts and humanities as well as to technology and science research, and a general public. The network brings together significant researchers and consolidates existing initiatives and methods of listening to advance its understanding and application across a wide range of disciplines. It is developed in the context of a recent emphasis on sound in the arts and humanities. And although science too has recently embraced listening, it remains a largely qualitative method of investigation, considered as generally subjective and peripheral to more established data assessment and analysis methods. In response, this network expands the interdisciplinary focus of sound studies, from its origin in arts and humanities, into science and technology, to explore the potential of cross fertilisation between artistic research and practices of listening and its scientific or technological methods and applications. The project will be realised through three network events, each lasting two days, and two online platforms, a website and a blog site. While the website serves to document and archive, to produce additional material and to disseminate the research globally, and the blog site enables faster exchanges and plural authorship, the network events will provide application and substance to the online network and enable a real world exchange. These events will feature workshops and technical demonstrations of listening strategies, tools, methods and instruments, as well as presentations of approaches to analysis, evaluation, and communication. They provide an applied forum for knowledge sharing and enable a shared enquiry into the possibilities of listening as a progressive and functional research methodology. The issues under investigation are: The scholarly and public understanding of listening as a skill and methodology The discipline specific applications of listening and how they can be shared The analytical, data gathering and diagnostic function of listening compared across the disciplines The legitimacy and evaluation of the heard for the arts and humanities and for science disciplines The role of listening in the transfer of results and outcomes to other researchers, professionals and a general public. In order to achieve focused discussions and guarantee relevant outcomes the events are organised in three themes: Listening to the Environment focuses on ecological, geological, architectural and spatial concerns Listening to Bodies and Material considers social and medical issues, anthropology and forensics Listening to Language Culture and Artefacts deliberates on speech and language, technology, museology and curation. Each event incorporates a public listening workshop that opens the selective forum to a more general audience and offers an immediate opportunity to experience listening as a thoughtful and directed methodology. The principal and longer term aim of this network project is to establish a research hub that provides the infrastructure and shared terrain to develop and document, educate and disseminate information, guidelines and policies on listening as a methodology of investigation and communication that advances what research can be conducted and what information and outcomes can be obtained in the arts and the sciences.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 80.13K | Year: 2015

Micro, small and medium designer fashion and textile businesses act as an engine for the wider UK fashion and textile sector, driving much of the creative conceptualization for the mass-market sector. However, lack of time and resources in the resource- and time-poor fashion and textile sector has inhibited R&D culture in fashion SMEs, weakening the UK sectors ability to innovate and capitalize on invention, and retain competitive edge internationally. Increasing pressures such as natural resource depletion, escalating consumption and waste, competition from overseas, and financial fluctuations driven by the seasonal nature of designer fashion all strongly indicate that the current fashion business model is unsustainable from both ecological and economic perspectives. Collaborative research and development between fashion designers and university researchers has great potential in addressing these issues, however this space is currently in its infancy. Micro enterprises and SMEs have a poor understanding of university research, its potential benefits and available funding opportunities. These businesses cannot allocate resource toward R&D beyond the inventive approaches applied but seldom capitalized upon in designer fashion. University researchers often work in isolation from the sector, use a different language and time frames that are not always compatible with industry needs and expectations. FIRE.Digital addresses these issues by developing the first digital platform for research-focused UK network of fashion SMEs and researchers. The key aim of the Platform is to galvanize collaborative research and innovation and provide sustainable source of data on UK fashion SMEs and research network. Building on the existing London-focused FIREup digital prototype (www.fireup.org.uk), FIRE.Digital will develop into a highend online tool for a UK-wide network of fashion industry and researchers to connect via user-friendly online network, as well as access curated fashion and textile research content, including news and funding opportunities. FIRE.Digital will develop existing standard backend tools to create bespoke digital data collation and visualization tools and methodologies, enabling capture of quantitative and qualitative data from the registered users. This data will provide significant insights into the structure of fashion SMEs, positioning of fashion and textile researchers, UK Fashion network formations, digital behavior in fashion SMEs and researchers, barriers to collaborative research and open innovation in the UK fashion industry and lead towards establishing new research topics. These tools could potentially find application in wider creative industry research context. FIRE.Digital strategic and technical elements will be developed in collaboration with a Digital Agency. FIRE Focus Group, consisting of designer fashion and textile SMEs and researchers, will be utilized for analysis, development and testing of the platform. UAL researchers will focus on defining fashion ontology and typology, which will underpin the site functionalities, as well as act as a benchmark for classification of UK fashion and textile sector for digital purposes. A comprehensive database of UK fashion researchers and fashion/textile relevant higher education institutions will be collated in order to populate the platform and provide an accessible knowledge database of potential academic partners for collaborative research. The collation and classification of potential sources of fashion research news and information will provide a basis for a sustainable stream of fashion and textile research, and act as a reference resource for both fashion SMEs and researchers including development of new editorial content featuring groundbreaking people and research themes.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SEC-2013.7.2-1 | Award Amount: 1.92M | Year: 2014

