Mobile, AL, United States
Mobile, AL, United States

The University of South Alabama is a public, national research university in Mobile, Alabama, USA. It was created by the Alabama Legislature in May, 1963, and replaced existing extension programs operated in Mobile by the University of Alabama.USA is the only major public institution of higher learning on the upper Gulf Coast. With Alabama's two older universities more than 200 miles distant, the University is strategically located in the greater Mobile area, which has a population of more than a million within a 100-mile radius.Currently, USA is divided into ten colleges and schools and includes one of Alabama's two state-supported medical schools. The university has an enrollment of about 15,000 students. To date, the University has awarded over 75,000 degrees.USA has an annual payroll of $404 million , with over 5,500 employees, and is the second largest employer in Mobile, Alabama. It has remained one of Alabama's fastest growing universities for the past several years.The university has come under great criticism, as of 2014 the university maintains a 14% graduation rate. South Alabama also has an annual economic impact of US$2 billion. South Alabama owned hospitals treat over 250,000 patients annually. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Patent
University of South Alabama | Date: 2016-08-31

Some embodiments of the present invention relate to agents and compositions for treating cancer. More embodiments include agents and compositions for modulating the activity of the Hedgehog pathway.


Patent
University of South Alabama | Date: 2016-08-25

Some embodiments of the present technology relate to methods and compositions for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Some embodiments include methods and compositions for the diagnosis and treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Some embodiments include methods and compositions for the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.


Patent
University of South Alabama | Date: 2016-02-29

The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the treatment of cancer. Some embodiments include methods of treating cancer comprising administering a chemotherapeutic agent associated with albumin, administering a second chemotherapeutic agent; and administering a third chemotherapeutic agent.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: Secure &Trustworthy Cyberspace | Award Amount: 249.32K | Year: 2016

The 2011 Federal Cybersecurity Research and Development Plan cites Accelerating Transition to Practice (TTP) as one of five strategic objectives in the Cyber Security and Information Assurance (CSIA) Program Component Area. TTP remains a strategic objective of Agencies which fund cybersecurity research, including NSF. However, the NSF cybersecurity portfolio contains only a small amount of security research that has been transitioned into operational activities. The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) of the White House defines transition to practice as research that creates measurable improvements in the cybersecurity landscape. Although NSF encourages security researchers with promising applied research projects to submit TTP (Transition to Practice) projects, a very low percentage of researchers take advantage of this opportunity. This EAGER will serve as an outreach vehicle to cybersecurity Principal Investigators (PIs), informing them of the advantages of engaging in a TTP and instructing them on the differences between a traditional research proposal and a TTP-focused one. The PIs will conduct workshops at three PI meetings for NSF programs - Cybersecurity Innovation for Cyberinfrastructure (CICI), Campus Cyberinfrastructure (CC*) and Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) as well as at several academic conferences, including USENIX Security and Security and Privacy (S&P) among others.

In 2015, NSF sponsored two workshops which brought together key stakeholders to provide insights on how to improve the TTP process and encourage more TTP submissions. An important outcome of that workshop was the identification of specific barriers to TTP. In order to keep momentum going from these workshops, this follow-on project identifies specific ways in which PIs can overcome these barriers as they consider how to address TTP. The project establishes workshops for PIs to write more focused proposals, and provides opportunities for the PIs to engage with the NSF-funded cybersecurity community to foster more transition of cybersecurity research into the hands of the operational Information Technology Community. The expected outcome is that NSF expands the impact of the cybersecurity research it funds by producing more TTP results in the near to mid-term in order to make cyberspace safer.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ROBERT NOYCE SCHOLARSHIP PGM | Award Amount: 824.98K | Year: 2015

This project will conduct research about teacher preparation in the context of hosting two annual convenings (2016 and 2017): Southeastern Regional Robert Noyce Connections: Convening a Community of Learners Focused on STEM Pre-Service Teacher Education. The Southeastern region includes 9 target states (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee). Each convening will involve 200 participants, including presenters and discussion leaders. The emphasis of this project is to strengthen connections among the Noyce projects and others interested and engaged in teacher preparation, in order to expand the impact from the local areas influenced by the individual projects to the larger region. To continue to strengthen the connections beyond the convenings, the project team will use a well-established electronic system to create the Southeast Regional Noyce Network (SRN^2), which will allow for discussion forums and a place to post articles, learning and teaching ideas, and other resources.

