Stavanger, Norway
Stavanger, Norway

The University of Stavanger is a university located in Stavanger, Norway and established in 2005. It has about 9 000 students and 1200 administration, faculty and service staff. It is organised in three faculties, including two national centres of expertise and the Museum of Archaeology.The university offers doctorates in: Literacy; Risk Management and Societal Safety; Educational science; Health and Medicine; Management, Economics and Tourism; Sociology, Social Work and Culture & Society; Chemistry and Biological Science; Offshore Technology; Petroleum Technology; Risk Management and Societal Safety- Technical/Scientific Approach; and Information Technology, Mathematics and physics.The University of Stavanger became a member of the European Consortium of Innovative Universities in October 2012. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: SCC-01-2014 | Award Amount: 29.50M | Year: 2015

The Triangulum project will demonstrate how a systems innovation approach based around the European Commissions SCC Strategic Implementation Plan can drive dynamic smart city development. We will test the SIP across three lighthouse cities: Manchester, Eindhoven and Stavanger, which represent the main typologies of European cities. They will be complemented by our follower cities Prague, Leipzig and Sabadell. This powerful combination reflects an urban population of between 100k and 1,2m inhabitants across six different countries, allowing us to demonstrate successful replication across a wide range of typical urban areas in Europe. Each city has already made significant progress towards the transition of becoming a smart city; developing their own individual approach reflecting specific local circumstances. These inherent strengths will now serve to accelerate the smart city development across proposed demonstration sites within Triangulum. The suite of projects developed will be based around zero/low energy districts, integrated infrastructures and sustainable urban mobility designed to deliver a range of cross-cutting outcomes across different sectors and stakeholders. This will provide the basis to road test the SIP and provide recommendations to the Commission on how it could be improved to facilitate wider replication. The Triangulum goals target a series of direct impacts around; reduced energy consumption of buildings, increased use of renewable energies, increased utilisation of electric vehicles, deployment of intelligent energy management technologies and the deployment of an adaptive and dynamic ICT data hub. The design and implementation of innovative Business Models and the activation of citizens as co-creators are core cross-cutting elements to base the technologies in real-world city environments and facilitate replication.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.71M | Year: 2016

The Role of Universities in Innovation and Regional Development (RUNIN) is a European Training Network for Early-Stage Researchers (ESRs) in the field of science and innovation studies. The aim of the network is to train researchers on how universities contribute to innovation and economic growth in their regions through research seeking to examine how universities fulfill their third mission in relation to regional industry and explore the range of university engagement with regional firms and institutions. The project operationalises the main research question of how universities can contribute to innovation and regional development through four main themes: People and Networks, Policies and Interventions, Places and Territories, and Practices and Governance. The aim of the training programme is to equip the next generation of researchers with the skills required to work across employment sectors, collaborate with a wide range of stakeholders and find the practical relevance of their specialist knowledge, in the process creating new knowledge on universities role in innovation and regional development. There is an increased focus on the instrumentalist position of universities as important drivers of regional development, and the aim of the training programme is therefore to equip a new generation of researchers who can work within this field in the academic world or as specialist policy makers at the regional, national or European level. The programme will capitalise on host institutions infrastructure, including supervision, methods training and quality assurance review systems. In addition, it will offer a comprehensive programme of learning through individual research projects, secondments, and eight targeted training events aimed at developing both research-specific and transferable skills.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.91M | Year: 2013

