Austin, TX, United States
Austin, TX, United States

The University of Texas at Austin is a state research university and the flagship institution of The University of Texas System. Founded in 1883 as "The University of Texas," its campus is located in Austin—approximately 1 mile from the Texas State Capitol. The institution has the fifth-largest single-campus enrollment in the nation, with over 50,000 undergraduate and graduate students and over 24,000 faculty and staff. The university has been labeled one of the "Public Ivies," a publicly funded university considered as providing a quality of education comparable to those of the Ivy League.UT Austin was inducted into the American Association of Universities in 1929, becoming only the third university in the American South to be elected. It is a major center for academic research, with research expenditures exceeding $640 million for the 2009–2010 school year. The university houses seven museums and seventeen libraries, including the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum and the Blanton Museum of Art, and operates various auxiliary research facilities, such as the J. J. Pickle Research Campus and the McDonald Observatory. Among university faculty are recipients of the Nobel Prize, Pulitzer Prize, the Wolf Prize, and the National Medal of Science, as well as many other awards.UT Austin student athletes compete as the Texas Longhorns and are members of the Big 12 Conference. Its Longhorn Network is unique in that it is the only sports network featuring the college sports of a single university. The Longhorns have won four NCAA Division I National Football Championships, six NCAA Division I National Baseball Championships and has claimed more titles in men's and women's sports than any other school in the Big 12 since the league was founded in 1996. Current and former UT Austin athletes have won 130 Olympic medals, including 14 in Beijing in 2008 and 13 in London in 2012. The university was recognized by Sports Illustrated as "America's Best Sports College" in 2002. Wikipedia.


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Butler M.T.,University of Texas at Austin | Wallingford J.B.,University of Texas at Austin
Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology | Year: 2017

Planar cell polarity (PCP) is an essential feature of animal tissues, whereby distinct polarity is established within the plane of a cell sheet. Tissue-wide establishment of PCP is driven by multiple global cues, including gradients of gene expression, gradients of secreted WNT ligands and anisotropic tissue strain. These cues guide the dynamic, subcellular enrichment of PCP proteins, which can self-assemble into mutually exclusive complexes at opposite sides of a cell. Endocytosis, endosomal trafficking and degradation dynamics of PCP components further regulate planar tissue patterning. This polarization propagates throughout the whole tissue, providing a polarity axis that governs collective morphogenetic events such as the orientation of subcellular structures and cell rearrangements. Reflecting the necessity of polarized cellular behaviours for proper development and function of diverse organs, defects in PCP have been implicated in human pathologies, most notably in severe birth defects. © 2017 Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.


Goyal V.,University of Texas at Austin
Obstetrics and Gynecology | Year: 2017

OBJECTIVE:: To compare preference for long-acting contraception (LARC) and subsequent use, year-long continuation, and pregnancy among women after induced abortion who were and were not eligible to participate in a specialized funding program that provided LARC at no cost. METHODS:: Between October 2014 and March 2016, we conducted a prospective study of abortion patients at Planned Parenthood in Austin, Texas (located in Travis County). We compared our primary outcome of interest, postabortion LARC use, among women who were eligible for the specialized funding program (low-income, uninsured, Travis County residents) and two groups who were ineligible (low-income, uninsured, non–Travis County residents, and higher income or insured women). Secondary outcomes of interest included preabortion preference for LARC and 1-year continuation and pregnancy rates among the three groups. RESULTS:: Among 518 women, preabortion preference for LARC was high among all three groups (low-income eligible: 64% [91/143]; low-income ineligible: 44% [49/112]; and higher income 55% [146/263]). However, low-income eligible participants were more likely to receive LARC (65% [93/143] compared with 5% [6/112] and 24% [62/263], respectively, P<.05). Specifically, after adjusting for age, race–ethnicity, and education, low-income eligible participants had a 10-fold greater incidence of receiving postabortion LARC compared with low-income ineligible participants (incidence rate ratio 10.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.68–21.91). Among low-income eligible and higher income women who received postabortion LARC, 1-year continuation was 90% (95% CI 82–97%) and 86% (95% CI 76–97%), respectively. One-year pregnancy risk was higher among low-income ineligible than low-income eligible women (hazard ratio 3.28, 95% CI 1.15–9.31). CONCLUSION:: Preference for postabortion LARC was high among all three eligibility groups, yet women with access to no-cost LARC were more likely to use and continue these methods. Low-income ineligible women were far more likely to use less effective contraception and become pregnant. Specialized funding programs can play an important role in immediate postabortion contraceptive provision, particularly in settings where state funding is limited. © 2017 by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Genomic bins belonging to multiple archaeal lineages were recovered from distinct redox regimes in sediments of the White Oak River estuary. The reconstructed archaeal genomes were identified as belonging to the rice cluster subgroups III and V (RC-III, RC-V), the Marine Benthic Group D (MBG-D), and a newly described archaeal class, the Theionarchaea. The metabolic capabilities of these uncultured archaea were inferred and indicated a common capability for extracellular protein degradation, supplemented by other pathways. The multiple genomic bins within the MBG-D archaea shared a nearly complete reductive acetyl-CoA pathway suggesting acetogenic capabilities. In contrast, the RC-III metabolism appeared centered on the degradation of detrital proteins and production of H2, whereas the RC-V archaea lacked capabilities for protein degradation and uptake, and appeared to be specialized on carbohydrate fermentation. The Theionarchaea appeared as complex metabolic hybrids; encoding a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle permitting carbon (acetyl-CoA) oxidation, together with a complete reductive acetyl-CoA pathway and sulfur reduction by a sulfhydrogenase. The differentiated inferred capabilities of these uncultured archaeal lineages indicated lineage-specific linkages with the nitrogen, carbon and sulfur cycles. The predicted metabolisms of these archaea suggest preferences for distinct geochemical niches within the estuarine sedimentary environment.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 13 January 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.189. © 2017 International Society for Microbial Ecology


Andrews J.G.,University of Texas at Austin
IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications | Year: 2017

I Would like to take this opportunity as I step down as EIC after three years to review the state of the Transactions. I believe that the Transactions should be an ever-evolving institution that always strives for a higher level of excellence across multiple dimensions such as quality, impact, timeliness, and efficiency. © 2016 IEEE.


Kirkpatrick M.,University of Texas at Austin
Journal of Heredity | Year: 2017

Progress on understanding how genome structure evolves is accelerating with the arrival of new genomic, comparative, and theoretical approaches. This article reviews progress in understanding how chromosome inversions and sex chromosomes evolve, and how their evolution affects species' ecology. Analyses of clines in inversion frequencies in flies and mosquitoes imply strong local adaptation, and roles for both over-and under dominant selection. Those results are consistent with the hypothesis that inversions become established when they capture locally adapted alleles. Inversions can carry alleles that are beneficial to closely related species, causing them to introgress following hybridization. Models show that this "adaptive cassette" scenario can trigger large range expansions, as recently happened in malaria mosquitoes. Sex chromosomes are the most rapidly evolving genome regions of some taxa. Sexually antagonistic selection may be the key force driving transitions of sex determination between different pairs of chromosomes and between XY and ZW systems. Fusions between sex-chromosomes and autosomes most often involve the Y chromosome, a pattern that can be explained if fusions are mildly deleterious and fix by drift. Sexually antagonistic selection is one of several hypotheses to explain the recent discovery that the sex determination system has strong effects on the adult sex ratios of tetrapods. The emerging view of how genome structure evolves invokes a much richer constellation of forces than was envisioned during the Golden Age of research on Drosophila karyotypes. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved.


Deaner M.,University of Texas at Austin | Alper H.S.,University of Texas at Austin
Metabolic Engineering | Year: 2017

Dissecting genotype-phenotype relationships in a high-throughput and scalable manner is still an unresolved problem facing metabolic engineers. While the RNA-guided nuclease Cas9 has been repurposed as a programmable transcription regulator, its application has typically been limited to binary on/off regulation and thus misses informative and potentially optimal intermediate levels of gene expression. In this work, we establish a rapid method for fine-tuned, graded expression of pathway enzymes via dCas9 regulation by varying sgRNA target location as the dominant parameter. Next, we utilize this technique to produce graded gene expression and Systematically Test Enzyme Perturbation Sensitivities (STEPS) to identify rate limiting steps in metabolic pathways. Specifically, we utilize this approach in an iterative fashion for the glycerol biosynthesis pathway and ultimately achieve a 5.7-fold increase in titer. We then demonstrate the portability of this approach by applying it to the pentose phosphate pathway in two distinct strain backgrounds. In doing so, we identify and alleviate pathway bottlenecks resulting in a 7.8-fold increase in 3-dehydroshikimate titer and the identification of 3 unique targets for xylose catabolism. This technique easily scales with DNA synthesis, a rapidly decreasing cost, and thus we envision that this technique can be used to complement genome-scale metabolic models by experimentally mapping the flux sensitivity of the entire genome to desired phenotypes. © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society


Kwasinski A.,University of Texas at Austin
8th International Conference on Power Electronics - ECCE Asia: "Green World with Power Electronics", ICPE 2011-ECCE Asia | Year: 2011

This paper explores how highly reliable power distribution architectures can be implemented, operated and controlled. Potential applications for advanced power distribution architectures include advanced micro-grid enabled smart grids, electric ships, and data centers. The analysis discusses power electronics circuit topologies and system wide architecture design. Some of the possible power architectures included radial, ring, and laddered topologies. Some commented relevant alternatives for any of these power architectures include ac and dc distribution systems. Although it is identified that dc architectures are more advantageous than ac power distribution systems in terms of efficiency, availability, flexibility, and components power density, dc systems present issues with fault detection and clearance. An option involving multiple-input multiple-output converters that addressed these issues with dc architectures is commented in this paper. The discussion presents some suitable topologies for these converters including one derived from a multiple-input boost converter and another one realized from a multiple-input fly-back converter. In the proposed architectures multiple-input multiple-output converters are placed in key distribution nodes and act as "power routers" by freely controlling all input and output powers. These power routers allow to address issues related with fault detection and clearance in distributed power architectures through internal over current protection mechanisms. © 2011 IEEE.


America's relationship with coal isn't over yet. The coal industry has been in decline for several decades now, with just over 50,000 coal miners employed as of March. But 43 percent of Americans want President Trump to "take actions to revive the U.S. coal industry," according to a national poll conducted by the University of Texas at Austin. And 64 percent think Trump has the power to affect the industry -- an increase of 9 percent from six months ago. This finding would seem to contradict a series of recent polls that found strong bipartisan support for renewable energy and weaker support for coal itself. Republican pollsters in North Carolina found that 83.2 percent of voters there would support a candidate who seeks to expand renewables; that position drew supermajority support from Republicans and Trump voters specifically. A different Republican firm a few months ago found that 75 percent of Trump voters support "action to accelerate the deployment and use of clean energy." Note, though, that this new data is coming from an energy research institute, not some group predisposed to favor coal. Here's how the university framed the data in its announcement: "These findings reflect a disconnect between energy market conditions, which show a steady decline in the use of coal for electricity generation, and statements made by Trump, who has pledged to revitalize the coal industry and create coal-mining jobs." On closer inspection, the plurality of support for coal fits within the public opinion trends we've been seeing -- it's all a matter of framing. For many voters, the support for both kinds of energy is a matter of supporting good domestic jobs, rather than an intricate evaluation of the nation's energy mix. The degree of support for saving coal falls sharply along party lines: 64 percent of Republicans and 32 percent of Democrats want Trump to revive the coal industry. That shakes out to 43 percent overall. Similarly, the North Carolina poll found that 49.3 percent of respondents would favor a candidate who advocated greater development of "fossil fuel energy such as oil and coal." That number includes 76.4 percent of Republican voters and just 36.1 percent of Democrats. Fossil fuels like coal split the electorate and did not earn majority support, whereas clean energy drew massive margins from both parties and independents. It is impressive that the coal industry can employ so few people nationwide and still rally 43 percent of the public to defend it. What's more impressive, though, is the number who think Trump is capable of restoring the industry's fortunes. Trump's efforts to undo Barack Obama's climate-change agenda and strip away environmental regulations make for effective political optics. But they fail to address stiff competition from cheap American natural gas and renewables. Nor has Trump taken a swing at the forces of industrial automation which drive coal companies to rely more on sophisticated machinery and less on human sweat. In another quirk in the poll, 75 percent of Americans think climate change is happening, but more people now think it is caused by natural forces than they did a year ago. That number has quadrupled from 5 percent to 20 percent. The essential facts of climate change and American energy economics haven't changed in the last few months. We don't know for sure what's causing the shift in public perceptions about the origins of climate change or the president's ability to resuscitate a declining fuel source, but it looks like Trump's messaging is having an impact.


