Tampere University of Technology

www.tut.fi
Tampere, Finland

Tampere University of Technology ) is Finland's second-largest university in engineering science. The university is located in Hervanta, a suburb of Tampere.The university's statutory duty is to pursue research and give the highest education in its field. The research, conducted by some 1,800 staff and faculty members, mostly focuses on applied science and often has close ties to many different companies . Located next to the university campus is a Technology Centre Hermia, including a large Nokia research facility. The yearly budget of the university is some 147 million euros. TUT is one of the only two Finnish universities which operate as foundation. Close to 50% of its budget is external funding. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Available to industry for the first time: New computation tools enable much faster and cheaper product development Faster, more accurate and agile computation tools and methods have been developed through the SEMTEC project, led by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. This will enable the elimination of the expensive and time-consuming prototype phase in the electromechanical industry. Finnish industry will gain a competitive advantage due to the faster product development of electrical motors, generators and transformers, which will enter the markets at lower cost. The project will also result in quieter and more energy-efficient machines. The key result of the SEMTEC project is new computation methods, which can now be exploited by industry for the first time, using companies' own tools. The project produced innovative and accurate methods to control vibrations, dampen noise and improve the energy efficiency of devices. Beneficiaries of the results include the electromechanical industry in particular, which manufactures electric motors, generators and transformers. In addition, cooperation between research and industry will increase when all results are available to everyone via the open-source Elmer software. "Finnish industry will gain a competitive advantage from leaner design processes. Electromechanical devices are seldom mass-produced -- each product unit tends to be separately designed. Accelerating product development will therefore markedly shorten delivery times and create a major competitive edge," says project manager Janne Keränen of VTT. For example, the noise generated by lifts and transformers will be reduced. This will enable the reducing of disturbing and tiresome noise in homes and workplaces. "SEMTEC has led to close and symbiotic cooperation between industrial enterprises, research institutes and universities. Open source code means that new models developed by researchers can be tested immediately in the industry's own design systems. The project has enabled the productisation of new, world-class modelling toolset, which we have already been using to win major deals," says Eelis Takala, Lead Research Specialist at Trafotek. As computing power grows and the use of open source software increases, electromagnetic computation is reaching a turning point. Old software is seldom suitable for the world of parallel computing. The Elmer tool, an open-source finite element method (FEM) software developed by CSC, was used in the project. Elmer features numerically efficient parallel computing and advanced coupling of multiple phenomena. "Only genuine cooperation enabled the development of software for a new application area so quickly. The importance of parallel computing will continue to grow as number of computational cores in CPUs increases. This leads us to believe that long and fruitful cooperation lies ahead," says Peter Råback of CSC, Product Manager of the Elmer software. The project began in February 2015 and will end in May 2017. The following companies are participants: ABB Oy, Kone Corporation, Konecranes Finland Corporation, Trafotek Oy, Sulzer Pumps Finland Oy, Ingersoll-Rand Finland Oy and CSC - IT Center for Science (CSC). The research organisations involved were VTT, Aalto University, Lappeenranta University of Technology and Tampere University of Technology. The SEMTEC project was funded by Tekes and the companies and research institutes participating in the project. SEMTEC final, open seminar will be held in Aalto University on Tuesday 23 May 2017. For further details on the project, go to http://www. . More information about the project: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd is the leading research and technology company in the Nordic countries. We use our research and knowledge to provide expert services for our domestic and international customers and partners, and for both private and public sectors. We use 4,000,000 hours of brainpower a year to develop new technological solutions. VTT in social media: Twitter @VTTFinland, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Instagram and Periscope.


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: cen.acs.org

Pity the poor insect that wanders onto a Venus flytrap. Just a couple false steps into the carnivorous plant’s trigger hairs, and the leaves snap shut, dooming the bug. Inspired by the Venus flytrap’s ability to distinguish between insects and other stray bits of matter, Tampere University of Technology scientists Arri Priimagi, Hao Zeng, and Owies M. Wani have created a soft robot that acts with the same sort of autonomy. Their optical flytrap distinguishes between objects that reflect or scatter light and those that do not before grabbing the reflective ones. “It’s very difficult in soft robotics to develop systems that make decisions by themselves,” says Priimagi, who led the research team. Most soft robots, he says, don’t react to their environment but instead require some sort of external activation. His team’s solution was to incorporate an optical fiber into a liquid crystalline elastomer. When the light strikes a reflective object, it reflects back onto the liquid crystalline elastomer, triggering a photochemical isomerization in the elastomer’s azobenzene components. The isomerization events release heat, causing the liquid crystals to lose their orientation and bend the elastomer, which makes the device grip the reflective object in as little as 200 microseconds (Nat. Commun. 2017, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms15546). Jian Chen, an expert in soft robotics at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, says Priimagi and coworkers’ use of an optical feedback loop to make their soft robot autonomous is creative. “This work represents very significant progress in the field of soft robotics,” Chen says. Priimagi explains that the optical flytrap was originally developed out of scientific curiosity. But the device might find use in quality control during microfabrication, gripping and removing tiny objects that don’t reflect light as they should. The optical flytrap can currently clamp down on objects hundreds of times as heavy as the elastomer, but Priimagi would like to boost that by an order of magnitude. He’d also like to create grippers that distinguish between differently colored objects and ones that snap shut as quickly as Venus flytraps—about twice as fast as the current optical flytrap.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.sciencenewsdaily.org

