Siegen, Germany
Siegen, Germany

The University of Siegen in Siegen, North Rhine-Westphalia, was founded in 1972. 17,500 students were enrolled at the university as of October 2012. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: ICT-04-2015 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2016

Critical Real-Time Embedded Systems (CRTES) such as railway, aerospace, automotive and energy generation systems face a disruptive challenge caused by the massive irruption of mixed-criticality systems based on multicore processors. At the same time low-power is an intensifying demand in many market segments, a competitive advantage for CRTES that have to operate with limited energy (e.g., battery powered systems), an enabler for higher availability and a desired feature towards near-zero emission in systems with tens/hundreds of devices. Power is also a key aspect in mixed-criticality systems as another resource (together with time and space) that has to be shared among different applications and has to be strictly controlled not to cause undesired interferences. The main objective of SAFEPOWER is to enable the development of mixed-criticality systems with low power, energy and temperature in combination with safety, real-time and security support by a reference architecture orchestrating different local power-management techniques. SAFEPOWER builds a comprehensive suite of multi-core platform technologies as well as analysis, simulation and verification tools for low-power mixed-criticality systems, including hardware and software reference platforms assisting the implementation, observation and test of such applications. SAFEPOWER will demonstrate the benefits through two industrial use-cases and a cross-domain public demonstrator. The safety concept of SAFEPOWER will be assessed by an external certification authority and consider reference domains and safety standards (e.g. industrial IEC-61508, railway, automotive, aerospace). SAFEPOWE brings significant improvements w.r.t. power, energy, temperature, availability and lifetime of CRTES as well as new types of competitive products operating with limited energy. Impact and exploitation will also be facilitated by the strong collaboration with other related projects in the cluster of mixed-criticality systems.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: REV-INEQUAL-05-2016 | Award Amount: 3.25M | Year: 2017

The proposed project aims to study the relations between inequalities and young peoples ways of doing politics as well as to advance scenarios for future democratic models and political systems in Europe that are more inclusive for young people. It has three main objectives: (1) To provide systematic evidence on the ways in which inequalities are lived by young people and (re)acted upon, exploring the coping mechanisms which are embedded in young peoples ways of doing politics; these coping mechanisms are manifested in multiple forms, i.e. as either political (dis)engagement and contestation online and offline or as (trans-)national democratic innovation and experimentation; (2) To advance knowledge on the conditions and causes underpinning young peoples ways of doing politics; this involves an examination of their norms, values, attitudes, and behaviors regarding democracy, power, politics, policy-making, social and political participation (online and offline) and the organization of economic, social and private life in order to identify ways to strengthen youth political participation and engagement with democratic life in Europe; (3) To suggest a number of different future scenarios for the development of democracy and political participation in Europe, putting particular emphasis on implementing new democratic models that are more inclusive for young people especially those with fewer opportunities. The research design consists of a multidimensional theoretical framework that combines macro-level (institutional), meso-level (organizational), and micro-level (individual) explanatory factors, a cross-national comparative design that includes nine European countries with different institutional arrangements and policies towards youth, and an integrated methodological approach based on multiple sources and methods (policy analysis, claims-making analysis, organizational survey, panel survey, survey experiments, biographical interviews, and social media analysis).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: Shift2Rail-RIA | Phase: S2R-OC-IP1-02-2016 | Award Amount: 6.68M | Year: 2016

SAFE4RAIL will provide the baseline for a fundamentally simplified embedded computing and networked TCMS platform, for modular integration and certification of all safety-, time- and mission-critical train functions, including distributed hard real-time controls, safety signals and functions up to SIL4. The generic embedded platform architecture provided by SAFE4RAIL will allow mixed-criticality integration and virtualization to host critical and non-critical functions on reconfigurable computing and networking resources. The SAFE4RAIL simulation and testing environment is based on the hardware abstraction and domain separation concepts allowing rapid deployment and testing of applications, e.g. by supporting early functional integration testing long before vehicle integration. The results of SAFE4RAIL are demonstrated with a SIL4 brake-by-wire system safety concept. Finally, the project will provide recommendations for standardization and certification of next generation TCMS embedded platform. SAFE4RAIL reduces TCMS system lifecycle and operating costs and minimizes time-to-market by: (1) minimized physical complexity: reduced weight, wiring, connector and computer count, increased part commonality, reliability and availability (2) supporting streamlined approaches to verification/testing, validation, reuse, and (re)certification (3) incorporating reconfiguration and modular certification to reduce system integration and recommissioning costs. SAFE4RAIL results will encourage interoperability, efficient, safe and secure interconnection of technical solutions among European railway providers, boosting the worldwide competitiveness and preserving the global leadership of the European transport industry. SAFE4RAIL is driven by a European cross-industry consortium of 11 academic and industrial partners (including 4 SMEs), with experts from automotive, aerospace, railway to ensure synergies with existing and developing architectural concepts and technologies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 1.46M | Year: 2017