News Article | April 10, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

An innovative supercomputing program could assist psychologists with diagnosing mental health conditions. Researchers are using the Stampede Supercomputer, stationed at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, to teach a machine-learning algorithm that can sift through diverse data sets and potentially predict which patients are at risk of developing depression and anxiety. The team conducted a study where they had 52 treatment-seeking participants with depression and 45 healthy control participants receive diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) MRI scans. This process entails tagging water molecules to analyze the level of which these particles are microscopically diffused in the brain over a certain period of time. "We feed in whole brain data or a subset and predict disease classifications or any potential behavioral measure such as measures of negative information bias," said David Schnyer, a psychology professor and cognitive neuroscientists at the University of Texas at Austin, in a statement. Measuring these diffusions in multiple spatial directions generates vectors for each voxel, according to the official announcement. Voxels are three-dimensional cubes that signify either structure or neural activity throughout the brain. These outcomes are then morphed into metrics that indicate the integrity of white matter pathways residing in the cerebral cortex. The algorithm sorted through this data and was able to predict whether a volunteer in this study had a form of depression with roughly 75 percent accuracy. "Not only are we learning that we can classify depressed versus non-depressed people using DTI data, we are also learning something about how depression is represented within the brain," said Christopher Beevers, a professor of psychology and director of the Institute for Mental Health Research at UT Austin who participated in this research. "Rather than trying to find the area that is disrupted in depression, we are learning that alterations across a number of networks contribute to the classification of depression." Both researchers were impressed with these findings, but plan on adding more data from several hundred volunteers to strengthen the system’s predictive capabilities. Machine learning is a growing field in the healthcare sector. Researchers are designing these innovative programs for tasks like obtaining data from cancer pathology reports, improving cancer surveillance on the national, state, and local levels, and diagnoses for voice disorders.


People are often looking for ways to prolong the battery life of their gadgets. From the more practical approach of changing their charging behaviors to relying on science to improve battery technology. Scientists and engineers are also looking into developing better batteries either through studying and improving current designs or actually creating new ones, like Harvard's Flow battery. Even Professor John Goodenough, the co-creator of the currently and popularly used Lithium-ion batteries, felt that it is not good enough and never stopped working and making it better. His efforts finally paid off when he led a team of engineers from the University of Texas at Austin to successfully develop a safer and longer lasting alternative to his creation. Prof. Goodenough discovered the materials that led to the development of Li-ion batteries when he was 57 years old but he never lost hope that he would be able to find something better to contribute to battery technology — he has finally done so again after 37 years. The very first all-solid-state battery cells could be used for rechargeable batteries that will allow faster and safer charging since it has a lower tendency of heating up to the point of combusting spontaneously — much like the batteries of a certain smartphone. The all-solid-state battery can be used for gadgets like smartphones and even electric vehicles or stationary energy storage. "Cost, safety, energy density, rates of charge and discharge and cycle life are critical for battery-driven cars to be more widely adopted. We believe our discovery solves many of the problems that are inherent in today's batteries," Goodenough said. By using glass electrolytes, the new battery removes the possibility of the liquid electrolytes forming dendrites that can short circuit and cause the device to explode. Not only that, the alkali-metal anode used in the new battery increases the energy density, which means more charge cycles, longer battery life, and quicker charge times. It can even be used it in sub-zero temperatures so explorers and scientists would also benefit greatly from it. Right now, Prof. Goodenough and Cockrell School senior research fellow Maria Helena Braga, who worked with the team on the development of the new battery, are working on patenting the new technology but they are also looking into working with battery makers to develop and conduct more tests on their discovery. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 10, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

An innovative supercomputing program could assist psychologists with diagnosing mental health conditions. Researchers are using the Stampede Supercomputer, stationed at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, to teach a machine-learning algorithm that can sift through diverse data sets and potentially predict which patients are at risk of developing depression and anxiety. The team conducted a study where they had 52 treatment-seeking participants with depression and 45 healthy control participants receive diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) MRI scans. This process entails tagging water molecules to analyze the level of which these particles are microscopically diffused in the brain over a certain period of time. "We feed in whole brain data or a subset and predict disease classifications or any potential behavioral measure such as measures of negative information bias," said David Schnyer, a psychology professor and cognitive neuroscientists at the University of Texas at Austin, in a statement. Measuring these diffusions in multiple spatial directions generates vectors for each voxel, according to the official announcement. Voxels are three-dimensional cubes that signify either structure or neural activity throughout the brain. These outcomes are then morphed into metrics that indicate the integrity of white matter pathways residing in the cerebral cortex. The algorithm sorted through this data and was able to predict whether a volunteer in this study had a form of depression with roughly 75 percent accuracy. "Not only are we learning that we can classify depressed versus non-depressed people using DTI data, we are also learning something about how depression is represented within the brain," said Christopher Beevers, a professor of psychology and director of the Institute for Mental Health Research at UT Austin who participated in this research. "Rather than trying to find the area that is disrupted in depression, we are learning that alterations across a number of networks contribute to the classification of depression." Both researchers were impressed with these findings, but plan on adding more data from several hundred volunteers to strengthen the system’s predictive capabilities. Machine learning is a growing field in the healthcare sector. Researchers are designing these innovative programs for tasks like obtaining data from cancer pathology reports, improving cancer surveillance on the national, state, and local levels, and diagnoses for voice disorders.


Texas University stabbing: At least one dead and several injured after campus attack in Austin At least one person has been killed and three more possibly seriously injured following a mass stabbing and assault on the University of Texas at Austin campus. Police took one person into custody after the stabbing and warned students and the public via social media channels to stay away from the area. The Austin Police force and the University of Texas at Austin Police Department worked together to respond to the incident. Local emergency responders said that there were three victims who came in as patients and that one of them was in critical condition, local media reported. Warren says Obama does not understand 'lived experience of Americans' Confirmed details about the suspect and their motive were not immediately available after police took them into custody. Students in the nearby Gregory Gym were reportedly evacuated for their safety, according to reports from local news organisations. No further threat to campus safety were reported, the University of Austin Police Department said via Twitter. The university’s campus is loaded just streets from downtown Austin and the Texas capitol building. The school is one of the largest universities in the United States.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.nature.com

The consequences of a magnitude-7.8 earthquake that struck New Zealand on 14 November 2016 are still rippling through the country. The quake, which killed two people and caused billions of dollars of damage, ruptured a complex set of geological faults near the surface. It also triggered slow-motion movement as deep as 40 kilometres in Earth’s crust, some of which continues to this day, scientists report. That deep ‘slow slip’ is worrying, because it adds to the risk of another big quake. “This earthquake is special,” says Bill Fry, a seismologist at GNS Science, a government-owned Earth-science research organization in Lower Hutt, New Zealand. He and others described their findings last week in Denver, Colorado, at a meeting of the Seismological Society of America. The November Kaikoura tremor is a rare example of a large quake triggering widespread slow slip. And what researchers have learned from this tremor could illuminate the seismic risk in other regions that experience slow slip, such as Japan and the US–Canadian Pacific Northwest. A spate of large earthquakes has rattled New Zealand in the past decade, including one in 2011 that devastated the city of Christchurch. But the Kaikoura tremor stands out for its geological complexity. It began near the north end of New Zealand’s South Island and ripped northward for more than 170 kilometres1. At least 21 separate faults broke along the way. Landslides buried roads and the shaking damaged buildings in the central business district of Wellington2. The earthquake immediately triggered slow-slip movement in at least three separate areas, according to GNS Science. The regions stretched from off the east coast of the North Island to the northern part of the South Island. In each case, the Australian and Pacific plates of Earth’s crust ground against one another extremely slowly, at a dangerous interface known as a subduction zone. Most of the slow slip ceased within weeks, although a little of it continues. Cumulatively, the plate motions have released as much energy as a magnitude-7.3 earthquake would have. These patches of Earth’s crust have slipped slowly before — but never all at once, said GNS Science seismologist Anna Kaiser at the meeting. The areas in motion surround a section that experiences no slow slip at all. This region, extending east of Wellington, may be locked and building up stress that could break in the next large quake. Seismologists have observed slow-slip movement in other subduction zones, in some cases coming before large tremors, including the devastating magnitude-9 Tohoku quake in Japan in 2011. How the two phenomena relate to one another is not entirely clear. “We’re at the very early stages of trying to understand the relationship between slow-slip events and earthquakes,” says Laura Wallace, a geophysicist at GNS Science and the University of Texas at Austin. The revelations from New Zealand could alter future planning in quake-prone areas. Earthquake forecasts look at past seismic activity and calculate the probability of tremors of a certain magnitude within a certain time period. They typically do not include the effects of slow slip. But after the Kaikoura quake, GNS scientists added that movement into their own calculations and found a 5% chance of a similar quake within a year. That is a relatively low probability, but is still six times higher than it was before the quake. With the New Zealand government busy retrofitting buildings and roads in preparation for future quakes, researchers are working to quantify what they do and do not know. For instance, seismic-risk models typically consider the rupture of one fault at a time — but after Kaikoura, geologists now realize they need to plan for the possibility of the simultaneous rupture of multiple faults. “This just really emphasizes that that needs to be done,” says Matt Gerstenberger, a GNS seismologist who works on the national seismic-hazard model. Researchers will gain greater insight into slow-slip movement late this year and next, when several project teams descend on the region. In November, the JOIDES Resolution ship will begin the first of two expeditions to drill into the slow-slip area off the New Zealand coast. A ship-borne seismic survey, to begin in early 2018, will provide a 3D look at where the slow slip is happening. And a bevy of new ocean-bottom seismometers will track the shaking as the plates continue to move. “It will be the best-imaged slow-slip area, anywhere in the world,” Wallace says. “We’re trying to apply everything we can to this.”


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.accesswire.com

DALLAS, TX / ACCESSWIRE / April 18, 2017 / In addition to decades long alias as the music mecca - the international South by Southwest Festival is held here every year - Austin has been the fastest growing tech town in the U.S. for several years running, with more than 147 companies securing almost $1 billion in funding just in 2015. Along with fresh entrepreneurs, giants like Amazon, Google, and Facebook have also opened offices in town. Meeting the increased demand for housing in the area is real estate developer Marcus Hiles, whose vision of upscale, ecologically-minded, yet affordable, homes for the burgeoning new professional class is being realized through more than 15,000 residential units that his company, Western Rim Property Services, has built throughout Texas, including Austin, Dallas and Fort Worth. "It's really an ideal combination of factors behind the tech boom," said Marcus Hiles. "Texas, of course, is a very business friendly state with zero personal income and corporate taxes. Besides economic incentives, Austin is also renowned for its culture and art, relaxed healthy lifestyle and great weather. Additionally, the University of Texas at Austin brings in many talented young people from all over the world who make the city their home." Along with these elements, Austin is simply much more affordable with a much lower cost of living than other tech hot spots such as Silicon Valley and New York. Austin is overall proving to be a city of innovators and risk-takers. The Kauffman Index, produced by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, is a key measurement of entrepreneurship on the national, state and metropolitan levels. By factoring three metrics - the rate of new businesspersons, the number of those who started their companies when unemployed, and the number of startups per capita - they develop an annual gauge. According to the data, roughly 555 out of every 100,000 adults in the Austin region became entrepreneurs in any given month during the past five years, on average. They have placed the startup rate at 180 new businesses - less than a year old and employing at least one other person besides the owner - per 100,000 residents. Marcus Hiles, Founder of Western Rim Property Services, has worked steadily to become a leader in Texas real estate. With a dedication to building quality residences that include advanced eco-friendly technology and natural landscaping techniques to create high value, yet still affordable, homes throughout the greater areas of Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston, New Braunfels, Austin, and San Antonio. Always seeking to give back to the community, Hiles has spearheaded a number of charitable ventures around the Dallas area including school support, children's hospitals and a number of low-income meal programs.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

VHS tapes, boy bands and scrunchies are just a few of the fads that helped to define the ‘90s. For many millennials, whose childhood exists in the grunge era, the ‘90s are home to fond memories and simpler times. As a child of rollerblades and overalls, Ashely Warren captures the essence of this memorable decade with her first fiction book loosely based on her own life, “Toothpick Legs.” In 1995, Ashley Vaughn is the typical middle schooler, riding in the back of a station wagon as she listens to Spice Girls on her cassette player. Vaughn, now an adult, recounts stories from her childhood, providing an authentic look at the whimsical ‘90s and chronicling junior high adventures. Vaughn fondly shares humorous and relatable tales of slumber parties, budding friendships, catfights, and school dances. “When my friends and I get together now, we always reminisce about what it meant to grow up in this time,” Warren said. “I’ve looked back on the experiences, trends and memoires of that era and realize that there is a connection between anyone that grew up in that period. Toothpick Legs is a chance to revisit those cherished times and share in those common bonds.” “Toothpick Legs” will appeal to today’s adolescents—who are looking to gain insight into their parents’ glory days—and current adults—who are hoping to revisit the 90s fashion, traditions and sense of community. “Toothpick Legs” By Ashley Warren ISBN: 9781480833944 (hardcover), 9781480833937 (softcover), 9781480833920 (e-book) Available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble and Archway Publishing About the author Ashley Warren is a Texas native with a Master of Arts in journalism and a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Texas at Austin. Her publishing credits include magazine feature stories about people whose life works inspire and educate others. She previously lived in New York City and currently lives in southern California.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