Graffiti is an omnipresent phenomenon all over Europe ranging from simple written words to elaborate wall paintings. Even if there are artful masterpieces graffiti without the property owners permission is commonly considered as disfigurement of public areas and transport, causing hundreds of millions of euros removal costs and the usage of tons of harmful chemicals each year. Furthermore scribbles often contain racist, homophobic or discriminatory content. Surroundings affected by extensive illegal graffiti produce feelings of insecurity among citizens and generate serious negative effects on a social, cultural and economic level. Graffolution aims at contributing to counteracting the increase of graffiti vandalism focusing on smart awareness and prevention solutions for all affected stakeholder groups summarised on an innovative web based platform. Graffolution will provide an extensive Collaborative Knowledge Base empowering city administrations, public transport services and law enforcement agencies to share statistics, knowledge, good practices and prevention strategies using intuitive modules and cooperation features. Additionally, the Graffolution platform will contain an interactive Open Information Hub addressing local communities, citizens and sprayers to strengthen public awareness and enforce the prevention of illegal spraying activities, using effectual tools and visualisations. Through the integration of social media features and channels young people and especially the sprayer community will be reached. The Graffolution project will lead to elementary research results and joint approaches integrating all interest groups to reduce illegal Graffiti in Europe with a strong pioneering nature in a global context. The created web platform will serve as a central instance against graffiti vandalism for all experts, stakeholders and citizens being expandable with future data, apps and effective solutions that supports artistic expression while preserving public and private property and safety.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 299.28K | Year: 2017

This research project is the first to systematically investigate the hidden history of fashion film in the silent era between 1900 and 1929, and its legacy for the rapidly changing field of fashion communications today, both in the UK and globally. It posits fashion film as a unique hybrid of two industries with distinct practices, resources, and motivations. Its interdisciplinary approach provides a new historical and theoretical framework for understanding this important and increasingly popular phenomenon. To that end, the project brings together scholars with combined expertise in film history, fashion history and media studies, and practitioners involved in various aspects of contemporary fashion film production. The study of fashion film has been neglected in both film and fashion histories, and in the fashion industry it is often assumed to be a novel product of the digital age. The project redresses this by conducting extensive archival and filmographic research into fashion film of the silent era, and by subjecting these findings to a comparison with the practices of emergent digital fashion film in the early 21st century - another period of rapid technological and cultural change. We use media archaeology as an innovative, non-linear method of connecting these two periods. Although not historically proximate, each period acts as a critical prism for understanding the other. More broadly, we will also investigate the potential of media archaeology approaches to rewire established fashion history methodologies and to inform contemporary fashion practice. Emphasising for the first time the transformative effects of film on fashion in both periods, the project forges a new understanding of film as a fashion medium and as a fashion object. It will make a major contribution to scholarly studies of the history of fashion, of film, and of fashion film, and will change how contemporary fashion filmmakers and other media practitioners understand the history of their discipline and the context for their own creative and commercial work. The project team is based at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, and Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton. The projects methods span fashion history and theory, fashion in film studies and media archaeology. The specialist art school environment is a singularly appropriate milieu for this project because its research activities regularly combine historical and theoretical research with art and design practice. The team will work closely in partnership with AnOther.com (an influential online magazine owned by Dazed Media, a leading UK-based international media platform with a focus on culture, fashion and lifestyle), the British Film Institute (the UKs foremost body for the collection, preservation, exhibition and promotion of film and the moving image), the British Fashion Council (the national organisation for the promotion of British fashion design and media in a global market), Somerset House (a major arts and cultural centre based in London) and Moravska Galerie Brno (a major national arts museum in the Czech Republic) to ensure a broad range of outputs and impacts, and wide dissemination. The outputs include: workshops, a showcase on a contemporary media platform, a conference, an international touring exhibition of historical fashion film at Somerset House and Moravska Galerie, Brno, public-facing screenings and discussion events, and several publications: a monograph accompanying the exhibition, a book documenting the conversations between academics and media industry practitioners, and a special issue of the Journal of Visual Culture.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 200.81K | Year: 2013