The joint research in this programme will study important aspectsboth theoretical as well as appliedof computing with infinite objects. A central aim is laying the grounds for the generation of efficient and verified software in engineering applications. A prime example for infinite data is provided by the real numbers, most commonly conceived as infinite sequences of digits. While most applications in science and engineering substitute the reals with floating point numbers of fixed finite precision and thus have to deal with truncation and rounding errors, the approach in this project is different: exact real numbers are taken as first-class citizens and while any computation can only exploit a finite portion of its input in finite time, increased precision is always available by continuing the computation process. This project aims to bring together the expertise of specialists in mathematics, logic, and computer science to push the frontiers of our theoretical and practical understanding of computing with infinite objects. Three overarching motivations drive the proposed collaboration: Representability. Cardinality considerations tell us that it is not possible to represent arbitrary mathematical objects in a way that is accessible to computation. We will enlist expertise in topology, logic, and set theory, to address the question of which objects are representable and how they can be represented most efficiently. Constructivity. Working in a constructive mathematical universe can greatly enhance our understanding of the link between computation and mathematical structure. Not only informs us which are the objects of relevance, it also allows us to devise always correct algorithms from proofs. Efficient implementation. We also aim to make progress on concrete implementations. Theoretical insights from elsewhere will be tested in actual computer systems; obstacles encountered in the latter will inform the direction of mathematical investigation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EURO-3-2014 | Award Amount: 2.85M | Year: 2015

TransSOL is committed to the systematic, interdisciplinary and praxis-oriented analysis of European solidarity in times of crisis. It has three overarching objectives: (a) it will map and analyse solidarity in Europe by means of a cross-national database that comprises three surveys addressing the general population, organized civil society, and claims-making in the media; (b) it will gather systematic data on the contextual factors and engage into political and legal analyses to ascertain the influence of the socio-economic, political, and legal context on solidarity, in particular the impact of the crisis, the EUs political responses and target-groups specific public policies; and (c) it will identify and develop best practices of transnational solidarity, draft evidence-based policy recommendations, and engage proactive dissemination and communication activities. The project comprises teams from Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Poland, Switzerland and the UK, including scientists from various disciplines and civil society practitioners, thus promising to deliver interdisciplinary and comparative analyses, knowledge-transfer and evidence-based, practicable recommendations. The project will enable us to address the three topics of the call. First, TransSOL will provide the first rigorous and comprehensive analysis of transnational solidarity in Europe, its main forms, conditioning factors (e.g., individual features as gender and social class, spatial inequalities, and contextual factors), and underlying conflicts about contending norms, identities, and interests. Secondly, the project will address the impact of Europes cultural diversity and multiple identities on European solidarity by analysing public claims-making and debates within the media. And finally, we engage into a critical reflection about adequate policy responses, in particular about the potentials of social investments balancing civic virtues of solidarity with public responsibilities.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-21-2015 | Award Amount: 5.17M | Year: 2016

Background We propose a holistic view of interrelated frailties: cognitive decline, physical frailty, depression and anxiety, social isolation and poor sleep quality, which are a major burden to older adults and social and health care systems. Early detection and intervention are crucial in sustaining active and healthy ageing (AHA) and slowing or reversing further decline. Aims and Relevance The main aim of my-AHA is to reduce frailty risk by improving physical activity and cognitive function, psychological state, social resources, nutrition, sleep and overall well-being. It will empower older citizens to better manage their own health, resulting in healthcare cost savings. my-AHA will use state-of-the-art analytical concepts to provide new ways of health monitoring and disease prevention through individualized profiling and personalized recommendations, feedback and support. Approach An ICT-based platform will detect defined risks in the frailty domains early and accurately via non-stigmatising embedded sensors and data readily available in the daily living environment of older adults. When risk is detected, my-AHA will provide targeted ICT-based interventions with a scientific evidence base of efficacy, including vetted offerings from established providers of medical and AHA support. These interventions will follow an integrated approach to motivate users to participate in exercise, cognitively stimulating games and social networking to achieve long-term behavioural change, sustained by continued end user engagement with my-AHA. Scale and Sustainability The proposed platform provides numerous incentives to engage diverse stakeholders, constituting a sustainable ecosystem with empowered end users and reliable standardised interfaces for solutions providers, which will be ready for larger scale deployment at project end. The ultimate aim is to deliver significant innovation in the area of AHA by cooperation with European health care organizations, SMEs, NGOs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-10-2014 | Award Amount: 6.03M | Year: 2015