The problem with tiny robots, if there can really be said to be one, is that you can’t put enough stuff on them. Cameras and motors don’t shrink down very well, meaning if you want your robot to grab something, you’d better come up with a new way to see it and hold onto it. And that’s just what Finnish researchers have done with this bio-inspired, super-small gripper! Read More Less than a centimetre in size, the soft robotic device can detect items based on how they reflect light and grasp them with impressive force This ultra-twee soft robotic gripper was inspired by Venus flytraps  The problem with tiny robots, if there can really be said to be one, is that you can’t put enough stuff on them. Cameras and motors don’t shrink down very well, meaning if ... The artificial Venus flytrap could give soft robots a way to grasp and release objects autonomously, according to scientists. This micro-robot mimics the ingenious grasp of a Venus flytrap Science Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Researchers created an artificial flytrap that's driven by light. Read on. Artificial 'Venus flytrap' can sense and pick up things Scientists from Tampere University of Technology, in Finland, have developed a soft, gripping device (pictured) that can sense and pick up objects, mimicking the ferocious Venus flytrap plant. ...


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: cen.acs.org

Pity the poor insect that wanders onto a Venus flytrap. Just a couple false steps into the carnivorous plant’s trigger hairs, and its leaves snap shut, dooming the bug. Inspired by the Venus flytrap’s ability to distinguish between insects and other stray bits of matter, Tampere University of Technology scientists Arri Priimagi, Hao Zeng, and Owies M. Wani have created a soft robot that acts with the same sort of autonomy. Their optical flytrap distinguishes between objects that reflect or scatter light and those that do not before grabbing the reflective ones. “It’s very difficult in soft robotics to develop systems that make decisions by themselves,” says Priimagi, who led the research team. Most soft robots, he says, don’t react to their environment but instead require some sort of external activation. His team’s solution was to incorporate an optical fiber into a liquid crystalline elastomer. When the light strikes a reflective object, it reflects back onto the liquid crystalline elastomer, triggering a photochemical isomerization in the elastomer’s azobenzene components. The isomerization events release heat, causing the liquid crystals to lose their orientation and bend the elastomer, which makes the device grip the reflective object in as little as 200 microseconds (Nat. Commun. 2017, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms15546). Jian Chen, an expert in soft robotics at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, says Priimagi and coworkers’ use of an optical feedback loop to make their soft robot autonomous is very creative. “This work represents very significant progress in the field of soft robotics,” Chen says. Priimagi explains that the optical flytrap was originally developed out of scientific curiosity. But the device might find use in quality control during microfabrication, gripping and removing tiny objects that don’t reflect light as they should. The optical flytrap can currently clamp down on objects hundreds of times heavier than the elastomer, but Priimagi would like to boost that by an order of magnitude. He’d also like to create grippers that distinguish between differently colored objects and ones that snap shut as quickly as Venus flytraps—about twice as fast as the current optical flytrap.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The work was carried out in to meet the need of growing market demands for solutions to improve the safety of lone workers. In some countries, such systems are required also by unions or legislation. Furthermore, many current lone worker solutions are user driven requiring the user to interact with the system which can sometimes frustrate the end-user and may leave room for human error. Mr Juha Eskelin, the EIT Digital Task leader and Senior Manager at Bittium said: "Our task, which we called 'Vertical Application in Protective Monitoring,' focused on processing data from the wearable sensor passively, i.e. without any user interaction, and to be able to produce actionable recommendations or enable sensors based on location. Recommendations and alerts can be triggered based on a number of variables including location, acceleration, temperature or devices coming on or going off-line." "We wanted to look this from the perspective of a passive application - let the application automate the actions on behalf of the user and thus make the life for example of a community care worker a bit easier. Also, as a side effect, we would expect productivity to increase as well, as through automation the worker can meet more patients during a given day." The concepts, protocols and data formats used in the protective monitoring application were developed through an EIT Digital High Impact Initiative known as Advanced Connectivity Platform for Vertical Segments (ACTIVE). Its focus is to develop an advanced connectivity Internet-of-Things (IoT) platform adoptable in various vertical segments. The platform will deliver, among other things, services for secure management, interaction and communication on IoT platforms. "A protective monitoring application fits very well with the ACTIVE initiative. If you try to decapsulate the actual vertical application, many of the IoT applications look very similar: sending sensor data, to or via a gateway to be processed either at the edge or at the cloud. Indeed, that is the idea of the ACTIVE as well: to remove the need to build each and every IoT application from scratch and allow to use the platform to reduce the time to market for new IoT applications. The application has verified that ACTIVE can indeed serve verticals regardless of the industry segment." To produce the new application EIT Digital partners Finnish Bittium and Engineering from Italy worked together to understand the concepts and commonalities in Body Area Networks (BAN), Personal Area Networks (PAN) and wearable integration.The task also used the deliverables of an another EIT Digital Innovation Activity, Fit to Perform, as a reference for professional/health oriented wearable platforms. In addition, EIT Digital partners Ericsson (Finland) and Finnish Tampere University of Technology have contributed to extending the device management to wearable devices and to facilitate semantic interoperability of sensor data across different vendors' devices. "The work on vertical application in protective monitoring will certainly continue. Thanks to ACTIVE and collaboration with the other partners, it is now faster and easier to integrate the application with other systems. We will look into supporting new use cases and making certain functionalities more flexible and configurable as well as incorporating feedback and ideas from customers and developers." EIT Digital Innovation Activities deliver new products or services, create startups and spinoffs to commercialise outputs from projects, and encourage the transfer of technologies for market entry. Active and is one of the 13 Innovation Activities of the Digital Infrastructure Action Line of EIT Digital for 2017. The Digital Infrastructure Action Line focuses on enabling digital transformation by providing secure, robust, responsive, and intelligent communications and computation facilities for the markets. *The Bittium SafeMove Zone solution was announced at the Hannover Messe on 24 April, 2017. EIT Digital is a leading European open innovation organisation that brings together a partnership of over 130 top European corporations, SMEs, start-ups, universities and research institutes. EIT Digital invests in strategic areas to accelerate market uptake of research-based digital technologies and to bring entrepreneurial talent and leadership to Europe. EIT Digital is a Knowledge and Innovation Community of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). EIT Digital headquarters are in Brussels with co-location centres in Berlin, Budapest, Eindhoven, Helsinki, London, Madrid, Paris, Stockholm, Trento and a hub in Silicon Valley.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