DALLAS, TX / ACCESSWIRE / April 18, 2017 / In addition to decades long alias as the music mecca - the international South by Southwest Festival is held here every year - Austin has been the fastest growing tech town in the U.S. for several years running, with more than 147 companies securing almost $1 billion in funding just in 2015. Along with fresh entrepreneurs, giants like Amazon, Google, and Facebook have also opened offices in town. Meeting the increased demand for housing in the area is real estate developer Marcus Hiles, whose vision of upscale, ecologically-minded, yet affordable, homes for the burgeoning new professional class is being realized through more than 15,000 residential units that his company, Western Rim Property Services, has built throughout Texas, including Austin, Dallas and Fort Worth. "It's really an ideal combination of factors behind the tech boom," said Marcus Hiles. "Texas, of course, is a very business friendly state with zero personal income and corporate taxes. Besides economic incentives, Austin is also renowned for its culture and art, relaxed healthy lifestyle and great weather. Additionally, the University of Texas at Austin brings in many talented young people from all over the world who make the city their home." Along with these elements, Austin is simply much more affordable with a much lower cost of living than other tech hot spots such as Silicon Valley and New York. Austin is overall proving to be a city of innovators and risk-takers. The Kauffman Index, produced by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, is a key measurement of entrepreneurship on the national, state and metropolitan levels. By factoring three metrics - the rate of new businesspersons, the number of those who started their companies when unemployed, and the number of startups per capita - they develop an annual gauge. According to the data, roughly 555 out of every 100,000 adults in the Austin region became entrepreneurs in any given month during the past five years, on average. They have placed the startup rate at 180 new businesses - less than a year old and employing at least one other person besides the owner - per 100,000 residents. Marcus Hiles, Founder of Western Rim Property Services, has worked steadily to become a leader in Texas real estate. With a dedication to building quality residences that include advanced eco-friendly technology and natural landscaping techniques to create high value, yet still affordable, homes throughout the greater areas of Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston, New Braunfels, Austin, and San Antonio. Always seeking to give back to the community, Hiles has spearheaded a number of charitable ventures around the Dallas area including school support, children's hospitals and a number of low-income meal programs. DALLAS, TX / ACCESSWIRE / April 18, 2017 / In addition to decades long alias as the music mecca - the international South by Southwest Festival is held here every year - Austin has been the fastest growing tech town in the U.S. for several years running, with more than 147 companies securing almost $1 billion in funding just in 2015. Along with fresh entrepreneurs, giants like Amazon, Google, and Facebook have also opened offices in town. Meeting the increased demand for housing in the area is real estate developer Marcus Hiles, whose vision of upscale, ecologically-minded, yet affordable, homes for the burgeoning new professional class is being realized through more than 15,000 residential units that his company, Western Rim Property Services, has built throughout Texas, including Austin, Dallas and Fort Worth. "It's really an ideal combination of factors behind the tech boom," said Marcus Hiles. "Texas, of course, is a very business friendly state with zero personal income and corporate taxes. Besides economic incentives, Austin is also renowned for its culture and art, relaxed healthy lifestyle and great weather. Additionally, the University of Texas at Austin brings in many talented young people from all over the world who make the city their home." Along with these elements, Austin is simply much more affordable with a much lower cost of living than other tech hot spots such as Silicon Valley and New York. Austin is overall proving to be a city of innovators and risk-takers. The Kauffman Index, produced by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, is a key measurement of entrepreneurship on the national, state and metropolitan levels. By factoring three metrics - the rate of new businesspersons, the number of those who started their companies when unemployed, and the number of startups per capita - they develop an annual gauge. According to the data, roughly 555 out of every 100,000 adults in the Austin region became entrepreneurs in any given month during the past five years, on average. They have placed the startup rate at 180 new businesses - less than a year old and employing at least one other person besides the owner - per 100,000 residents. Marcus Hiles, Founder of Western Rim Property Services, has worked steadily to become a leader in Texas real estate. With a dedication to building quality residences that include advanced eco-friendly technology and natural landscaping techniques to create high value, yet still affordable, homes throughout the greater areas of Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston, New Braunfels, Austin, and San Antonio. Always seeking to give back to the community, Hiles has spearheaded a number of charitable ventures around the Dallas area including school support, children's hospitals and a number of low-income meal programs.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE PHOTO: A student walks at the University of Texas campus in Austin, Texas, U.S., on June 23, 2016. REUTERS/Jon Herskovitz/File Photo AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) - A man thought to be enrolled at the University of Texas went on a stabbing spree with a large hunting knife at the school's Austin campus on Monday, killing one student and wounding three others also believed to be students, police said. The suspect, identified as Kendrex White, was apprehended about two minutes after campus police received reports of the attack on the school's main grounds. White was being questioned by police and charges were likely to come later. "I don't know what his motivation is," University of Texas at Austin Police Chief David Carter told a news conference. All the victims were found in about a one-block area and were men aged 20 or 21, police said. Their names have not been released. "Earlier this afternoon, a tragedy struck the heart of the University of Texas campus," University President Gregory Fenves told the news conference. The person killed was found dead at the scene, Austin-Travis County EMS Captain Rick Rutledge said in a telephone interview. The university canceled classes for the day. “Our prayers go out to all those affected by today’s tragic events,” Texas Governor Greg Abbott said in a statement.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Suspect in Texas university stabbings to be charged with murder (Reuters) - The man accused of killing one person and wounding three others at the University of Texas at Austin has a history of mental health problems and will be charged with murder, police said on Tuesday. Kendrex White, a student at the university, appeared to act calmly during the stabbing spree on Monday, UT-Austin Police Chief David Carter told reporters. "This was not a conspiracy," said Carter. "This was not a person that had a vendetta against any particular group. We have solid grounds and reason to believe that the individual was suffering from mental health issues." UT-Austin President Gregory Fenves said two of the three people wounded on Monday had been released from the hospital, and one was still being treated. Fenves identified the dead man as Harrison Brown, a first-year student at the university. White, 21, has been involuntarily committed to a mental health facility outside Austin, Carter said. Campus police responded to the first call of the stabbings within two minutes, Carter said. The suspect kicked a female student as if he was "kicking her out of the way" and then stabbed his first victim, Brown, at about 1:45 p.m. local time (1815 GMT), he said. The three others were then attacked, one while sitting at a picnic table. All four victims were outdoors when they were targeted. The suspect, who was brandishing a long knife, then entered a dormitory building where he was arrested by officers as he approached other students. Social media reports saying the attacker targeted people wearing clothing identifying them as members of a fraternity were unfounded, Carter said. None of the victims was wearing such clothing, he said. Classes were held on Tuesday after being canceled on Monday after the stabbings.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has ranked the best colleges in Texas for 2017 based on analysis of degree programs, career resources and other student data. 50 four-year colleges and universities were highlighted for overall quality, with Rice University, Trinity University, Southern Methodist University, LeTourneau University and the University of Texas at Austin ranking as the top five. 50 two-year schools also made the list, with Texas State Technical College Waco, Western Texas College, Galveston College, Del Mar College and Navarro College coming in as the top five. All winning schools are listed below. “As Texas’ economy continues to grow, more job seekers are bolstering their resumes by earning a certificate or degree,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “Not only do these Texas colleges provide excellent academic opportunities, they also offer employment and career services that contribute to student success in the job market after college.” To be included on the “Best Colleges in Texas” list, all schools must be regionally accredited and not-for-profit institutions. Each college is ranked on a variety of data points, including number of degree programs offered, annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college, career services, academic counseling, financial aid availability and graduation rates. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Texas” list, visit: Texas’ Best Four-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Abilene Christian University Austin College Baylor University Dallas Baptist University Dallas Christian College Hardin-Simmons University Houston Baptist University Howard Payne University LeTourneau University Lubbock Christian University McMurry University Midwestern State University Rice University Saint Edward's University Sam Houston State University Southern Methodist University Southwestern Adventist University Southwestern University St Mary's University Stephen F Austin State University Tarleton State University Texas A & M International University Texas A & M University-College Station Texas A & M University-Commerce Texas Christian University Texas Lutheran University Texas State University Texas Tech University Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Texas Woman's University The University of Texas at Arlington The University of Texas at Austin The University of Texas at Dallas The University of Texas at El Paso The University of Texas at Tyler The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio The University of Texas of the Permian Basin The University of Texas-Pan American Trinity University University of Dallas University of Houston University of Houston-Clear Lake University of Mary Hardin-Baylor University of North Texas University of St Thomas University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center University of the Incarnate Word Wayland Baptist University West Texas A & M University Texas’ Best Two-Year Colleges for 2017 include: Alvin Community College Amarillo College Angelina College Austin Community College District Blinn College Brookhaven College Central Texas College Cisco College Coastal Bend College College of the Mainland Collin College Del Mar College Eastfield College El Paso Community College Frank Phillips College Galveston College Grayson College Hill College Houston Community College Howard College Kilgore College Lamar Institute of Technology Lamar State College-Port Arthur Lee College Lone Star College McLennan Community College Navarro College North Central Texas College North Lake College Northeast Texas Community College Northwest Vista College Odessa College Palo Alto College Panola College Richland College San Antonio College San Jacinto College South Plains College St Philip's College Tarrant County College District Temple College Texas State Technical College - West Texas Texas State Technical College-Waco Trinity Valley Community College Tyler Junior College Vernon College Victoria College Weatherford College Western Texas College Wharton County Junior College ### About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A University of Texas at Arlington team has won the 2017 Brain Bowl organized by University of Texas Health Science Center - San Antonio Center for Biomedical Neuroscience, beating out teams from Trinity University and the defending champions University of Texas at Dallas. The Brain Bowl is modeled after the 1960's quiz show University Challenge and includes three rounds of short answer questions that increase in difficulty with each round. The final round is comprised of a single complex challenge question, where teams wager points they have accumulated in the previous rounds. "All five members of our team are active members of my behavioral neuroscience laboratory," said Linda Perrotti, UTA associate professor of psychology and team mentor. "We made a victorious comeback to reclaim the title of Brain Bowl Champions after having lost it to UT Dallas in 2015. We also get to house the Brain Bowl Trophy on our campus for another year." The questions asked during Brain Bowl cover many fields of neuroscience research, including neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, neuropharmacology and behavioral neuroscience. The Brain Bowl is sponsored annually by the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience at the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio and is a premier event within Brain Awareness Week for the neuroscience community. The first Brain Bowl was held in 1998. To date, nine Texas universities have competed; Texas Lutheran, Saint Mary's, University of Texas San Antonio, Trinity, Southwestern, University of Texas at Austin, UTA, Baylor, and Texas A&M. In 2013, UTA won their first Brain Bowl against the then defending champs, Trinity University, and the University of Texas at San Antonio. The following year our team went on to successfully defend their championship in 2014. UTA psychology chair Perry Fuchs was one of those congratulating the team on this important success: "UTA's team took on this challenge of cross-disciplinary quiz knowledge about neuroscience and beat out great teams from across Texas," Perry said. "It also clearly reflects on the leadership of UTA in the growing field of neuroscience." Anthropology and biology 2016 graduate. Research technician in Dr. Perrotti's lab group. Intends to apply to graduate school for neuroscience doctorate to further research in neuronal cell signaling. Enjoys reading, music, walking, and Japanese culture. Psychology major, minoring in biology. Intends to complete a medical degree and doctorate to improve psychiatric health care. Enjoys reading, meditating and 80s music. Psychology major, will begin pursuing her doctorate in neuroscience at UTA starting in the Fall 2017 semester. Enjoys reading, cooking and hiking. Biology and psychology major. Intends to complete a doctorate in clinical psychology to help people struggling with mental health issues. Enjoys trying new foods, reading, learning random facts and reading comics. The University of Texas at Arlington is a Carnegie Research-1 "highest research activity" institution. With a projected global enrollment of close to 57,000, UTA is one of the largest institutions in the state of Texas. Guided by its Strategic Plan 2020 Bold Solutions|Global Impact, UTA fosters interdisciplinary research and education within four broad themes: health and the human condition, sustainable urban communities, global environmental impact, and data-driven discovery. UTA was recently cited by U.S. News & World Report as having the second lowest average student debt among U.S. universities. U.S. News & World Report lists UTA as having the fifth highest undergraduate diversity index among national universities. The University is a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is ranked as the top four-year college in Texas for veterans on Military Times' 2017 Best for Vets list.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