Cancer biomarkers circulating in body fluids have been shown to reflect the pathological process and for this reason can be used for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and choice for therapeutic interventions. It is proven that their detection is a key to new minimal-invasive detection approaches. However, barriers to wide spread use of similar approaches are lack of test sensitivity, specificity and limited availability of low cost detection platforms. This project is focused at developing a compact plasmonic-based device with integrated microfluidic circuit and functionalized nanostructures for the detection of DNA, microRNA and tumor autoantibodies cancer biomarkers. The aim is to detect cancer biomarkers circulating in blood with improvement in sensitivity of factor up to 1000, reduction in cost of platform of factor ranging from 2 to 4 compared to todays available techniques and analysis time less than 60 minutes. The proposed detection approache will provide ultrasensitive detection of biomolecular systems with no need for complex sample chemical modifications thus allowing direct and simple assays to be performed. Within the project a bimodal industrial prototype will be developed integrating novel surface plasmon resonance imaging and plasmon-enhanced fluorescence sensing technologies, respectively. Automated fabrication processes suitable for low cost mass production will be developed and applied to produce disposable integrated chips. Prototype will be specifically fabricated for early diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer. The team includes partners holding cross-disciplinary competencies needed to achieve the proposed results, including two of the first five plasmon resonance groups in the world, the inventor of surface plasmon microscopy also known as surface plasmon resonance imaging- and plasmon-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy, and full European value chain including disposable chip and readout platforms design, development and manufacturing.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SEC-2013.6.1-1 | Award Amount: 4.15M | Year: 2014

EmerGent aims at understanding the positive and the negative impact of social media in emergencies in order to enhance objective and perceived safety and security of citizens before, during and after emergencies. Furthermore, EmerGent aims at strengthening the role of European companies dealing with services and products related to the aimed research and development results. EmerGent will perform studies on the communication behaviour via social media in an emergency situation and its impact on emergency management procedures with citizens and public authorities (emergency management services) involved. The understanding of critical situations, the reactions expressed through social media and the general importance and preferred types of social media will be considered. For this research new methods and tools will be developed to reinforce the communication between weakly connected (via social media) crisis-communities (citizens) and the emergency management services, supported by European associations. To handle the vast amount of valuable and distributed data new methods for Information Mining and Information Quality will be developed to classify and rate publicly available and provided data from users. With developed methodologies and software tools for the routing of mined and classified emergency relevant information from social networks, EmerGent will create a comprehensive concept for Novel Emergency Management. All analysis and impact assessment results will lead to the creation of guidelines. Hence stakeholders will be enabled to understand and get the most benefit out of social media and its integration into their processes.


Zimmermann M.,University of Siegen
International Materials Reviews | Year: 2012

Over the last decade, it has been shown for a number of metals that failure occurs even beyond the classical fatigue limit. High frequency testing techniques make it possible to conduct fatigue tests up to 10 9 or even 10 11 cycles for various alloys, ranging from aluminium to high strength steels. As a consequence, the characterisation of fatigue life and damage mechanisms at N>10 7 cycles [very high cycle fatigue (VHCF)] has become a major research issue. Fatigue life in this regime is dominated by crack initiation. With the overall strain being in the purely elastic range, microstructural features acting as stress raisers lead to localised and inhomogeneously distributed irreversible deformation. Hence, microstructural discontinuities become the leading features controlling fatigue life at very high numbers of cycles. The present survey will focus on dislocation arrangement, grain orientation, grain size and surface roughening and their implications on the VHCF behaviour for selected virtually defect free metals, thus providing a sound basis for a detailed understanding of the relevant deformation and damage evolution mechanisms. It will also focus on the VHCF behaviour of materials representing a 'transition' between non-defect related damage evolution and defect based crack initiation, thus pointing out the complexity of damage evolution in the VHCF range. In this context, the term defect is limited to hard non-metallic inclusions, which can be found, among others, in high strength steels as well as pores in casting materials, both dominating the VHCF behaviour of these material types. In contrast, second phases, precipitates or intermetallic particles are considered as irregularities of the microstructure and will not be classified as defects. The current review will show that a true understanding of the VHCF behaviour requires a careful differential analysis of the possible microstructural features leading to localised plastic deformation and that not only crack initiation, but also crack growth behaviour analysis is essential to gain a sound basis for a reliable fatigue life prediction. © 2012 Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining and ASM International Published by Maney for the Institute and ASM International.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-COG | Phase: ERC-CoG-2015 | Award Amount: 1.67M | Year: 2016

Correlations are central for our modern view on the foundations of quantum theory and applications like quantum information processing. So far, research concentrated on correlations between two or more particles. Indeed, for this situation it is well established that spatial quantum correlations are a useful resource for tasks like quantum cryptography and quantum metrology. There are, however, other types of correlations in quantum mechanics, which arise if a sequence of measurements on a single quantum system is made. These temporal quantum correlations have recently attracted attention, because they are central for the understanding of some differences between the quantum and the classical world. Moreover, due to experimental progress their observation has become feasible with trapped ions, polarized photons, or other quantum optical systems. This project aims at a full understanding and characterization of temporal quantum correlations. For that, we will derive criteria and measures for temporal quantum correlations and investigate their connection to information theory. Then, we will elucidate to which extent temporal correlations can be used to prove that a system is quantum and not classical. Finally, we consider implementations of temporal quantum correlations using continuous variable systems like nanomechanical oscillators and applications in quantum information processing.

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