The work was carried out in to meet the need of growing market demands for solutions to improve the safety of lone workers. In some countries, such systems are required also by unions or legislation. Furthermore, many current lone worker solutions are user driven requiring the user to interact with the system which can sometimes frustrate the end-user and may leave room for human error. Mr Juha Eskelin, the EIT Digital Task leader and Senior Manager at Bittium said: "Our task, which we called 'Vertical Application in Protective Monitoring,' focused on processing data from the wearable sensor passively, i.e. without any user interaction, and to be able to produce actionable recommendations or enable sensors based on location. Recommendations and alerts can be triggered based on a number of variables including location, acceleration, temperature or devices coming on or going off-line." "We wanted to look this from the perspective of a passive application - let the application automate the actions on behalf of the user and thus make the life for example of a community care worker a bit easier. Also, as a side effect, we would expect productivity to increase as well, as through automation the worker can meet more patients during a given day." The concepts, protocols and data formats used in the protective monitoring application were developed through an EIT Digital High Impact Initiative known as Advanced Connectivity Platform for Vertical Segments (ACTIVE). Its focus is to develop an advanced connectivity Internet-of-Things (IoT) platform adoptable in various vertical segments. The platform will deliver, among other things, services for secure management, interaction and communication on IoT platforms. "A protective monitoring application fits very well with the ACTIVE initiative. If you try to decapsulate the actual vertical application, many of the IoT applications look very similar: sending sensor data, to or via a gateway to be processed either at the edge or at the cloud. Indeed, that is the idea of the ACTIVE as well: to remove the need to build each and every IoT application from scratch and allow to use the platform to reduce the time to market for new IoT applications. The application has verified that ACTIVE can indeed serve verticals regardless of the industry segment." To produce the new application EIT Digital partners Finnish Bittium and Engineering from Italy worked together to understand the concepts and commonalities in Body Area Networks (BAN), Personal Area Networks (PAN) and wearable integration.The task also used the deliverables of an another EIT Digital Innovation Activity, Fit to Perform, as a reference for professional/health oriented wearable platforms. In addition, EIT Digital partners Ericsson (Finland) and Finnish Tampere University of Technology have contributed to extending the device management to wearable devices and to facilitate semantic interoperability of sensor data across different vendors' devices. "The work on vertical application in protective monitoring will certainly continue. Thanks to ACTIVE and collaboration with the other partners, it is now faster and easier to integrate the application with other systems. We will look into supporting new use cases and making certain functionalities more flexible and configurable as well as incorporating feedback and ideas from customers and developers." EIT Digital Innovation Activities deliver new products or services, create startups and spinoffs to commercialise outputs from projects, and encourage the transfer of technologies for market entry. Active and is one of the 13 Innovation Activities of the Digital Infrastructure Action Line of EIT Digital for 2017. The Digital Infrastructure Action Line focuses on enabling digital transformation by providing secure, robust, responsive, and intelligent communications and computation facilities for the markets. *The Bittium SafeMove Zone solution was announced at the Hannover Messe on 24 April, 2017. EIT Digital is a leading European open innovation organisation that brings together a partnership of over 130 top European corporations, SMEs, start-ups, universities and research institutes. EIT Digital invests in strategic areas to accelerate market uptake of research-based digital technologies and to bring entrepreneurial talent and leadership to Europe. EIT Digital is a Knowledge and Innovation Community of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). EIT Digital headquarters are in Brussels with co-location centres in Berlin, Budapest, Eindhoven, Helsinki, London, Madrid, Paris, Stockholm, Trento and a hub in Silicon Valley.


