Tampa, FL, United States
Tampa, FL, United States

The University of South Florida, also known as USF, is a member institution of the State University System of Florida, one of the state's three flagship universities for public research, and is located in Tampa, Florida, USA. Founded in 1956, USF is the eighth largest university in the nation and the third largest in the state of Florida, with a total enrollment of 47,122 as of 2009. USF has an autonomous campus in St. Petersburg, and branch centers in Sarasota and Lakeland. Wikipedia.


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Patent
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Research Institute and University of South Florida | Date: 2015-03-10

Virtually every cancer patient is imaged with CT, PET or MRI. Importantly, such imaging reveals that tumors are complex and heterogeneous, often containing multiple habitats within them. Disclosed herein are methods for analyzing these images to infer cellular and molecular structure in each of these habitats. The methods can involve spatially superimposing two or more radiological images of the tumor sufficient to define regional habitat variations in two or more ecological dynamics in the tumor, and comparing the habitat variations to one or more controls to predict the severity of the tumor.


Patent
University of South Florida and Charles Stark Draper Laboratory | Date: 2016-11-28

An electronic catheter stethoscope measures and analyzes acoustic fields and dynamic pressure variations in the gaseous or liquid fluid inside a conventional medical catheter that is positioned in a patients urologic, digestive, reproductive, cardiovascular, neurological or pulmonary system. Measurement transducers are installed in a housing connectable to multiple preselected medical catheters. The transducers detect bodily functions that are transmitted to the preselected catheter from within the body. The transducers, housing, electrical interface and signal processing electronics are positioned outside the body.


The inventors have determined, contrary to the prior art and experience, how to successfully use triciribine to treat esophogeal adenocarcinoma by one or a combination of (i) administering triciribine only to patients which according to a diagnostic test described below, exhibit enhanced sensitivity to the drug; (ii) use of a described dosage level that minimizes the toxicity of the drug but yet still exhibits efficacy; or (iii) use of a described dosage regimen that minimizes the toxicity of the drug.


Patent
University of South Florida and Torey Pines Institute For Molecular Studies | Date: 2015-02-19

The present disclosure provides compositions including a bis-cyclic guanidine compound, pharmaceutical compositions including a bis-cyclic guanidine compound, methods of treatment of a condition {e.g., bacterial infection) or disease, methods of treatment using compositions or pharmaceutical compositions, and the like.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2016-07-25

The inventors have determined, contrary to the prior art and experience, how to successfully use triciribine to treat ovarian cancer by one or a combination of (i) administering triciribine only to patients which according to a diagnostic test described below, exhibit enhanced sensitivity to the drug; (ii) use of a described dosage level that minimizes the toxicity of the drug but yet still exhibits efficacy; or (iii) use of a described dosage regimen that minimizes the toxicity of the drug.


Blood brain barrier (BBB) permeabilizers, such as mannitol, can facilitate the entry of stem cells from the periphery to the stroke brain. It is unknown whether BBB permeation in the chronic stage of the disease still facilitates the entry of stem cells from the periphery to the injured brain. Evidence herein shows BBB permeation in the chronic stage of stroke assisted in the entry of stem cells from the periphery to the stroke brain. Stroke models treated with human umbilical cord stem cells (hUCBC) only (2 million viable cells), mannitol or a combination. Results revealed that hUCBC alone or combined with mannitol displayed significant behavioral and histological deficits compared to control animals, with the HUCBC-mannitol combined treatment showing improvements over hUCBC only treatments in brain cell survival in the peri-infarct area. BBB permeation in chronic stroke also lowers the effective stem cell dose necessary to improve functional outcomes.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2015-03-19

In one embodiment, a portable wastewater treatment system includes an anaerobic reactor in which organic material within the wastewater can be broken down, a membrane filter that receives wastewater from the anaerobic reactor and filters the water to produce permeate, and a small shipping container in which the reactor and the membrane filter are contained.


The present invention provides fusion peptides, compositions, methods and kits for treating, reducing the risk of, lessening the severity of, preventing, or delaying the onset of amyloid-related disorders, such as Alzheimers disease and HIV associated neurocognitive impairment.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2015-03-03

In one embodiment, a concentrically baffled reactor includes an outer housing that defines an interior space, an inlet through which material can be delivered into the interior space, an outlet through which material can be removed from the interior space, and multiple concentric baffles within the interior space that define multiple concentric reactor zones through which the material can sequentially flow to the outlet.


Patent
University of South Florida and The Regents Of The University Of California | Date: 2016-11-08

Embodiments of the present disclosure, in one aspect, relate to a beta-lactamase inhibitor, pharmaceutical compositions including a beta-lactamase inhibitor, methods of treatment of a condition (e.g., infection) or disease, methods of treatment using compositions or pharmaceutical compositions, and the like.


Patent
University of South Florida and George Mason University | Date: 2015-04-21

An implantable magnetic resonant imaging (MRI) safe stylus for biomedical devices is described. In one example, the stylus includes a set of stylus modules. One or more of the stylus modules includes a core rod formed of silicon carbide (SiC) material, a recording array mounted on the core rod, and a stimulation array mounted at a distal end of the core rod. The stylus also includes a hemispherical cap formed of SiC material. In part due to the construction and choice of materials used in the stylus, it does not substantially couple with electromagnetic fields during an MRI, for example. Therefore, the stylus does not produce excessive additional heat. The designs described herein also rely on the high thermal transport but low heat capacity of SiC to provide a thermal pathway which will conduct induced heat throughout the stylus, to dissipate heat more evenly.


Patent
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Research Institute and University of South Florida | Date: 2015-03-20

Disclosed are compositions and methods for ex vivo expansion of tumorinfiltrating lymphocytes for use in adoptive cell therapy (ACT). Also disclosed are compositions and method for identifying an agent for ex vivo expansion of tumorinfiltrating lymphocytes for use in ACT. Also disclosed are methods for treating cancer using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes expanded by the disclosed methods.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2016-11-11

Synthetically-derived S,S-heterodisubstituted disulfides that exhibit potent in vitro antibacterial activity against a variety of bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Francisella tularensis. The present invention provides compounds, methods and compositions effective to treat microbial/bacterial infections, and, especially, infections arising from bacteria which have developed resistance to conventional antibiotics.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2016-07-27

Novel antimicrobial compounds and associated methods of development are presented herein.


Patent
University of South Florida and University of Central Florida | Date: 2016-08-22

Electrospun nanofibrils and methods of preparing the same are provided. The electrospun nanofibrils comprise at least one polypeptide. A polypeptide can be dissolved in a solution, and the solution can be electrospun into a nanofibril. The solution can be added to a syringe or syringe pump, and an electric field can be applied to electrospin the at least one polypeptide.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2016-10-13

The present invention is directed to a novel class of antimicrobial agents called -AApeptides. The current invention provides various categories of -AApeptides, for example, linear -AApeptides, cyclic -AApeptides, and lipidated -AApeptides. -AApeptides of the current invention are designed to exert antimicrobial activity while being stable and non-toxic. -AApeptides also do not appear to lead to the development of microbial resistance in treated microorganisms. Thus, the disclosed -AApeptides can be used for the treatment of various medical conditions associated with pathogenic microorganisms.


Patent
University of South Florida and Transgenex Therapeutics Llc | Date: 2015-05-19

Described herein are compositions and methods of forming multi-cellular tumoroids. Also described herein are methods of using the multi-cellular tumoroids.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2015-05-18

In one embodiment, an optical spectroscopy probe includes an optical fiber having a distal tip and a microfluidic filtering chamber attached to the distal tip of the optical fiber, the chamber comprising a microfluidic membrane adapted to enable liquid to enter the chamber but prevent particles from entering the chamber.


Patent
University of South Florida and University of Central Florida | Date: 2016-08-22

Electrospun nanofibrils and methods of preparing the same are provided. The electrospun nanofibrils comprise at least one polypeptide. A polypeptide can be dissolved in a solution, and the solution can be electrospun into a nanofibril. The solution can be added to a syringe or syringe pump, and an electric field can be applied to electrospin the at least one polypeptide.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2016-06-28

A vaginal cuff surgical model and methods of manufacture and use thereof. The model includes a body (resembling a vaginal cuff) and appendages (resembling uterosacral ligaments) extending from the body. The model (body and appendages) is formed of silicone, rubber, a polymer, or other suitable material with one or more layers of mesh embedded within the polymeric material. The embedded mesh permits suture between the components of the model. The surgical model permits surgical practice of this important component of a total hysterectomy procedure via suturing across the model and to the appendages.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2016-06-24

A magnetic system for solving a quadratic optimization problem by associating each of a plurality of variables of a quadratic optimization problem with a nanomagnet of a nanomagnet array, driving the nanomagnets of the nanomagnet array to an excited state, allowing the nanomagnets of the nanomagnet array to enter a relaxed state after being driven to an excited state, wherein the nanomagnets magnetically couple with one another in the relaxed state to minimize the total magnetic coupling energy of the nanomagnet array, and sensing a magnetic coupling of the nanomagnets of the nanomagnet array to solve the quadratic optimization problem.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2016-11-07

A system and method for providing a physically unclonable function (PFU) is described. In operation, the method includes applying a domain wall shift pulse challenge to a plurality of nanowires of a domain wall memory (DWM) array, wherein the nanowires of the domain wall memory (DWM) array have process induced variations, resulting in pinning potentials which affect the velocity of the domain walls along the length of the nanowires. Following the application of the domain wall shift pulse, the response to the challenge is determined by measuring the response of the plurality of nanowires of the domain wall memory to the applied domain wall shift pulse challenge to provide a physically unclonable function (PUF) for the integrated circuit.


Beckstead J.W.,University of South Florida
Medical Decision Making | Year: 2017

Background. Brunswik's Lens Model and lens model equation (LME) have been applied extensively in medical decision making. Clinicians often face the dual challenge of formulating a judgment of patient risk for some adverse outcome and making a yes or no decision regarding a particular risk-reducing treatment option. Objective. In this article, I examine the correlation between clinical risk judgments and treatment-related decisions, referring to this linkage as "cohesion". A novel form of the LME is developed to decompose cohesion. The approach is "bifocal" in that it focuses on 2 sets of linked responses from the same individual. Methods. Data from 2 studies were analyzed to illustrate how individual differences in cohesion could be explained by differences in the parameters of the bifocal lens model equation (BiLME). Results. Cohesion varied because of differences in cognitive control, similarities in the judgment and decision policies, and a possible reliance on a subjective threshold value applied to the judgments to make decisions. The parameters of the BiLME accounted for individual differences in cohesion; however, their relative influences differed between the two studies. Conclusion. The BiLME links the results from two regression models - one linear and one logistic - based on the same set of cases. In its current form, the equation holds promise for understanding cognitive individual differences that could underlie practice variation. With minor modifications, it becomes possible to apply the equation to traditional, dual-system judgment analysis studies, where continuous judgments are compared with an ecology composed of dichotomous outcomes, or vice versa. In this regard, the BiLME is quite flexible and adds to the set of tools available to judgment analysts. © The Author(s) 2016.


OBJECTIVE:: To compare the incidence of complications (wound, infection, nonunion) among those patients treated with closed, percutaneous, and open intramedullary nailing for closed tibial shaft fractures. DESIGN:: Retrospective Review. SETTING:: Multiple trauma centers. PATIENTS:: Skeletally mature patients with closed tibia fractures amenable to treatment with an intramedullary device. INTERVENTION:: Intramedullary fixation with closed, percutaneous, or open reduction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS:: Superficial Wound Complication, Deep Infection, Nonunion. RESULTS:: 317 tibial shaft fractures in 315 patients were included in the study. 200 fractures in 198 patients were treated with closed reduction, 61 fractures in 61 patients were treated with percutaneous reduction, and 56 fractures in 56 patients were treated with formal open reduction. The superficial wound complication rate was 1% (2/200) for the closed group, 1.6% (1/61) for the percutaneous group, and 3.6% (2/56) for the open group with no statistical difference between the groups (p=0.179). The deep infection rate was 2% (4/200) for the closed group, 1.6% (1/61) for the percutaneous group, and 7.1% (4/56) for the open group with no significant difference between the groups (p=0.133). Nonunion rate was 5.0% (10/200) for the closed group, 4.9% (3/61) for the percutaneous group, and 7.1% (4/56) for the open group, with no statistical difference between the groups (p=0.492). CONCLUSIONS:: This is the largest reported series of closed tibial shaft fractures nailed with percutaneous and open reduction. Percutaneous or open reduction did not result in increased wound complications, infection, or nonunion rates. Carefully performed percutaneous or open approaches can be safely used in obtaining reduction of difficult tibial shaft fractures treated with intramedullary devices. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Morris K.L.,University of South Florida | Goldenberg J.,University of South Florida
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology | Year: 2014

From the perspective of terror management theory, men's attraction to women poses a threat in the context of salient mortality concerns. We hypothesized that literal objectification-associating women with (non-mortal) objects-reduces this threat. Reactions to advertisements featuring sexually provocative women merged with objects (e.g., a woman merged with a bottle of beer), or control ads in which the women were separated from the objects, were examined in conjunction with a mortality salience manipulation. Replicating previous research (Landau et al., 2006), men, but not women, reported lower attractiveness ratings for the (non-merged) woman in response to a morality reminder. In contrast, men's attractiveness ratings for the merged (i.e., literally objectified) woman increased when mortality was salient. Further, men primed with mortality reported higher attractiveness ratings for the merged woman, compared to the same woman depicted as separate from an object. These findings help explain the prevalence and appeal of literal objectification, and provide evidence of its existential function. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Fan L.,University of South Florida
IEEE Transactions on Power Systems | Year: 2017

This letter revisits interarea oscillation analysis using networked control analysis techniques. The power system analysis problem is analyzed as a networked control problem, specifically consensus control of homogeneous systems with static output feedback. The power grid is represented by a graph Laplacian matrix. Stability of the entire system can be evaluated by individual system dynamics and graph Laplacian's eigenvalues. Through this technique, the classical large-scale power system analysis problem is decomposed into multiple small-scale system analysis problems. Analysis of the classical two-area four-machine system is conducted by the proposed approach and compared with the small-signal analysis results from Power System Toolbox. The interarea oscillation mode is found to be related to the second smallest eigenvalue of the graph Laplacian matrix, while the local oscillation modes are related to the other eigenvalues of the graph Laplacian matrix. © 1969-2012 IEEE.


