Sioux Falls, SD, United States
Sioux Falls, SD, United States

Founded in 1883, the University of Sioux Falls is a Christian liberal arts university located in Sioux Falls, in the U.S. state of South Dakota. USF's mission is to foster academic excellence and the development of mature Christian persons for service to God and humankind in the world. In fall 2014, the University enrolled a total of 1,108 undergraduate students and 311 graduate students. Wikipedia.


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News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) has published it’s 2016-2017 Best Radiology Technician Programs ranking for 2016-2017. An online leader for higher education resources and information, AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org compared data from both online and on-campus programs, highlighting the following schools as those receiving top scores: Clarkson College, Valencia College, Weber State University, Idaho State University and Southern Illinois University Carbondale for four-year schools; Pitt Community College, Owensboro Community & Technical College, Somerset Community College, Washtenaw Community College and Chattanooga State Community College for two-year schools. “With higher median pay and job growth projections than many occupations in the U.S., radiology tech programs are a positive choice for college-bound students,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “Hundreds of radiology tech programs are available around the nation, but this list pinpoints the schools who offer the best combination of affordability, quality and flexibility for aspiring radiology technologists.” In order to qualify for the list, AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org requires all schools with a Radiology Technician program to meet several base criteria points. All colleges and universities must be accredited, two- or four-year public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each schools must also offer career placement services to its grads. Each school was ranked and scored by comparing more than a dozen data points, including cost and financial aid reports, student-teacher ratios and more. A full list of the 2016-2017 Best Radiology Technician Programs in the U.S. is included below. More details on the specific data and methodology used can be found at the link below, along with specific information on where each school placed in the ranking: Two-year schools recognized for providing the Best Radiology Technician Programs: Ashland Community and Technical College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Bunker Hill Community College Cape Fear Community College Chattanooga State Community College Chippewa Valley Technical College Columbus State Community College Community College of Denver Cuyahoga Community College East Central College Eastern Maine Community College Galveston College Georgia Northwestern Technical College Guilford Technical Community College Hagerstown Community College Hillsborough Community College Jefferson Community and Technical College Lakeland Community College Lakeshore Technical College Lone Star College Lorain County Community College Middlesex Community College Mountwest Community and Technical College North Arkansas College Northeast Community College Northwest Mississippi Community College Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College Owens Community College Owensboro Community and Technical College Pitt Community College Rend Lake College Rhodes State College Roane State Community College Sinclair College Somerset Community College South Arkansas Community College Southcentral Kentucky Community & Technical College Southeast Arkansas College Southeast Community College Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College Southern Union State Community College SUNY Broome Community College Tallahassee Community College Technical College of the Lowcountry Truckee Meadows Community College Tulsa Community College Washtenaw Community College West Virginia Northern Community College Western Nebraska Community College Western Wyoming Community College Four-year schools recognized for providing the Best Radiology Technician Programs: Arkansas State University - Main Campus Baptist Memorial College of Health Sciences Bellevue College Bluefield State College Boise State University Briar Cliff University Broward College Clarkson College College of Southern Nevada Concordia University - Wisconsin Daytona State College Eastern Florida State College Florida SouthWestern State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Gulf Coast State College Idaho State University Keiser University - Fort Lauderdale La Roche College LIU Post Miami Dade College Minot State University Missouri Southern State University Morehead State University Mount Aloysius College Newman University Notre Dame of Maryland University Palm Beach State College Pensacola State College Saint Catharine College Santa Fe College Shawnee State University Siena Heights University South Florida State College Southern Illinois University - Carbondale Southwestern Oklahoma State University St. Catherine University St. Luke's College St. Petersburg College State College of Florida - Manatee-Sarasota Suffolk University University of Charleston University of Cincinnati - Blue Ash College University of Hartford University of Jamestown University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of Sioux Falls University of St Francis Valencia College Vincennes University Weber State University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org), a leading online higher education resource site, has released its list of the nation’s Best Paramedic Programs. Comparing data from both online and on-campus programs at two- and four-year schools, top scores went to Colorado Mountain College, Florida Gateway College, Santa Fe College, Midland College and College of Central Florida for four-year schools; Northland Pioneer College, Eastern New Mexico University Roswell, North Arkansas College, Arkansas State University Beebe and Galveston College for two-year schools for 2016-2017. “The U.S. Department of Labor shows the job outlook for paramedics is extremely favorable over the next decade,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “The schools on this list are raising the bar when it comes to Paramedic education, providing the best combination of affordability and quality to their students.” To qualify for the Best Paramedic Program list, the Community for Accredited Online Schools requires schools to meet specific baseline requirements. All institutions are required to be accredited public or private not-for-profit entities. Each must also offer students career placement assistance or services post-graduation. More than a dozen different school-specific metrics, from graduation rates to student-teacher ratios, are weighed against one another to determine individual school scores and placement on rankings. The full list of colleges included on the Best Paramedic Programs list is included below. Find more details on the methodology used to score each school, as well as specific scores at: Arizona Western College Arkansas Northeastern College Arkansas State University - Beebe Arkansas State University - Mountain Home Athens Technical College Belmont College Black River Technical College Central Community College Central New Mexico Community College Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Crowder College Del Mar College East Arkansas Community College East Mississippi Community College Eastern New Mexico University - Roswell Campus Estrella Mountain Community College Gadsden State Community College Galveston College Grayson College H. Councill Trenholm State Technical College Hill College Hillsborough Community College Hinds Community College Howard College Itawamba Community College Jefferson College Johnson County Community College Lakeshore Technical College Lenoir Community College Meridian Community College Mesa Community College Metropolitan Community College North Arkansas College North Florida Community College North Georgia Technical College Northeast Texas Community College Northern Maine Community College Northland Pioneer College Redlands Community College San Juan College Santa Fe Community College Sinclair College South Arkansas Community College Southeast Arkansas College Tallahassee Community College Trinidad State Junior College University of Arkansas Community Hope - Texarkana Wallace State Community College - Hanceville Western Iowa Tech Community College Western Nebraska Community College Arkansas Tech University Baker College of Clinton Township Baker College of Muskegon Bismarck State College Broward College Chipola College College of Central Florida College of Southern Nevada Colorado Mountain College Creighton University Daytona State College Dixie State University Drexel University Florida Gateway College Florida SouthWestern State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Goodwin College Great Basin College Idaho State University Jackson College Lake Michigan College Lewis-Clark State College Miami Dade College Midland College Missouri Southern State University Montana State University - Billings Oklahoma State University - Oklahoma City Palm Beach State College Pasco-Hernando State College Pensacola State College Polk State College Saint Josephs College Santa Fe College Seattle Community College - North Campus Seminole State College of Florida Shawnee State University Siena Heights University South Florida State College St. Petersburg College University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Arkansas at Monticello University of Cincinnati - Blue Ash College University of Cincinnati - Clermont College University of New Haven University of Sioux Falls Utah Valley University Valencia College Vincennes University Weber State University Youngstown State University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


