Sunderland, United Kingdom

University of Sunderland

www.sunderland.ac.uk
Sunderland, United Kingdom

The University of Sunderland is a university located in Sunderland in the North East of England. The university has 17,101 students, including 2,695 international students from 118 countries.Sunderland was one of six universities to be short-listed for 'University of the Year' in the Times Higher Education Supplement Awards 2012. Wikipedia.

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Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 169.32K | Year: 2015

Advances in fit for use manufacturing of biopharmaceutical drug delivery and pharmaceutical systems are now required to fit Quality by Design (QbD) models. These current regulations require excellence to be built into the preparation of emerging products (both material and process) thereby leading to product robustness and quality. In addition, industrial needs (economical and reproducible quality enhancement) are driving manufacturing towards continuous processes over batch type processes which also rely on QbD (for integrity and quality). EHDA technology is a robust process that has been utilised in various formats (e.g. electrospinning, electrospraying, bubbling and even 3D printing) and is favourable due to applicability with the development of stable nanomedicines and biopharmaceuticals, the emergence of this technology is clearly evident in the UK and on the global scale. Attempts in scaling up (for suitable pharmaceutical scale) and in tandem with continuous processes (including controlled manufacturing) have been very limited. There also, now, remains a huge void in the adaptation of sensible QbD (multi-variate) for the current methods developed and also those required by industry. While lab scale research continues with the ongoing development of such processes (e.g. nanomedicines, smart and controlled delivery), the transition to industry or the clinic will have to meet these regulations (and scales) for there to be a real impact, which is now, also, an important aspect of grass root research in the UK. The EHDA network brings together specialists from academia and industry to advance this technology through several means. Firstly, initiating developments towards a real-viable scale for Pharmaceutical production. Secondly, to incorporate developments in lean manufacturing and legislation (e.g. continuous manufacturing, online diagnostics, QbD and adaptable scale). Thirdly, to marry optimised lean technologies with novel and emerging macromolecular therapies and actives. The network has a wide range of activities and initiatives which will lead to significant developments (and collaborations) in an area of increasing global interest (EHDA processes) - but currently only on a viable lab scale to date. This network will be the first of its kind and will serve as the central and pioneering hub in this remit.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: JTI-CSA-FCH | Phase: SP1-JTI-FCH.2013.5.3 | Award Amount: 999.38K | Year: 2014

There is increasing realisation amongst policy makers and industry that public acceptance is a key issue to deploy and extend H2 technologies and infrastructures in Europe. The development of H2 technologies involve small-scale applications as well as large-scale infrastructures that are influenced by the acceptance of the public, stakeholders, communities and potential customers / users. Previous research on social acceptance investigated the general levels of public understanding of HFC technologies in specific countries, but there is limited systematic evidence on the acceptance of FCH technologies throughout Europe. The overall purpose of HYACINTH is to gain deeper understanding of social acceptance of H2 technologies across Europe and to develop a communication / management toolbox for ongoing or future activities introducing H2 into mobility, stationary and power supply systems. Social acceptance of FCH technologies will be investigated via survey research with representative panels (7.000 European citizens) and semistructured interviews with 455 stakeholders in 10 countries. The design of the data gathering instruments will build upon methodological and conceptual developments in the research of new technologies social acceptance. The toolbox will provide the necessary information and understanding of the state of awareness and acceptance of HFC technologies by the public and by stakeholders. It will further provide the necessary tools to understand and manage expectations of future HFC projects and products in the transition phase, to identify regional challenges and to determine effective policy support measures Results from the research on the social acceptance across Europe and the toolbox will support projects in setting up under through consideration of the acceptance processes influenced by their activities; i.e. identifying regions of supportive acceptance, barriers, challenges, communication strategies and other means to manage acceptance processes


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: SGA-RIA | Phase: FETFLAGSHIP | Award Amount: 89.00M | Year: 2016

This project is the second in the series of EC-financed parts of the Graphene Flagship. The Graphene Flagship is a 10 year research and innovation endeavour with a total project cost of 1,000,000,000 euros, funded jointly by the European Commission and member states and associated countries. The first part of the Flagship was a 30-month Collaborative Project, Coordination and Support Action (CP-CSA) under the 7th framework program (2013-2016), while this and the following parts are implemented as Core Projects under the Horizon 2020 framework. The mission of the Graphene Flagship is to take graphene and related layered materials from a state of raw potential to a point where they can revolutionise multiple industries. This will bring a new dimension to future technology a faster, thinner, stronger, flexible, and broadband revolution. Our program will put Europe firmly at the heart of the process, with a manifold return on the EU investment, both in terms of technological innovation and economic growth. To realise this vision, we have brought together a larger European consortium with about 150 partners in 23 countries. The partners represent academia, research institutes and industries, which work closely together in 15 technical work packages and five supporting work packages covering the entire value chain from materials to components and systems. As time progresses, the centre of gravity of the Flagship moves towards applications, which is reflected in the increasing importance of the higher - system - levels of the value chain. In this first core project the main focus is on components and initial system level tasks. The first core project is divided into 4 divisions, which in turn comprise 3 to 5 work packages on related topics. A fifth, external division acts as a link to the parts of the Flagship that are funded by the member states and associated countries, or by other funding sources. This creates a collaborative framework for the entire Flagship.


Ennaceur A.,University of Sunderland
Physiology and Behavior | Year: 2014

The plus-maze, the light-dark box and the open-field are the main current tests of unconditioned anxiety for mice and rats. Despite their disappointing achievements, they remain as popular as ever and seem to play an important role in an ever-growing demand for behavioral phenotyping and drug screening. Numerous reviews have repeatedly reported their lack of consistency and reliability but they failed to address the core question of whether these tests do provide unequivocal measures of fear-induced anxiety, that these measurements are not confused with measures of fear-induced avoidance or natural preference responses - i.e. discriminant validity. In the present report, I examined numerous issues that undermine the validity of the current tests, and I highlighted various flaws in the aspects of these tests and the methodologies pursued. This report concludes that the evidence in support of the validity of the plus-maze, the light/dark box and the open-field as anxiety tests is poor and methodologically questionable. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

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