Kuykendall L.V.,University of South Florida
Annals of Plastic Surgery | Year: 2017

OBJECTIVE: Over the recent years, there has been an increase in prophylactic mastectomies with an associated increase in bilateral breast reconstruction. We aimed to compare outcomes in terms of patient satisfaction with unilateral versus bilateral breast reconstruction after deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap and implant-based reconstruction. METHODS: Patients who underwent breast reconstruction by a single surgeon between July 2011 and July 2015 were surveyed using the independently validated BREAST-Q questionnaire. Mean satisfaction scores between patients undergoing unilateral versus bilateral breast reconstruction were compared and stratified based on the type of reconstruction [eg, DIEP flap, tissue expander to implant (TE/I)]. Groups were further categorized by age (patients <55 years and ≥55 years of age) and body mass index (<24.9 and >24.9). Complications were recorded. RESULTS: Of the 308 patients included, 118 (38%) had unilateral reconstruction (42 TE/I and 76 DIEP) and 190 (62%) had bilateral reconstruction (124 TE/I and 66 DIEP). A total of 95 patient surveys were included (31% response rate). Overall, patients receiving unilateral reconstruction demonstrated increased satisfaction with outcome (P = 0.028), psychosocial well-being (P = 0.043), and sexual well-being (P = 0.002). Complication rates were similar between unilateral and bilateral reconstruction. No significant differences for satisfaction were found in the TE/I group (N = 58; unilateral, 10; bilateral, 48).In the DIEP group (N = 37; unilateral, 20; bilateral, 17), those receiving unilateral reconstruction had higher satisfaction with outcome (P = 0.013) and sexual well-being (P = 0.014).Additionally, younger patients (<55 years) were more likely to undergo bilateral reconstruction (P = 0.018). Body mass index did not have a significant association with unilateral or bilateral reconstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing DIEP flap reconstruction showed higher satisfaction with unilateral reconstruction, whereas patients receiving TE/I reconstruction, either unilateral or bilateral, were equally satisified. Additionally, younger women were more likely to undergo bilateral reconstruction, which is consistent with current data trends. When considering surgical options, unilateral DIEP flap reconstruction may provide improved outcomes in terms of patient satisfaction when compared with bilateral reconstruction in select patients. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Elston J.B.,University of South Florida
Annals of Plastic Surgery | Year: 2017

BACKGROUND: Patients with a history of prior breast augmentation and newly diagnosed breast cancer represent a rapidly expanding and unique subset of patients. Prior studies have described changes in breast parenchyma and characteristic body habitus of previously augmented patients, as well as increased rates of capsular contracture associated with breast conservation therapy. In our current study, we aimed to study the risk factors contributing to morbidity and whether recurrence rates are higher in patients with prior breast augmentation undergoing lumpectomy or mastectomy for breast cancer and identify differences in complications between these 2 groups. METHODS: Retrospective analysis approved by institutional review board was performed on patients with prior breast augmentation undergoing lumpectomy (N = 52) and mastectomy (N = 64) for breast cancer. RESULTS: Patients with prior breast augmentation undergoing mastectomy had a higher rate of complications compared with those undergoing lumpectomy (20.3% vs 5.9% respectively, P = 0.031), after adjusting for patient-specific factors including body mass index [odds ratio (OR), 0.242; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.063–0.922; P = 0.0376], tumor stage (OR, 0.257; 95% CI, 0.064–1.036; P = 0.0562), smoking status (OR, 0.244; 95% CI, 0.065–0.918; P = 0.0370), and chemotherapy (OR, 0.242; 95% CI, 0.064–0.914; P = 0.0364). Four patients (7.7%) developed late complications in the lumpectomy group with 2 developing capsular contractures, 1 had fat necrosis and 1 needed complex reconstruction because of flattening of the nipple-areolar complex. There was no difference in recurrence or tumor margins between lumpectomy and mastectomy groups. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with prior breast augmentation undergoing mastectomy have higher complication rates compared with lumpectomy even after adjusting for tumor stage. There appears to be no increased oncologic risk associated with either procedure given our current follow-up. Understanding these operative risks may help in patientsʼ decision-making process with regards to type of oncologic surgery. Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.


Rogers D.M.,University of South Florida
Physical Review E - Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics | Year: 2017

This work examines the thermodynamic consequences of the repeated partial projection model for coupling a quantum system to an arbitrary series of environments under feedback control. This paper provides observational definitions of heat and work that can be realized in current laboratory setups. In contrast to other definitions, it uses only properties of the environment and the measurement outcomes, avoiding references to the "measurement" of the central system's state in any basis. These definitions are consistent with the usual laws of thermodynamics at all temperatures, while never requiring complete projective measurement of the entire system. It is shown that the back action of measurement must be counted as work rather than heat to satisfy the second law. Comparisons are made to quantum jump (unravelling) and transition-probability based definitions, many of which appear as particular limits of the present model. These limits show that our total entropy production is a lower bound on traditional definitions of heat that trace out the measurement device. Examining the master equation approximation to the process at finite measurement rates, we show that most interactions with the environment make the system unable to reach absolute zero. We give an explicit formula for the minimum temperature achievable in repeatedly measured quantum systems. The phenomenon of minimum temperature offers an explanation of recent experiments aimed at testing fluctuation theorems in the quantum realm and places a fundamental purity limit on quantum computers. © 2017 American Physical Society.


Pathak E.B.,University of South Florida
Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities | Year: 2017

Importance: Black men have the lowest life expectancy of all major ethnic-sex populations in the USA, yet no recent studies have comprehensively examined black male mortality. Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze recent mortality trends for black men, including black to white (B to W) disparities. Design: The study design was national mortality surveillance for 2000 to 2014. Setting: The setting was the USA. Population: All black non-Hispanic males aged ≥15 years old in the USA, including institutionalized persons, were included. Exposure: The 15 leading causes of death were analyzed. Main Outcomes and Measures: Linear regression of log-transformed annual age-adjusted death rates was used to calculate average annual percent change (AAPC) in mortality. Black to white (B to W) disparity rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were compared for 2000 and 2014. The most recent available social and economic profile data were obtained from the U.S. Census of Population. Results: The top five causes of death for black men in 2014, with percentage of total deaths, were (1) heart disease (24.8%), (2) cancer (23.0%), (3) unintentional injuries (5.8%), (4) stroke (5.1%), and (5) homicide (4.3%). Significant mortality declines for 12 of the 15 leading causes occurred through 2014, with the strongest decline for HIV/AIDS (AAPC −8.0, 95% CI −8.8 to −7.1). Only Alzheimer’s disease, ranked #15, significantly increased (AAPC +2.5, 95% CI +1.4 to +3.7). Significant black disadvantage persisted for 10 of the 15 leading causes in 2014, including homicide (RR = 10.43, 95% CI 9.98 to 10.89), HIV/AIDS (RR = 8.01, 95% CI 7.50 to 8.54), diabetes (RR = 1.88, 95% CI 1.82 to 1.93), and stroke (RR = 1.61, 95% CI 1.57 to 1.65). The B to W disparity did not improve for heart disease (RR 1.24 in 2000 vs. RR 1.23 in 2014), but did improve for cancer (RR 1.39 in 2000 vs. 1.20 in 2014). Death rates were significantly lower in black men for five causes, including unintentional injuries (RR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.80 to 0.84), chronic lower respiratory diseases (RR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.78), and suicide (RR = 0.37, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.39). Conclusions and Relevance: Total mortality significantly declined for black men from 2000 to 2014, and the overall B to W disparity narrowed to RR = 1.21 (95% CI 1.20 to 1.23) in 2014. However, significant black disadvantages relative to white men persisted for 10 leading causes of death. © 2017 W. Montague Cobb-NMA Health Institute


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

TAMPA, FL (May 1, 2017)- A key piece of evidence proving how dinosaurs evolved into modern-day birds could soon be studied across the world. University of South Florida biology professor Ryan Carney, PhD, MPH, MBA, has created interactive holograms of dinosaurs, including the Archaeopteryx, which is believed to be the missing link in understanding the origin of birds and flight. Only 12 fossils have been discovered, all in Germany. Dr. Carney digitizes these fossils using X-ray, lasers and photogrammetry, then brings them "back to life" with computer animation. Using virtual reality and augmented reality, paleontologists and students could interact with the dinosaurs in 3D, allowing them to better understand their anatomy and motion without having to travel to a museum. These technologies are also integrated into Dr. Carney's Digital Dinosaurs course at the University of South Florida's Center for Virtualization & Applied Spatial Technologies (CVAST) and Integrative Biology Department. Students use the same techniques to visualize, animate, and 3D print specimens for research and educational purposes, helping foster enthusiasm for STEM fields. His work is so groundbreaking, the National Geographic Society just named Dr. Carney to the 2017 class of "Emerging Explorers," granting him $10,000 for research and exploration. This prestigious award recognizes those who are already making a difference and changing the world. He is the first faculty member at the University of South Florida to receive this honor.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

People with Parkinson’s disease may show hints of motor difficulty years before an official diagnosis, but current methods for detecting early symptoms require clinic visits and highly trained personnel. Three recent studies, however, suggest that diagnosis could be as simple as walking, talking and typing. Tests of activities such as these might eventually enable early intervention, which will be crucial for halting progression of the neurodegenerative condition if a cure becomes available. The findings are exciting, says neurologist Zoltan Mari of Johns Hopkins University. But he cautions that larger studies will be necessary to ensure that these techniques are ready for wider use. Walking: Data from wearable sensors attached to 93 Parkinson’s patients and 73 healthy controls revealed distinctive walking patterns: factors such as step distance and heel force helped to differentiate between the two groups with 87 percent accuracy, according to an analysis by Shyam Perumal and Ravi Sankar of the University of South Florida. Talking: In a study by Jan Rusz of Czech Technical University and Charles University, both in Prague, and his colleagues, participants read a list of words aloud, and each made a 90-second recording during which they described their current interests. Fifty of the participants were at high risk for developing Parkinson’s, but only 23 had begun to show symptoms. Simple acoustic features of the short speech samples—including slower speed of talking and longer duration of pauses than healthy controls—pinpointed the symptomatic participants with 70 percent accuracy. Typing: People with and without Parkinson’s were asked to listen to a folktale and transcribe it by typing. The two groups were matched for age and overall typing speed and excluded people with dementia. Luca Giancardo of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his colleagues successfully discriminated between the groups solely by analyzing key hold times (the time required to press and release a key). Their analysis performed comparably or better than motor tests currently used in clinical settings.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.spie.org

On April 13, on a sunny Spring day in central Florida, a high-tech research facility called BRIDG was officially opened in a formal ribbon-cutting ceremony. The acronym stands for "Bridging the Innovation Development Gap" and conveys the central mission of the innovative technology collective, to "bridge the gap" that exists between companies and universities doing research and the products that will benefit from that research. A DBA for the International Consortium for Advanced Manufacturing Research (ICAMR), this ambitious high-tech project is housed in the Florida Advanced Manufacturing Research Center (FAMRC), the anchor of a 500-acre site called NeoCity. The 109,000-square-foot facility will be one of the most advanced fabrication labs in the world. The facility will focus on developing new advanced semiconductor designs for micro-electronics, nano-electronics, sensors, fiber optics, and photonics. These developments will positively impact multiple industries such as aerospace, defense, and homeland security; agriculture; robotics and autonomous systems; manufacturing; energy; cybersecurity; and biomedical fields. BRIDG is housed in the Florida Advanced Manufacturing Research Center. Courtesy Osceola County. "Just one year ago, NeoCity was an open field in Central Florida," said BRIDG CEO, Chester Kennedy. "Today, it is BRIDG's new home, and we have a state-of-the-art facility to help us bring to light new and exciting ideas for our partners." BRIDG's partners now range from a Belgium-based leading international hub in nano-electronics and digital technology to a home-grown photonics and smart sensor developer. Other major partners include Harris Corporation, Tupperware Brands, Argonne National Laboratories, Kissimmee-based Photon-X, Florida International University, University of South Florida and University of Florida among others. The project was guided by University of Central Florida (UCF) and other universities, the High Tech Corridor and other private parties. UCF has been helping BRIDG pursue federal contracts that would build sensors and other photonics technology at the facility.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Scores of undocumented immigrant youth in the U.S. who are pursuing careers in the chemical sciences and related fields face an uncertain future in this country. This week's cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, provides an in-depth look at the issue. Linda Wang, a senior editor at C&EN, spoke with several undocumented immigrants in the chemical sciences. Many of these students and chemistry professionals have benefited from a 2012 Obama Administration immigration policy called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), which allows some undocumented youth who entered the U.S. as minors to apply for deferred action from deportation as well as temporary work permits. But their future remains in limbo as President Donald J. Trump considers policies to crack down on undocumented immigrants. Even if DACA remains unchanged, however, there are virtually no avenues aside from marrying a U.S. citizen to legalize a person's status. Currently, 20 states offer in-state college tuition to students who meet eligibility requirements, including undocumented students. In addition, several universities, including the University of Washington and the University of South Florida, encourage faculty and staff to participate in UndocuAlly programs, which train them on how to support the undocumented student population. Although the current political climate and recent news of deportations are making some undocumented workers and students retreat into the shadows, many who spoke with Wang said it was important to share their stories. The article, "Undocumented students remain in the shadows of the chemical sciences," is freely available here. The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio. To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

, a paleontologist at the University of South Florida, is working on developing interactive holograms of dinosaurs that allow people to see, touch and play with a number of different species without having to travel to a museum. Carney runs a course at the university's Center for Virtualisation & Applied Spatial Technologies where students are tasked with digitizing fossils using X-ray, laser and photogrammetry techniques, and then creating 3D representations. Those representations can be used in a number of ways – as holograms, in virtual or augmented reality, or even 3D-printed. The goal is to help people understand the anatomy and motion of dinosaurs, for research or educational purposes or just to get people excited about science. Among the species Carney has digitally reconstructed are the raptor and the mollusk . But his main research is into – the link between dinosaurs and modern birds. Carney was recently . "What I love about science is the intellectual freedom to pursue the questions that truly inspire me, such as the mysteries of how flight evolved and what dinosaurs looked like," he told National Geographic. "I’m also inspired by the role that new technologies can play in discovering secrets hidden within fossils for millions of years—from imaging the insides of bones to detecting original pigments in feathers and skin!"


