Culiacán, Mexico
Culiacán, Mexico

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Islas-Granillo H.,Autonomous University of the State of Hidalgo | Borges-Yanez S.A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Medina-Solis C.E.,Autonomous University of the State of Hidalgo | Casanova-Rosado A.J.,Autonomous University of Campeche | And 5 more authors.
Geriatrics and Gerontology International | Year: 2012

Aim: To determine the prevalence of root caries and the root caries index in a population of older Mexicans, and its relationship to socioeconomic, sociodemographic and dental factors. Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional study in 85 persons 60years and older living either in long-term care facilities, or independently and attending an elder day-care group. Each subject underwent an oral examination, performed by a trained and standardized dentist, to determine the root caries index and other clinical variables. Questionnaires were administered to collect socioeconomic, sociodemographic and hygiene data. Statistical analyses were performed using non-parametric tests. Results: The prevalence of root caries was 96.5%. The root caries index was 37.7%±21.7%. Statistically significant differences (P<0.05) of root caries index were observed across residential arrangements and marital statuses, and were higher in publicly funded long-term care and among single subjects (P<0.05). Those who had poor hygiene had more root caries (P<0.05); persons with a low level of schooling and who brushed their teeth less frequently also showed a difference (P<0.05). Conclusions: The prevalence of root caries was very high. The type of long-term care, marital status, schooling and oral hygiene were associated with a higher root caries index. Oral health programs and preventive caries interventions are needed for this age group in general; targeted strategies may be better focused if sociodemographic profiles are used to characterize high need groups. © 2011 Japan Geriatrics Society.


Montoya-Rodriguez A.,University of Sinaloa | Montoya-Rodriguez A.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Milan-Carrillo J.,University of Sinaloa | Reyes-Moreno C.,University of Sinaloa | de Mejia E.G.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign
International Journal of Molecular Sciences | Year: 2015

The objectives of this study were to characterize peptides found in unprocessed amaranth hydrolysates (UAH) and extruded amaranth hydrolysates (EAH) and to determine the effect of the hydrolysis time on the profile of peptides produced. Amaranth grain was extruded in a single screw extruder at 125 °C of extrusion temperature and 130 rpm of screw speed. Unprocessed and extruded amaranth flour were hydrolyzed with pepsin/pancreatin enzymes following a kinetic at 10, 25, 60, 90, 120 and 180 min for each enzyme. After 180 min of pepsin hydrolysis, aliquots were taken at each time during pancreatin hydrolysis to characterize the hydrolysates by MALDI-TOF/MS-MS. Molecular masses (MM) (527, 567, 802, 984, 1295, 1545, 2034 and 2064 Da) of peptides appeared consistently during hydrolysis, showing high intensity at 10 min (2064 Da), 120 min (802 Da) and 180 min (567 Da) in UAH. EAH showed high intensity at 10 min (2034 Da) and 120 min (984, 1295 and 1545 Da). Extrusion produced more peptides with MM lower than 1000 Da immediately after 10 min of hydrolysis. Hydrolysis time impacted on the peptide profile, as longer the time lower the MM in both amaranth hydrolysates. Sequences obtained were analyzed for their biological activity at BIOPEP, showing important inhibitory activities related to chronic diseases. These peptides could be used as a food ingredient/supplement in a healthy diet to prevent the risk to develop chronic diseases. © 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


Urquiza-Aguiar L.,Polytechnic University of Catalonia | Vazquez-Rodas A.,Polytechnic University of Catalonia | Tripp-Barba C.,University of Sinaloa | Mezher A.M.,Polytechnic University of Catalonia | And 2 more authors.
PE-WASUN 2014 - Proceedings of the 11th ACM Symposium on Performance Evaluation of Wireless Ad Hoc, Sensor, and Ubiquitous Networks | Year: 2014

This paper proposes a mixed linear and integer optimization model for multi-hop ad-hoc networks to select the positions of the gateways over a certain area. This model mimics the routing behavior of such network and takes into account the maximum bandwidth capacity of the network gateways. We also include a suboptimal solution for the cases in which the complexity or the amount of the data make the optimal solution infeasible. Results in a pedestrian mesh network and in a VANET scenarios show that the model locates gateways in an efficient way and that the suboptimal solution is close to the optimal one in terms of the number of required gateways or the common selected gateways. Copyright © 2014 ACM.