Kauranen M.,Tampere University of Technology | Zayats A.V.,King's College London
Nature Photonics | Year: 2012

When light interacts with metal nanostructures, it can couple to free-electron excitations near the metal surface. The electromagnetic resonances associated with these surface plasmons depend on the details of the nanostructure, opening up opportunities for controlling light confinement on the nanoscale. The resulting strong electromagnetic fields allow weak nonlinear processes, which depend superlinearly on the local field, to be significantly enhanced. In addition to providing enhanced nonlinear effects with ultrafast response times, plasmonic nanostructures allow nonlinear optical components to be scaled down in size. In this Review, we discuss the principles of nonlinear plasmonic effects and present an overview of their main applications, including frequency conversion, switching and modulation of optical signals, and soliton effects. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Moltchanov D.,Tampere University of Technology
Ad Hoc Networks | Year: 2012

To account for stochastic properties when modeling connectivity in wireless mobile systems such as cellular, ad hoc and sensor networks, spatial point processes are used. Since connectivity can be expressed as a function of the distance between nodes, distance distributions between points in spatial processes are of special importance. In this paper, we survey those results available for distance distributions between points in two mostly used spatial point models, namely, the homogeneous Poisson process in R 2 and independently uniformly distributed points in a certain region of R 2. These two models are known for decades and various distance-related results have been obtained. Unfortunately, due to a wide application area of spatial point processes they are scattered among multiple field-specific journals and researchers are still wasting their time rediscovering them time after time. We attempt to unify these results providing an ultimate reference. We will also briefly discuss some of their applications. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


The present invention relates to the field of electrotherapy and measuring by means of electric currents for diagnostic purposes, and more particularly to an electrode arrangement for facilitating wound healing, a method for measuring wound healing and a wound dressing having an electrode arrangement. A wound dressing according is described which includes at least two impedance reference electrodes, a frame like counter-electrode and stimulation electrodes in a form of an array; and a bioadhesive affinity layer surrounding the stimulation electrodes; said wound dressing being suited for applying on top of the wound so that the stimulation electrode array is on the wound area, and that the at least two impedance reference electrodes and the frame like counter-electrode are suited for placing in contact with the healthy skin surrounding the wound area; which electrodes, are suited for applying LIDC type electrical stimulation current to the wound area and for bioimpedance measurement. The wound dressing can provide a continuous, non-invasive and objective solution for monitoring chronic wound healing without disturbing the delicate healing process.


Patent
Tampere University of Technology | Date: 2016-11-30

The invention is related to a micro handling device for handling micro objects and for measuring forces exerted on said micro objects, including a micro gripper and a force sensor connected to said micro gripper, In order to provide such handling device which is rather simple and rugged in construction, less expensive than other typical devices used for such purpose and still useful and easily adaptable in measuring linear forces in the range of 10 N to 1000 mN under relative displacements up to 1 mm or more, the device being applicable to a wide area of materials and components having micro-scale dimensions the present invention proposes that the device comprises a micro spring as the force sensor.

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