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute's (HHMI) Medical Research Fellows Program has selected 79 talented medical and veterinary students to conduct in-depth, mentored biomedical research. Fifty-three percent of the awardees are female, the greatest representation of women in the program to date. Starting this summer, each fellow will spend a year pursuing basic, translational, or applied biomedical research at one of 32 academic or nonprofit research institutions across the United States. "The Med Fellows Program allows exceptional MD, DVM, and DDS students to effectively shift course and conduct rigorous research at top institutions throughout the country," says David Asai, senior director in science education at HHMI. "It's an extraordinary opportunity for future physicians, veterinarians, and dentists to explore the intersection of medicine and scientific discovery, and we hope that each student comes away further empowered to pursue a career as a physician-scientist." Now, 28 years after the Med Fellows Program was first launched, it has helped more than 1,700 medical, veterinary, and dental students establish a foothold in the research world. In this year's group, 18% of the fellows are from minority groups typically underrepresented in the biomedical sciences, and seven fellows will continue their research for another year. Tolu Rosanwo, a second-year fellow and medical student at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, says the program is a gift, but for Rosanwo, it was a gift that left her wanting more. "I couldn't leave just as my research was starting to show promise," she says. "I'm still intrigued by my initial question, and I want to see it through." That initial question dates back to Rosanwo's childhood, growing up with two siblings with sickle cell anemia. Her curiosity about what caused them to be sick turned into a committed desire to understand and contribute to a treatment for the disorder. Now, in the laboratory of George Daley, Dean of Harvard Medical School and an alumnus of the HHMI Investigator Program, she's trying to tackle that question. "An important and profound place to be is in between science and patients," she says. "I want to be a physician whose patient care is informed by research, and vice versa." Anna Cheng, a first-year fellow and current medical student at University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, started dabbling in the scientific method as a high school student. Science had always interested her, but when her best friend and her godmother found themselves in a fight against cancer, Cheng decided to narrow her scientific focus. "My best friend was diagnosed with leukemia and my godmother with ovarian cancer. I wanted to understand why - to figure it out," she says. "Yes, I was interested in cancer research, but I had personal factors that really drove me." During her undergraduate studies at Duke University, Cheng continued to make time for lab research, fitting it in over summers and in between coursework. And though she valued the experiences, the fleeting glimpses of bench time only whet her appetite for more. The Med Fellows Program, she says, provided her the opportunity for more sustained exposure to research. "I feel so fortunate, because now I get to pursue a project for an entire year," she says. After a thoughtful pause, she amends her statement. "But the program's experience isn't really just a year. It's something that will serve me well for the rest of my career." The Med Fellows Program takes a multilevel mentoring approach to help incoming fellows get off to a strong start, make new connections, and access a network of support throughout their fellowship year. Various meetings bring the fellows together to connect with newly minted Med Fellow alumni, early-career faculty, and senior investigators to participate in seminars and learn from physician-scientists at various career stages. The most direct form of support comes from each fellow's mentor. Cathy Wu, an alumna from the early days of the Med Fellows Program and associate professor at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, will be mentoring her third med fellow this fall. "The fellows are such a terrific bunch - they're brimming with enthusiasm, super smart, and eager to learn," Wu says. As someone who took great inspiration from her own mentors as a student in the program, Wu emphasizes that the mentor-mentee relationship is a crucial part in learning how to approach investigation. "Part of the Med Fellows Program is getting a sense of the opportunities and resources available - having the latitude to explore and learn about the investigative process. When I was a fellow, the program helped me cement research as part of my medical career," she says. "I'm eager for these students to have their year, too." In collaboration with HHMI, five partners - the American Society of Human Genetics, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy, Foundation Fighting Blindness, and Parkinson's Foundation - will fund 8 of the 79 aspiring physician- and veterinarian- scientists, bringing the program's total investment to $3.4 million. The Howard Hughes Medical Institute plays an important role in advancing scientific research and education in the United States. Its scientists, located across the country and around the world, have made important discoveries that advance both human health and our fundamental understanding of biology. The Institute also aims to transform science education into a creative, interdisciplinary endeavor that reflects the excitement of real research. HHMI's headquarters are located in Chevy Chase, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C.


Dr. Anthony L. D'Ambrosio, Board Certified Neurosurgeon & Director, Neurosurgeons of New Jersey, has joined The Expert Network©, an invitation-only service for distinguished professionals. Dr. D'Ambrosio has been chosen as a Distinguished Doctor™ based on peer reviews and ratings, numerous recognitions, and accomplishments achieved throughout his career. Dr. D'Ambrosio outshines others in his field due to his extensive educational background, numerous awards and recognitions, and career longevity. After graduating from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in 1999, Dr. D’Ambrosio went on to pursue his internship and Neurological Surgery residency at the Neurological Institute of New York at Columbia University, serving as chief resident in his final year. He then completed a Skull Base and Cerebrovascular Surgery Fellowship in the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of South Florida in Tampa. He is the recipient of many awards and honors, such as New Jersey Monthly’s Best Doctor Award and (201) Health’s Bergen’s Top Doctors, among many others. With 10 years dedicated to medicine, Dr. D'Ambrosio brings a wealth of knowledge to his industry, and in particular, to his area of expertise, neurosurgery. When asked why he decided to pursue a career in medicine, Dr. D'Ambrosio said: "When I was little, my eldest grandfather, whom I never met, passed away of heart disease. Then in 1999, my mom's dad died from the same disease. I knew then that I wanted to go into medicine to help people, even if it was for something other than cardiology." Dr. D’Ambrosio’s vast knowledge, training, and expertise have made him one of the go to neurosurgeons in the Tri-State area. Today, he devotes his practice to the treatment of brain tumors, skull base tumors, meningiomas, acoustic neuromas, pituitary tumors, Chiari malformation, and microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm. Using state-of-the-art technology, Dr. D'Ambrosio is able to perform complex neurological procedures with much lower complication percentages than traditional approaches. As Co-Director of Gamma Knife Perfexion Program at Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, N.J., Dr. D’Ambrosio uses revolutionary, non-invasive radiation beams that offer extremely precise, concentrated radiation to shrink and stop the growth of tumors and other cranial abnormalities, including pain and movement disorders, that would otherwise require surgery. As a thought-leader in his specialty, Dr. D’Ambrosio is widely regarded for his groundbreaking research in neurosurgery. He has published numerous peer-reviewed journal articles on the subjects of neuro-oncology, surgical management of brain metastases, and surgical strategies for giant pituitary adenomas, among many others. He is a big proponent of making medical decisions based on proven scientific evidence to offer the best possible service for his patients. Dr. D’Ambrosio is proud to pass on his knowledge to those that want to follow in his footsteps as an Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery at Columbia University. This prominent position in his specialty gives Dr. D’Ambrosio a unique vantage point from which to keep a close eye on prevailing trends in neurosurgery. In particular, he notes a promising advancement in getting patients access to healthcare through technology and social media: "I think what we're starting to see is a connection between social media and telemedicine. The barriers to health care are dropping, and the world is becoming flat with respect to people getting their medical care and information from all around the world. I'm very interested in seeing trends in social media connecting patients to the right doctors along with apps and telemedicine getting the right people to talk. So all those barriers, whether they be physical barriers or transportation barriers, are starting to drop which is really great for neurosurgery because some of the things we do are so refined and siloed. I think we're going to see a major uptaking in collaboration between doctors that will enable patients to find the right specialists." For more information, visit Dr. D’Ambrosio's profile on the Expert Network here: https://expertnetwork.co/members/anthony-l-d'ambrosio-md-faans/24e2c5f808fdb608 The Expert Network© has written this news release with approval and/or contributions from Dr. Anthony L. D'Ambrosio. The Expert Network© is an invitation-only reputation management service that is dedicated to helping professionals stand out, network, and gain a competitive edge. The Expert Network selects a limited number of professionals based on their individual recognitions and history of personal excellence.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville’s Greg Budzban, PhD, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, will speak at “A Focus on Educational Assessment: Advancing African American Education” conference in Washington, D.C. on Monday, April 3. The conference will be held at the Keck Center of the National Academies and is designed to address challenges in the K–12 and college admissions arenas. Budzban will participate in the session “Investing in Education Interventions to Improve,” concerning academic interventions and assessments focused on improving educational outcomes for African American students. The invitation came on behalf of the Educational Testing Service (ETS), ACT®, the Center for Assessment, the College Board®, the Learning Policy Institute, and the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine. “I am honored to represent SIUE before the National Academies,” Budzban said. “This is a result of my collaborations and NSF grants with Bob Moses and ETS around next-generation curricula and assessments, and my presentation will primarily focus on those. This also provides an opportunity to present a vision of how a regional comprehensive university in a major metropolitan area can play an important role in advancing African American STEM education.” Budzban became CAS dean during summer 2015 after serving as chair of the Department of Mathematics and acting director of the STEM Education Research Center at Southern Illinois University Carbondale (SIUC). He brought more than 25 years of academic experience, along with six years of professional experience from Martin Marietta Aerospace, to SIUE. Budzban received a bachelor’s in mathematics, a master’s in theoretical computer science, and a doctorate in mathematics from the University of South Florida. Central to SIUE’s exceptional and comprehensive education, the College of Arts and Sciences has 19 departments and 85 areas of study. More than 300 full-time faculty/instructors deliver classes to more than 8,000 undergraduate and graduate students. Faculty help students explore diverse ideas and experiences, while learning to think and live as fulfilled, productive members of the global community. Study abroad, service-learning, internships, and other experiential learning opportunities better prepare SIUE students not only to succeed in our region’s workplaces, but also to become valuable leaders who make important contributions to our communities.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