Eichler B.,University of Sioux Falls
Journal of Chemical Health and Safety | Year: 2016

A pyridine bottle broke in an undergraduate stockroom, spilling two liters of pyridine onto a student, a bench and the floor. Details are discussed about the safety of the student, the subsequent evacuations of laboratories and finally the whole science building. Remediation of the spill is also discussed. A faculty member with an auto-immune disease was affected by their involvement in the spill cleanup, and the consideration of chemists with auto-immune diseases and their interaction with chemical spills is discussed. © 2015 Division of Chemical Health and Safety of the American Chemical Society.


Ferley D.D.,University of Sioux Falls | Osborn R.W.,University of South Dakota | Vukovich M.D.,South Dakota State University
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research | Year: 2013

Uphill running represents a frequently used and often prescribed training tactic in the development of competitive distance runners but remains largely uninvestigated and unsubstantiated as a training modality. The purpose of this investigation included documenting the effects of uphill interval training compared with level-grade interval training on maximal oxygen consumption (V̇O2max), the running speed associated with V̇O 2max (Vmax), the running speed associated with lactate threshold (VLT), and the duration for which Vmax can be sustained (Tmax) in well-trained distance runners. Thirty-two well-trained distance runners (age, 27.4 ± 3.8 years; body mass, 64.8 ± 8.9 kg; height, 173.6 ± 6.4 cm; and V̇O2max, 60.9 ± 8.5 ml.min-1.kg-1) received assignment to an uphill interval training group (GHill = 12), level-grade interval training group (GFlat = 12), or control group (GCon = 8). GHill and GFlat completed 12 interval and 12 continuous running sessions over 6 weeks, whereas GCon maintained their normal training routine. Pre-and posttest measures of V̇O2max, Vmax, VLT, and Tmax were used to assess performance. A 3 × 2 repeated measures analysis of variance was performed for each dependent variable and revealed a significant difference in Tmax in both GHill and GFlat (p < 0.05). With regard to running performance, the results indicate that both uphill and level-grade interval training can induce significant improvements in a run-to-exhaustion test in well-trained runners at the speed associated with V̇O2max but that traditional level-grade training produces greater gains. © 2013 National Strength and Conditioning Association.


