Glasgow, United Kingdom
Glasgow, United Kingdom

The University of Strathclyde is a Scottish public research university located in Glasgow, United Kingdom. It is Glasgow's second university by age, being founded in 1796 as the Andersonian Institute, and receiving its Royal Charter in 1964 as the UK's first technological university. It takes its name from the historic Kingdom of Strathclyde.The University of Strathclyde is Scotland's third largest university by number of students, with students and staff from over 100 countries. The institution was awarded University of the Year 2012 and Entrepreneurial University of the year 2013 by Times Higher Education.Applications for a place into many of the courses in the university is competitive and successful entrants have on average of 462 UCAS points. This places Strathclyde as the 15th highest ranked among UK higher education institutions. Wikipedia.


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Patent
University of Strathclyde | Date: 2017-03-29

The present invention relates to the formation of emulsions using small amphipathic molecules, such as peptides which self-assemble to form an interface between at least two substantially immiscible liquids. The emulsions may find application is a variety of technological fields, such as in food, cosmetics, life style products, coating, catalysis, encapsulation, drug delivery and/or cell assays. There is also provided a method of making such emulsions, as well as methods of tailoring the stability of the emulsions for particular applications.


Patent
University of Strathclyde | Date: 2017-03-08

A method comprising detecting injected magnetic grout to provide an indication of penetration into an injection region of the injected magnetic grout.


Patent
University of Strathclyde | Date: 2017-06-28

A support and corresponding system and method of using and producing the support, the support being for supporting a joint or body part of a wearer, the support having at least one rigid first support member, at least one fixing device for attaching the support to the wearer, and at least one second support member extending at an angle from the first support member. Optionally, the joint is a joint between first and second body parts, and the first body part is movable or pivotable relative to the second body part via the joint, and the support is arranged such that at least one of the fixing devices is operable to fix the support to the first body part, the at least one rigid support member covers at least part of at least one side of the first body part and extends over at least part of at least one side of the joint, the second support member is configured to extend to another side of the second body part to the first support member, the first support member is adapted to limit motion of the second body part and/or joint in a first direction,and the second support member is configured to limit motion of the second body part in a second direction.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: LCE-05-2015 | Award Amount: 51.69M | Year: 2016

In order to unlock the full potential of Europes offshore resources, network infrastructure is urgently required, linking off-shore wind parks and on-shore grids in different countries. HVDC technology is envisaged but the deployment of meshed HVDC offshore grids is currently hindered by the high cost of converter technology, lack of experience with protection systems and fault clearance components and immature international regulations and financial instruments. PROMOTioN will overcome these barriers by development and demonstration of three key technologies, a regulatory and financial framework and an offshore grid deployment plan for 2020 and beyond. A first key technology is presented by Diode Rectifier offshore converter. This concept is ground breaking as it challenges the need for complex, bulky and expensive converters, reducing significantly investment and maintenance cost and increasing availability. A fully rated compact diode rectifier converter will be connected to an existing wind farm. The second key technology is an HVDC grid protection system which will be developed and demonstrated utilising multi-vendor methods within the full scale Multi-Terminal Test Environment. The multi-vendor approach will allow DC grid protection to become a plug-and-play solution. The third technology pathway will first time demonstrate performance of existing HVDC circuit breaker prototypes to provide confidence and demonstrate technology readiness of this crucial network component. The additional pathway will develop the international regulatory and financial framework, essential for funding, deployment and operation of meshed offshore HVDC grids. With 35 partners PROMOTioN is ambitious in its scope and advances crucial HVDC grid technologies from medium to high TRL. Consortium includes all major HVDC and wind turbine manufacturers, TSOs linked to the North Sea, offshore wind developers, leading academia and consulting companies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: IoT-01-2016 | Award Amount: 34.71M | Year: 2017

The IoF2020 project is dedicated to accelerate adoption of IoT for securing sufficient, safe and healthy food and to strengthen competitiveness of farming and food chains in Europe. It will consolidate Europes leading position in the global IoT industry by fostering a symbiotic ecosystem of farmers, food industry, technology providers and research institutes. The IoF2020 consortium of 73 partners, led by Wageningen UR and other core partners of previous key projects such as FIWARE and IoT-A, will leverage the ecosystem and architecture that was established in those projects. The heart of the project is formed by 19 use cases grouped in 5 trials with end users from the Arable, Dairy, Fruits, Vegetables and Meat verticals and IoT integrators that will demonstrate the business case of innovative IoT solutions for a large number of application areas. A lean multi-actor approach focusing on user acceptability, stakeholder engagement and sustainable business models will boost technology and market readiness levels and bring end user adoption to the next stage. This development will be enhanced by an open IoT architecture and infrastructure of reusable components based on existing standards and a security and privacy framework. Anticipating vast technological developments and emerging challenges for farming and food, the 4-year project stays agile through dynamic budgeting and adaptive decision-making by an implementation board of representatives from key user organizations. A 6 M mid-term open call will allow for testing intermediate results and extending the project with technical solutions and test sites. A coherent dissemination strategy for use case products and project learnings supported by leading user organizations will ensure a high market visibility and an increased learning curve. Thus IoF2020 will pave the way for data-driven farming, autonomous operations, virtual food chains and personalized nutrition for European citizens.