ST. PETERSBURG, FL (April 19, 2017)- More than 30,000 fish species exist. But it's always been a guessing game on where they originate. A new technique developed by researchers at the University of South Florida College of Marine Science is paving the way in discovering where a wide-range of species spawn. It's a difficult task as 95% of fish in the world release their eggs into the water and drift away. Marine biologists are gathering samples of hundreds of free-floating fish eggs in the Gulf of Mexico. They then extract DNA from each one and amplify and sequence a specific barcoding gene. That gene is then compared to a database, revealing the fish's identity. Previous studies have looked for eggs belonging to a specific fish species. This work is groundbreaking as it determines the complete composition of fish egg communities, which could contain more than a dozen species. "This is pioneering work. They can be underneath everyone's noses for decades and no one would know it, they just get called fish eggs they have no idea what species they are," says co-lead investigator Ernst Peebles. Since the fish eggs are only a few hours old, this technique allows researchers to assign spawning locations with certainty, as opposed to methods of looking for older larvae which could have been floating in the ocean for weeks or even months. Identifying spawning sites will enable better management and protection of critical habitats for economically and ecologically important fish species in the Gulf of Mexico. This innovative research is a positive outcome from the tragic Deepwater Horizon oil spill. It's funded by the RESTORE Act, an acronym for Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities and Revived Economies of the Gulf Coast States. In addition to the 2-year pilot study, USF researchers are competing to win funds for an additional 15 years of monitoring and special studies. The results could provide an essential baseline of fish spawning habitats in the Gulf of Mexico, which is critical knowledge should another disaster occur.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Ice cores drilled from a glacier in a cave in Transylvania offer new evidence of how Europe's winter weather and climate patterns fluctuated during the last 10,000 years, known as the Holocene period. The cores provide insights into how the region's climate has changed over time. The researchers' results, published this week in the journal Scientific Reports, could help reveal how the climate of the North Atlantic region, which includes the U.S., varies on long time scales. The project, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Romanian Ministry of Education, involved scientists from the University of South Florida (USF), University of Belfast, University of Bremen and Stockholm University, among other institutions. Researchers from the Emil Racoviță Institute of Speleology in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, and USF's School of Geosciences gathered their evidence in the world's most-explored ice cave and oldest cave glacier, hidden deep in the heart of Transylvania in central Romania. With its towering ice formations and large underground ice deposit, Scărișoara Ice Cave is among the most important scientific sites in Europe. Scientist Bogdan Onac of USF and his colleague Aurel Perșoiu, working with a team of researchers in Scărișoara Ice Cave, sampled the ancient ice there to reconstruct winter climate conditions during the Holocene period. Over the last 10,000 years, snow and rain dripped into the depths of Scărișoara, where they froze into thin layers of ice containing chemical evidence of past winter temperature changes. Until now, scientists lacked long-term reconstructions of winter climate conditions. That knowledge gap hampered a full understanding of past climate dynamics, Onac said. "Most of the paleoclimate records from this region are plant-based, and track only the warm part of the year -- the growing season," says Candace Major, program director in NSF's Directorate for Geosciences, which funded the research. "That misses half the story. The spectacular ice cave at Scărișoara fills a crucial piece of the puzzle of past climate change in recording what happens during winter." Reconstructions of Earth's climate record have relied largely on summer conditions, charting fluctuations through vegetation-based samples, such as tree ring width, pollen and organisms that thrive in the warmer growing season. Absent, however, were important data from winters, Onac said. Located in the Apuseni Mountains, the region surrounding the Scărișoara Ice Cave receives precipitation from the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea and is an ideal location to study shifts in the courses storms follow across East and Central Europe, the scientists say. Radiocarbon dating of minute leaf and wood fragments preserved in the cave's ice indicates that its glacier is at least 10,500 years old, making it the oldest cave glacier in the world and one of the oldest glaciers on Earth outside the polar regions. From samples of the ice, the researchers were able to chart the details of winter conditions growing warmer and wetter over time in Eastern and Central Europe. Temperatures reached a maximum during the mid-Holocene some 7,000 to 5,000 years ago and decreased afterward toward the Little Ice Age, 150 years ago. A major shift in atmospheric dynamics occurred during the mid-Holocene, when winter storm tracks switched and produced wetter and colder conditions in northwestern Europe, and the expansion of a Mediterranean-type climate toward southeastern Europe. "Our reconstruction provides one of the very few winter climate reconstructions, filling in numerous gaps in our knowledge of past climate variability," Onac said. Warming winter temperatures led to rapid environmental changes that allowed the northward expansion of Neolithic farmers toward mainland Europe, and the rapid population of the continent. "Our data allow us to reconstruct the interplay between Atlantic and Mediterranean sources of moisture," Onac said. "We can also draw conclusions about past atmospheric circulation patterns, with implications for future climate changes. Our research offers a long-term context to better understand these changes." The results from the study tell scientists how the climate of the North Atlantic region, which includes the U.S., varies on long time scales. The scientists are continuing their cave study, working to extend the record back 13,000 years or more.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Tampa, Fla. (May 1, 2017) - At the 24rd Annual Conference of the American Society of Neural Therapy and Repair (ASNTR), held April 27-29 in Clearwater Beach, Florida, ASNTR awarded The 2017 Bernard Sanberg Memorial Award for Brain Repair to Li-Ru Zhao, PhD, MD, a tenured Associate Professor, Department of Neurosurgery, State University of New York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University and research scientist at the Syracuse (NY) Veterans Administration Medical Center. The award, presented to her on Saturday April 29, recognized her significant research contributions in acute and chronic stroke, vascular dementia, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Zhao received her MD from Hebei Medical College in Shijizhaung China in 1982 and her PhD in neuroscience from the Wallenberg Neuroscience Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden in 2004. She carried out postdoctoral work at the University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis. She subsequently served as a researcher and assistant at Northwestern University, and associate professor at Louisiana State University prior to coming to SUNY Upstate Medical University and the Syracuse VA Medical Center. Dr. Zhao's extensive investigation into potential treatments for the debilitating effects of stroke includes the first demonstration of the neuroprotective properties of stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and SCF + G-CSF combinations in treating the effects of acute and chronic stroke. She discovered that these growth factors - naturally occurring substances capable of stimulating cellular growth, proliferation and healing - could be used alone or in combination to reduced brain damage from stroke and improve motor function. Her many studies into SCF and G-CSF used a variety of approaches, including molecular and cell biology as well as brain and cell imaging. Her contributions to Alzheimer's disease (AD) research have investigated how amyloid plaques in the brain (one of the causes thought to be behind the development of AD) might be cleared by injections of bone marrow-derived monocytes/macrophages (BMDMs) and SCF+G-CSF, all of which have been found to be low in the blood and bone marrow of AD patients. In her most recent stroke studies she is investigating Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), the most common yet rare form of hereditary stroke disorder. Using animal models, she found that neural stem cells were radically reduced in patients with CADSIL, causing cognitive impairment. Currently, there is no drug that can improve the functional or delay the progressive brain damage caused by CADASIL. Her laboratory is currently studying how the bone marrow stem cell factors (SCF and G-CSF) repair the brain in both AD and CADASIL and is working at determining how the bone marrow stem cell factors regulate neuronal process formation, synaptic generation, and stem cell growth and differentiation. "Dr. Zhao's studies have significantly advanced our understanding about the contribution of SCF and G-CSF in slowing the progression of Alzheimer's disease," said Dr. Barry J. Hoffer, MD, PhD, scientist emeritus at the National Institutes of Health and an adjunct professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "She has also carried out exceptional service activities as a peer reviewer for grants for NIH, AHA, and Alzheimer's Association, as well as for a large number of scientific journals." According to Dr. Hoffer, she has successfully balanced her career and personal life, including raising an "exceptionally gifted" son who is currently a resident in neurosurgery at University Hospitals of Cleveland. The award Dr. Zhao received is named for Bernard Sanberg, father of Dr. Paul Sanberg (University of South Florida), a co-founder of the ASNTR. After Bernard Sanberg died of a stroke in 1999, the award bearing his name was established and is presented by the ASNTR annually to an individual who has made outstanding research contributions in the field of neural therapy and repair. The award, first presented in 2000, is presented every year at ASNTR's Annual Meeting. Recent past winners of the Bernard Sanberg Memorial Award for Brain Repair include: Mariana E. Emborg, PhD, MD, University of Wisconsin-Madison, John D. Elsworth, PhD, Yale School of Medicine, Douglas Kondziolka, MD, NYU Langone Medical Center; Mike Modo, PhD, University of Pittsburgh; Timothy Collier, PhD, Michigan State University; Donald Eugene Redmond, MD, Yale University; Shinn-Zong Lin, MD, PhD, China Medical University; Howard J. Federoff, MD, PhD, Georgetown University; Barry J. Hoffer, MD, PhD, National Institutes of Health ASNTR's 25th Annual Conference will be held April 25-29, 2018 in Clearwater Beach, Florida. For more information, email Donna Morrison dmorriso@health.usf.edu or visit the ASNTR website http://www. ASNTR is a society for basic and clinical neuroscientists using a variety of technologies to better understand how the nervous system functions and establish new procedures for its repair in response to trauma or neurodegenerative disease. Member scientists employ stem/neural cell transplantation, gene therapy, trophic factor and neuroprotective compound administration and other approaches.


"We are thrilled that Dr. Adonis Maiquez is joining our team and together we are committed to cementing Carillon's status as a world-class wellness resort," said James Zenni, Chairman of Carillon Miami Wellness Resort's Board of Directors and President and Chief Executive Officer of Z Capital Partners. "Dr. Adonis Maiquez brings to Carillon Miami unparalleled experience in the wellness space, and we are confident that our guests will appreciate his deep knowledge about achieving total wellness. This is an important step in continuing to improve the guest and resident experience and provide them access to premier medical professionals across an array of specialties, including orthopedics, reconstruction, dentistry, functional medicine and other areas of interest." Dr. Adonis Maiquez was a post-grad and fellow in the Department of Surgery and Neurosurgery at the University of South Florida in Tampa, where he developed expertise in neurosurgery, neuro-oncology and neuro-endocrinology. In addition, Dr. Adonis Maiquez has pursued advanced training in pain management and family and preventive medicine. He is fluent in English and Spanish. ABOUT CARILLON MIAMI WELLNESS RESORT: Located along the white sand shores of Miami Beach, Carillon Miami Wellness Resort presents an authentic and specialized approach to health, wellness and complete well-being. Exuding the "luxury of wellness," the resort focuses on aligning physical, mental and spiritual health by offering a comprehensive retreat, the largest spa in the region (65,000 sq. ft.), a one-of-a-kind Thermal Experience and an integrative medical wellness center. The resort features 150 spacious one- and two-bedroom suites, ranging in size from 720 – 1,200 sq. ft. An array of recreational activities are at guests' fingertips, with over 200 fitness classes offered each week, access to the resort's two-story indoor rock wall and four pools located throughout the property: the Sunrise Pool, Cabana Pool, Sunset Pool and the adult-only rooftop Atlantic Pool. Serving fresh, locally-sourced, cuisine, the resort features four dining venues including Thyme, Carillon Lounge, The Cabana, and the Juice Bar. Carillon Miami Wellness Resort promotes a path to discovery and provides tools for a healthier lifestyle extending beyond each guest's stay. Carillon Miami Wellness Resort is a member of The Leading Hotels of the World and Leading Spas. For more information, please visit www.carillonhotel.com. ABOUT Z CAPITAL PARTNERS Z Capital Group, L.L.C. is a leading alternative asset management firm with $2.3 billion in regulatory assets under management across complementary private equity and credit businesses. Z Capital manages both opportunistic, value-oriented private equity and credit funds with offices in New York, NY and Lake Forest, IL. Z Capital's investors are some of the largest and most sophisticated global institutional investors in North America, Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East including, public and corporate pension funds, university endowments, foundations, sovereign wealth funds, central banks, and insurance companies. For more information, please visit www.zcapgroup.net. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/carillon-miami-wellness-resort-announces-partnership-with-leading-functional-medicine-expert-adonis-maiquez-md-300440816.html


OTTAWA, Ontario--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Transforming the viewing experience worldwide, Espial today announced that Aamir Hussain, Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of CenturyLink, Inc., the 3rd largest telecommunications service provider in the USA with $18 billion in revenues, will stand for election to Espial’s board of directors at this year’s Annual General Meeting to be held on June 13, 2017. Aamir Hussain, leads product, platforms, infrastructure, cloud, network operations and information technology for CenturyLink (NYSE: CTL), a global communications, hosting, cloud and IT services company that provides broadband, voice, video, data and managed services to millions of customers. Prior to CenturyLink, Aamir was the Managing Director & Chief Technology Officer of Liberty Global in Europe (NASDAQ: LBTYA/B/K), one of the largest cable companies in the world serving 48 million RGUs, where he led the technology and network organizations across 13 countries in Europe spanning voice, video, broadband and wireless. While at Liberty Global, Aamir led the development of several next generation video and broadband solutions, along with mobile network solutions across the European cable footprint. Aamir has also held senior executive positions at Covad Communications, AT&T, Qwest and Telus. Aamir has first-hand involvement in launching various next generation video platforms and cloud strategies across multiple operators at both CenturyLink and Liberty Global. Aamir has completed business, telecom and strategy training at Harvard Business School and Insead in France. He also holds a Masters in Electrical Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology and a Bachelor in Electrical Engineering from University of South Florida. “As a board, we are continually evaluating and considering candidates to strengthen our board in order to bring new perspectives and thinking” said Peter Seeligsohn, Chairman, Espial. “I am very pleased to announce Aamir Hussain as a nominee to our Board of Directors. There are few in the industry who have Aamir’s depth of knowledge and unique industry perspective, given his European and North American experience and from having held executive roles in both telecom and cable companies. His experience will help Espial further expand in the European cable and broader telecom markets. Aamir’s leadership and strategic perspective will be a valuable addition to our board in shaping future strategy and executing on our goals to the benefit of our shareholders.” “Espial has developed an exciting portfolio of cloud, device and user experience products and solutions. Their recent success across service providers in Europe and North America to launch next generation video services is impressive" said Aamir Hussain. "Our industry is going through a transformation in technology, delivery and business models and Espial’s focus around RDK, IP, and Cloud are important elements in helping service providers evolve to next generation services. I look forward to working with the Board and management to help them achieve their vision." With Espial, video service providers create responsive and engaging subscriber viewing experiences incorporating powerful content discovery and intuitive navigation. Service providers achieve ‘Web-speed’ innovation with Espial’s flexible, open software leveraging RDK and HTML5 technologies. This provides competitive advantage through an immersive and personalized user experience, seamlessly blending advanced TV services with OTT content. With customers spanning six continents, Espial is headquartered in Ottawa, Canada, with R&D centers in Seattle, Montreal, Silicon Valley, Cambridge and Lisbon, and with sales offices in North America, Europe and Asia. For more information, visit www.espial.com. This press release contains information that is forward looking information with respect to Espial within the meaning of Section 138.4(9) of the Ontario Securities Act (forward looking statements) and other applicable securities laws. In some cases, forward-looking information can be identified by the use of terms such as "may", "will", "should", "expect", "plan", "anticipate", "believe", "intend", "estimate", "predict", "potential", "continue" or the negative of these terms or other similar expressions concerning matters that are not historical facts. In particular, statements or assumptions about, economic conditions, ongoing or future benefits of existing and new customer, and partner relationships or new board nominees, our position or ability to capitalize on the move to more open systems by service providers, existing or future opportunities for the company and products (including our ability to successfully execute on market opportunities and secure new customer wins) and any other statements regarding Espial's objectives (and strategies to achieve such objectives), future expectations, beliefs, goals or prospects are or involve forward-looking information. Forward-looking information is based on certain factors and assumptions. While the company considers these assumptions to be reasonable based on information currently available to it, they may prove to be incorrect. Forward-looking information, by its nature necessarily involves known and unknown risks and uncertainties. A number of factors could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements or could cause our current objectives and strategies to change, including but not limited to changing conditions and other risks associated with the on-demand TV software industry and the market segments in which Espial operates, competition, Espial’s ability to continue to supply existing customers and partners with its products and services and avoid being displaced by competitive offerings, effectively grow its integration and support capabilities, execute on market opportunities, develop its distribution channels and generate increased demand for its products, economic conditions, technological change, unanticipated changes in our costs, regulatory changes, litigation, the emergence of new opportunities, many of which are beyond our control and current expectation or knowledge. Additional risks and uncertainties affecting Espial can be found in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Results of Operations and Financial Condition and its Annual Information Form for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2016 on SEDAR at www.sedar.com. If any of these risks or uncertainties were to materialize, or if the factors and assumptions underlying the forward-looking information were to prove incorrect, actual results could vary materially from those that are expressed or implied by the forward-looking information contained herein and our current objectives or strategies may change. Espial assumes no obligation to update or revise any forward looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements that speak only as of the date hereof.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