Gulseth M.P.,University of Sioux Falls
American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy | Year: 2016

The DOACs provide clinical advantages versus vitamin K antagonists, including fixed dosing with no routine coagulation monitoring and evidence of a lower risk of bleeding. However, as with all anticoagulants, there is a risk of bleeding complications in patients receiving DOACs, so urgent reversal of their anticoagulant activity may be required for spontaneous or traumatic bleeding events and in patients undergoing emergency invasive procedures. Reversal strategies are dependent on the anticoagulant involved, the location and severity of the bleeding, and/or the urgency of the invasive procedure. The recently approved specific reversal agent for dabigatran, idarucizumab, together with other reversal agents in development will hopefully allow for the emergent reversal of DOACs, without increasing the underlying risk of thrombosis. However, research is required to determine the optimal use of these reversal agents, in terms of choice of agent, dosing, and concomitant management. A systematic approach to their implementation in hospitals is also required to ensure that physicians, nurses, and pharmacists receive appropriate education and have the necessary protocols and guidelines to manage these clinical situations. Conclusion. Reversal strategies in patients receiving a DOAC need to be tailored to the anticoagulant involved as well as the urgency and severity of the clinical situation. Reversal agents should help facilitate the urgent reversal of anticoagulation in patients with emergency bleeding or who require urgent surgery, though research and education are required to ensure the optimal use of these agents. © 2016, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.


Lal Y.,University of South Dakota | Van Heukelom J.,University of Sioux Falls
American Journal of the Medical Sciences | Year: 2013

Dabigatran etexilate, a direct thrombin inhibitor, has become an alternative to warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. There remains a concern about its overdose and life-threatening hemorrhage because of unavailability of appropriate coagulation tests to monitor and antidotes to reverse its effects. There are no clinical data about its safety in patients with fluctuating renal function. Multiple bleeding events reported with dabigatran have prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to further investigate these reports. Four clinical cases with life-threatening bleeding, strategies that were used to achieve hemostasis and a brief literature review to demonstrate the hematologic emergency caused by dabigatran are presented in this study.


Bartel B.,University of Sioux Falls
Hospital practice (1995) | Year: 2012

Diarrhea is a frequent complication among hospitalized patients. Nosocomial diarrhea is generally diagnosed as increased frequency and decreased consistency of stools developing after 72 hours of hospitalization. The causes of nosocomial diarrhea may be infectious or noninfectious. Noninfectious etiologies occur most commonly, and are often adverse effects of medications or enteral nutrition therapies. Infectious etiologies are most concerning and include Clostridium difficile and norovirus. Patients with nosocomial diarrhea should be placed in isolation with contact precautions in place until the presence of C difficile infection is determined. Irrespective of etiology, diarrhea can cause serious complications in hospitalized patients, including malnutrition, hemodynamic instability, metabolic acidosis, and potentially fatal pseudomembranous colitis. This article reviews nosocomial diarrhea, including its pathophysiology, infectious and noninfectious causes, and treatment strategies based on identified cause.


Munce T.A.,University of Sioux Falls
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise | Year: 2014

