Saskatoon, Canada

University of Saskatchewan

www.usask.ca
Saskatoon, Canada

The University of Saskatchewan is a Canadian public research university, founded in 1907, and located on the east side of the South Saskatchewan River in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. An "Act to establish and incorporate a University for the Province of Saskatchewan" was passed by the provincial legislature in 1907. It established the provincial university on April 3, 1907 "for the purpose of providing facilities for higher education in all its branches and enabling all persons without regard to race, creed or religion to take the fullest advantage". The University of Saskatchewan is now the largest education institution in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan.The university began as an agricultural college in 1907 and established the first Canadian university-based department of extension in 1910. 300 acres were set aside for university buildings and 1,000 acres for the U of S farm, and agricultural fields. In total 10.32 km2 was annexed for the university. The main University campus is situated upon 2,425 acres , with another 500 acres allocated for Innovation Place Research Park. The University of Saskatchewan agriculture college still has access to neighbouring urban research lands. The University of Saskatchewan's Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization facility, develops DNA-enhanced immunization vaccines for both humans and animals.Since its origins as an agricultural college, research has played an important role at the university. Discoveries made at the U of S include sulphate-resistant cement and the cobalt-60 cancer therapy unit. The university offers over 200 academic programs. Duncan P. McColl was appointed as the first registrar, establishing the first convocation from which Chief Justice Edward L. Wetmore was elected as the first chancellor. Walter Charles Murray became the first president of the university's board of governors. Wikipedia.

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The disclosure relates to immunogenic and vaccine compositions comprising Streptococcus exotoxins and/or bacterial thermolysins from M4 protease family. Also provided are kits, methods and uses of said compositions for treating or preventing laminitis in a hooved animal.


Patent
University of Saskatchewan | Date: 2017-04-26

The disclosure provides methods of detecting and monitoring brain injury in a test subject comprising analyzing a blood sample from the test subject for increased levels of PrPC. The disclosure also provides kits for measuring the amount of PrPC in a blood sample.


The disclosure relates to immunogenic and vaccine compositions comprising Streptococcus exotoxins and/or bacterial thermolysins from M4 protease family. Also provided are kits, methods and uses of said compositions for treating or preventing laminitis in a hooved animal.


Patent
University of Saskatchewan | Date: 2015-06-12

The disclosure provides methods of detecting and monitoring brain injury in a test subject comprising analyzing a blood sample from the test subject for increased levels of PrP^(c). The disclosure also provides kits for measuring the amount of PrP^(c )in a blood sample.


Patent
University of Saskatchewan | Date: 2016-07-25

Recombinant, chimeric porcine influenza viruses are disclosed that include hemagglutinin segments from more than one influenza virus subtype. Also described are methods of producing the recombinant influenza viruses, immunogenic compositions comprising the recombinant influenza viruses, methods of stimulating an immune response against influenza virus, and methods of treating and preventing influenza virus infection.


NMiTE, Britain’s new engineering university, has appointed Professor Janusz Kozinski as its inaugural President and Chief Executive. Kozinski, who will take up his post in Hereford on 1 July 2017, has wide experience as an international academic leader and entrepreneur. Most recently he orchestrated the creation of the Lassonde School of Engineering in Toronto, Canada. “This is perhaps the brightest and the boldest academic start up in recent times in the UK or anywhere else,” said Kozinski. “The chance to lead this project was impossible to resist. All the ingredients are there to create an engineering education experience designed for the future, not the past or the present.” David Sheppard, co-project leader and member of the NMiTE Board, said: “Anyone who meets Janusz realises immediately that they are meeting a leader and a visionary. He is a relentless motivator and collaborator who sets his sights on a bold vision, and builds an exceptional team to make that possible. He was our unanimous choice and we can’t wait to have him at the helm.” Call for passionate engineers and manufacturing businesses Kozinski will be assembling a team of leaders and teachers – from inside and outside the world of engineering – to turn this project from an idea to reality by 2020. “We need the most creative, imaginative and ambitious people, of all genders and backgrounds, who see engineering as a path to making real change in the world. “We want people from Britain’s engineering and manufacturing businesses with passion and drive to get involved in creating the curriculum and courses. You might be a recent graduate or a have been in practice for many years and you want the chance to rethink how we prepare young engineers for the future, or you might be someone who’s never studied engineering. “I have a message to all those who are intrigued by this new project… Don’t wait to see what happens. We need your ideas and your energy right now. Please come join us!” Kozinski stressed: “The first students applying to this university will have been born after the year 2000. They deserve an education designed for them, not for their parents and grandparents. I can promise this will be different from anything we’ve seen before in higher education. So please watch this space.” A Polish-born Canadian, Kozinski has been Founding Dean of the Lassonde School of Engineering at York University in Toronto, Canada. This $250-million academic start up created a new concept of engineering education with a broad ‘Renaissance’ curriculum including humanities, law and business, a ‘flipped classroom’ model of teaching without lectures, and a commitment to become the first engineering school in Canada to achieve a 50:50 gender balance. Previously he was a leader and scholar at McGill University in Montreal, University of Saskatchewan, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He has also held several visiting professorships including the Institute for Advanced Studies and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France’s most distinguished research laboratory). NMiTE aims to open its doors in September 2020 to the first 300 students at a purpose-built city centre campus in Hereford. It intends to be educating more than 5,000 students by 2032. Its new university concept was launched in 2015 with the support of engineers, leading universities, businesspeople and politicians. Britain has an estimated shortfall of 40,000 engineering graduates, and closing this gap is essential if the country is to have the high-value skills needed for a successful modern economy. NMiTE is being created to help solve this problem with a radical new approach and curriculum that combines the best innovations from leading universities around the world. The fledgling university is being strongly backed by engineering businesses, the Herefordshire community, the University of Warwick, professional engineering bodies and the UK Government, which recently announced over £8million in initial funding with more to follow shortly.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