WASHINGTON, DC, May 05, 2017 /24-7PressRelease/ -- In 1963 President Kennedy introduced Small Business Week and in 2017 President Trump in his April 28th proclamation declared April 30 - May 6 as Small Business Week, stating, "Small business owners embody the American pioneering spirit and remind us that determination can turn aspiration into achievement. This week, we affirm our commitment to removing government barriers to the success of American small businesses." In honor of Small Business Week, Pure Air Control Services, a certified MBE and small business acknowledges that "its clients have allowed us be a part of creating a healthy, more comfortable and energy efficient building environment benefiting the building and its hard working employees with healthy indoor air," stated Alan Wozniak, President/CEO of Pure Air Control Services. As an Inc. 5000 2016 honoree, Pure Air Control Services is among the elite small business that had a 3 year growth of 229% and listed as the #1638 company in the US adding many jobs to the economy. The Inc. 5000 2016 List of America's Fastest-Growing private companies wield powers like strategy, service, and innovation. Pure Air Control Services, headquartered in Clearwater, FL was honored as the # 8 fastest growing environmental services firm in the US and #1 (indoor) environmental services firm in the US. Pure Air Control Services 3 year growth was 229% and listed as the #1638 company in the US. "We are proud to be a small business and be listed among this prestigious INC Magazine 5000 fastest growing companies in the US" stated Alan Wozniak, president/CEO of Pure Air Control Services. "This honor is a testament to all of our teams focus on customer service, improved IAQ in the workplace, green clean initiatives and energy savings results." Visit Pure Air Control Services at the upcoming FAPPO Conference in Orlando FL or BOMA Conference (click links for details) Nashville, TN. More info on upcoming events: http://pureaircontrols.com/event-calendar About Pure Air Control Services: Pure Air Control Services, Inc. was established in 1984 as a small mechanical contracting firm. Today, the firm sets the industry standard for indoor environmental quality diagnosis, laboratory and remediation. Pure Air Control Services expanding roster of valued clients: Harvard University, Toyota, Northrop Grumman, University of South Florida - Student Housing, VA Medical Center - James Haley, Polk County School District, Hillsborough County School District, Pasco County Government, General Services Administration (GSA) - Sam Gibbons Federal Courthouse, Tampa Bay Trane, Johnson Controls Inc (JCI) , Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Allstate Insurance; Carrier Air Conditioning; Naval Air Warfare Center, Orlando; and Naval Air Station - King's Bay, Georgia, and many other Fortune 500 companies, school boards, and city, state, and county governments, making Pure Air Control Services the reliable industry leader in IAQ Pure Air's nationally performed services include: Building Sciences Evaluation; Building Health Check; a CDC ELITE Environmental Microbiology Laboratory; Environmental Project Management; HVAC New Life Restoration and PURE-Steam Coil Cleaning/Mold Remediation Services, among other indoor environmental services For more information on Pure Air Control Services, Inc. please contact Alan Wozniak (800) 422-7873 ext 804 or visit http://www.pureaircontrols.com


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The system offers surgeons the ability to customize implant types and supports a multitude of techniques, depending on surgeon preference. Also, RELINE Trauma enhances the surgeon's ability to dial-in fracture correction through a dual rack system achieving independent lordosis restoration and parallel compression/distraction for ligamentotaxis. This enables procedures to be completed by one surgeon rather than two, helping reduce the total cost of the procedure. "The versatility of the new RELINE Trauma system allows me to address trauma surgery circumferentially," said Juan Uribe, M.D., Associate Professor, Department of Neurosurgery, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida. "NuVasive has removed the need for a second surgeon and eliminated hours in comparison to the alternative technique. RELINE Trauma is a game-changer in spine." In addition, the RELINE Trauma Fracture Frame instrumentation allows for controlled fracture correction throughout the procedure, with or without a rod present in the construct. The systems also allows surgeons the ability to place various rod diameters and/or materials before or after fracture correction, greatly improving the ability to reduce fractures more easily and reproducibly. "The launch of RELINE Trauma is a key milestone in our continued commitment to industry-leading innovation that delivers untapped clinical and economic value for our surgeon partners," said Jason Hannon, president and chief operating officer of NuVasive. "RELINE Trauma will help define the standard of trauma care for spine, with its ability to dramatically reduce time and provide complete versatility intra-operatively. The system will be the foundation of our trauma portfolio as we invest further in this key market." RELINE Trauma is further integrated with proprietary NuVasive Computer Assisted Technologies such as NVM5®, NuvaLine™, NuvaMap® and NuvaMap® O.R., all within the Integrated Global Alignment® (iGA) platform. iGA allows surgeons to calculate, correct and confirm spinal alignment through preoperative planning, intraoperative assessment, and postoperative confirmation for their trauma cases. Additionally, constructs are further enhanced with the integration of the Bendini® system which expedites manual rod manipulation via computer-assisted bend instructions. About NuVasive NuVasive, Inc. (NASDAQ: NUVA) is a world leader in minimally invasive, procedurally-integrated spine solutions. From complex spinal deformity to degenerative spinal conditions, NuVasive is transforming spine surgery with innovative technologies designed to deliver reproducible and clinically proven surgical outcomes. NuVasive's highly differentiated, procedurally-integrated solutions include access instruments, implantable hardware and software systems for surgical planning and reconciliation technology that centers on achieving the global alignment of the spine. With $962 million in revenues (2016), NuVasive has an approximate 2,300 person workforce in more than 40 countries around the world. For more information, please visit www.nuvasive.com. Forward-Looking Statements NuVasive cautions you that statements included in this news release that are not a description of historical facts are forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties, assumptions and other factors which, if they do not materialize or prove correct, could cause NuVasive's results to differ materially from historical results or those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. The potential risks and uncertainties which contribute to the uncertain nature of these statements include, among others, risks associated with acceptance of the Company's surgical products and procedures by spine surgeons, development and acceptance of new products or product enhancements, clinical and statistical verification of the benefits achieved via the use of NuVasive's products (including the iGA® platform), the Company's ability to effectually manage inventory as it continues to release new products, its ability to recruit and retain management and key personnel, and the other risks and uncertainties described in NuVasive's news releases and periodic filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. NuVasive's public filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission are available at www.sec.gov. NuVasive assumes no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances arising after the date on which it was made. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nuvasive-launches-new-spinal-trauma-portfolio-300442151.html


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: motherboard.vice.com

A version of this post originally appeared on Tedium , a twice-weekly newsletter that hunts for the end of the long tail. Forcing education and entertainment together is a great way to ensure you don't really do either all that well. Case in point: The Jack Hanna repeat wasteland, targeted toward young teens as part of an advertising loophole, that is FCC-mandated educational television on broadcast stations. Games are no exception. In the infancy of computers, educators quickly figured out that computer games could be a great vessel for both education and entertainment. Problem was, the educators were always better at the teaching part than the game part. But that didn't stop edutainment from having its big moment in the educational spotlight in the early 1990s. "I thought I read somewhere that she had won a big typing contest, or that she ran a school, or something. There really is no Mavis? I can't believe it." — Brent Bynum, a Philadelphia man who learned, after purchasing a copy of Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing, that Beacon is not a real person but a composite person whose face is a model's and whose name is partly stolen from Mavis Staples. Of note: The cover model had three-inch fingernails at the time of her 1986 cover shot, which seems like a bad choice if you're a typist. Math Blaster game box. Image: GameFAQs The tutor who became a multi-millionaire edutainment innovator because she went to the wrong restaurant In the late 1970s, it was pretty common for people in California and elsewhere to have an "aha" moment as they introduced a computer to their homes for the first time. Famously, for example, the roots of Sierra On-Line—the groundbreaking games company behind such popular game series as King's Quest and Leisure Suit Larry—came about in 1979, after Ken Williams bought an Apple II and his wife, Roberta, felt like the text adventure games she was playing on the machine would be better if they had graphics. The California couple soon had the graphical adventure game market cornered. Professional tutor and fellow Californian Jan Davidson had a similar discovery. Davidson bought an Apple II to help get her after-school tutoring business off the ground, only to find that there weren't any applications to assist with the cause. So, according to the New York Times, she contracted one out. The speed-reader program she created would turn out to be a building block for the modern education software industry, but not one as fundamental as a game she came up with as a follow-up. Math Blaster was inspired by the programs for math on the system at the time, which seemed to punish the student for an incorrect answer. "They were dull and if a kid missed something they would make this horrible 'beep,'" Davidson recalled of her competition to the Los Angeles Times at the time. "Here you had this powerful tool for teaching and all you were giving a kid was negative feedback every time they hit the wrong key. And it was loud enough that everyone in the room knew that Johnny had made a boo-boo." This is a bad problem to get wrong.So Davidson worked with a programmer to create a program that could be legitimately be considered both fun, and, well, math. It quickly became much more than a side hustle, especially after Davidson's husband, Bob, convinced the reluctant software entrepreneur to jump into the software business with both feet—a decision she made reluctantly at the time, but a move that proved very lucrative. (Fun fact: That decision came about because she was meeting with a software publishing company's rep to talk about selling off her programs, but the rep was a no-show. Per the Los Angeles Times, the rep did show up—but at a different location of the same restaurant, on the other side of town. The lesson? Serendipity and luck go hand-in-hand.) With Math Blaster as its centerpiece, Davidson and Associates became an educational publishing giant, publishing dozens of titles a year, with Jan Davidson emphasizing the importance of the games' education content. Eventually, it became so big that it could focus on more than edutainment: In 1993, the company acquired a formative version of Blizzard Entertainment in the days before the release of WarCraft—a shrewd purchase of a company that would become one of the largest game developers in the world—but generally, it stuck to its education software guns. Davidson's namesake company was once so synonymous with education that its domain was Education.com. But by the late '90s, the Davidsons had sold their company and parlayed its success into philanthropic efforts. (The Math Blaster series continues without them, gaining a Facebook-based edition in 2015.) The couple founded the Davidson Institute for Talent Development, a school based in Reno, Nevada, in 1999. They chose their endeavor because it targeted gifted students, a segment of the student population they thought highly underserved. In their 2005 book Genius Denied: How to Stop Wasting Our Brightest Young Minds, they explain how they got on such a sharply different path: People always ask us why, when we sold Davidson & Associates, our educational software company, and entered the world of philanthropy, we chose to work with gifted children. Our reply is that we have always wanted to help children become successful learners. Even before founding Davidson & Associates, Jan taught English at the college level and tutored children of all ages. Bob's ideas for our math and reading software helped thousands of students discover that learning can be as much fun as playing video games. We want all children to have these "Aha' moments. So we searched for the population that traditional schools serve least, the population that is least likely to learn and achieve to its potential. We believe that highly gifted students are that population. As you can guess by that statement, the goal of entertaining was always secondary to education at Davidson and Associates. And while lots of kids have good memories of Math Blaster and other games of the edutainment era, it's a game that receives a surprising amount of retrospective criticism from developers today. In fact, there's a surprising nickname for games of its ilk: "chocolate covered broccoli." "Whereas in the 1980s Nintendo released an average of one or two new Mario titles a year, the 1990s saw a flood of ill-conceived Mario spin-offs, such as Mario Teaches Typing, Mario's Game Gallery, and Mario's Time Machine. Although some of the worst titles were produced under license by third party developers, such as Philips and Interplay, the onslaught of mediocre Mario games nearly destroyed Nintendo's most valuable franchise." — Authors Gloria Barczak and David Wesley, discussing the dilution of the Mario brand in the early 90s in their book Innovation and Marketing in the Video Game Industry. While this dilution is largely associated by modern gamers with Nintendo's ill-advised decision to let Philips make Mario and Zelda games for its CD-i console, the three examples cited the the authors are all edutainment games for the PC. (They let Interplay make bad edutainment games for the PC, but wouldn't let id Software port Super Mario Bros. 3? Weird logic.) The marketing dilution situation wasn't remedied until the 1996 release of Super Mario 64. The Internet Archive has Mario Teaches Typing, by the way. Practice your home row. "Chocolate-covered broccoli": An evocative term that has come to define the edutainment era If (like me) you do a search on Newspapers.com for the term "edutainment," you'll find that it had a surge in interest as a term in the early 90s—a point after which some of the successes of the model had been proven by games like Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? and The Oregon Trail, two games in which education and entertainment found perhaps the perfect balance. (In the case of The Oregon Trail, in fact, the game long predated any vestige of edutainment, which probably worked in its favor.) Now, making the assumption that the surge of interest in the term "edutainment" did not come as a direct result of the Boogie Down Productions album of the same name, we can assume that the industry surged around this time. Clearly, there was a lot of success from a financial level, but to hear it now from education-minded game-makers now, it was not a creative success. Math Blaster, for all its success, is seen as a key example of this kind of game—a drill sheet without the paper. "You could probably get kids to play this for a while and think they were having fun, but after a while they'll figure out that you've handed them what we in educational games like to call chocolate-covered broccoli," noted Anastasia Salter, PhD, a digital media academic at the University of South Florida, in comments at the 2014 American Psychological Association's Education Leadership Conference. "Chocolate-covered broccoli." The term, coined in 2001 by author Brenda Laurel in her book Utopian Entrepreneur, speaks to the idea that many forms of edutainment poorly integrate the entertainment part of the equation—leading to a result that still tastes pretty bad, even though it has something really sweet right on top. It's become sort of a rallying cry for education-minded game developers these days, which have largely eschewed the term in favor of one that probably makes more sense for the game industry's goals: "Serious games," a phrase popularized by a 2006 book of the same name by authors David Michael and Sande Chen. In an article reflecting on the issue from last year, Chen noted that there's a belief among developers that the game has to be as good as the education—if not better. "Many developers have found prioritizing entertainment over education can yield the desired results," Chen writes. "Kids would rather play an entertainment title over an educational one, even if that entertainment game makes them learn astrophysics." The subject of edutainment is a common one for mockery. Blizzard Entertainment—which, remember, was purchased by an edutainment giant in 1993 and likely owes much of its early success to the additional distribution gained from that move—once created an April Fool's parody called Blizzard Kidzz that mocked games like The Oregon Trail and Mario Teaches Typing. (A bit unfair, but funny!) But just because the games of the era were kind of terrible doesn't mean that's the upper limit for edutainment. It makes sense that educators have recently found more luck with introducing Minecraft to the classroom than Math Blaster. Often, the best education isn't deliberate. That lesson was hard to find two decades ago, when Mattel found it had purchased a lemon from Shark Tank loud guy Kevin O'Leary with The Learning Company. Mattel spent $3.6 billion on the business, only to sell it off a couple years later for basically nothing. Not even the fact that The Print Shop was part of the purchase could save the deal. It worked out for O'Leary, who is dabbling in Canadian politics these days, but the edutainment space never really recovered. In comments to EdSurge, Lee Banville of Games and Learning noted that The Learning Company's failure shows the complexity of the problem. "The Learning Company showed that mixing games with education is a powerful tool, but it also showed how difficult it is to grow that business and diversify and evolve," Banville said. The Learning Company deserves more credit than it's getting in the modern day, and so, too, does Jan Davidson, who uncovered a genuinely important trend with Math Blaster. But, to be clear, you can't just put Mario on a boring game and hope that kids learn something in the process. Considering how sophisticated games are getting these days, that's not good enough. And you can't do that hundreds of times over with little variation and hope that it sticks—which is what the edutainment market felt like in the 90s. Kids are way smarter than that.