The PERFUME (PERoxisome Formation, Function, MEtabolism) program is an interdisciplinary and intersectoral ITN providing state-of-the-art research training at the interface of medicine, plant and fungal biology. The PERFUME S&T specifically aims at unraveling the principles of peroxisome biology. Peroxisomes have been discovered relatively recently (in 1954). Consequently, the level of understanding of their biology is relatively weak compared to the knowledge of other organelles. Despite their modest appearance, they are crucially important for cell vitality. Peroxisomes ubiquitously occur in eukaryotes, display an unprecedented versatility of functions and are essential in man. Recent findings indicate that improper functioning of peroxisomes contributes to ageing and age-related diseases. However, there are still major gaps in our current knowledge of peroxisome biology. PERFUME aims to fill these gaps by focusing on i) the identification of novel peroxisome functions, ii) in-depth understanding of the compartmentalization of functions in peroxisomes and iii) unraveling the principles of peroxisome proliferation. Enhancing knowledge on these three themes is relevant for medicine, agriculture and biotechnology and demands directed analyses, which require the combined expertise from different disciplines and sectors that cut across historically separated fields. PERFUME brings together such a team comprising of top scientists from the fields of cell biology, biochemistry, genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, mathematical modeling, bioinformatics and protein structure analysis. Together, PERFUME shows maximal complementarity and synergy to warrant optimal training facilities for the participating students.


In surgical research, the ability to correctly classify one type of condition or specific outcome from another is of great importance for variables influencing clinical decision making. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis is a useful tool in assessing the diagnostic accuracy of any variable with a continuous spectrum of results. In order to rule a disease state in or out with a given test, the test results are usually binary, with arbitrarily chosen cut-offs for defining disease versus health, or for grading of disease severity. In the postgenomic era, the translation from bench-to-bedside of biomarkers in various tissues and body fluids requires appropriate tools for analysis. In contrast to predetermining a cut-off value to define disease, the advantages of applying ROC analysis include the ability to test diagnostic accuracy across the entire range of variable scores and test outcomes. In addition, ROC analysis can easily examine visual and statistical comparisons across tests or scores. ROC is also favored because it is thought to be independent from the prevalence of the condition under investigation. ROC analysis is used in various surgical settings and across disciplines, including cancer research, biomarker assessment, imaging evaluation, and assessment of risk scores. With appropriate use, ROC curves may help identify the most appropriate cutoff value for clinical and surgical decision making and avoid confounding effects seen with subjective ratings. ROC curve results should always be put in perspective, because a good classifier does not guarantee the expected clinical outcome. In this review, we discuss the fundamental roles, suggested presentation, potential biases, and interpretation of ROC analysis in surgical research. © 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


The promise of individualized treatment is gradually being fulfilled, and targeted therapy is becoming a powerful strategy to treat selected patients based on their molecular profile. For metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients anti-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) targeted therapy has markedly improved disease control and survival. However, only a subgroup of patients with mCRC respond to anti-EGFR treatment, and selecting the patients with a positive effect from treatment is important for both the patient and the society. Patients with mutations in the KRAS gene are known as non-responders to anti-EGFR treatment and, consequently, KRAS testing has been employed in routine clinical practice for patient selection. However, a large number of the KRAS wildtype patients do not respond to this treatment. The molecular mechanism underlying response is not fully understood, and other members of the KRAS-BRAF pathway and PI3K-AKT pathway are investigated as predictive biomarkers. Furthermore, concordance of mutation status of primary tumors and their corresponding hepatic or pulmonary metastases, as well as treatment-induced mutations, possess another challenge for properly tailoring the appropriate therapy to this patient group. In this review, molecular biomarkers involved in prediction of response to anti-EGFR treatment are discussed.


Aven T.,University of Stavanger
Reliability Engineering and System Safety | Year: 2013

In recent years several authors have argued for the adoption of certain new types of risk perspectives which highlight uncertainties rather than probabilities in the way risk is understood and measured. The theoretical rationale for these new perspectives is well established, but the practical implications have not been so clearly demonstrated. There is a need to show how the new perspectives change the way risk is described and communicated in real-life situations and in its turn the effects on risk management and decision making. The present paper aims at contributing to this end by considering two cases, related to a national risk level, and a specific analysis concerning an LNG plant. The paper concludes that the new risk perspectives influence the current regime in many ways, in particular the manner in which the knowledge dimension is described and dealt with. Two methods for characterising the strength of knowledge are presented, one of them based on a new concept, the "assumption deviation risk", reflecting risks related to the deviations from the conditions/states defined by the assumption made. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Aven T.,University of Stavanger
Reliability Engineering and System Safety | Year: 2012