CION Investments (“CION”) announced that Robert Nicholson and Andre Hatibi have joined as Senior Vice Presidents. Rob has 20 years of financial services experience. Rob was most recently with Commerce Group, a boutique financial services consulting firm focused on advising Private Equity, Sovereign Investors, Broker-Dealers, RIAs, Hedge Funds, Family Offices, Pension and Insurance Companies on capital markets initiatives. Prior to Commerce Group Rob was Senior Vice President with Cole Capital where he ultimately headed the RIA and Institutional divisions. Prior to Cole Capital, Rob held wholesaling roles at Hines and Wells Real Estate. He earned a MBA from Columbia Business School; a MBA from London Business School and a B.A. degree from the University of Texas at Austin. Rob currently holds FINRA Series 7, 63, and 65 licenses. “Rob comes to CION with an impeccable reputation in the sponsor and intermediary channel for conceptualizing, developing and building distribution,” said Douglas Crossman, Head of Distribution for CION Securities. “As we expand our product offerings and continue expansion of our distribution capabilities, Rob’s vast experience and depth of knowledge across the intermediary channel will help us execute on various deliverables and channel opportunities,” added Mark Gatto, co-CEO of CION Investments. In addition, Andre Hatibi has joined CION with nearly 20 years of financial services experience. Andre was most recently Senior Vice President at S2K Financial leading a diverse set of initiatives to assist in the formation, development and launch of a start up distribution company focused on alternative investments. Prior to S2K Andre was Senior Vice President at Realty Capital Securities where he held various sales management positions with increasing responsibilities culminating in being named National Sales Manager of the Regional/Wirehouse channel where he lead all business development and distribution efforts to on-board and advance relationships with a select group of broker dealers. Prior to that, Andre held wholesaling positions at The Hartford and American Skandia/Prudential Annuities. He currently holds FINRA Series 7, 63, and 24 licenses. “Andre has a unique and diverse skill set in launching and managing a start up distribution franchise as well as leading a seasoned team of distribution professionals across the intermediary channel,” remarked Michael A. Reisner. “We are excited to have individuals of Rob and Andre’s caliber join CION to increase our presence with existing intermediary clients as well as developing new relationships,” continued Michael A. Reisner. CION Investments is a leading manager of alternative investment solutions that focus on alternative credit strategies for individual investors. The firm currently manages CION Investment Corp., a leading BDC with approximately $1.5 billion in assets under management and sponsors, through CION Ares Management, LLC, CION Ares Diversified Credit Fund (“CADEX). Its affiliated broker-dealer, CION Securities, LLC, distributes its offerings. CION Investments is headquartered in New York. For more information please visit cioninvestments.com.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new model for assessing real-time risk of a Zika virus epidemic in the United States is described in research published in the open access journal BMC Infectious Diseases. The computer simulation, based on data from Texas including population dynamics, historical infection rates, socioeconomics, and mosquito density, is designed to help policymakers gauge the underlying epidemic threat as cases first appear in US cities. In 2016, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended that public health officials trigger epidemic intervention when two non-familial locally-acquired cases of Zika are reported in an area. However, Zika importation and transmission rates vary widely, meaning that two such cases may pose very different threats in different locations. In this study, the authors describe a computer model that can be used to calculate the probability that the presence of two Zika cases in a given area will lead to an epidemic, based on real-time simulations of all the counties in the state of Texas. Across the 254 counties in the state of Texas, the model predicted that Harris County, which includes the city of Houston, and Travis County, which includes the city of Austin, have the highest rates of Zika introductions by infected travellers. The counties located in the southeastern area of Texas were found to have the highest risk of Zika transmission from one person to another. The one Zika outbreak that occurred in Texas in Cameron County in November of 2016 falls within this region. By combining all the data, the researchers found that the risk of a Zika epidemic varies widely across Texas counties. Even if two cases are reported locally, most Texas counties will have nearly no risk of an epidemic, while a few will have greater than 50% epidemic risk. Spencer Fox, co-lead author and PhD Student at the University of Texas at Austin, said: "Our model was designed to quantify the risk of local Zika outbreaks as cases accumulate across Texas, taking into account international travel patterns, mosquito habitat, and the low detection rate of Zika infections. Its flexible framework can be readily applied to other US states and adapted for risk assessments of other emerging arboviruses, including Chikungunya, Dengue, and Yellow fever." Lauren Castro, co-lead author and PhD student at The University of Texas at Austin, said: "The CDC's recommendation to intervene following two reported Zika cases should ensure early action everywhere, even though Zika epidemic risk can vary enormously, even within a single state. Our model quantifies that variation in risk and can help officials prioritize high risk areas for monitoring and intervention resources." Dr. Lauren Ancel Meyers, senior author and Professor at The University of Texas at Austin, added: "Zika outbreaks require the importation of the disease by infected travellers followed by local mosquito-borne transmission. Our model combines these processes to estimate local emergence risk. It enables policymakers to think carefully about risk tolerance--the certainty required before intervening and the potential consequences of premature or delayed interventions." This is the first study to assess both the risk of Zika arrival to an area and the risk of local spread by mosquitoes. The flexibility of the model design means that as new information becomes available on Zika dynamics, epidemiology and biology it can be updated to help public health officials assess situational awareness, according to the researchers Assessing real-time Zika risk in the United States Spencer Fox et al. BMC Infectious Diseases May 2017 During embargo period, please contact Matthew Lam for a copy of the article. After the embargo lifts, the article will be available at the journal website here: https:/ Please name the journal in any story you write. If you are writing for the web, please link to the article. All articles are available free of charge, according to BioMed Central's open access policy. 2. BMC Infectious Diseases is an open access, peer-reviewed journal that considers articles on all aspects of the prevention, diagnosis and management of infectious and sexually transmitted diseases in humans, as well as related molecular genetics, pathophysiology, and epidemiology. 3. BioMed Central is an STM (Science, Technology and Medicine) publisher which has pioneered the open access publishing model. All peer-reviewed research articles published by BioMed Central are made immediately and freely accessible online, and are licensed to allow redistribution and reuse. BioMed Central is part of Springer Nature, a major new force in scientific, scholarly, professional and educational publishing, created in May 2015 through the combination of Nature Publishing Group, Palgrave Macmillan, Macmillan Education and Springer Science+Business Media. http://www.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Moye White LLP announced that Rachel Yeates has joined the Denver law firm as an associate in the Trial Section. She was previously an associate at Hall & Evans LLC. Denver, CO, April 19, 2017 --( Yeates was previously an associate at Hall & Evans in Denver, where she developed and implemented end-to-end litigation strategies, and tried cases in the Office of Administrative Courts. She also managed multiple projects and worked in a variety of practice areas, including business disputes, medical malpractice, professional malpractice, tort litigation and appeals. Prior to that, Yeates worked as a law clerk in a variety of offices including Colorado’s 20th Judicial, District Attorney’s Office; Colorado Attorney General’s DNA Justice Review Project; the Colorado Attorney General’s Appellate Division; and Lee + Kinder, LLC. Yeates is a 2012 graduate of the University of Denver’s Sturm College of Law, where she was a member of the Student Trial Lawyers Association, a copy editor of The Writ, the Sturm College of Law student newspaper and vice president of communications for the DU Law Ambassadors. She received a B.A. in English from the University of Texas at Austin. Yeates is a member of the Minoru Yasui Inn of Court. She is active in community affairs and is a board member and membership chair of the Colorado Symphony Remix Program for Young Professionals. Yeates is also a member of Inside OC, Opera Colorado’s Young Professionals Club, and of World Denver, whose mission is to strengthen and expand the community of engaged global citizens and organizations in Colorado. In her spare time, Yeates enjoys international travel and studying nineteenth century literature and military history. About Moye White LLP Moye White LLP is a business law firm serving clients throughout Colorado, North Dakota, the Rocky Mountain West, nationally and internationally. Moye White provides legal representation across a wide variety of transactional and litigation matters. The firm’s attorneys offer strategic, team-oriented counsel to public, private and governmental clients in complex business and real estate transactions and disputes. As a Certified B Corporation, Moye White meets rigorous standards of social and environmental performance, transparency and accountability. Moye White is a member of Ally Law, providing its clients with a reliable network of corporate law firms around the world. For more information, please visit www.moyewhite.com or contact Managing Partner Thomas List, at 303-292-2900 or tom.list@moyewhite.com. Denver, CO, April 19, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Moye White LLP announced that Rachel Yeates has joined the Denver law firm’s Trial Section as an associate.Yeates was previously an associate at Hall & Evans in Denver, where she developed and implemented end-to-end litigation strategies, and tried cases in the Office of Administrative Courts. She also managed multiple projects and worked in a variety of practice areas, including business disputes, medical malpractice, professional malpractice, tort litigation and appeals.Prior to that, Yeates worked as a law clerk in a variety of offices including Colorado’s 20th Judicial, District Attorney’s Office; Colorado Attorney General’s DNA Justice Review Project; the Colorado Attorney General’s Appellate Division; and Lee + Kinder, LLC.Yeates is a 2012 graduate of the University of Denver’s Sturm College of Law, where she was a member of the Student Trial Lawyers Association, a copy editor of The Writ, the Sturm College of Law student newspaper and vice president of communications for the DU Law Ambassadors.She received a B.A. in English from the University of Texas at Austin.Yeates is a member of the Minoru Yasui Inn of Court. She is active in community affairs and is a board member and membership chair of the Colorado Symphony Remix Program for Young Professionals. Yeates is also a member of Inside OC, Opera Colorado’s Young Professionals Club, and of World Denver, whose mission is to strengthen and expand the community of engaged global citizens and organizations in Colorado.In her spare time, Yeates enjoys international travel and studying nineteenth century literature and military history.About Moye White LLPMoye White LLP is a business law firm serving clients throughout Colorado, North Dakota, the Rocky Mountain West, nationally and internationally. Moye White provides legal representation across a wide variety of transactional and litigation matters. The firm’s attorneys offer strategic, team-oriented counsel to public, private and governmental clients in complex business and real estate transactions and disputes. As a Certified B Corporation, Moye White meets rigorous standards of social and environmental performance, transparency and accountability. Moye White is a member of Ally Law, providing its clients with a reliable network of corporate law firms around the world. For more information, please visit www.moyewhite.com or contact Managing Partner Thomas List, at 303-292-2900 or tom.list@moyewhite.com. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Moye White


SANTA MONICA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Cornerstone OnDemand (NASDAQ:CSOD), a global leader in cloud-based learning and human capital management software, today announced that Steffan Tomlinson, chief financial officer for Palo Alto Networks, Inc., and Dean Carter, vice president of human resources and shared services for Patagonia, Inc., have been elected to Cornerstone’s board of directors, effective as of May 3, 2017. Tomlinson oversees Palo Alto Networks’ finance, accounting, IT and manufacturing functions. Tomlinson also served as chief financial officer of Aruba Networks, Inc. and was instrumental in the company’s initial public offering, as well as in helping the company scale to facilitate growth. Prior to Aruba Networks, Tomlinson was the chief financial officer of Peribit Networks, Inc. Tomlinson earned an MBA from Santa Clara University and a BA from Trinity College. Carter leads Patagonia’s global HR, legal and finance shared services and, as an officer and a member of the company’s core leadership team, serves to further Patagonia’s unique business model, proving that companies can “do well and do good.” Prior to Patagonia, Carter was the chief human resources officer with Sears Holdings Corporation, Inc., a Fortune 50 company. Carter also served as chief human resources officer for Fossil, Inc. during a time of high growth and international expansion. Carter has a BS in Organizational Communication from the University of Texas at Austin and has served as a Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law Workforce Science Fellow. “ I’m thrilled to welcome Dean and Steffan to our board of directors. The addition of Dean’s extensive global human resources experience, along with Steffan’s deep financial and operational management background, will provide Cornerstone with valuable expertise to continue driving margin improvement and capitalize on the global market opportunity for cloud-based human capital management solutions,” said Adam Miller, Cornerstone’s CEO. “ Cornerstone’s technology innovation, human capital management expertise and unique vision for recruiting, training and managing people in the new world of work is inspiring, and I look forward to supporting the company’s success,” remarked Carter. “ It’s a privilege to join Cornerstone’s board of directors and provide guidance as the company makes strides in its operational excellence initiatives and scales key areas of the business to support continued growth and innovation,” commented Tomlinson. Cornerstone OnDemand (NASDAQ: CSOD) is a global leader in cloud-based learning human capital management software. The company is pioneering solutions to help organizations realize the potential of the modern workforce. From recruitment, onboarding, training and collaboration, to performance management, compensation, succession planning, people administration and analytics, Cornerstone is designed to enable a lifetime of learning and development that is fundamental to the growth of employees and organizations. Based in Santa Monica, California, the company’s solutions are used by nearly 3,000 clients worldwide, spanning more than 31 million users across 191 countries and 43 languages. To learn more about Cornerstone, visit us on Twitter, Facebook and our blog. www.cornerstoneondemand.com. Cornerstone® and Cornerstone OnDemand® are registered trademarks of Cornerstone OnDemand Inc.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