RESULTS: The median individual head impacts per practice, per game and throughout the entire season were 9, 12 and 252, respectively. Approximately 50% of all head impacts (6183) had a linear acceleration between 10-20g, but nearly 2% were greater than 80g. Overall, the head impact frequency distributions in this study population were similar in magnitude and location as in high school and collegiate football, but total impact frequency was lower. Individual changes in neurologic function were not associated with cumulative HIE.CONCLUSION: This study provides a novel examination of HIE and associations with short-term neurologic function in youth football and notably contributes to the limited HIE data currently available for this population. While youth football players can experience remarkably similar head impact forces as high school players, cumulative sub-concussive HIE throughout one youth football season may not be detrimental to short-term clinical measures of neurologic function.Football players are subjected to repetitive impacts that may lead to brain injury and neurologic dysfunction. Knowledge about head impact exposure (HIE) and consequent neurologic function among youth football players is limited.PURPOSE: To measure and characterize HIE of youth football players throughout one season and explore associations between HIE and changes in selected clinical measures of neurologic function.METHODS: Twenty-two youth football players (11–13 yr) wore helmets outfitted with a Head Impact Telemetry (HIT) System to quantify head impact frequency, magnitude, duration and location. Impact data were collected for each practice (27) and game (9) in a single season. Selected clinical measures of balance, oculomotor performance, reaction time and self-reported symptoms were assessed before and after the season. © 2014 American College of Sports Medicine


Ferley D.D.,University of Sioux Falls | Osborn R.W.,University of South Dakota | Vukovich M.D.,South Dakota State University
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research | Year: 2014

Despite a paucity of evidence, uphill running has been touted as a sport-specific resistance-to-movement training tactic capable of enhancing metabolic, muscular, and neuromuscular processes in distance runners in ways similar to previously established resistance-to-movement training methods, such as heavy and/or explosive strength training and plyometric training. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation included documenting the effects of incline and level-grade interval treadmill training on indices of running economy (RE) (i.e., oxygen consumption [V̇ O2] and blood lactate [BLa] responses of submaximal running) and muscle power. Thirty-two well-trained distance runners (age, 27.4 ± 3.8 years; body mass, 64.8 ± 8.9 kg; height, 173.6 ± 6.4 cm; and V̇ O2max, 60.9 ± 8.5 ml · min-1·kg-1) received assignment to an uphill (GHill = 12), level-grade (GFlat = 12), or control (GCon = 8) group. GHill and GFlat completed 12 interval and 12 continuous run sessions over 6 weeks, whereas GCon maintained their normal training. Dependent variables measured before and after training were V· O2 and BLa at 2 separate velocities associated with lactate threshold (VLT) (V̇ O2max-60% and V̇ O2max-80%; and BLa-60% and BLa-80%, respectively); percentage of V̇ O2max at lactate threshold (%V̇ O2max at V LT); muscle power as assessed through a horizontal 5-jump test (5Jmax); and isokinetic knee extension and flexion at 3 angular velocities (90, 180, and 300° · s-1). Statistical significance was set to p ≤ 0.05. All groups significantly improved 5J max, V̇ O2max-60%, V̇ O2max-80%, BLa-60%, and BLa-80%. Additionally, GHill and GFlat significantly improved %V̇ O2max at VLT. Other indices of RE and muscle power did not improve. We conclude incline treadmill training effective for improving the components of RE, but insufficient as a resistance-to-movement exercise for enhancing muscle power output. © 2014 National Strength and Conditioning Association.


Ganske C.M.,Faculty Physician | Horning K.K.,University of Sioux Falls
Annals of Pharmacotherapy | Year: 2012

OBJECTIVE: To describe what we believe to be the first reported possible case of tendinopathy of the hip in a patient receiving levofloxacin. CASE SUMMARY: A 58-year-old male with recurrent otitis media was admitted for left lateral hip pain of 10 on a scale of 10. He had started a 5-day course of levofloxacin 750 mg/day 10 days before he began experiencing pain. He also took simvastatin 20 mg/day and walked 90 minutes each day. He was treated with oxycodone with acetaminophen and physical therapy. His pain had improved significantly at a 10-day recheck. DISCUSSION: Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy has been well-reported in the literature, but most cases involve pefloxacin and affect the Achilles tendon. Only 11 cases of tendinopathy have been reported with levofloxacin based on a MEDLINE search (1966-December 2011). This is the first known case reported that involved tendinopathy of the hip believed to be caused by fluoroquinolones. The Naranjo probability scale revealed a possible adverse reaction of levofloxacin-induced tendinopathy of the hip. Contributing factors likely included the high dose of levofloxacin, concomitant use of a statin, and strenuous physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Health care professionals should be aware of the possibility of tendinopathy of the hip in patients who receive fluoroquinolones. Thorough history for possible risk factors should be obtained. Patients on fluoroquinolones at risk for tendinopathy should be counseled to avoid strenuous physical activity.

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