This paper reviews the definition and meaning of the concept of risk. The review has a historical and development trend perspective, also covering recent years. It is questioned if, and to what extent, it is possible to identify some underlying patterns in the way risk has been, and is being understood today. The analysis is based on a new categorisation of risk definitions and an assessment of these categories in relation to a set of critical issues, including how these risk definitions match typical daily-life phrases about risk. The paper presents a set of constructed development paths for the risk concept and concludes that over the last 1520 years we have seen a shift from rather narrow perspectives based on probabilities to ways of thinking which highlight events, consequences and uncertainties. However, some of the more narrow perspectives (like expected values and probability-based perspectives) are still strongly influencing the risk field, although arguments can be provided against their use. The implications of this situation for risk assessment and risk management are also discussed. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 445.50K | Year: 2017

Effective collaboration between mental health (MHS) and correctional services (CS) impacts on mental illness and reduces reoffending rates. Service leaders have indicated a need for more effective models of collaboration. Researchers have identified the Change Laboratory Model (CLM) of workplace transformation as a more effective means of supporting interagency collaborative practice than current integration tools. It provides a way to optimise the effectiveness of mental healthcare provision to offenders through a model that fosters innovation and collaborative processes. However, the change laboratory, highly successful internationally and in other clinical contexts, is a new idea in prison development, none as yet being applied to the challenges facing the MHS and CS. The wickedness, complexity and unpredictability of challenges facing interagency working in these secure environments means that piloting the CLM is premature and it must first be adapted to the MHS/CS context. The aim of this study is to validate the change laboratory model ready for implementation in practice. This RISE application builds a community of practice that enriches international research capacity and cooperation to achieve this aim. It brings academic knowledge of the Change Laboratory model to the market of interagency practices between mental health and correctional services for the development of innovation and the advancement of integrated service provision to mentally ill offenders. Knowledge exchange takes place through secondments, interactive workshops, the development of workforce training programmes, study tours, shadowing opportunities and ethnographic research. Through this knowledge exchange, the consortium delivers a user-informed prototype of change laboratory model ready for implementation in the MHS and CS field. This validated change laboratory model, offers the ERA a clear strategy with which to promote integrated care for mentally ill offenders.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: INFRASUPP-4-2015 | Award Amount: 2.50M | Year: 2015

The EDISON project will focus on activities to establish the new profession of Data Scientist, following the emergence of Data Science technologies (also referred to as Data Intensive or Big Data technologies) which changes the way research is done, how scientists think and how the research data are used and shared. This includes definition of the required skills, competences framework/profile, corresponding Body Of Knowledge and model curriculum. It wil develop a sustainability/business model to ensure a sustainable increase of Data Scientists, graduated from universities and trained by other professional education and training institutions in Europe. To achieve this, EDISON will work with the major Data Science stakeholders from academic, research communities and industry, as well as with the professional community to help them to obtain proper education and training and/or formal certification for already practicing self-made Data Scientists, grown from the advanced research projects who want to build a new career in Data Science. Consistent Data Science education and professional training requires besides theoretical knowledge access to real scientific data infrastructure and real large data sets to acquire practical experience and develop data centric thinking. For this, EDISON will leverage on EGI infrastructure and community/activities, as well as products from the APARSEN project, to create a supporting infrastructure for Data Science education and training that will include both example datasets and virtual labs which will allow the students or trainees to work with real data sets, infrastructure and tools. EDISON will facilitate the establishment of a Data Science education and training infrastructure at major European universities by promoting experience of champion universities involving them into coordinated development and implementation of the model curriculum and creation of cooperative educational and training infrastructure.


Patent
University of Stavanger | Date: 2016-03-02

A method for removing a casing section (14) from a casing (12) that lines a subsurface borehole (16) is presented. The casing section has a wall constituting an elongated hollow cylinder. The method involves: separating the casing section from the rest of the casing, and cutting the complete casing section in a lengthwise direction of the borehole into at least three elongated casing portions (20). The method further involves: removing the elongated casing portions from the original location of the casing section. A tool (10) for performing the method is also presented

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