Fedorov M.V.,University of Strathclyde | Kornyshev A.A.,University of Tirana
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2014

The review discusses the properties of RTILs at different EIs, specifically the RTILs' response to charging of the interface and how it manifests itself in a range of selected applications. Response of an electrolyte to a charged electrode surface is described within the theory of electrical double layer (EDL). It overviews the current status of the theory of EDL in RTILs, showing that the structure of EDL there is different from that of a diluted electrolyte despite having certain common features with that of high-temperature molten salts (HTMS). It is well-known that the EDL plays a crucial role in electrodes and the potential drop across the EDL and its response to charging determines the electrical capacitance of the electrode/electrolyte interface and the energy stored in the EDL capacitors. The potential distribution in the EDL controls electrochemical kinetics, as the voltage difference between the electrode and the point where the reactant sits is the driving force of electrochemical reactions.


Gibson L.T.,University of Strathclyde
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2014

This tutorial review will focus on the removal of organic pollutants from the aqueous phase by mesoporous silica. After a brief discussion about mesosilica formation (MCM-41 and SBA-15) and silica surface modification, the review will focus on the use of mesosilica for the removal of (i) organic compounds, (ii) organic dyes, or (iii) pharmaceuticals from aqueous solutions. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.


Gibson L.T.,University of Strathclyde
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2014

This tutorial review focuses on the application of mesoporous silica materials, primarily MCM-41 and SBA-15, for the removal of organic pollutants in the vapour phase. After briefly providing an introduction into the types of mesosilica covered in this review article the information is presented on a topic by topic basis and covers mesosilica and its interaction with vapour phase organic pollutants under the general subject headings of (i) adsorption isotherms and temperature programme desorption, (ii) dynamic adsorption experiments and (iii) gas separations. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.


Lang S.,University of Strathclyde
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2013

Isocyanides possess a rich history in the world of synthetic chemistry. Recently the scope of this already versatile class of reagent has been expanded into its use in palladium-catalysed cascade sequences. The scope of this type of reaction is explored in depth and this tutorial review focuses on its various applications in chemical synthesis, and the wide range of systems that can be efficiently prepared using this strategy are documented. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 10.33M | Year: 2017

Our Hub research is driven by the societal need to produce medicines and materials for modern living through novel manufacturing processes. The enormous value of the industries manufacturing these high value products is estimated to generate £50 billion p.a. in the UK economy. To ensure international competitiveness for this huge UK industry we must urgently create new approaches for the rapid design of these systems, controlling how molecules self-assemble into small crystals, in order to best formulate and deliver these for patient and customer. We must also develop the engineering tools, process operations and control methods to manufacture these products in a resource-efficient way, while delivering the highest quality materials. Changing the way in which these materials are made, from what is called batch crystallisation (using large volume tanks) to continuous crystallisation (a more dynamic, flowing process), gives many advantages, including smaller facilities, more efficient use of expensive ingredients such as solvents, reducing energy requirements, capital investment, working capital, minimising risk and variation and, crucially, improving control over the quality and performance of the particles making them more suitable for formulation into final products. The vision is to quickly and reliably design a process to manufacture a given material into the ideal particle using an efficient continuous process, and ensure its effective delivery to the consumer. This will bring precision medicines and other highly customisable projects to market more quickly. An exemplar is the hubs exciting innovation partnership with Cancer Research UK. Our research will develop robust design procedures for rapid development of new particulate products and innovative processes, integrate crystallisation and formulation to eliminate processing steps and develop reconfiguration strategies for flexible production. This will accelerate innovation towards redistributed anufacturing, more personalisation of products, and manufacturing closer to the patient/customer. We will develop a modular MicroFactory for integrated particle engineering, coupled with a fully integrated, computer-modelling approach to guide the design of processes and materials at molecule, particle and formulation levels. This will help optimise what we call the patient-centric supply chain and provide customisable products. We will make greater use of targeted experimental design, prediction and advanced computer simulation of new formulated materials, to control and optimise the processes to manufacture them. Our talented team of scientists will use the outstanding capabilities in the award winning £34m CMAC National Facility at Strathclyde and across our 6 leading university spokes (Bath, Cambridge, Imperial, Leeds, Loughborough, Sheffield). This builds on existing foundations independently recognised by global industry as exemplary collaboration between industry, academia and government which represents the future of pharmaceutical manufacturing and supply chain R&D framework. Our vision will be translated from research into industry through partnership and co-investment of £31m. This includes 10 of worlds largest pharmaceutical companies (eg AstraZeneca, GSK), chemicals and food companies (Syngenta, Croda, Mars) and 19 key technology companies (Siemens, 15 SMEs) Together, with innovation spokes eg Catapult (CPI) we aim to provide the UK with the most advanced, integrated capabilities to deliver continuous manufacture, leading to better materials, better value, more sustainable and flexible processes and better health and well-being for the people of the UK and worldwide. CMAC will create future competitive advantage for the UK in medicines manufacturing and chemicals sector and is strongly supported by industry / government bodies, positioning the UK as the investment location choice for future investments in research and manufacturing.

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