New Public-Private Partnership Aims to Ease Tampa Bay School Traffic; Encourage Ridesharing Using PikMyKid Application PikMyKid, winner of the "Emerging Technology Company of the Year- 2016" awarded by Tampa Bay Technology Forum, is fast evolving as the sole parent communication platform for K-12 schools, which also simplifies school dismissal process, reduces chaos, and eases traffic in the school neighborhoods, enhancing student safety. Tampa, FL, April 28, 2017 --( The PikMyKid app works by creating a virtual geographic boundary, known as a “geofence,” around each school site that connects with the mobile application. When parent’s check-in with the app, the order of dismissal is automatically sequenced with the car line, streamlining the process. The application also provides enhanced security features for parents and guardians, such as instant push-notifications to parents and school staff when each child/student boards their bus or car for the ride home and instantly communicating any schedule changes or emergency notifications that need to be sent out by the school. Starting last month, TBARTA began meeting with each school district to present the project to transportation staff and school board members and request their support in identifying candidate schools for the pilot. Since 2015, several schools in Tampa Bay have implemented the PikMyKid program, and feedback from those schools played a large role in TBARTA facilitating the partnership. “The change in transportation has really assisted our front office and it’s been wonderful to have a ‘silent dismissal,’” said John Legg, former state senator and co-founder of Dayspring Academy Charter Schools. “We have had over 98% parent adoption within the first four weeks of launch,” said Renu Parker, a parent at Berkeley Prep School parent in Hillsborough County, "From a parent's point of view, it was revolutionary. It made a huge difference." The PikMyKid application has received acclaim across the United States as well, including in several technology publications, such as a listing by Popular Mechanics in 2015 as one of “6 Startups You Need to Know.” (http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/startups/g1965/6-startups-one-spark-2015/?slide=6) PikMyKid founder and CEO Pat Bhava himself experienced the frustrations of the pick-up and dismissal process, and set out to make the school dismissal management smarter, safer, and cheaper in designing the software. “Waiting in the pick-up line an hour each day, I would watch school staff run around to keep the process moving,” said Bhava. “I thought, there has to be a better way that actually works for the schools and teachers while keeping the parents happy and the kids safer.” In addition to subsidizing the first-year costs of the app for schools, TBARTA is also planning to assist PikMyKid in developing features that will further reduce school traffic congestion and increase parent engagement, starting with real-time predictive traffic notifications, which will communicate with parents the optimal time to leave for drop-off and dismissal. Automated ridematching for participating parents is also planned, whereby the app would automatically identify common routes for students attending the same school, and send a push notification to parents to encourage carpooling. “Work commuters aren’t the only ones facing road congestion and lack of transit availability in our region, and school commuting is a very specific type of transportation need with far more security required in its delivery,” said Michael Case, the Principal Planner for TBARTA. “TBARTA was looking for ways to improve its school commute program, and PikMyKid was doing exactly what we identified as needed to bring it to the next level.” While it will be up to the school and/or district to continue with the program after the pilot ends, research from the University of South Florida College of Business shows it can be well worth the investment. According to the study, schools that subscribe to the system can save up to $43,000 annually in labor, transportation, and traffic management related efforts. With TBARTA fully subsidizing the first-year for select schools new to the program, the savings can be even greater. “We really want this to be a part of how we address school congestion in our region,” said Ray Chiaramonte, TBARTA Executive Director. “The effort will be data-driven, with the intention of showing the impacts to safety and efficiency for each school at the end of the pilot.” (http://tbarta.com/files/PIKMYKID-_Business_Analysis-USF_2014pdf.pdf) Since 2004, TBARTA has provided its Regional School Commute Program to schools that face transportation and related safety issues through computerized ridematching for carpooling, “walking school buses,” and “bicycle trains.” As a program funded by the FDOT District 7, the service is available free of charge to schools in Pinellas, Hillsborough, Pasco, Citrus, and Hernando Counties. Currently, there are over 2,000 parents and 66 schools participating between Pinellas and Hillsborough. Through the PikMyKid partnership, the Authority intends to bring schools from the Pasco, Citrus, and Hernando on board as well. For more information about TBARTA and the PikMyKid Partnership, contact Michael Case at (813) 282-8200 or michael.case@tbarta.com. For information on the PikMyKid application, contact Pat Bhava at (813 649-8028) or pat@pikmykid.com or go to Tampa, FL, April 28, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The Tampa Bay Area Regional Transportation Authority (TBARTA) has announced a partnership with local education-technology company PikMyKid to bring their real-time mobile app dismissal management system to 20 select schools across the Tampa Bay area. Through a $115,000 grant provided by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), District 7, TBARTA will be covering the full-cost of the yearly licensing fee for schools identified in Citrus, Hernando, Hillsborough, Pasco and Pinellas Counties, with the goal of reducing school traffic congestion created by pick up and drop off lines as well as improving the safety and reliability of transportation in getting students to and from school.The PikMyKid app works by creating a virtual geographic boundary, known as a “geofence,” around each school site that connects with the mobile application. When parent’s check-in with the app, the order of dismissal is automatically sequenced with the car line, streamlining the process. The application also provides enhanced security features for parents and guardians, such as instant push-notifications to parents and school staff when each child/student boards their bus or car for the ride home and instantly communicating any schedule changes or emergency notifications that need to be sent out by the school.Starting last month, TBARTA began meeting with each school district to present the project to transportation staff and school board members and request their support in identifying candidate schools for the pilot. Since 2015, several schools in Tampa Bay have implemented the PikMyKid program, and feedback from those schools played a large role in TBARTA facilitating the partnership. “The change in transportation has really assisted our front office and it’s been wonderful to have a ‘silent dismissal,’” said John Legg, former state senator and co-founder of Dayspring Academy Charter Schools. “We have had over 98% parent adoption within the first four weeks of launch,” said Renu Parker, a parent at Berkeley Prep School parent in Hillsborough County, "From a parent's point of view, it was revolutionary. It made a huge difference." The PikMyKid application has received acclaim across the United States as well, including in several technology publications, such as a listing by Popular Mechanics in 2015 as one of “6 Startups You Need to Know.” (http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/startups/g1965/6-startups-one-spark-2015/?slide=6)PikMyKid founder and CEO Pat Bhava himself experienced the frustrations of the pick-up and dismissal process, and set out to make the school dismissal management smarter, safer, and cheaper in designing the software. “Waiting in the pick-up line an hour each day, I would watch school staff run around to keep the process moving,” said Bhava. “I thought, there has to be a better way that actually works for the schools and teachers while keeping the parents happy and the kids safer.”In addition to subsidizing the first-year costs of the app for schools, TBARTA is also planning to assist PikMyKid in developing features that will further reduce school traffic congestion and increase parent engagement, starting with real-time predictive traffic notifications, which will communicate with parents the optimal time to leave for drop-off and dismissal. Automated ridematching for participating parents is also planned, whereby the app would automatically identify common routes for students attending the same school, and send a push notification to parents to encourage carpooling. “Work commuters aren’t the only ones facing road congestion and lack of transit availability in our region, and school commuting is a very specific type of transportation need with far more security required in its delivery,” said Michael Case, the Principal Planner for TBARTA. “TBARTA was looking for ways to improve its school commute program, and PikMyKid was doing exactly what we identified as needed to bring it to the next level.”While it will be up to the school and/or district to continue with the program after the pilot ends, research from the University of South Florida College of Business shows it can be well worth the investment. According to the study, schools that subscribe to the system can save up to $43,000 annually in labor, transportation, and traffic management related efforts. With TBARTA fully subsidizing the first-year for select schools new to the program, the savings can be even greater. “We really want this to be a part of how we address school congestion in our region,” said Ray Chiaramonte, TBARTA Executive Director. “The effort will be data-driven, with the intention of showing the impacts to safety and efficiency for each school at the end of the pilot.” (http://tbarta.com/files/PIKMYKID-_Business_Analysis-USF_2014pdf.pdf)Since 2004, TBARTA has provided its Regional School Commute Program to schools that face transportation and related safety issues through computerized ridematching for carpooling, “walking school buses,” and “bicycle trains.” As a program funded by the FDOT District 7, the service is available free of charge to schools in Pinellas, Hillsborough, Pasco, Citrus, and Hernando Counties. Currently, there are over 2,000 parents and 66 schools participating between Pinellas and Hillsborough. Through the PikMyKid partnership, the Authority intends to bring schools from the Pasco, Citrus, and Hernando on board as well.For more information about TBARTA and the PikMyKid Partnership, contact Michael Case at (813) 282-8200 or michael.case@tbarta.com.For information on the PikMyKid application, contact Pat Bhava at (813 649-8028) or pat@pikmykid.com or go to www.pikmykid.com Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from PikMyKid


Taylor-Clark T.,University of South Florida
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology | Year: 2014

Persons with allergies present with symptoms that often are the result of alterations in the nervous system. Neuronally based symptoms depend on the organ in which the allergic reaction occurs but can include red itchy eyes, sneezing, nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, coughing, bronchoconstriction, airway mucus secretion, dysphagia, altered gastrointestinal motility, and itchy swollen skin. These symptoms occur because mediators released during an allergic reaction can interact with sensory nerves, change processing in the central nervous system, and alter transmission in sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric autonomic nerves. In addition, evidence supports the idea that in some subjects this neuromodulation is, for reasons poorly understood, upregulated such that the same degree of nerve stimulus causes a larger effect than seen in healthy subjects. There are distinctions in the mechanisms and nerve types involved in allergen-induced neuromodulation among different organ systems, but general principles have emerged. The products of activated mast cells, other inflammatory cells, and resident cells can overtly stimulate nerve endings, cause long-lasting changes in neuronal excitability, increase synaptic efficacy, and also change gene expression in nerves, resulting in phenotypically altered neurons. A better understanding of these processes might lead to novel therapeutic strategies aimed at limiting the suffering of those with allergies. © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.


Paskett E.D.,Ohio State University | Harrop J.P.,Ohio State University | Wells K.J.,University of South Florida
CA Cancer Journal for Clinicians | Year: 2011

Although patient navigation was introduced 2 decades ago, there remains a lack of consensus regarding its definition, the necessary qualifications of patient navigators, and its impact on the continuum of cancer care. This review provides an update to the 2008 review by Wells et al on patient navigation. Since then, there has been a significant increase in the number of published studies dealing with cancer patient navigation. The authors of the current review conducted a search by using the keywords "navigation" or "navigator" and "cancer." Thirty-three articles published from November 2007 through July 2010 met the search criteria. Consistent with the prior review, there is building evidence of some degree of efficacy of patient navigation in terms of increasing cancer screening rates. However, there is less recent evidence concerning the benefit of patient navigation with regard to diagnostic followup and in the treatment setting, and a paucity of research focusing on patient navigation in cancer survivorship remains. Methodological limitations were noted in many studies, including small sample sizes and a lack of control groups. As patient navigation programs continue to develop across North America and beyond, further research will be required to determine the efficacy of cancer patient navigation across all aspects of the cancer care continuum. © 2011 American Cancer Society, Inc.


Patent
University of South Florida and Foundation University | Date: 2011-09-19

The subject invention pertains to uses of PKC-iota inhibitors for treatment of breast cancer. In one embodiment, the subject invention provides novel uses of 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3 -dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy) methyl]cyclopentyl]-,[1R-(1, 2, 3, 4)] (ICA-1) and related compounds for treatment of breast cancer. The compounds of the subject invention have potent anti-proliferative effects against human breast cancer cells. The compounds of the subject invention also inhibit the phosphorylation of IKK-/IKK-, induce chromatin condensation, and/or induce DNA fragmentation in cancer cells.