Tripp-Barba C.,Polytechnic University of Catalonia | Aguilar Igartua M.,Polytechnic University of Catalonia | Urquiza Aguiar L.,Polytechnic University of Catalonia | Mezher A.M.,Polytechnic University of Catalonia | And 2 more authors.
DIVANet 2013 - Proceedings of the 3rd ACM International Symposium on Design and Analysis of Intelligent Vehicular Networks and Applications, Co-located with ACM MSWiM 2013 | Year: 2013

This paper proposes an adaptation of the collision probability used in the measure of the available bandwidth designed for Mobile Ad hoc Networks (MANETs) and which is described in ABE[12]. Instead, we propose a new ABE+ that includes a new function to estimate the probability of losses. This new function has been specially designed for Vehicular Ad hoc Networks, to be suited to the high mobility and variable density in vehicular environments. In this analysis we do not only consider the packet size, but also other metrics, such as, density and speed of the nodes. We include the ABE+ algorithm in the forwarding decisions of the GBSR-B protocol[14], which is an improvement of the well-known GPSR protocol. Finally through simulations, we compare the performance of our new ABE+ compared to the original ABE. These results show that ABE+ coupled with GBSR-B achieves a good trade-off in terms of packet losses and packet end-to-end delay. © 2013 ACM.


Noguera-Marin D.,University of Granada | Moraila-Martinez C.L.,University of Sinaloa | Cabrerizo-Vilchez M.,University of Granada | Rodriguez-Valverde M.A.,University of Granada
European Physical Journal E | Year: 2016

Abstract.: The motion of electrically charged particles under crowding conditions and subjected to evaporation-driven capillary flow might be ruled by collective diffusion. The concentration gradient developed inside an evaporating drop of colloidal suspension may reduce by diffusion the number of particles transported toward the contact line by convection. Unlike self-diffusion coefficient, the cooperative diffusion coefficient of interacting particles becomes more pronounced in crowded environments. In this work, we examined experimentally the role of the collective diffusion of charge-stabilized nanoparticles in colloidal patterning. To decouple the sustained evaporation from the contact line motion, we conducted evaporating menisci experiments with driven receding contact lines at low capillary number. This allowed us to explore convective assembly at fixed and low bulk concentration, which enabled to develop high concentration gradients. At fixed velocity of receding contact line, we explored a variety of substrate-particle systems where the particle-particle electrostatic interaction was changed (via p H) as well as the substrate receding contact angle and the relative humidity. We found that the particle deposition directed by receding contact lines may be controlled by the interplay between evaporative convection and collective diffusion, particularly at low particle concentration. Graphical abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2016, EDP Sciences, SIF, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


PubMed | University of Sinaloa and University of Granada
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The European physical journal. E, Soft matter | Year: 2016

The motion of electrically charged particles under crowding conditions and subjected to evaporation-driven capillary flow might be ruled by collective diffusion. The concentration gradient developed inside an evaporating drop of colloidal suspension may reduce by diffusion the number of particles transported toward the contact line by convection. Unlike self-diffusion coefficient, the cooperative diffusion coefficient of interacting particles becomes more pronounced in crowded environments. In this work, we examined experimentally the role of the collective diffusion of charge-stabilized nanoparticles in colloidal patterning. To decouple the sustained evaporation from the contact line motion, we conducted evaporating menisci experiments with driven receding contact lines at low capillary number. This allowed us to explore convective assembly at fixed and low bulk concentration, which enabled to develop high concentration gradients. At fixed velocity of receding contact line, we explored a variety of substrate-particle systems where the particle-particle electrostatic interaction was changed (via p H) as well as the substrate receding contact angle and the relative humidity. We found that the particle deposition directed by receding contact lines may be controlled by the interplay between evaporative convection and collective diffusion, particularly at low particle concentration.


del Socorro Herrera M.,National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, León | Medina-Solis C.E.,Autonomous University of the State of Hidalgo | Minaya-Sanchez M.,University of Campeche | Pontigo-Loyola A.P.,Autonomous University of the State of Hidalgo | And 5 more authors.
Medical Science Monitor | Year: 2013