CAIRO and HOUSTON, May 8, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Apex International Energy (www.apexintl.com), an independent oil and gas exploration and production company focused on Egypt, today announced that it has expanded its global team with the appointments of Willis "Trey" Gilmore as Vice President of Corporate Reservoir Engineering in Houston and Raed Saba as Deputy General Manager and Exploration Manager in Cairo. Mr. Gilmore brings over 25 years of engineering, operations and leadership experience in the oil and gas industry and will contribute significant reserve evaluation and planning expertise to Apex. Mr. Saba has over 35 years of international oil and gas experience, including nearly three decades working for Shell in Egypt, Kazakhstan and the Netherlands. Thomas M. Maher, President and Chief Operating Officer of Apex International Energy, commented, "We are delighted to welcome Trey and Raed, who each bring extensive experience in the international oil and gas industry and will be valuable contributors to Apex's ongoing expansion." Roger B. Plank, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Apex International Energy, commented, "We are pleased with the progress Apex has made in our first year, including the expansion of our global team and the strong foothold we have established in Egypt.  We remain focused on scaling our business through new asset acquisitions and capital investments to deliver long-term, profitable growth in production and reserves." Trey Gilmore brings over 25 years of engineering, operations and leadership experience in the oil and gas industry.  He most recently served as Manager of Reserves at Sheridan Production Company, where he managed the corporation's reserve and reporting processes, working closely with the engineering, operations and accounting departments as well as external auditors.  Prior to that, Mr. Gilmore served as Vice President of Corporate Reserves and Planning at Fieldwood Energy. Previously, Mr. Gilmore held a variety of leadership roles at Apache Corporation.  He began his career as a Petroleum Engineer at Antelope Production Company and held a variety of engineering roles at Pacific Enterprises Oil Company USA and Hunt Oil Company. Mr. Gilmore received a bachelor's degree in Petroleum Engineering and an MBA from the University of Texas at Austin. Raed Saba has over 35 years of international oil and gas experience covering a wide spectrum of exploration activities including seismic acquisition operations and processing, geological studies and acreage evaluation, drill site maturation, well drilling operations and reserves calculation. He joined Shell in 1988, during his nearly 30-year career, Mr. Saba served in roles of increasing responsibility internationally, including Egypt, Kazakhstan and the Netherlands.  Most recently, Mr. Saba was the Government Relations Manager and Senior Country Advisor for Shell in Egypt, where he oversaw all of Shell's exploration activity in onshore and offshore concessions and producing fields. Mr. Saba began his career as a Seismic Observer and Weathering Seismologist for Western Geophysical Company, and also served as a Seismic Interpreter for Total Proche Orient in Egypt and Total Oil Marine Aberdeen before joining Shell. Mr. Saba received his bachelor's degree with honors in Geology and Geophysics from Cairo University. Apex International Energy is an independent oil and gas exploration and production company focused on Egypt and backed by Warburg Pincus, a global private equity firm focused on growth investing.  Apex International Energy plans to build an exploration and production business of scale through asset acquisitions and capital investments in drilling, infrastructure and production enhancement to deliver long-term profitable growth in production and reserves. Apex International Energy is also pursuing acreage transactions including farm-ins and new concession bid rounds. Apex was recently awarded 1.7 million acres in the prolific Abu Gharadig Basin by the Egyptian General Petroleum Company (EGPC) from their 2016 Bid Round. For more information, please visit www.apexintl.com.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Recurrence (http://www.recurrenceinc.com), a software startup that is revolutionizing the way critical thinking skills are taught in higher education, has signed its largest customer, the University of Texas at Austin. The company has developed a business simulation, called The Signature Case Study, in which students enact various high-level executive roles, such as CEO or CFO, as they guide an airline through a series of challenges and crises, each of which is based on real-world data. Working as a team, students make crucial decisions, from business strategy to budgeting, that will determine the fate of the airline. Furthermore, the business simulation is easy for instructors to implement and students to use. “I tried the game as extra credit last semester in my online class,” says Mihran Aroian, a lecturer at the University of Texas McCombs School of Business. “As my online class evolves, I want to be able to offer a more interactive student experience and allow students to utilize some of the concepts and skills that are taught in the course. The response was so overwhelmingly positive that I implemented the simulation into the curriculum for all of my online classes this semester.” One student commented, “To complete the simulation, we needed to interact with other people and then see what happened. It really put us in a real-life situation where sometimes decisions are tough and unpredictable. This gave us a real-life experience and enabled us to understand that the decision-making process is complex, requires knowledge about many different aspects, and requires the courage to make a decision.” “We are truly excited to be working with Professor Aroian and the University of Texas at Austin,” said Rob Savette, COO of Recurrence. “Such forward thinking teachers and institutions will be the drivers of innovation in 21st Century education. We feel privileged to have them on board.” The business simulation is currently used in many prestigious universities across the nation, such as the University of Washington, the University of Colorado (Boulder), Penn State University, and Florida International University.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

NEWARK, Del.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sallie Mae, the nation’s saving, planning, and paying for college company, today announced the winners of the “Make College Happen Challenge,” the contest which asked high school students to describe creatively their plan to pay for college. Blake Takushi of Sugar Land, Texas, took home the top prize of $15,000; second-place winner Gabriel Gaurano of San Diego, California, won $10,000; and third-place winner Amy Wisegarver of Sammamish, Washington, won $8,000. The winners, along with the seven other finalists, each of whom received $1,000, were revealed during a special event on Facebook Live. More than 1,100 students from across the country entered the “Make College Happen Challenge,” with creative entries that included videos, rap songs, poems, essays, and other creative forms. A panel of judges narrowed the field to 10 finalists based on creativity, effective communication, and potential of the plan. Voting was then opened to the public, who cast more than 35,000 votes for their favorite entries. Grand-prize winner Blake Takushi, 18, is a senior and honor student-athlete at Kempner High School in Sugar Land, Texas. He plans to pursue a degree in mechanical engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. Blake submitted an engaging video that provided practical advice about planning for college, including taking advanced placement courses to earn college credits while still in high school, exploring dual-enrollment opportunities through local community colleges, working part-time to save money, applying for scholarships, and borrowing responsibly to make college happen. Second-place winner Gabriel Gaurano, a senior at Canyon Crest Academy in San Diego, California, is already following his dream of becoming a filmmaker. The 17-year-old filmmaker combined both suspense and humor in his video submission, providing tips for making college happen, such as working part-time, searching and applying for scholarships, and completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Gaurano also provided practical personal finance tips to help young people understand their finances and manage their budgets. Third-place winner Amy Wisegarver, 18, is a senior at Eastlake High School in Sammamish, Washington. She plans to study graphic design in college. An entrepreneur — she’s already started her own line of T-shirts — and musician, Wisegarver wrote, produced, and performed a song about her dream of attending college and her efforts to make that happen, which included winning scholarships, completing the FAFSA, and working. “The ‘Make College Happen Challenge’ goes hand-in-hand with our mission here at Sallie Mae,” said Martha Holler, senior vice president, Sallie Mae. “It’s especially gratifying to see these young people embrace the challenge of planning for college not only creatively, but also practically, providing real-world advice to their peers who may be on this same journey. Their excitement during our Facebook Live event was priceless. Congratulations to all the winners. You inspire the students and families out there working hard to make college happen.” Sallie Mae conducted the “Make College Happen Challenge” in partnership with By Kids For Kids, a leader in education that inspires innovation in youth. “We are thrilled to once again be working with Sallie Mae to help students plan for college,” said Norm Goldstein, founder and CEO, By Kids For Kids. “We were blown away by this year’s entries and the overwhelming response from the public, who cast even more votes than last year. We congratulate not just the winners, but all the contest participants who are taking the right steps to turn their college dreams into reality.” Sallie Mae also awarded $1,000 to the following “Make College Happen Challenge” winners who rounded out the top 10 finalists: Join the conversation on social media using #MakeCollegeHappenChallenge. For complete contest rules, visit MakeCollegeHappenChallenge.com/rules. For more information about saving, planning, and paying for college, visit www.SallieMae.com. Sallie Mae (Nasdaq: SLM) is the nation’s saving, planning, and paying for college company. Whether college is a long way off or just around the corner, Sallie Mae offers products that promote responsible personal finance, including private education loans, Upromise rewards, scholarship search, college financial planning tools, and online retail banking. Learn more at SallieMae.com. Commonly known as Sallie Mae, SLM Corporation and its subsidiaries are not sponsored by or agencies of the United States of America.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Mr. Saba has over 35 years of international oil and gas experience, including nearly three decades working for Shell in Egypt, Kazakhstan and the Netherlands. Thomas M. Maher, President and Chief Operating Officer of Apex International Energy, commented, "We are delighted to welcome Trey and Raed, who each bring extensive experience in the international oil and gas industry and will be valuable contributors to Apex's ongoing expansion." Roger B. Plank, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Apex International Energy, commented, "We are pleased with the progress Apex has made in our first year, including the expansion of our global team and the strong foothold we have established in Egypt.  We remain focused on scaling our business through new asset acquisitions and capital investments to deliver long-term, profitable growth in production and reserves." Trey Gilmore brings over 25 years of engineering, operations and leadership experience in the oil and gas industry.  He most recently served as Manager of Reserves at Sheridan Production Company, where he managed the corporation's reserve and reporting processes, working closely with the engineering, operations and accounting departments as well as external auditors.  Prior to that, Mr. Gilmore served as Vice President of Corporate Reserves and Planning at Fieldwood Energy. Previously, Mr. Gilmore held a variety of leadership roles at Apache Corporation.  He began his career as a Petroleum Engineer at Antelope Production Company and held a variety of engineering roles at Pacific Enterprises Oil Company USA and Hunt Oil Company. Mr. Gilmore received a bachelor's degree in Petroleum Engineering and an MBA from the University of Texas at Austin. Raed Saba has over 35 years of international oil and gas experience covering a wide spectrum of exploration activities including seismic acquisition operations and processing, geological studies and acreage evaluation, drill site maturation, well drilling operations and reserves calculation. He joined Shell in 1988, during his nearly 30-year career, Mr. Saba served in roles of increasing responsibility internationally, including Egypt, Kazakhstan and the Netherlands.  Most recently, Mr. Saba was the Government Relations Manager and Senior Country Advisor for Shell in Egypt, where he oversaw all of Shell's exploration activity in onshore and offshore concessions and producing fields. Mr. Saba began his career as a Seismic Observer and Weathering Seismologist for Western Geophysical Company, and also served as a Seismic Interpreter for Total Proche Orient in Egypt and Total Oil Marine Aberdeen before joining Shell. Mr. Saba received his bachelor's degree with honors in Geology and Geophysics from Cairo University. Apex International Energy is an independent oil and gas exploration and production company focused on Egypt and backed by Warburg Pincus, a global private equity firm focused on growth investing.  Apex International Energy plans to build an exploration and production business of scale through asset acquisitions and capital investments in drilling, infrastructure and production enhancement to deliver long-term profitable growth in production and reserves. Apex International Energy is also pursuing acreage transactions including farm-ins and new concession bid rounds. Apex was recently awarded 1.7 million acres in the prolific Abu Gharadig Basin by the Egyptian General Petroleum Company (EGPC) from their 2016 Bid Round. For more information, please visit www.apexintl.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/apex-international-energy-welcomes-two-new-leaders-300452351.html


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: phys.org

A sugar cube serves as a template for new stretchable, sponge-like, graphene-based battery electrodes. Credit: Li et al. ©2017 WILEY-VCH (Phys.org)—Scientists have used sugar cubes as a template for synthesizing stretchable battery electrodes, which serve as a key component in newly designed stretchable yet mechanically robust sodium-ion batteries. Although there has recently been a great deal of research on stretchable batteries, usually these devices still contain some rigid components. By using electrodes templated on sugar cubes, the new battery is one of the first sodium-ion batteries whose components are all fully stretchable. The scientists, led by Guihua Yu at the University of Texas at Austin, have published a paper on the new stretchable batteries in a recent issue of Advanced Materials. By starting with sugar cubes, the researchers were able to obtain the size, shape, and porosity needed for high-performance battery electrodes. The researchers first placed ordinary sugar cubes on top of a polymer gel in a dish. After the dish was placed in a vacuum, heated in an oven, and washed, the sugar was dissolved away and the polymer gel took its place, resulting in stretchable polymer sponges. The pores of the polymer sponges were then filled with a conductive graphene-based solution to create "sponge electrodes," which the researchers achieved by immersing the sponges in the solution and squeezing them several times to soak it up. As the researchers explained, the sponge's porous architecture provides a combination of stretchability, mechanical strength, fast sodium-ion transport, and large storage capacity. Tests showed that the full battery can be stretched to 50% beyond its original length, and that the strain is limited by the intrinsic properties of the polymer material. The researchers expect that modifying the polymer or developing a new nanoarchitectured elastomer could further increase the stretchability of the battery. "This first-of-its-kind battery design maintains better mechanical properties compared with most reported designs using one or more rigid components that fail to meet the stretchability requirement for the entire device," Yu told Phys.org. "Moreover, the demonstrated electrochemical performance rivals most previously reported stretchable energy systems. This novel stretchable sodium-ion battery represents a promising alternative for the next generation of energy-storage technologies in a broad range of applications." In its current form, the battery retains nearly 90% of its capacity after 100 cycles of stretching to 50% strain. This performance is sufficient to enable the researchers to mount the stretchable battery on an elbow brace, and demonstrate that the battery continues to power an LED when the user's arm is bent at different angles. The stretchable battery has potential applications in conformable health monitoring skin sensors, wearable communication devices, roll-up displays, and implantable medical devices. In the future, the researchers plan to make further improvements to the battery, such as extending the lifetime and scaling up the design to larger-sized batteries. They anticipate that the sponge design can also be extended to other types of devices, such as energy-harvesting devices. "Future directions will be focused on further improving the mechanical properties and electrochemical performance, along with lowering the manufacturing cost," Yu said. Explore further: Making sodium-ion batteries that last More information: Hongsen Li et al. "An All-Stretchable-Component Sodium-Ion Full Battery." Advanced Materials. DOI: 10.1002/adma.201700898