The present invention provides use of protein kinase C-zeta (PKC-) as a diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer tumorigenesis. Also provided are uses of PKC-zeta inhibitors for inhibiting breast cancer tumorigenesis and for treatment of breast cancer.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.92K | Year: 2010

A stand-off mid-IR based system offers great promise for the detection of chemical, biological or explosive (CBE) agents. Such a system has yet to be realized due mostly to broad spectral features and interfering substances. In this proposal we will demonstrate the feasibility of a system that collects laser induced thermal emission (LITE) from a substance and identifies it as known CBE agent with a low rate of false positives. Key features of our system include: 1. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser to heat the surface and desorb chemical agents with a minimum of fragmentation. 2. Collection of LITE spectra from a point ~1 cm above the surface with fluorescence recorded by an infrared spectrometer. 3. Spectrometer to collect fluorescence and principal components analysis that allows us to identify the CBE compounds with a high level of confidence. For Phase I we will demonstrate our surface LITE system on two nerve agent simulants—DMMP and DIMP. From our work we will choose those emission features that can be used for their identification in the field. We will demonstrate that, even in the presence of interfering compounds, users of this system can identify these agents with a low rate of false positives.


Patent
University of South Florida and Foundation University | Date: 2011-09-19

The subject invention pertains to uses of PKC-iota inhibitors for treatment of breast cancer. In one embodiment, the subject invention provides novel uses of 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3 -dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy) methyl]cyclopentyl]-,[1R-(1, 2, 3, 4)] (ICA-1) and related compounds for treatment of breast cancer. The compounds of the subject invention have potent anti-proliferative effects against human breast cancer cells. The compounds of the subject invention also inhibit the phosphorylation of IKK-/IKK-, induce chromatin condensation, and/or induce DNA fragmentation in cancer cells.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2016-05-10

Various scaffolds of small molecules capable of binding to the active site of sortilin are identified by in silico methods. These scaffolds include norbornene anhydride amino acid adducts, phenyl-amide-acids of benzyl substituted glutaric acids, and 2-substituted 3-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-quinoxalines. These sortilin ligands increase the uptake of glucose in 3T3L1 cells and can be employed in compositions to increase uptake of glucose for the treatment of diabetic patents.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2010-10-20

Disclosed is a method of inhibiting the growth of a cancer cell using Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), isolated from the Green Mamba snake venom with similar structure to ANP, with or without four cardiac natriuretic peptides i.e., atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), vessel dilator, long acting natriuretic peptide (LANP), and kaliuretic peptide. Dose-response curves revealed a significant (p<0.0001) decrease in human glioblastoma cells with each ten-fold increase in concentration from 1 M to 100 M of four of the cardiac peptide hormones. There was an 75%, 68%, 67%, and 65% elimination within 24 hours of glioblastoma cells secondary to vessel dilator, kaliuretic peptide, ANP, and LANP, respectively (p<0.0001) while DNP had no significant effect at 1 M (2% decrease), and 10 M (7%), but 100 M caused a (17%) decrease (p<0.05). Three days after treatment with these peptide hormones, the cancer cells began to proliferate again. These same hormones decreased DNA synthesis from 65% to 87% (p<0.00001).


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2012-12-04

C-natriuretic peptide (CNP) has been shown to regulate proliferation of mouse and rat osteoblasts. Genetic deletion of CNP results in dwarfism. CNP effects on bone growth involve inhibition of MEK 1 and ERK 1/2 kinases mediated via the intracellular messenger cyclic GMP. Vessel dilator is another natriuretic peptide synthesized by the atrial natriuretic peptide gene whose biologic half-life is 12 times longer than CNP. Vessel dilators biologic effects on proliferating cells are mediated via inhibiting MEK 1/2 and ERK 1/2 kinases via cyclic GMP. Vessel dilator was not studied previously on osteoblasts. CNP and vessel dilator were tested in dose-response studies enhanced human osteoblasts proliferation, showing that vessel dilator has identical mechanisms of action to CNP but much longer biologic half-life and effects at lower concentrations. Vessel dilator exhibited therapeutic effect for use in human achondroplasia, short stature and osteoporosis by stimulating osteoblast proliferation.


Patent
University of Oregon, Medicines For Malaria Venture and University of South Florida | Date: 2013-10-16

Compounds of formula I: or formula II:


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2013-11-08

A method of detecting prostate tumorigenesis in a subject, the method including the steps of (a) obtaining a sample from the prostate of the human subject, (b) detecting quantitatively or semi-quantitatively in the sample a level of expression for PKC- and (c) comparing the expression level in (b) to a level of expression in a normal control, wherein overexpression of PKC-, with respect to the control, indicates the presence of prostate cancer in the subject. The present invention is based upon the discovery that PKC- levels are elevated during prostate tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the proliferation rate of the tumor correlates with the level of PKC-. The invention also provides methods of treating prostate cancer by administering to the subject a compound that inhibits the expression of PKC-. The compound can be a small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecule.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2015-12-23

C-natriuretic peptide (CNP) has been shown to regulate proliferation of mouse and rat osteoblasts. Genetic deletion of CNP results in dwarfism. CNP effects on bone growth involve inhibition of MEK 1 and ERK 1/2 kinases mediated via the intracellular messenger cyclic GMP. Vessel dilator is another natriuretic peptide synthesized by the atrial natriuretic peptide gene whose biologic half-life is 12 times longer than CNP. Vessel dilators biologic effects on proliferating cells are mediated via inhibiting MEK 1/2 and ERK 1/2 kinases via cyclic GMP. Vessel dilator was not studied previously on osteoblasts. CNP and vessel dilator were tested in dose-response studies enhanced human osteoblasts proliferation, showing that vessel dilator has identical mechanisms of action to CNP but much longer biologic half-life and effects at lower concentrations. Vessel dilator exhibited therapeutic effect for use in human achondroplasia, short stature and osteoporosis by stimulating osteoblast proliferation.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2011-12-02

The present invention pertains to the use of PKC-epsilon (PKC-), PKC-delta (PKC-), PKC-eta, and/or PKC-theta as biomarker(s) for prediction and/or detection of neuroblastoma, as well as therapeutic targets for treatment of neuroblastoma.


Patent
University of South Florida | Date: 2012-08-17

RA treatment can improve cognition; promote neurogenesis; and regulate alternative splicing of genes, particularly by mediating mechanisms of 5 splice site selection and generation of PKC alternatively spliced variants. Expression of PKCVIII is an indicator of the levels of on-going apoptosis in neurons. In the aging brain, switching the isoform expression to PKCVIII by RA could shield the cells from neuronal death. The inventors discovered that human PKCVIII expression is increased in neuronal cancer and decreased in Alzheimers disease. The data shows that PKCVIII promotes neuronal survival and increases neurogenesis via Bcl2 and Bcl-xL. In addition, the trans-factor SC35 was found to be crucial in mediating the effects of RA on alternative splicing of PKCVIII mRNA in neurons. The data described herein indicate that PKCVIII can be used as a biomarker for neurological diseases such as cancers and Alzheimers disease and as a tool for monitoring and evaluating treatment.


The present invention provides use of protein kinase C-zeta (PKC-) as a diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer tumorigenesis. Also provided are uses of PKC-zeta inhibitors for inhibiting breast cancer tumorigenesis and for treatment of breast cancer.


PALM BEACH GARDENS, FL / ACCESSWIRE / February 27, 2017 / Olympus Insurance Company, a leading Florida homeowners' insurer, announced that Mariela Perez-Pennock, FCLS, was elected Chair and voting member of the Public Relations and Public Outreach Committee of the Florida Property and Casualty Insurance Fraud Task Force. The Task Force was created by the Florida Department of Financial Services in 2010. The organization's mission is to reduce, deter, or eliminate property and casualty (P&C) insurance fraud. As Chair of the Public Relations and Public Outreach Committee, Ms. Perez-Pennock will oversee the efforts of the Committee to provide fraud awareness to consumers through social media, seminars, and legislative support, in order to fight the escalating epidemic of property fraud. "Through this new role, I hope to continue the Task Force's work to fight insurance fraud in Florida," said Ms. Perez-Pennock. "I have dedicated my career to investigating and reducing fraud in our industry and am passionate about working to decrease the impact that this issue has had in our state." Ms. Perez-Pennock began her insurance career in 1988 with Progressive Insurance in Tampa, Fla. Prior to joining Olympus Insurance, she was the SIU Manager for North American Risk Services (NARS). Her background also includes working as a Special Agent with the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) where she served as part of the Mid-Atlantic Fraud Task Force, covering Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. Additionally, she was the SIU Medical Fraud Manager for Nationwide Insurance in Florida and has held SIU positions with Travelers and Safe Auto Insurance. Ms. Perez-Pennock attended the University of South Florida, pursuing a double major in Criminal Justice and Voice Performance. She holds FCLS, CCA, and CATI designations and is a prominent speaker and trainer at industry conferences. "We are all very proud of Mariela for taking on this new and critical role and fully support her efforts," said Jeffrey B. Scott, CEO of Olympus Insurance. "At Olympus, we are dedicated to fighting anything that increases rates for our customers." Headquartered in Palm Beach Gardens, FL and founded in 2007, Olympus Insurance Company specializes in Florida property insurance. Through its independent agency force, Olympus insures $45 billion worth of residential and investment property, including homes, condos, rental property, and valuable personal property. The company also writes flood insurance and umbrella policies. Coverage for individual risks up to $5 million in total insured value is provided on one of the most comprehensive coverage forms in the industry. For more information, visit olympusinsurance.com. PALM BEACH GARDENS, FL / ACCESSWIRE / February 27, 2017 / Olympus Insurance Company, a leading Florida homeowners' insurer, announced that Mariela Perez-Pennock, FCLS, was elected Chair and voting member of the Public Relations and Public Outreach Committee of the Florida Property and Casualty Insurance Fraud Task Force. The Task Force was created by the Florida Department of Financial Services in 2010. The organization's mission is to reduce, deter, or eliminate property and casualty (P&C) insurance fraud. As Chair of the Public Relations and Public Outreach Committee, Ms. Perez-Pennock will oversee the efforts of the Committee to provide fraud awareness to consumers through social media, seminars, and legislative support, in order to fight the escalating epidemic of property fraud. "Through this new role, I hope to continue the Task Force's work to fight insurance fraud in Florida," said Ms. Perez-Pennock. "I have dedicated my career to investigating and reducing fraud in our industry and am passionate about working to decrease the impact that this issue has had in our state." Ms. Perez-Pennock began her insurance career in 1988 with Progressive Insurance in Tampa, Fla. Prior to joining Olympus Insurance, she was the SIU Manager for North American Risk Services (NARS). Her background also includes working as a Special Agent with the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) where she served as part of the Mid-Atlantic Fraud Task Force, covering Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. Additionally, she was the SIU Medical Fraud Manager for Nationwide Insurance in Florida and has held SIU positions with Travelers and Safe Auto Insurance. Ms. Perez-Pennock attended the University of South Florida, pursuing a double major in Criminal Justice and Voice Performance. She holds FCLS, CCA, and CATI designations and is a prominent speaker and trainer at industry conferences. "We are all very proud of Mariela for taking on this new and critical role and fully support her efforts," said Jeffrey B. Scott, CEO of Olympus Insurance. "At Olympus, we are dedicated to fighting anything that increases rates for our customers." Headquartered in Palm Beach Gardens, FL and founded in 2007, Olympus Insurance Company specializes in Florida property insurance. Through its independent agency force, Olympus insures $45 billion worth of residential and investment property, including homes, condos, rental property, and valuable personal property. The company also writes flood insurance and umbrella policies. Coverage for individual risks up to $5 million in total insured value is provided on one of the most comprehensive coverage forms in the industry. For more information, visit olympusinsurance.com.


PALM BEACH GARDENS, FL / ACCESSWIRE / February 27, 2017 / Olympus Insurance Company, a leading Florida homeowners' insurer, announced that Mariela Perez-Pennock, FCLS, was elected Chair and voting member of the Public Relations and Public Outreach Committee of the Florida Property and Casualty Insurance Fraud Task Force. The Task Force was created by the Florida Department of Financial Services in 2010. The organization's mission is to reduce, deter, or eliminate property and casualty (P&C) insurance fraud. As Chair of the Public Relations and Public Outreach Committee, Ms. Perez-Pennock will oversee the efforts of the Committee to provide fraud awareness to consumers through social media, seminars, and legislative support, in order to fight the escalating epidemic of property fraud. "Through this new role, I hope to continue the Task Force's work to fight insurance fraud in Florida," said Ms. Perez-Pennock. "I have dedicated my career to investigating and reducing fraud in our industry and am passionate about working to decrease the impact that this issue has had in our state." Ms. Perez-Pennock began her insurance career in 1988 with Progressive Insurance in Tampa, Fla. Prior to joining Olympus Insurance, she was the SIU Manager for North American Risk Services (NARS). Her background also includes working as a Special Agent with the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) where she served as part of the Mid-Atlantic Fraud Task Force, covering Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. Additionally, she was the SIU Medical Fraud Manager for Nationwide Insurance in Florida and has held SIU positions with Travelers and Safe Auto Insurance. Ms. Perez-Pennock attended the University of South Florida, pursuing a double major in Criminal Justice and Voice Performance. She holds FCLS, CCA, and CATI designations and is a prominent speaker and trainer at industry conferences. "We are all very proud of Mariela for taking on this new and critical role and fully support her efforts," said Jeffrey B. Scott, CEO of Olympus Insurance. "At Olympus, we are dedicated to fighting anything that increases rates for our customers." Headquartered in Palm Beach Gardens, FL and founded in 2007, Olympus Insurance Company specializes in Florida property insurance. Through its independent agency force, Olympus insures $45 billion worth of residential and investment property, including homes, condos, rental property, and valuable personal property. The company also writes flood insurance and umbrella policies. Coverage for individual risks up to $5 million in total insured value is provided on one of the most comprehensive coverage forms in the industry. For more information, visit olympusinsurance.com.


