Hobart, Australia

University of Tasmania

www.utas.edu.au/
Hobart, Australia

The University of Tasmania is a public Australian university in Tasmania, Australia. Officially founded on 1 January 1890, it was the fourth university to be established in Australia. The University of Tasmania is a sandstone university and is a member of the international Association of Commonwealth Universities. It is currently the only university located in Tasmania.The University offers various undergraduate and graduate programs in a range of disciplines, and has links with 20 specialist research institutes, cooperative research centres and faculty based research centres; many of which are regarded as nationally and internationally competitive leaders. The University has a student population of nearly 26,800, including over 6,000 international students and 1000 PhD students. Wikipedia.

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Patent
University of Tasmania | Date: 2015-09-30

A device for extracting and concentrating a target analyte including a sample channel that receives the sample, a separation channel, a waste channel, a first junction between the sample channel and the separation channel, and, a second junction between the separation channel and the waste channel. The first junction selectively transports a first group of analytes, including target analytes, from the sample channel to the separation channel in accordance with a size of a first free transport region of the first junction. The second junction selectively transports a second group of analytes from the separation channel to the waste channel in accordance with a size of a second free transport region of the second junction, the second group being a subset of the first group, so as to concentrate a number of the target analytes in the separation channel.


Patent
University of Tasmania | Date: 2016-12-13

The present invention relates to neural cell survival, differentiation and proliferation promoting peptide fragments derived from metallothioneins (MT), pharmaceutical compositions comprising said peptide fragments and uses thereof for treatment of diseases and conditions where the effects of stimulating neural cell proliferation, differentiation and/or survival, and/or stimulating neural plasticity associated with learning and memory are beneficial for treatment.


Patent
University of Tasmania | Date: 2017-08-09

A device for extracting and concentrating a target analyte including a sample channel that receives the sample, a separation channel, a waste channel, a first junction between the sample channel and the separation channel, and, a second junction between the separation channel and the waste channel. The first junction selectively transports a first group of analytes, including target analytes, from the sample channel to the separation channel in accordance with a size of a first free transport region of the first junction. The second junction selectively transports a second group of analytes from the separation channel to the waste channel in accordance with a size of a second free transport region of the second junction, the second group being a subset of the first group, so as to concentrate a number of the target analytes in the separation channel.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INT-04-2015 | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2016

This Project aims to address an increasingly pressing global challenge: How to achieve the EUs development goals and the UNs Sustainable Development Goals, while meeting the global target of staying within two degrees global warming and avoid transgressing other planetary boundaries. EU policies must align with sustainable development goals (Article 11 TFEU). The impacts of climate change and global loss of natural habitat undermine the progress achieved by pursuing the Millennium Development Goals and threaten the realisation of EU development policy goals. Our focus is the role of EUs public and private market actors. They have a high level of interaction with actors in emerging and developing economies, and are therefore crucial to achieving the EUs development goals. However, science does not yet cater for insights in how the regulatory environment influences their decision-making, nor in how we can stimulate them to make development-friendly, environmentally and socially sustainable decisions. Comprehensive, ground-breaking research is necessary into the regulatory complexity in which EU private and public market actors operate, in particular concerning their interactions with private and public actors in developing countries. Our Consortium, leading experts in law, economics, and applied environmental and social science, is able to analyse this regulatory complexity in a transdisciplinary and comprehensive perspective, both on an overarching level and in depth, in the form of specific product life-cycles: ready-made garments and mobile phones. We bring significant new evidence-based insights into the factors that enable or hinder coherence in EU development policy; we will advance the understanding of how development concerns can be successfully integrated in non-development policies and regulations concerning market actors; and we provide tools for improved PCD impact assessment as well as for better corporate sustainability assessment.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: INT-01-2015 | Award Amount: 1.06M | Year: 2016

Mesopelagic Southern Ocean Prey and Predators The underlying concept of MESOPP is the creation of a collaborative network and associated e-infrastructure (marine ecosystem information system) between European and Australian research teams/institutes sharing similar interests in the Southern Ocean and Antarctica, its marine ecosystem functioning and the rapid changes occurring with the climate warming and the exploitation of marine resources. While MESOPP will focus on the enhancement of collaborations by eliminating various obstacles in establishing a common methodology and a connected network of databases of acoustic data for the estimation of micronekton biomass and validation of models, it will also contribute to a better predictive understanding of the SO based on furthering the knowledge base on key functional groups of micronekton and processes which determine ecosystem dynamics from physics to large oceanic predators. This first project and associated implementation (science network and specification of an infrastructure) should constitute the nucleus of a larger international programme of acoustic monitoring and micronekton modelling to be integrated in the general framework of ocean observation following a roadmap that will be prepared during the project.