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLUMBUS, Ohio - More than half of breast cancer patients (57 percent) undergoing mastectomy lack the necessary medical knowledge to make a high-quality decision about reconstructive surgery that aligns with their personal goals, suggesting a trend toward overtreatment, according to a new study conducted by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James). "High-quality" decisions were defined as those that demonstrated adequate medical knowledge of treatment choices - including associated risks - and that also matched with the patient's specific goals and preferences for choosing whether or not to pursue reconstructive surgery. Researchers say shared decision-making tools are needed to help women make decisions based on a full understanding of treatment choices and associated risks alongside their personal goals for surgery. Researchers report the findings online first in the medical journal JAMA Surgery May 3, 2017. In this observational, single-institution study, researchers sought to evaluate the quality of 126 adult breast cancer patients' decisions about breast reconstruction after mastectomy. All patients had stage I-III invasive ductal/lobular breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or were having preventive mastectomies. The majority of patients (73 percent) had early-stage disease. Researchers measured study participants' medical knowledge about mastectomy and mastectomy with reconstruction -- for example, effects of surgery on appearance and associated risks. They also measured individual preferences of what mattered most to patients. Key preference factors included breast appearance/shape post treatment, length of recovery time and risk for complications. "We found that less than half of the women had adequate medical knowledge about breast reconstruction and made a choice that aligned with their personal preferences. This is very concerning to us, because it means that some women did not get the treatment they truly preferred, and quite a few had more treatment than they preferred," says Clara Lee, MD, principal investigator of the study and a breast reconstructive surgeon at The OSUCCC - James. Lee holds a dual associate professor appointment in the colleges of medicine and public health at Ohio State. "Many women were quite concerned about complication risks, but they didn't actually know how high the risk was. This may explain some of the overtreatment that we saw," she adds. Researchers found that only 43 percent of the patients in the study demonstrated an understanding of at least half of the important facts about reconstruction and made a choice that was consistent with their preferences. Understanding of surgical complications was particularly low, with only 14 percent of patients demonstrating strong knowledge of associated risks. "As breast cancer providers, we need to talk about the pros and cons of surgery to help women make treatment choices. Shared decision-making between the surgeon and patient would be particularly useful for this decision. We need to connect patients with decision aids to help them really think through what is most important to them," Lee adds. Collaborators in this National Cancer Institute-funded study include Allison Deal, MD, and Ruth Huh, BA, of Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill; Michael Pignone, MD, MPH, of University of Texas at Austin; and Peter Ubel, MD, of Duke University. "The interesting thing is that these findings are not unique to breast reconstruction," adds Pignone, study coauthor and chair of the Department of Internal Medicine at the Dell Medical School at The University of Texas at Austin. "In other places where we've looked at decision quality, we see gaps in patients' understanding of key information and poor alignment between the things they care most about and the treatments that they choose. It means that we need to do a much better job of providing decision support to patients, so that the care they get is, ultimately, the care they want." Lee and colleagues in Ohio State's colleges of engineering, communication and public health are working on a study to evaluate treatment decisions in early-stage breast cancer patients to assess how communication with their providers affects their decision-making. This ongoing study examines patients' knowledge, preferences, and expectations about future well-being. Information from this study is expected to help clinicians develop tools to aid patients in making an informed decision about their care. The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 47 National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only a few centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials on novel anticancer drugs sponsored by the NCI. As the cancer program's 308-bed adult patient-care component, The James is one of the top cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S. News & World Report and has achieved Magnet designation, the highest honor an organization can receive for quality patient care and professional nursing practice. At 21 floors and with more than 1.1 million square feet, The James is a transformational facility that fosters collaboration and integration of cancer research and clinical cancer care. Learn more at cancer.osu.edu.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

More than half of breast cancer patients (57 percent) undergoing mastectomy lack the necessary medical knowledge to make a high-quality decision about reconstructive surgery that aligns with their personal goals, suggesting a trend toward overtreatment, according to a new study conducted at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center -- Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James). "High-quality" decisions were defined as those that demonstrated adequate medical knowledge of treatment choices -- including associated risks -- and that also matched with the patient's specific goals and preferences for choosing whether or not to pursue reconstructive surgery. Researchers say shared decision-making tools are needed to help women make decisions based on a full understanding of treatment choices and associated risks alongside their personal goals for surgery. Researchers report the findings online first in the medical journal JAMA Surgery May 3, 2017. In this observational, single-institution study, researchers sought to evaluate the quality of 126 adult breast cancer patients' decisions about breast reconstruction after mastectomy. All patients had stage I-III invasive ductal/lobular breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or were having preventive mastectomies, and the majority (73 percent) had early-stage disease. Researchers measured study participants' medical knowledge about mastectomy and mastectomy with reconstruction -- for example, effects of surgery on appearance and associated risks. They also measured individual preferences of what mattered most to patients. Key preference factors included breast appearance/shape post treatment, length of recovery time and risk for complications. "We found that less than half of the women had adequate medical knowledge about breast reconstruction and made a choice that aligned with their personal preferences. This is very concerning to us, because it means that some women did not get the treatment they truly preferred, and quite a few had more treatment than they preferred," says Clara Lee, MD, principal investigator of the study and a breast reconstructive surgeon at The OSUCCC - James. Lee holds a dual associate professor appointment in the colleges of medicine and public health at Ohio State. "Many women were quite concerned about complication risks, but they didn't actually know how high the risk was. This may explain some of the overtreatment that we saw," she adds. Researchers found that only 43 percent of the patients in the study demonstrated an understanding of at least half of the important facts about reconstruction and made a choice that was consistent with their preferences. Understanding of surgical complications was particularly low, with only 14 percent of patients demonstrating strong knowledge of associated risks. "As breast cancer providers, we need to talk about the pros and cons of surgery to help women make treatment choices. Shared decision-making between the surgeon and patient would be particularly useful for this decision. We need to connect patients with decision aids to help them really think through what is most important to them," Lee adds. Collaborators in this National Cancer Institute-funded study include Allison Deal, MD, and Ruth Huh, BA, of Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill; Michael Pignone, MD, MPH, of University of Texas at Austin; and Peter Ubel, MD, of Duke University. Lee and colleagues in Ohio State's colleges of engineering, communication and public health are working on a study to evaluate treatment decisions in early-stage breast cancer patients to assess how communication with their providers affects their decision-making. This ongoing study examines patients' knowledge, preferences, and expectations about future well-being. Information from this study is expected to help clinicians develop tools to aid patients in making an informed decision about their care. The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute strives to create a cancer-free world by integrating scientific research with excellence in education and patient-centered care, a strategy that leads to better methods of prevention, detection and treatment. Ohio State is one of only 47 National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers and one of only a few centers funded by the NCI to conduct both phase I and phase II clinical trials on novel anticancer drugs sponsored by the NCI. As the cancer program's 308-bed adult patient-care component, The James is one of the top cancer hospitals in the nation as ranked by U.S. News & World Report and has achieved Magnet designation, the highest honor an organization can receive for quality patient care and professional nursing practice. At 21 floors and with more than 1.1 million square feet, The James is a transformational facility that fosters collaboration and integration of cancer research and clinical cancer care. Learn more at cancer.osu.edu.


"These four up-and-coming artists have strong choreographic voices," said Jaffe. "We are proud to offer them a groundbreaking career opportunity to develop new works as we launch our UNCSA Choreographic Institute." Announced in February 2017, the two-track Choreographic Institute includes both the Development Residency and the Professional Residency. Jaffe and former Dean of Dance Ethan Stiefel, both former principal dancers with American Ballet Theatre, are the first professional residents, who will work with invited professional dancers for two weeks to research choreographic ideas or build toward new works. The institute's second track, the Development Residency, includes individual mentorship by Visiting Distinguished Artist Helen Pickett, who is resident choreographer for Atlanta Ballet. In addition to mentoring by Pickett, the choreographers will participate in daily technique classes, workshops and lectures led by esteemed UNCSA Summer Dance faculty and guests, and will hold afternoon rehearsals with their cast of dancers selected from the Summer Dance Intensives. In the evenings, residents will have access to UNCSA's studios for further choreographic research. The residencies will culminate in a fully produced performance of the new works. Kyle Davis trained at Makaroff School of Ballet and at Rock School for Dance Education and UNCSA. He joined PNB as an apprentice in 2008 and was promoted to corps de ballet in 2009 and soloist in 2016. In 2008, he won the Prix de Lausanne competition in Switzerland. He also won various awards in the Youth American Grand Prix Regional and Finals in 2005 and 2006. Marielis Garcia is a member of the Brian Brooks Moving Company and Peter Kyle Dance. In 2016, she premiered MG DanceArts. Garcia earned her B.F.A. in Dance from Marymount Manhattan College. She has danced with ODC of San Francisco, City Dance Ensemble, Douglas Dunn, Stefanie Battan Bland and Steps Repertory Ensemble, and toured South Africa teaching and performing with Ikapa Dance Theater. She teaches at Rutgers University, The Washington Heights Community Conservatory of Fine Arts and in New York City public schools. Charlotte Griffin's repertory has been commissioned by Juilliard Dance Ensemble,  Hartt School Dance Division, BJM Danse in Montreal, Danza UDLAP, Barcelona Institut del Teatre, Juilliard Summer Intensive, Peridance Professional Trainees, Princeton University and Rutgers University. She has created ballets at the New York Choreographic Institute, at the American Ballet Theatre Summer Intensive in Austin, and for Eliot Feld's Ballet Tech Kids Dance. Current projects include Bum Phillips All-American Opera for La MaMa's Ellen Stewart Theater in New York and The Cambrians' Empress Archer remix project, which premiered in Chicago in January 2017. Griffin studied with the American Dance Festival from 1994-1996. She has been a guest artist at ArcDanz in Mexico, Springboard Danse Montreal, The Yard, Cayman Island Arts Festival, and the Bates Dance Festival. Her award-winning dance films, BAREFOOT NEGOTIATIONS (2009) and RAVEN STUDY (2007), have screened internationally. Griffin received her B.F.A. in Dance from The Juilliard School and her M.F.A. in Dance from the University of Texas at Austin. She has taught at Marymount Manhattan College and Bowdoin College, and has offered master classes in Mexico, Spain, the Czech Republic, and South Korea.  Griffin is assistant professor of dance at the University of California, Irvine. Mari Meade graduated from the New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts and UNCSA. In 2009, she started Mari Meade Dance Collective (MMDC). Since that time, she has been an Artist-in-Residence at Chez Bushwick and Lake Studios Berlin (Germany). Meade's work has been shown at Lincoln Center, Danspace St. Mark's Church, STUFFED at Judson Memorial Church, FLICfest, Battery Dance Festival, New Orleans Fringe Festival, and Katlehong Arts Center (South Africa). In New York, she has danced for Dana Salisbury and the no-see-ums, Amanda Hinchey & Dancers, Celia Rowlson-Hall, CJ Holm, touche pas, and Barbie Diewald. She is currently a teaching artist for New York City Ballet and Dancing Classrooms. Helen Pickett has created more than 30 ballets in the United States and Europe. She  has twice been named the best choreographer in Atlanta.  In 2007, she was named to Dance Magazine's list of "25 to Watch."  She received a Choreographic Residency from Jacob's Pillow in 2008, and was one of the first recipients of the Jerome Robbins Foundation's New Essential Works Grant. She was nominated for an Isadora Duncan Dance award in 2013. She earned a Master of Fine Arts from Hollins University in 2011. Since 2005, she has guest starred in William Forsythe's award-winning postmodern ballet Impressing the Czar for the Royal Ballet of Flanders and Dresden Ballet in Germany. She has also performed the work in France, England, Scotland and China, and at the Lincoln Center Festival in New York. The University of North Carolina School of the Arts is America's first state-supported arts school, a unique stand-alone public university of arts conservatories. With a high school component, UNCSA is a degree-granting institution that trains young people of talent in dance, design and production, drama, filmmaking, and music. Established by the N.C. General Assembly in 1963, the School of the Arts opened in Winston-Salem ("The City of Arts and Innovation") in 1965 and became part of the University of North Carolina system when it was formed in 1972. For more information, visit www.uncsa.edu. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/unc-school-of-the-arts-announces-four-inaugural-choreographic-development-residents-for-summer-institute-300446703.html SOURCE University of North Carolina School of the Arts