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

DURHAM, N.C. - Forest elephant populations in one of Central Africa's largest and most important preserves have declined between 78 percent and 81 percent because of poaching, a new Duke University-led study finds. "Our research suggests that more than 25,000 elephants in Gabon's Minkébé National Park may have been killed for their ivory between 2004 and 2014," said John Poulsen, assistant professor of tropical ecology at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment. "With nearly half of Central Africa's estimated 100,000 forest elephants thought to live in Gabon, the loss of 25,000 elephants from this key sanctuary is a considerable setback for the preservation of the species," he said. While some of the poaching originated from within Gabon, findings from the new study indicate that cross-border poaching by hunters from neighboring nations -- chiefly Cameroon to the north -- largely drove the precipitous decline. Poulsen and his colleagues published their peer-reviewed findings Feb. 20 in the journal Current Biology. They estimated the extent of the population losses by comparing data from two large-scale surveys of elephant dung in Minkébé National Park from 2004 and 2014, using two different analytic methods to account for periods of heavy rainfall that might speed the dung's decay and skew the surveys' accuracy. "Based on changes in the abundance and geographic distribution of the dung, we identified two fronts of poaching pressure," Poulsen said. "Elephant numbers in the south of the park, which is 58 kilometers from the nearest major Gabonese road, have been somewhat reduced," he said. "By comparison, the central and northern parts of the park -- which, at one point, are just 6.1 kilometers from Cameroon's national road -- have been emptied." The proximity of this road makes it relatively easy for Cameroonese poachers to access the park and transport their illegal haul back to their nation's largest city, Douala, a major hub of the international ivory trade. Since 2011, the Gabonese government has taken major steps to curb poaching in Minkébé, Poulsen noted. Among other things, they have elevated forest elephants' conservation status to "fully protected," created a National Park Police force, doubled the national park agency's budget, and become the first African nation to burn all confiscated ivory. These efforts are laudable and may be reducing poaching from within Gabon, Poulsen said, but the new research suggests they have done little to slow the illegal cross-border traffic. "The clock is ticking," he said. "To save Central Africa's forest elephants, we need to create new multinational protected areas and coordinate international law enforcement to ensure the prosecution of foreign nationals who commit or encourage wildlife crimes in other countries," he said. "Studies showing sharp declines in forest elephant populations are nothing new," he said, "but a 78 to 81 percent loss in a single decade from one of the largest, most remote protected areas in Central Africa is a startling warning that no place is safe from poaching." Researchers from the National Parks Agency of Gabon, the University of South Florida, the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, the World Wildlife Fund Central Africa Regional Program Office, Gabon's Institute for Tropical Ecology Research, and the University of Stirling conducted the study with Poulsen. Duke-affiliated co-authors were Connie Clark, Amelia Meier, Cooper Rosin, Sarah Moore, Sally Koerner and Vincent Medjibe. The 2004 and 2014 surveys used in the new study were funded by four agencies: the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the World Wildlife Fund, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora's Monitoring the Illegal Killing of Elephants program.


News Article | January 18, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Many adults today who have been diagnosed with asthma many not actually have the condition, a new Canadian study warns. Using objective tests, the researchers found that one-third of over 600 adults diagnosed with asthma did not have the disease, and 35 percent of them were medicating every day. This group kept testing negative for asthma after multiple retests, showing no signs of worsening symptoms when they stopped medication. In some cases, according to lead researcher and respiratory expert Dr. Shawn Aaron of Ottawa Hospital, some of the participants had the obvious signs of the condition during diagnosis period, but their symptoms later went into remission. In most cases, however, it is unknown whether the asthma went away on its own or the patients were misdiagnosed at the beginning. The team studied over 600 adults living in 10 Canadian cities and had been diagnosed with asthma in the last five years. The subjects underwent spirometry, and if they tested negative, they proceeded to a second test where they inhaled methacholine, a common asthma trigger. If they still tested negative, they would be told to lower their medication dose, stop taking the drugs altogether, and then go through a fourth and final test if still appearing negative. Thirty-three percent or around 200 of the subjects did not have asthma, as they have negative results on the diagnostics. The team followed the 200 participants for another year and discovered that over 90 percent still showed no signs of the condition despite quitting their medications. When evaluated by study doctors, around 60 percent were found to have seasonal allergies, acid reflux, or a breathing issue due to obesity. Aaron warned about asthma diagnoses without actual objective testing, with nearly half diagnosed based only on signs and the doctor’s evaluation. “[A doctor] would order a test of the patient’s blood sugar levels [to diagnose diabetes],” he said as an example. A spirometer, a device that gauges how much air someone can blow out of her lungs and how quickly, is often used to diagnose the disease. Aaron speculated that there are doctors who may not be comfortable using it and may find that they lack the time or expertise to perform it. Dr. Richard Lockey of University of South Florida told ABC News that because asthma is a highly complicated disease, it makes him wary of declaring someone asthma-free if they exhibited symptoms in the past and were already diagnosed. Dr. Todd Rambasek of the Ohio College of Osteopathic Medicine said the overtreatment of asthma is no longer surprising, although adding that taking extra asthma drugs will not cause as severe adverse effects as other common medications for diabetes or blood pressure. "[Asthma is] a dynamic thing, it varies and comes and goes," he said. The team clarified, though, that some asthma patients may undergo long remission periods before recurrence, meaning asthma could still return after the study ended. The findings were discussed in the journal Journal of the American Medical Association. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Patent
Georgia Regents University and University of South Florida | Date: 2011-09-12

Stem cells are exposed to disease condition (the OGD stroke model), that mimics the target disease (stroke), allowing the stem cells to exert better neuroprotective effects. Thus, the present technology demonstrates a disease-tailored stem cell therapy. The present invention discloses that the administration of a therapeutically effective amount of amnion derived stem cells concomitantly with a therapeutically effective dose of melatonin provides additive/synergistic neuroprotective effects. Moreover, the present invention offers an equally robust technology employing a receptor-regulated mechanism, whereby stem cells can be enhanced (melatonin treatment) over their basal level (lack of melatonin treatment), facilitating a regulation of stem cells.


Patent
Foundation University and University of South Florida | Date: 2015-06-19

A method of treating ovarian cancer by administering a PKC inhibitor is presented herein. It was found that administering a PKC inhibitor, such as ACPD or ICA-1, to ovarian cancer cells inhibited cancer cell proliferation.


Patent
University of South Florida, Saneron Ccel Therapeutics, Inc. and Georgia Regents University | Date: 2011-05-13

A cell type that is a complete match of the transplant recipient appears as an optimal scenario to open treatment options to a large patient population with minimal complications. The use of autologous bone marrow or umbilical cord blood has been proposed as a good source of stem cells for cell therapy. Menstrual blood is found to be another important source of stem cells. Assays of cultured menstrual blood reveal that they express embryonic like-stem cell phenotypic markers and neuronal phenotypic markers under appropriate conditioned media. Oxygen glucose deprivation stroke models show that OGD-exposed primary rat neurons, co-cultured with menstrual blood-derived stem cells or exposed to the media from cultured menstrual blood, exhibited significantly reduced cell death. Transplantation of menstrual blood-derived stem cells, either intracerebrally or intravenously, after experimentally induced ischemic stroke in adult rats also significantly reduced behavioral and histological impairments compared to vehicle-infused rats.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Sherene Shalhub, MD, MPH, FACS, Vascular Surgeon, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Sherene Shalhub is a highly trained and qualified surgeon with extensive expertise in all facets of her work. Dr. Shalhub is currently serving patients within Valley Medical Center in Renton, Washington, and a Multidisciplinary Vascular Genetics Clinic within Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, Washington. She is also an Assistant Professor of Surgery in the Division of Vascular Surgery at the University of Washington with a research program at the University Medical Center in Seattle, Washington. Dr. Sherene Shalhub graduated with her Medical Degree with honors from the Morsani College of Medicine at the University of South Florida in Tampa, where she also gained her Master of Public Health Degree. She then relocated to Seattle, Washington, where she completed training as a General Surgery resident and Vascular Surgery fellow at the University of Washington, where she also completed her postdoctoral Trauma Research fellowship. Dr. Shalhub is double board certified in both Vascular and General Surgery, and has earned the coveted title of Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in her field, she maintains a professional membership with the Society for Vascular Surgery. Dr. Shalhub has authored and coauthored multiple research manuscripts and textbook chapters, and teaches in both clinical and research settings. For her hard work and dedication to her patients, she was awarded the 2014 and 2016 UW Medicine PRAISE Award. In her free time, Dr. Shalhub enjoys traveling to other countries, learning new skills unrelated to medicine, and spending time with her family and friends. Learn more about Dr. Shalhub here: http://www.valleymed.org/ and be sure to read her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics. Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Florida Hospital Pepin Heart Institute has received a $20,000 gift from Constellation Brands to purchase a new ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis machine, a state-of-the-art device that breaks up life-threatening blood clots by combining clot-dissolving medication and ultrasonic waves. The gift was facilitated by the Pepin Family Foundation. “We greatly appreciate this gift from Constellation Brands. We are also grateful to the Pepin Family Foundation for being so instrumental in procuring this gift,” said Jan Berry, Executive Director of the Florida Hospital Tampa Foundation. “As a not-for-profit hospital, we are sincerely appreciative when our community steps up with support to allow us to deliver the highest level of care to our patients.” “Constellation Brands is thrilled to support Florida Hospital Pepin Heart Institute,” said Lisa Boswell, Senior Vice President Southeast Business Unit for Constellation Brands. “It is truly an honor to join with Tom and Lauren Pepin, and the Pepin Family Foundation to positively impact heart health care in a manner that will make a difference in the lives of patients, their families and our communities for generations to come.” “Florida Hospital Pepin Heart Institute is one of the most advanced specialty digital hospitals in the Southeast and has emerged as a leader in cardiovascular care,” said Tom Pepin, President and CEO of Pepin Distributing. “With the momentum we are generating with community leaders such as our Corona partners Constellation Brands, Pepin Heart Institute will continue to set a standard in heart health care.” Ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis is used for patients who have a pulmonary embolism, or a blood clot in their lungs. A catheter is inserted in a blood vessel and directed to the area of the clot. Clot-dissolving medication is delivered through the catheter, and high-frequency ultrasound waves are emitted to help break up the clot. The device, an EkoSonic® Endovascular system with Acoustic Pulse Thrombolysis® Therapy, is the only device cleared by the FDA for the treatment of pulmonary embolism. “With the EKOS machine, we can break up a pulmonary embolism quicker and more efficiently,” said Vasco Marques, MD. “Patients who come in to our ER with chest pain and severe shortness of breath are usually discharged the next day with little to no complications. This is absolutely the best option available to help patients with pulmonary embolism.” About Constellation Brands Based in Victor, N.Y., Constellation Brands is a Fortune 500® company that believes that industry leadership involves a commitment to brand building, our trade partners, the environment, our investors and to consumers around the world who choose our products when celebrating big moments or enjoying quiet ones. Founded in 1945, Constellation has grown with more than 100 brands in its portfolio, about 40 facilities and approximately 8,000 talented employees. We express our company vision: to elevate life with every glass raised. To learn more, visit http://www.cbrands.com. About Pepin Family Foundation Pepin Family Foundation strives to engender a positive difference in the lives of our community’s children and families through education and health care. We aim to build a better tomorrow through lasting friendships with community partners who will help to serve the most at-risk populations of children and young adults, serving their educational needs at the Pepin Academies. Additionally, we are dedicated to the quest of eradication of heart disease through research, awareness and delivery of revolutionary patient-centered care at the Pepin Heart Institute. About Florida Hospital Tampa Florida Hospital Tampa is a not-for-profit 527-bed tertiary hospital specializing in cardiovascular medicine, neuroscience, orthopaedics, women’s services, pediatrics, oncology, endocrinology, bariatrics, wound healing, sleep medicine and general surgery including minimally invasive and robotic-assisted procedures. Also located at Florida Hospital Tampa is the renowned Florida Hospital Pepin Heart Institute, a recognized leader in cardiovascular disease prevention, diagnosis, treatment and leading-edge research. The recent addition of the Doc1st ER shows that Florida Hospital Tampa is committed to providing compassionate and quality healthcare. Part of the Adventist Health System, Florida Hospital is a leading health network comprised of 26 hospitals throughout the state. For more information, visit http://www.FHTampa.org. About Florida Hospital Pepin Heart Institute and Dr. Kiran C. Patel Research Institute Florida Hospital Pepin Heart Institute, located at Florida Hospital Tampa, is a free-standing cardiovascular institute providing comprehensive cardiovascular care. Leading the way with the first accredited chest pain emergency room in Tampa Bay, the institute is among an elite few in the state of Florida chosen to perform the ground breaking Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) procedure and was the first in Tampa to offer the Watchman procedure to prevent blood clots in patients with atrial fibrillation. Florida Hospital Pepin Heart Institute and the Dr. Kiran C. Patel Research Institute, affiliated with the University of South Florida (USF), are exploring and conducting leading-edge research to develop breakthrough treatments long before they are available in most other hospitals. To learn more, visit http://www.FHPepinHeart.org.


Pennypacker K.R.,University of South Florida | Offner H.,Oregon Health And Science University
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism | Year: 2015

This opinion piece highlights the scientific literature reporting that the peripheral immune response to ischemic stroke originates from the spleen. Removal of the spleen not only reduces stroke-induced neurodegeneration but also cellular degeneration in the body's other tissues when exposed to ischemic conditions. © 2015 ISCBFM All rights reserved.


Patent
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Research Institute, University of South Florida and Modulation Therapeutics, Inc. | Date: 2014-04-28

The present invention concerns the use of HYD1 peptides to reduce activated T-cell numbers and/or to promote bone preservation in vivo. The present invention concerns methods of treating a bone deficiency and/or an autoimmune disorder, comprising administering an effective amount of a HYD1 peptide. Another aspect of the invention concerns a pharmaceutical composition comprising a HYD1 peptide and another agent for treating a bone deficiency and/or another agent for treating an autoimmune disorder.

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