Background: Our study aimed to evaluate the effect of various risk indicators for dental caries on primary teeth of Nicaraguan children (from Leon, Nicaragua) ages 6 to 9, using the negative binomial regression model. Material/Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out to collect clinical, demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral data from 794 schoolchildren ages 6 to 9 years, randomly selected from 25 schools in the city of León, Nicaragua. Clinical examinations for dental caries (dmft index) were performed by 2 trained and standardized examiners. Socio-demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral data were self-reported using questionnaires. Multivariate negative binomial regression (NBR) analysis was used. Results: Mean age was 7.49±1.12 years. Boys accounted for 50.1% of the sample. Mean dmft was 3.54±3.13 and caries prevalence (dmft >0) was 77.6%. In the NBR multivariate model (p<0.05), for each year of age, the expected mean dmft decreased by 7.5%. Brushing teeth at least once a day and having received preventive dental care in the last year before data collection were associated with declines in the expected mean dmft by 19.5% and 69.6%, respectively. Presence of dental plaque increased the expected mean dmft by 395.5%. Conclusions: The proportion of students with caries in this sample was high. We found associations between dental caries in the primary dentition and dental plaque, brushing teeth at least once a day, and having received preventive dental care. To improve oral health, school programs and/or age-appropriate interventions need to be developed based on the specific profile of caries experience and the associated risk indicators. © Med Sci Monit, 2013.


Ontiveros N.,University of Sinaloa | Lopez-Gallardo J.A.,University of Sinaloa | Vergara-Jimenez M.J.,University of Sinaloa | Cabrera-Chavez F.,University of Sinaloa
Nutrients | Year: 2015

The prevalence of symptomatic adverse reactions to gluten and adherence to gluten-free diet in Latin American countries is unknown. These measurements are strongly linked to gluten-related disorders. This work aimed to estimate the prevalence of adverse reactions to oral gluten and the adherence to gluten-free diet in the adult Mexican population. To reach this aim, a self-administered questionnaire was designed and tested for clarity/comprehension and reproducibility. Then, a self-administered questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted in the Mexican population. The estimated prevalence rates were (95% CI): 11.9% (9.9–13.5) and 7.8 (6.4–9.4) for adverse and recurrent adverse reactions to gluten respectively; adherence to gluten-free diet 3.7% (2.7–4.8), wheat allergy 0.72% (0.38–1.37); celiac disease 0.08% (0.01–0.45), and NCGS 0.97% (0.55–1.68). Estimated pooled prevalence of self-reported physician-diagnosis of gluten-related disorders was 0.88% (0.49–1.5), and 93.3% respondents reported adherence to gluten-free diet without a physician-diagnosis of gluten-related disorders. Symptom comparisons between those who reported recurrent adverse reactions to gluten and other foods showed statistically significant differences for bloating, constipation, and tiredness (p < 0.05). Gluten-related disorders may be underdiagnosed in the Mexican population and most people adhering to a gluten-free diet are doing it without proper diagnostic work-up of these disorders, and probably without medical/dietician advice. © 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


Aguilar J.A.,University of Alicante | Aguilar J.A.,University of Sinaloa | Garrigos I.,University of Alicante | Mazon J.-N.,University of Alicante
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2011

Due to the continuous changes and heterogeneous audience of the Web, a requirement engineering stage is crucial for Web development. Importantly, this stage should consider that Web applications are more likely to rapidly evolve during the development process, thus leading to inconsistencies among requirements. Therefore, Web developers need to know dependencies among requirements to ensure that Web applications finally satisfy the audience. The understanding of requirement dependencies also helps in better managing and maintaining Web applications. In this work, an algorithm has been defined in order to deal with dependencies among functional and non-functional requirements to understand which is the impact of making changes when developing a Web application. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


Corral-Verdugo V.,University of Sonora | Mireles-Acosta J.,University of Sinaloa | Tapia-Fonllem C.,University of Sonora | Fraijo-Sing B.,University of Sonora
Human Ecology Review | Year: 2011

Sustainable behavior (SB) generally encompasses a series of actions intended at protecting both the physical and the social environments. SB may be indicated by pro-ecological, frugal, altruistic, and equitable conducts and one of the aims of environmental psychology is to investigate the psychological consequences of such actions. Previous studies had reported that the practice of pro-ecological and altruistic behaviors might result in enhanced levels of happiness; people living in more equitable countries seem to be happier, while a frugal consumption often conduces to a state of satisfaction and intrinsic motivation. Yet, so far no study considering the relationship between an aggregate of the four abovementioned instances of SB, on the one hand, and subjective wellbeing, on the other hand, had been conducted. Six-hundred-and-six undergraduate students at a Mexican university responded to an instrument assessing pro-ecological, altruistic, frugal and equitable behaviors, as well as their report of happiness. By using structural equations we modeled a higher-order-construct of "sustainable behavior", indicated by the interrelations of their four first-order (proecological, altruistic, frugal and equitable) factors. The higher- order-factor coherently emerged from such interrelation. In turn, sustainable behavior significantly influenced a "happiness" factor, also specified within the structural model. Implications for the study and promotion of sustainable behaviors are discussed within the framework of a positive psychology of sustainability. © Society for Human Ecology.

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