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

Robert Taylor, a computer scientist who was instrumental in the creation of the internet and modern computer, has died. He was 85. Taylor, who had suffered from Parkinson's disease, died Thursday at his home in Woodside, California, his son Kurt told The New York Times. While many people played a role in building the internet, few made as many contributions as Taylor. As a researcher for the Pentagon's Advanced Research Projects Agency in 1966, Taylor was frustrated that he had to use three separate terminals to communicate with researchers through incompatible computer systems. His solution was Arpanet, a single computer network to link each project with the others that would evolve into what we now know as the internet. Taylor correctly predicted the network would one day become an efficient and necessary utility for the public. "In a few years, men will be able to communicate more effectively through a machine than face to face," he wrote in a 1968 paper. In 1970, Taylor moved on to Xerox's famous Palo Alto Research Center, where he oversaw design and creation of the Alto, considered a pioneer in personal computers. The Alto was the first computer designed to support an operating system based on a graphical user interface, a concept to be copied by the operating systems that would follow. Taylor's team also developed the networking technology Ethernet and a what-you-see-is-what-you-get word processing program called Bravo that would become the basis for Microsoft Word. Taylor also played a key role in the creation of the computer mouse. While serving as a project manager for NASA in 1961, Taylor learned of research into interaction between humans and computers being conducted by computer scientist Douglas Engelbart at the Stanford Research Institute. Taylor directed more funding to the research, leading to the creation of the computer mouse, which became a key element of both Macintosh and Microsoft Windows-based computers. In the 1980s, Taylor formed and ran the Digital Equipment Systems Research Laboratory in Palo Alto, which, among other technologies, developed the AltaVista search engine in 1995 -- two years before Google was founded. Taylor was born in Dallas on Feb. 10, 1932. He began attending Southern Methodist University at the age of 16 but considered himself "not a serious student." (PDF) After serving in the US Navy Reserve during the Korean War, Taylor returned to his studies, earning bachelor's and master's degrees in psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. In 1999, Taylor was awarded the National Medal of Technology and Innovation "for visionary leadership in the development of modern computing technology, including computer networks, the personal computer and the graphical user interface." In 2004, he and other PARC researchers were awarded the National Academy of Engineering's Draper Prize for development of "the first practical networked personal computers." Batteries Not Included: The CNET team shares experiences that remind us why tech stuff is cool. CNET Magazine: Check out a sampling of the stories you'll find in CNET's newsstand edition.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Whereas humans can look at a complex landscape like a mountain vista and almost immediately orient themselves to navigate its multiple regions over long distances, other mammals such as rodents orient relative to physical cues—like approaching and sniffing a wall—that build up over time. This ability to navigate our surroundings and understand our relative position includes an environment-dependent scaling mechanism, according to a new study. “Our research, based on human data, redefines the fundamental properties of the internal coordinate system,” says Zoltan Nadasdy, lead author of the study and an adjunct assistant professor in the University of Texas at Austin’s psychology department. Nadasdy is also a researcher at Eötvös Loránd University and the Sarah Cannon Research Institute at St. David’s Medical Center. “Dysfunction in this system causes memory problems and disorientation, such as we see in Alzheimer’s disease and age-related decline. So, it’s vital that we continue to further our understanding of this part of the brain,” he says. Through a partnership with Seton Healthcare Family, the researchers in the UT Austin Human Brain Stimulation and Electrophysiology Lab were able to measure relevant brain activity of epileptic patients whose diagnostic procedure requires that they have electrodes planted in the entorhinal cortex of the brain. Neurons there serve as the internal coordinate system for humans. (The brains of individuals with epilepsy function normally when not undergoing a seizure.) Patients performed a virtual navigation task on a tablet computer in four environments daily for seven to eight consecutive days. By measuring their brain activity, the researchers identified three previously unknown traits of the system: The findings illuminate the fabric of the human memory and spatial navigation, which are vulnerable to disease and deterioration. Deeper knowledge of these neuronal mechanisms can inform the development of techniques to prolong the health of this part of the brain and combat diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, builds on earlier Nobel Prize-winning research exploring the entorhinal cortex of rodents. Due to the differences discovered between the human and rodent systems of navigation, the researchers emphasize that generalizing results from studies on animal subjects may provide inaccurate conjectures. This study is one of the few on human subjects that report on the activity of individual neuron behavior, says György Buzsáki, an expert from New York University Medical Center who was not involved in the research. “They not only confirm a previous report but extend the findings by showing that the size of the neuronal representation by entorhinal grid cells scales with the environment,” Buzsáki says. “Our hypothesis is challenging the definition of a universal spatial scale of environment predominant in lower mammals, which may open up important avenues of discovery,” says Robert Buchanan, another lead author of the study and an associate professor at Dell Medical School. He is also an adjunct associate professor in the university’s psychology department and a chief of neurosurgery at Seton Brain and Spine Institute. “Now, we can continue to explore this key component of what it means to be human—how we think about our past and future, how we imagine and plan,” Buchanan says. By using virtual reality, the researchers also refined a new experimental technology for facilitating spatial experiences that can’t be reproduced in a laboratory. The data implies that humans can seamlessly switch between reality and virtual reality—a finding that can be applied in other studies of the brain. Additional coauthors are from Baylor College of Medicine; Eötvös Loránd University and Hungarian Academy of Sciences; and UT Austin’s Dell Medical School and Seton Brain and Spine Institute. The Brain and Behavior Research Foundation and the Seton Seed Grant for Research supported the work.


Ward W.L.,University of Oregon | Ward W.L.,University of Texas at Austin | Plakos K.,University of Oregon | Derose V.J.,University of Oregon
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2014

RNA-assisted catalysis by ribozymes plays select but critical roles in nature. Despite seemingly restricted diversity in chemical properties, the sequence and structural diversity available to RNA supports selective positioning of reactants and metal-ion and other cofactors, along with providing general acid and base properties and fine-tuning of environmental pKa values. Early concepts of RNA as a scaffold for Mg2+-ion catalysts have evolved to a continuum of metal-ion participation in RNA catalysis, with active sites showing a range of interactions that span an absence of direct metal-ion interactions to precisely positioned clusters of three or more specific cations. In the context of the vast counterion atmosphere supported by nucleic acids and the potential nonspecific reactivity of metal ions in backbone hydrolysis, it is amazing that RNAs have evolved to selectively harness metal ions for function and that naturally occurring sequences of both RNA and DNA have evaded unwanted reactivities.


Wang K.,Beijing Normal University | Dickinson R.E.,University of Texas at Austin
Reviews of Geophysics | Year: 2012

This review surveys the basic theories, observational methods, satellite algorithms, and land surface models for terrestrial evapotranspiration, E (or E, i.e., latent heat flux), including a long-term variability and trends perspective. The basic theories used to estimate E are the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST), the Bowen ratio method, and the Penman-Monteith equation. The latter two theoretical expressions combine MOST with surface energy balance. Estimates of E can differ substantially between these three approaches because of their use of different input data. Surface and satellite-based measurement systems can provide accurate estimates of diurnal, daily, and annual variability of E. But their estimation of longer time variability is largely not established. A reasonable estimate of E as a global mean can be obtained from a surface water budget method, but its regional distribution is still rather uncertain. Current land surface models provide widely different ratios of the transpiration by vegetation to total E. This source of uncertainty therefore limits the capability of models to provide the sensitivities of E to precipitation deficits and land cover change. © 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.


Mueller U.G.,University of Texas at Austin | Sachs J.L.,University of California at Riverside
Trends in Microbiology | Year: 2015

Animal and plant microbiomes encompass diverse microbial communities that colonize every accessible host tissue. These microbiomes enhance host functions, contributing to host health and fitness. A novel approach to improve animal and plant fitness is to artificially select upon microbiomes, thus engineering evolved microbiomes with specific effects on host fitness. We call this engineering approach host-mediated microbiome selection, because this method selects upon microbial communities indirectly through the host and leverages host traits that evolved to influence microbiomes. In essence, host phenotypes are used as probes to gauge and manipulate those microbiome functions that impact host fitness. To facilitate research on host-mediated microbiome engineering, we explain and compare the principal methods to impose artificial selection on microbiomes; discuss advantages and potential challenges of each method; offer a skeptical appraisal of each method in light of these potential challenges; and outline experimental strategies to optimize microbiome engineering. Finally, we develop a predictive framework for microbiome engineering that organizes research around principles of artificial selection, quantitative genetics, and microbial community-ecology. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Rodriguez R.,CNRS Natural Product Chemistry Institute | Rodriguez R.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Miller K.M.,University of Texas at Austin
Nature Reviews Genetics | Year: 2014

Small molecules-including various approved and novel cancer therapeutics-can operate at the genomic level by targeting the DNA and protein components of chromatin. Emerging evidence suggests that functional interactions between small molecules and the genome are non-stochastic and are influenced by a dynamic interplay between DNA sequences and chromatin states. The establishment of genome-wide maps of small-molecule targets using unbiased methodologies can help to characterize and exploit drug responses. In this Review, we discuss how high-throughput sequencing strategies, such as ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing) and Chem-seq (chemical affinity capture and massively parallel DNA sequencing), are enabling the comprehensive identification of small-molecule target sites throughout the genome, thereby providing insights into unanticipated drug effects.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.94K | Year: 2016

Hydraulic fractures must be contained within the target formation so that they do not contact and potentially contaminate sources of drinking water. To mitigate this risk, research is needed to develop technologies that will advance our ability to diagnose, quantify, and map hydraulic fractures and thus help mitigate the danger that hydraulic fracturing results in the contamination of subsurface potable water reservoirs. Specifically, the challenge is to develop a new technology to more accurately and cost effectively characterize the dimensions, orientation, and proppant distribution of hydraulic fractures in near real time as well as provide long-term monitoring capabilities of these same parameters in cased wells. Currently, induction tools that are placed in the wellbore to make measurements are severely limited in sensing and resolution capabilities. How Problem will be addressed: This research will lead to the development and commercialization of a fracture diagnostics tool capable of measuring the size of propped fractures (with electrically conductive proppant) in cased wells that can be operated during the fracturing operation, or at any time during the well's lifecycle to ensure that underground potable water sources are not contaminated. The basic tool design will also support production monitoring capabilities such as temperature and pressure measurement/logging. Specifically, this project will investigate and develop a modular electrode-based resistivity tool to be used for in-situ measurement of fracture diagnostics in steel-cased wellbores. The tool will be designed to be integrally installed within a production zone casing string and run-in and cemented as part of a multistage cased-borehole fracturing operation. It will use signals generated by locally energizing the casing using sliding sleeves and gap subs. The system will be developed by using novel computational models and methods that will be able to predict the response of fractures to signals generated by locally energized casing. During Phase I, a novel simulator will be developed and preliminary analyses will be performed to investigate the feasibility of the system and to characterize a system design specification. Subsequently, the design parameters will be verified via model based simulations. Additional specifications will be developed during Phase I to ensure mechanical packaging design to be usable as a commercial industrial tool. At the end of Phase I, a system specification will be complete allowing prototype system design and commercialization testing to be accomplished during a Phase II effort. In Phase II, a modular and scalable tool will be prototyped and tested that is capable of operation based on the number of fracture zones required for each deployed application. It is anticipated that the inter-module communications/command infrastructure will be implemented using a mesh network topology, controlled from the surface via a master controller node with multiple downhole modular nodes acting as both router/repeaters and end-devices within the network. It is possible that the physical layer for the network could consist of fiber optic or coaxial cable attached to the casing during make-up and run-in. Also, wireless EM telemetry infrastructure options will be investigated as part of the development of the system specification. At the completion of Phase II development and operational testing of a commercial tool can immediately commence. Key Words: Fracture Diagnostics, Hydraulic Fracturing, Fracking, water contamination, environmental monitoring, potable water, resistivity tool, proppant, induction tool, fracture mapping, conductive proppant, cased well,


Stachowiak J.C.,University of Texas at Austin | Brodsky F.M.,University of California at San Francisco | Miller E.A.,Columbia University
Nature Cell Biology | Year: 2013