The research agenda will investigate cultural, racial, and educational variables in the community of Noyce investigators and pre-service and in-service teachers. Research questions include: (1) How do Noyce Programs address cultural competence? (2) What racial, cultural, and educational attitudes and experiences predict desire to teach STEM in a high-need school? (3) How do Noyce Scholars perceive students? STEM abilities from majority and non-majority groups? (4) Which factors are related to job satisfaction and wellbeing for Noyce Scholars? In addition, the convenings will provide opportunities for researchers and other investigators interested in the Noyce Program, as well as Noyce scholarship and fellowship recipients, to build and strengthen collaborations toward moving teaching and research about teacher education forward as fields.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 285.00K | Year: 2015

In this project, funded by the Chemical Structure, Dynamics and Mechanism B Program of the Chemistry Division, Professor James Davis and his students of the Department of Chemistry at the University of South Alabama will explore the synthesis, characterization, and properties of a new type of ionic liquids (liquid salts). The liquid salts to be investigated are expected to be highly resistant to heat and to retain their liquid character, without evaporation, decomposition, or flammability, for long periods of time. Salts of this type can, in principle, be used as substitutes for more traditional liquids in applications ranging from heat transfer fluids and high-performance lubricants to biomass processing and the synthesis of important electronic materials such as semiconductors. The project brings together elements of chemical synthesis as well as material science and engineering, and offers engaged students a broad opportunity for gaining experience from a spectrum of activities. Since the institution at which the research will take place serves a high proportion of individuals from groups underrepresented in the sciences and engineering, the present project will provide important opportunities to engage in the professional training of individuals from these communities.

Ionic liquids (ILs) are materials of considerable fundamental interest and growing practical utility. Because of their non-volatility, ionic liquids can be used in applications requiring high temperatures, such as in heat transfer, lubrication, or high-temperature materials synthesis. Although typical ILs have relatively high degrees of thermal stability, they are still incapable of being used for long durations at temperatures above 200 degrees Celsius. In the present project, ILs will be prepared using the tetraphenylphosphonium cation and derivatives thereof. Preliminary work has revealed that the former cation is stable to temperatures in excess of 300 degrees Celsius for days without decomposition or evaporation. Building on these findings, the mechanism by which thermal decomposition eventually does occur will be studied, and that knowledge will be harnessed to create salts of still higher thermal stability. In addition to creating new molten salts of high thermal stability, the use of these liquids in facilitating the rapid pyrolysis of biomass (for production of bio-oil) and in the thermal synthesis of electronically important materials such as ZnS and CdSe will be investigated.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY | Award Amount: 473.05K | Year: 2015

Researchers from the University of South Alabama and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution will use a new method to quantify the cycling of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and its related compounds in the Subarctic Northeast Pacific Ocean. DMS is a sulfur-containing gas that is abundant in the worlds oceans. Oceanic DMS emissions are the largest source of biologically-produced sulfur to the atmosphere, with important implications for atmospheric chemistry and the worlds climate. Research over the last two decades has revealed that a complex web of processes is involved in the cycling of DMS in the ocean. However, many of these processes remain poorly understood. Results from this research will provide key information to a broad range of disciplines from microbiology to Earth-system science, and further develop methods and technologies useful to the broader research community. The study will also provide educational opportunities for graduate, undergraduate, K-12 students, and high school teachers. In addition, results from the study will be communicated to the general public through podcasts.

Dimethylsulfide (DMS), dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) play critical roles in marine microbial ecology as metabolic substrates and as essential components of the oceanic sulfur cycle. Moreover, oceanic DMS emissions are geochemically important as the largest source of biogenic sulfur to the atmosphere and have been implicated as a contributing factor for the atmospheric radiative balance, with important climate implications. The researchers will study the dynamics of the biogenic trace gas DMS, and the related compounds DMSP and DMSO in the Subarctic Northeastern Pacific, a high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region with exceptionally high DMS concentrations. They will use a novel isotope tracer method to quantify the in-situ turnover rates of these compounds in different surface water masses across frontal boundaries with contrasting DMS/phosphorus/oxygen and nutrient concentrations, and in Lagrangian experiments to investigate temporal evolution of cycling rates. Using newly-developed methods for automated underway sampling, researchers will map the surface distributions of DMS, DMSP and DMSO at unprecedented spatial resolution. Results from this study will improve our understanding of the spatial variability in oceanic DMS, DMSP, and DMSO concentrations in surface waters by accurately measuring the cycling rates of these compounds.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ROBERT NOYCE SCHOLARSHIP PGM | Award Amount: 799.96K | Year: 2015