Ambrose M.,University of Tasmania
Blood | Year: 2013

In 1988, the gene responsible for the autosomal recessive disease ataxia- telangiectasia (A-T) was localized to 11q22.3-23.1. It was eventually cloned in 1995. Many independent laboratories have since demonstrated that in replicating cells, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is predominantly a nuclear protein that is involved in the early recognition and response to double-stranded DNA breaks. ATM is a high-molecular-weight PI3K-family kinase. ATM also plays many important cytoplasmic roles where it phosphorylates hundreds of protein substrates that activate and coordinate cell-signaling pathways involved in cell-cycle checkpoints, nuclear localization, gene transcription and expression, the response to oxidative stress, apoptosis, nonsense-mediated decay, and others. Appreciating these roles helps to provide new insights into the diverse clinical phenotypes exhibited by A-T patients-children and adults alike-which include neurodegeneration, high cancer risk, adverse reactions to radiation and chemotherapy, pulmonary failure, immunodeficiency, glucose transporter aberrations, insulin-resistant diabetogenic responses, and distinct chromosomal and chromatin changes. An exciting recent development is the ATM-dependent pathology encountered in mitochondria, leading to inefficient respiration and energy metabolism and the excessive generation of free radicals that themselves create life-threatening DNA lesions that must be repaired within minutes to minimize individual cell losses.


McGuinness D.S.,University of Tasmania
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2011

Recent advances in the area of Olefin Oligomerization via metallacycles that include dimerization, trimerization, tetramerization, and beyond, are reviewed. Studies have found that metallacyclopentane decomposition to 1-butene many not be particularly facile due to the absence of metallacycle expansion. Follow-up studies concentrated on the N-H functionality and the Cr oxidation state and role of MAO show that activities and selectivities to 1-hexene are similar to the original Cr(III) complexes. Nenu and Weckhuysen prepared silica-supported triazacyclohexane complexes, by treating the reduced Phillips polymerization catalyst with triazacyclohexane ligands in dichloromethane. The influence of N-aryl functionality investigated by Killian et al. shows that the selectivity was mainly dependent upon the steric bulk attached to nitrogen, and less so on the group's basicity.


Cheung W.W.L.,University of British Columbia | Watson R.,University of Tasmania | Pauly D.,University of British Columbia
Nature | Year: 2013

Marine fishes and invertebrates respond to ocean warming through distribution shifts, generally to higher latitudes and deeper waters. Consequently, fisheries should be affected by 'tropicalization' of catch (increasing dominance of warm-water species). However, a signature of such climate-change effects on global fisheries catch has so far not been detected. Here we report such an index, the mean temperature of the catch (MTC), that is calculated from the average inferred temperature preference of exploited species weighted by their annual catch. Our results show that, after accounting for the effects of fishing and large-scale oceanographic variability, global MTC increased at a rate of 0.19 degrees Celsius per decade between 1970 and 2006, and non-tropical MTC increased at a rate of 0.23 degrees Celsius per decade. In tropical areas, MTC increased initially because of the reduction in the proportion of subtropical species catches, but subsequently stabilized as scope for further tropicalization of communities became limited. Changes in MTC in 52 large marine ecosystems, covering the majority of the world's coastal and shelf areas, are significantly and positively related to regional changes in sea surface temperature. This study shows that ocean warming has already affected global fisheries in the past four decades, highlighting the immediate need to develop adaptation plans to minimize the effect of such warming on the economy and food security of coastal communities, particularly in tropical regions. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Breadmore M.C.,University of Tasmania
Journal of Chromatography A | Year: 2012

Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has long been regarded as a powerful analytical separation technique that is an alternative to more traditional methods such as gel electrophoresis (GE) and liquid chromatography (LC). It is often touted as having a number of advantages over both of these, such as speed, flexibility, portability, sample and reagent requirements and cost, but also a number of disadvantages such as reproducibility and sensitivity. Microchip electrophoresis (ME), the next evolutionary step, miniaturised CE further providing improvements in speed and sample requirements as well as the possibility to perform more complex and highly integrated analyses. CE and ME are seen as a viable alternative to GE, but are often considered to be inferior to LC. This review will consider the strengths and weaknesses of both CE and ME and will challenge the common conceptions held about these. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Background Global annual losses in agricultural production from salt-affected land are in excess of US$12 billion and rising. At the same time, a significant amount of arable land is becoming lost to urban sprawl, forcing agricultural production into marginal areas. Consequently, there is a need for a major breakthrough in crop breeding for salinity tolerance. Given the limited range of genetic diversity in this trait within traditional crops, stress tolerance genes and mechanisms must be identified in extremophiles and then introduced into traditional crops. Scope and Conclusions This reviewargues that learning from halophytes may be a promisingway of achieving this goaL. The paper is focused around two central questions: what are the key physiological mechanisms conferring salinity tolerance in halophytes that can be introduced into non-halophyte crop species to improve their performance under saline conditions and what specific genes need to be targeted to achieve this goal? The specific traits that are discussed and advocated include: manipulation of trichome shape, size and density to enable their use for external Na+ sequestration; increasing the efficiency of internal Na + sequestration in vacuoles by the orchestrated regulation of tonoplast NHX exchangers and slow and fast vacuolar channels, combined with greater cytosolic K + retention; controlling stomata aperture and optimizing water use efficiency by reducing stomatal density; and efficient control of xylem ion loading, enabling rapid shoot osmotic adjustment while preventing prolonged Na + transport to the shoot. © The Author 2013.

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