The UK is the birthplace of some of the worlds most creative and innovative designer fashion companies, of which many are small and micro enterprises. These companies, supply chains and intermediaries constitute the UK designer fashion industry and consist of a poorly understood complex web of interactions. The British Fashion Council has identified a number of issues that is preventing the industry from reaching its full growth potential. These challenges include lack of a formal R&D culture across the industry, lack of knowledge and contacts within the designer fashion industry and weak knowledge exchange and open innovation practices. The FIREup project will address these issues. Specifically, FIREup will focus on the creation of a prototype digital platform that will research new models of knowledge exchange (KE) for the industry and foster open innovation. The platform will create: an accessible knowledge base for academic/B-2-B interactions, integrate research methodologies into the industry creating new collaborations between science and design disciplines, and support the industry to reduce its carbon footprint by sharing best practice. The platform will be a research tool that delivers quantitative data identifying knowledge and asset flows. It will also be used to catalyse research collaborations linked to funding calls. New participants will register information about themselves that will provide valuable insight into research needs, cluster formations, existing networks & collaborations and KE models. Sandpits will shape open research calls to test & validate the platform. Project partners & SMEs will deliver research supported by a voucher (funded from FIREup). Outcomes of research projects will be presented as case studies, showcasing the platform and also used for dissemination activities. The platform will be online, making the data readily accessible to registered participants. It will be easily updateable to take account of rapid changes within the industry. FIREup will draw upon established networks and existing alumni from fashion focused UK HEIs to ensure initial rapid project development. The University of the Arts London (UAL) will lead the FIREup Project leveraging the social capital vested within alumni networks to engage with small businesses within this sector, particularly those that do not access or take advantage of new research developments. Research will be practice-led and respond to the need for KE between industry and the academia, including: - Relationship-building opportunities at different levels within the industry, helping SMEs to access the wider designer fashion ecosystem in order to promote their products, access new contacts and tap into academic/entrepreneurial expertise. - Exploring research and design processes in academia and industry and how new collaborations between science & textile disciplines can be developed. - Building communication & collaboration platforms, to enhance KE opportunities, develop R&D consortia and provide new research insight. A multi-disciplinary research team from across UAL and project partners will leverage their significant expertise and social capital to ensure FIREup is a success. The Centre for Fashion Enterprise (CFE) and Designer-Manufacturer Innovation Support Centre (DISC) will contribute insights into the UK designer fashion economy. Design Against Crime Research Centre (DACRC) will contribute knowledge/experience of award winning practice-led open innovation approaches to design research. The Centre for Sustainable Fashion (CSF) and Textile Futures Research Centre (TFRC) will contribute knowledge focused on innovation and sustainability. Fashion Design Studio (FDS) will support designer fashion enterprises to adopt new digital technologies. It is anticipated that the open KE platform has potential for significant beneficial legacy to the designer fashion industry beyond the project duration.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: ESRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 85.12K | Year: 2014

Today fashion e-retail, conceived as a web presence alone, is not sufficient for any high street retailer to operate or promote themselves. High street retailers still find it challenging to communicate store atmosphere and excellent service via online communication. However retailers that operate single and multiple channel strategies can provide a range of valuable benefits for customers while still maintaining heritage, luxury status and service. This can be achieved by innovative use of new technologies and digital tools such as 3d body-scanning, style advice, co-design and interactive screening, which enables an online retailer to equal or surpass that of the physical retail environment. This is becoming a key strategy for the future viability of high street retailers, as additional channels can provide additional income. In particular for garments which need to provide an exceptionally good fit, the anthropometric data generated by sizing systems such as body-scanners can actually bridge the gap between custom-made and mass-produced and ultimately lead to a substantial growth of online sales.Anthropometrics, the study of measuring the human body, has been considered by tailors and scientists for decades, but instead of using traditional methods of measurement, a good fit can now be achieved digitally. The big question for high street retailers is how accurately? This project capitalises on the widespread use of standard devices such as mobile phone and home webcam technology to take a picture of an individual in their home, upload it and use it to produce accurate body measurements that will ultimately enhance customers satisfaction by improving their online shopping experience on the retailers website and by therefore reducing returns due to poor fit. The choice of the most suitable application is driven by our previous research. The application is novel since use 2D images to infer 3D bodyshape and has more potential to offer true virtual fitting as opposed to the ones which use user 2D measurement data. By virtue of this software application costumers are more likely to better match their shape and measurements to garment data by overall increasing their satisfaction with the online shopping experience and by thus reducing returns. This project will focus on user experience testing by integrating feedback from customers into sizing information and guidance to improve their online shopping experience and feedback into the garment information as well. The keys to this are the quality and accuracy of the measurements, overall user satisfaction with the online experience and effectively matching body and garment measurements so the consumer can find the best fitting clothing size. Drawing on our existing research, we specifically seek to assess the implementation and the deployment of a novel software application into the e-retailer systems so that if a customer uses widely available technology such as a mobile phone or webcam as a body scan device to shop and then later decide to return an item, it will be flagged up and the customer can be asked for feedback about the reasons for returning the item. This project is specifically framed around the user experience with the twofold aim to promote the elimination of waste through reduction of returns, and to increase customer satisfaction by addressing the balance between online and high street shopping experience within the digital era.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 61.32K | Year: 2016

To re-design brand vision methodology, streamlining the experience for their clients and making efficiencys within the process that will transform the capacity and competitiveness.

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