Currently the lack of certified science teachers is a major cause of poor achievement and low expectations for high-risk pupils. This problem is greatly intensified in both rural and urban areas because schools in these locales typically have: overpopulated science classrooms and inadequate science teacher staffing; teachers who teach outside of their field of certification; and/or long-term substitute teachers who do not have a science, mathematics, or engineering background. With funding from the National Science Foundations Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship program, the Pathway to Science (PTS) Phase 2 project, is recruiting undergraduate majors in science disciplines and recent graduates and preparing them to become middle grades and high school science teachers. The project is funding 12 scholarships over four years. In this project, the Colleges of Education, Arts & Sciences, and Engineering at the University of South Alabama are collaborating with Mobile County Public Schools. PTS Phase 2 will enable recent STEM bachelor degree graduates to complete secondary science certification through an intensive, four-semester program that culminates with an earned masters degree and will directly address the need to increase the number of science teachers in Mobile County. A distinguishing feature of the project is the pre-residency experiences provided to help individuals with strong science backgrounds gauge their interest in a career in teaching before they commit time to completing the education coursework.

A research study will investigate the longitudinal impact of the program, by addressing questions such as, (1) With regard to preparedness, what are the effects of increased field experiences on the self-efficacy of graduating Noyce PTS scholars? (2) With regard to retention of Noyce graduates in the teaching profession, what are the effects of a Professional Learning Community (PLC)? (3) What are the effects of a PLC on Noyce graduates and current PTS scholars? (4) What effect does a mentoring program have on the retention of current and graduated scholars? (5) How does engaging in professional development (PD) both as a student and as a teacher through the Noyce PTS program effect teacher self-efficacy? (6) What impact do Noyce graduates have on the departments of the schools in which they work in terms of teacher leadership and student advocacy? The results of the longitudinal study on the effectiveness of former PTS graduates on student achievement, along with qualitative data describing their experiences, will assist in better preparation of science teachers to meet student needs.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESEARC | Award Amount: 393.29K | Year: 2016

This project, acquiring a Riscure Inspector system to provide advance instrumentation for side-channel measurement and analysis, aims to provide the country with a unique capability within the Gulf Region to engage in cybersecurity research of side channel vulnerabilities, countermeasure development and analysis, and fault injection testing for security and reliability of critical infrastructure devices.

Side channels are unintended information paths that occur as a side effect due to physical implementation properties, electrical devices that could contribute to information assurance (IA) and cyber security research and education to an institution with a track record in these areas. Unintended side channels introduce significant cyber security risks to computing systems and critical infrastructure. This instrumentation enables a significant expansion in its capabilities in side-channel security research critical to securing embedded devices used in cryptographic applications, medical devices, and smart cards.

The instrumentation enables faculty and students to be at the cutting edge of critical cyber security research issues. USAs School of Computing (SoC) is a fast growing academic unit on campus with a core focus in cyber security research collaborating on security-focused cross disciplinary initiatives. Hence, this system is expected to position the institution towards becoming a national leader in cyber security research and education support. The university traditionally meets the needs of a diverse student body with a high percentage coming from rural or financially depressed areas. It has higher than 60% of female students, and more than 1/3 non-while student population. The students will be afforded hands-on opportunities in research and classroom activities directly utilizing the side-channel system. The skills gained are expected to lead directly to internships and permanent employment. The instrumentation also provides opportunities for doctoral students in both SoC and CoE and offers opportunities for cohort activities for CoC?s current Scholarships for Service program. It additionally supports existing K-12 outreach through Center to Center for Forensics Information Technology and Security (CFITS).


Patent
University of South Alabama | Date: 2016-01-26

Embodiments of the present invention include methods and compositions for ameliorating cancer. Some embodiments include methods and compositions for ameliorating pancreatic cancer targeting the CXCR4 receptor and the CXCL12 ligand.

Loading University of South Alabama collaborators
Loading University of South Alabama collaborators