Many cellular membrane-bound structures exhibit distinct curvature that is driven by the physical properties of their lipid and protein constituents. Here we review how cells manipulate and control this curvature in the context of dynamic events such as vesicle-mediated membrane traffic. Lipids and cargo proteins each contribute energy barriers that must be overcome during vesicle formation. In contrast, protein coats and their associated accessory proteins drive membrane bending using a variety of interdependent physical mechanisms. We survey the energy costs and drivers involved in membrane curvature, and draw a contrast between the stochastic contributions of molecular crowding and the deterministic assembly of protein coats. These basic principles also apply to other cellular examples of membrane bending events, including important disease-related problems such as viral egress. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Pesin D.,University of Washington | Pesin D.,Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics | Pesin D.,University of Texas at Austin | Balents L.,Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics
Nature Physics | Year: 2010

Recent theory and experiment have revealed that strong spin-orbit coupling can have marked qualitative effects on the band structure of weakly interacting solids, leading to a distinct phase of matter, the topological band insulator. We show that spin-orbit interaction also has quantitative and qualitative effects on the correlation-driven Mott insulator transition. Taking Ir-based pyrochlores as a specific example, we predict that for weak electron-electron interaction Ir electrons are in metallic and topological band insulator phases at weak and strong spin-orbit interaction, respectively. We show that by increasing the electron-electron interaction strength, the effects of spin-orbit coupling are enhanced. With increasing interactions, the topological band insulator is transformed into a topological Mott insulator phase having gapless surface spin-only excitations. The proposed phase diagram also includes a region of gapless Mott insulator with a spinon Fermi surface, and a magnetically ordered state at still larger electron-electron interaction.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2016

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is the production of high-fidelity intelligent transportation systems at lower costs to increase automotive safety globally without wasting wireless spectrum to be used for other humanity improvement technologies. Successful completion of the work plan in this project enables opportunity for wireless communication device vendors and automotive original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in the vehicular RADAR sensor market through structured target estimation (SSTE). Preliminary studies have suggested that SSTE may reduce the device cost requirements for vehicular RADAR to automotive OEMs by one order of magnitude. The availability of RADAR processing on standard wireless communication devices also enables dual-purpose wireless devices, leading to further reduced costs as well as increased security. Reduced costs and increased security in vehicular RADAR not only presents an attractive business opportunity, but also leads to safer transportation globally. Preliminary studies have also shown that SSTE requires 87% fewer spectrum resources. More efficient spectrum usage yields more spectrum availability for other applications like cellular communications and simultaneously increases the opportunity for license-free public spectrum. This Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) Phase I project will validate a new framework for RADAR through a suite of signal processing functions known as successive structured target estimation (SSTE). In contrast to standard RADAR waveform processing, SSTE uses channel impulse response estimates available on wireless communication devices. SSTE exploits newly-discovered target structure to substantially improve performance in terms of ranging accuracy and spectrum consumption. The work plan will evaluate ranging accuracy and spectrum consumption through over-the-air radio frequency (RF) testing with moving vehicles. These tests must show that: (1) SSTE enables RADAR applications that use much less spectrum than required by current RADAR devices (2) SSTE functions adequately in all relevant vehicular environments (3) SSTE is able to track a sufficient number of targets for vehicular applications (4) wireless communication devices may service RADAR applications through SSTE without sacrificing performance in relevant vehicular environments.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 184.62K | Year: 2015

The crust that underlies the worlds oceans forms as a result of seafloor spreading - a process that sees the rigid oceanic plates pulled apart at fast (>100 mm/yr), intermediate (100-55 mm/yr) or slow (55-20 mm/yr) rates. As plates separate the mantle beneath rises to fill the gap and as it does so it melts due to the lower pressure. This molten rock, or magma, solidifies to form the ~6-8 km thick oceanic crust, comprising a layer of erupted and rapidly cooled magma (basalt) at the top and a layer of slowly cooled magma (gabbro) beneath. Over the last decade, observations have shown that the crust created where oceanic plates are pulled apart at slower rates, does not form by such a simple process of symmetrical, magmatic construction as our current models predict, but instead the magmatic construction is interspersed with periods of apparent magma-starvation. During these amagmatic phases plate separation is accommodated by large-offset faults along which rocks from the lower crust and the upper mantle beneath are brought to the surface. These regions of exhumed lower crust and upper mantle rocks are called oceanic core complexes (OCCs). About 25% of the Earths mid-ocean ridges spread at very slow rates of less than 20 mm/yr. However, most of these ultraslow ridges are located in remote areas that have poor weather or ice cover that impedes their investigation. Consequently, how the crust forms and ages at these slowest spreading centres, which current models predict should be predominantly magma-starved and cold, remains poorly understood. Recent seabed imaging and sampling studies of the ultraslow Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre (MCSC) in the Caribbean, have observed the deepest and hottest black smoker hydrothermal vents on Earth, and regions of exhumed lower crust and upper mantle juxtaposed against volcanically erupted rocks of the normal upper oceanic crust. Here we will establish the crustal context of these contrasting observations that challenge the predictions of traditional models, and we will determine the time and space interplay between magmatic construction and amagmatic extension and the controls on, and relationship between, faulting and hydrothermal activity. As part of a British, German and American partnership, we will use sub-seabed seismic imaging to study the structure and lithology of the crust at the Mt Dent OCC on the MCSC and determine the relationship between this and the adjacent volcanic domain that also hosts hydrothermal vents. We will also investigate how the crust changes as it cools and ages as it spreads away from the ridge axis. Using the pattern of local earthquakes we will map sub-seabed fault geometries and whether or not these faults are connected at depth. As the southern tip of the MCSC also abuts against the continental crust of the Caribbean plate across the Swan Island Transform Zone, this also provides a unique opportunity to determine not only how the mantle rises up and melts beneath the ridge and how this melt is distributed along-ridge, but also if this process is impeded by the cooling affect of adjacent thick, cold continental lithosphere. To achieve our goals we will deploy ocean-bottom seismographs (OBSs) onto the seabed to determine the variation in velocity associated with, and the interfaces between the different rock types deep into the crust and upper mantle using man-made seismic signals. We will also use the OBSs to record the signals that occur naturally when faults move. We will measure the gravity field to determine crustal density as a test of our seismic models, and to image deeper into the mantle to depths beyond which our seismic signals will penetrate. Finally, we will measure reversals in the magnetic field to reveal seafloor spreading rate and crustal age and, jointly with the seismic data, determine how frequently phases of amagmatic extension have occurred from the current time to at least 20 million years ago.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.57K | Year: 2016

Geometrically constrained underwater environments abrogate the simplifying acoustic modeling assumption that energy can be modeled in a two-dimensional vertical plane. In these environments, current tools to perform navigation and passive and/or active sonar mission planning are inadequate. Furthermore, channel complexity makes it difficult to model acoustic communications. HRC proposes to upgrade the current Navy Standard Comprehensive Acoustic System Simulation, currently used in the Navys tactical decision aids for ASW sensor performance predictions and Acoustic Communications planning, to model propagation loss, reverberation, performance, and communications effectiveness in complex, 3-dimensional environments. HRC and its academic partner, ARL:UT, will first design upgrades to the reflection and scattering modeling and bookkeeping in the model, implementing upgrades in a prototype that will then be compared to academic, closed-form, and/or measured data sets, to determine the level of fidelity achieved by this initial set of upgrades. Next, the one-way propagation loss and eigenray model will be upgraded and validated. Once the modeling has been completed and validated, it will go through the Navys OAML process, during which the upgrades are subject to independent validation, and then implemented in Navy sensor performance and communication prediction systems, and through OAML, be made available for additional DoD applications.


Alu A.,University of Texas at Austin | Engheta N.,University of Pennsylvania
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2010

Optical waveguide interconnects are a major component of chip-scale data processing and computational systems. Here, we propose an alternative mechanism based on optical wireless broadcasting links using nanoantennas, which may overcome some of the limitations of nanoscale waveguide interconnects. By properly loading and matching nanoantenna pairs with optical nanocircuits, we theoretically demonstrate a complete optical wireless link that, in spite of some radiation loss and mismatch factors, may exhibit much less absorption loss, largely outperforming regular plasmonic waveguide links. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Zhang J.,Hong Kong University of Science and Technology | Andrews J.G.,University of Texas at Austin
IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications | Year: 2010

Downlink spatial intercell interference cancellation (ICIC) is considered for mitigating other-cell interference using multiple transmit antennas. A principle question we explore is whether it is better to do ICIC or simply standard single-cell beamforming. We explore this question analytically and show that beamforming is preferred for all users when the edge SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) is low (0 dB), and ICIC is preferred when the edge SNR is high (10 dB), for example in an urban setting. At medium SNR, a proposed adaptive strategy, where multiple base stations jointly select transmission strategies based on the user location, outperforms both while requiring a lower feedback rate than the pure ICIC approach. The employed metric is sum rate, which is normally a dubious metric for cellular systems, but surprisingly we show that even with this reward function the adaptive strategy also improves fairness. When the channel information is provided by limited feedback, the impact of the induced quantization error is also investigated. The analysis provides insights on the feedback design, and it is shown that ICIC with well-designed feedback strategies still provides significant throughput gain. © 2006 IEEE.


Kim H.Y.,University of Texas at Austin | Lee H.M.,KAIST | Henkelman G.,University of Texas at Austin
Journal of the American Chemical Society | Year: 2012

Density functional theory was used to study the CO oxidation catalytic activity of CeO 2-supported Au nanoparticles (NPs). Experimental observations on CeO 2 show that the surface of CeO 2 is enriched with oxygen vacancies. We compare CO oxidation by a Au 13 NP supported on stoichiometric CeO 2 (Au 13@CeO 2-STO) and partially reduced CeO 2 with three vacancies (Au 13@CeO 2-3VAC). The structure of the Au 13 NP was chosen to minimize structural rearrangement during CO oxidation. We suggest three CO oxidation mechanisms by Au 13@CeO 2: CO oxidation by coadsorbed O 2, CO oxidation by a lattice oxygen in CeO 2, and CO oxidation by O 2 bound to a Au-Ce 3+ anchoring site. Oxygen vacancies are shown to open a new CO oxidation pathway by O 2 bound to a Au-Ce 3+ anchoring site. Our results provide a design strategy for CO oxidation on supported Au catalysts. We suggest lowering the vacancy formation energy of the supporting oxide, and using an easily reducible oxide to increase the concentration of reduced metal ions, which act as anchoring sites for O 2 molecules. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 931.42K | Year: 2014

Sea levels around the world are currently rising, threatening populations living near the coast with flooding and increased coastal erosion. Evaluating the future threat requires a better understanding of the physical processes responsible for driving changes in the Earths ice sheets. Recent observations show that in some key locations around the ice sheets margins, rapid thinning is currently contributing 1.3 mm/yr to global sea level rise, and that that number has risen dramatically in recent years. Most of the attention has been focussed on the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets, where the thinning is most widespread and rapid. It is generally assumed that the culprit is a warming of the ocean waters that come into contact with the ice sheet. Increased melting of the floating ice shelves and tidewater glaciers has caused them to thin, forcing the grounding line or calving front to retreat and allowing the inland ice to flow faster towards the coast. Although thinning of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) is currently much less widespread and dramatic than that observed in West Antarctica, a large sector of the EAIS is grounded below sea level and is thus potentially vulnerable to the same process of ice shelf thinning, grounding line retreat and ice stream acceleration. In addition, analogous ocean forcing to that in West Antarctica could influence the marine-based sector of the EAIS. In both regions the Antarctic Circumpolar Current brings warm Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) close to the continental slope. While CDW may already be influencing Totten Glacier, which now shows the strongest thinning signature over the entire EAIS, other glaciers in the region, most notably Mertz Glacier, may be protected by the formation of dense, cold Shelf Water in local polynyas. However, our knowledge of the oceanography of the continental shelf and of the waters that circulate beneath and interact with the floating ice shelves is presently insufficient to understand what processes are driving the change on Totten Glacier and how vulnerable its near neighbours such as Mertz Glacier might be. Our ability to project the future behaviour of these outlet glacier systems is severely limited as a result. To address this deficiency, this project will make observations of the critical processes that take place beneath the floating ice shelves, to determine how the topography beneath the ice and the oceanographic forcing from beyond the cavity control the rate at which the ice shelves melt. The key tool with which the necessary observations will be made is an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (Autosub3), configured and run in a manner analogous to that used for an earlier, highly successful campaign in which it completed 500 km of along-track observations beneath the 60-km long floating tongue of Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica. We will use these data to validate a numerical model of ocean circulation beneath the ice shelves and use the computed melt rates to force a numerical model of ice flow, in order to investigate the response of the glaciers to a range of climate forcing. A detailed understanding of ocean circulation and melting beneath Totten and Mertz glaciers will generate insight into ocean-ice interactions that will be relevant to many other sites in Greenland and Antarctica, and will advance our developing knowledge of ice sheet discharge and its future effect on sea-level rise. This work forms part of an intensive observational campaign focused on ocean-ice shelf interactions in East Antarctica. The collaborative, interdisciplinary effort consists of coordinated ocean and glacier studies conducted by groups at Australian, French, UK and US institutions.

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