ALL AMOUNTS ARE STATED IN CDN $ (UNLESS NOTED) Cameco (TSX:CCO) (NYSE:CCJ) announced the appointment of Brian Reilly as Cameco's senior vice-president and chief operating officer, and election of 11 board members at its annual meeting held on May 11, 2017. Reilly will succeed Bob Steane who is retiring on June 30, 2017 after 34 years with Cameco. Reilly will report to president and CEO Tim Gitzel. "I thank Bob for his outstanding contributions to Cameco and wish him the very best in his retirement," said Gitzel. "I'm also pleased to welcome Brian to Cameco's senior executive team." Reilly joined Cameco in 2011 as managing director of Cameco Australia Pty., a wholly owned subsidiary overseeing development of two mine projects and an extensive exploration program. Under Reilly, Cameco Australia made extensive progress on securing regulatory approval for the mine projects, completed an indigenous land use agreement with the traditional owners of the Kintyre site, and built strong relationships with local and government stakeholders. In March 2017, he was appointed Cameco's vice-president, mining, technology and projects. Prior to joining Cameco, Reilly served as president and CEO of Titan Uranium Inc., a junior exploration company, and for eight years with AREVA where he advanced from project geologist at the Cluff Lake uranium mine to vice-president human resources and industrial relations. He holds a master's degree in geology from Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario and an MBA from the University of Saskatchewan. Also at Cameco's annual general meeting, shareholders elected board members Ian Bruce, Daniel Camus, John Clappison, Donald Deranger, Catherine Gignac, Tim Gitzel, Jim Gowans, Kathryn Jackson, Don Kayne, Anne McLellan and Neil McMillan. (Voting results are available below) Cameco is one of the world's largest uranium producers, a significant supplier of conversion services and one of two Candu fuel manufacturers in Canada. Our competitive position is based on our controlling ownership of the world's largest high-grade reserves and low-cost operations. Our uranium products are used to generate clean electricity in nuclear power plants around the world. We also explore for uranium in the Americas, Australia and Asia. Our shares trade on the Toronto and New York stock exchanges. Our head office is in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.


Patent
University of Saskatchewan | Date: 2016-12-19

The present application includes a method for improving human and animal health comprising administering an effective amount of a linus cyclopeptide (LCP) extract from flaxseed to a subject in need thereof. Also included are feeds, foodstuffs, functional food compositions, natural product compositions nutraceuticals and food additive compositions comprising an LCP extract from flaxseed.


Fang J.,University of Saskatchewan
Drug Metabolism Reviews | Year: 2014

Anthocyanins are a subgroup of flavonoids responsible for the blue, purple, and red color of many fruits, flowers, and leaves. Consumption of foods rich in anthocyanins has been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. The fate of anthocyanins after oral administration follows a unique pattern rather different from those of other flavonoids. Anthocyanins could be absorbed from the stomach as well as intestines. Active transporters may play a role in the absorption of anthocyanins from the stomach as well as in their transfer within the kidney or liver. Anthocyanins such as cyanidin-3-glucoside and pelargonidin-3-glucoside could be absorbed in their intact form into the gastrointestinal wall; undergo extensive first-pass metabolism; and enter the systemic circulation as metabolites. Phenolic acid metabolites were found in the blood stream in much higher concentrations than their parent compounds. These metabolites could be responsible for the health benefits associated with anthocyanins. Some anthocyanins can reach the large intestine in significant amounts and undergo decomposition catalyzed by microbiota. In turn, these decomposition products may contribute to the health effects associated with anthocyanins in the large intestine. This review comprehensively summarizes the existing knowledge about absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of anthocyanins as well as their decomposition within the gastrointestinal lumen. © 2014 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


Liu D.,University of Saskatchewan | Kelly T.L.,University of Saskatchewan
Nature Photonics | Year: 2014

Organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells that combine a mesoporous scaffold, a perovskite light absorber and an organic hole transporter have emerged at the forefront of solution-processable photovoltaic devices; however, they require processing temperatures of up to 500C to sinter the mesoporous metal-oxide support. Here, we report the use of a thin film of ZnO nanoparticles as an electron-transport layer in CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 -based solar cells; in contrast to mesoporous TiO 2, the ZnO layer is both substantially thinner and requires no sintering. We took advantage of these facts to prepare flexible solar cells with power-conversion efficiencies in excess of 10%. The use of ZnO also results in improvements to device performance for cells prepared on rigid substrates. Solar cells based on this design exhibit power-conversion efficiencies as high as 15.7% when measured under AM1.5G illumination, which makes them some of the highest-performing perovskite solar cells reported to date. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

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