Sao Paulo, Brazil
Sao Paulo, Brazil

The University of São Paulo is a public university in the Brazilian state of São Paulo. It is the largest Brazilian university and the country's most prestigious educational institution, the best university in Ibero-America, and one of the most prestigious universities in the world. According to reports by the Ministry of Science and Technology, more than 25% of scientific papers published by Brazilian researchers in high quality conferences and journals are produced at the University of São Paulo.USP is one of the largest institutions of higher education in Latin America, with approximately 90,000 enrolled students. It has eleven campuses, four of them in São Paulo . The other campuses are in the cities of Bauru, Lorena, Piracicaba, Pirassununga, Ribeirão Preto and two in São Carlos. USP is involved in teaching, research and university extension in all areas of knowledge. Wikipedia.


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Patent
CBJ Hong Kong Ocean Engineering Ltd and University of Sao Paulo | Date: 2017-01-18

Provided is a method of installing and constructing a hollow cylindrical pier for fixing an offshore platform structure to the bed, wherein a steel cylinder (101) with an inner diameter slightly greater than the hollow cylindrical pier is driven into the bed (2) until at least the bearing stratum is reached to ensure fixing, and part of the steel cylinder (101) is exposed above the water surface (1); draining ponding inside the steel cylinder (101), and excavating bed sediment inside the steel cylinder (101); cutting off the steel cylinder (101); hoisting a first hollow cylindrical pier section (1A) with a sealed bottom end vertically downwards from the water surface (1) towards the steel cylinder (101), pre-tensioning an overlapping hollow cylindrical pier section on the hollow cylindrical pier section via a shear key structure and then fixedly connecting same with the previous hollow cylindrical pier section, and hoisting same in turn such that after the sealed bottom end of the first hollow cylindrical pier section (1A) reaches near the bottom end of steel cylinder (101), at least part of the lastly hoisted overlapping hollow cylindrical pier section is exposed above the water surface (1); and pouring concrete (107) into a gap between the steel cylinder (101) and the hollow cylindrical piers. Further provided are a method of installing and constructing an offshore platform structure and a hollow cylindrical pier for fixing to the bed and an offshore platform structure.


Patent
Idcgs Clinica De Diagnosticos Medicos, University of Sao Paulo and Biocrates Life Sciences | Date: 2017-02-08

The present invention relates to metabolic biomarker sets for assessing HIV. In preferred embodiments, the present invention relates to the use of biomarker sets for screening and/or diagnosing HIV infection, for prediction of immunologic response of a mammalian subject to antiretroviral therapy and/or prognosis of HIV disease progression, and for monitoring of HIV disease activity in a mammalian subject.In other embodiments, the invention relates to methods for screening and/or diagnosing HIV infection, for prediction of immunologic response of a mammalian subject to antiretroviral therapy and/or prognosis of HIV disease progression, and for monitoring of HIV disease activity in a mammalian subject, as well as to a kit adapted to carry out the methods. By employing the specific biomarkers and the method according to the present invention it becomes possible to more properly and reliably assess HIV. In particular, it becomes possible to screen for and diagnose HIV in a patient with high accuracy and predict early in advance the patients therapeutic response to antiretroviral therapy.


Patent
Spigot Media Corporation, Jason Inc, University of Sao Paulo, Reade and Buscher | Date: 2017-02-01

A method, system, and apparatus, including a program encoded on computer-readable medium, for downloading media content files to mobile devices includes downloading media files from local storage on a kiosk to a mobile device over a high-speed wireless communication link using an application on the mobile device. A message can be sent to the mobile device to provide notification of a proximity of the device to a kiosk when a location of the device satisfies predetermined criteria associated with a location of the kiosk, and a download can be initiated after authenticating the device. In addition, a battery charging service for charging the mobile device can be authorized through a charging port of a charging station in response to detecting the installed application on the mobile device. A file can be downloaded from a particular solid state drive in accordance with a file system detected for the device.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Chagas disease, affecting millions of people in Central and South America, is classified as one of the 17 most important neglected diseases by the World Health Organization. Now, researchers have found that even the non-symptomatic stage of Chagas infection, which can last for many years, more than doubles a person's risk of death. The new study, published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, also concludes that deaths from Chagas have likely been under-reported in the past. Chagas disease is an insect-borne parasitic disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. A bite from an infected Triatominae, or kissing bug, can cause initial swelling, fever, and headaches but symptoms generally fade away after a few months. Infected people can then live for decades with no more signs of the disease, during which time clinicians have assumed they have no increased mortality. Years later, it's known that cardiac, neurological, and digestive symptoms of Chagas can reemerge. In the new work, Ligia Capuani, of the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and colleagues retrospectively studied 2,842 Chagas-positive and 5,684 Chagas-negative blood donors in Sao Paulo from 1996 to 2000. Since blood donors are routinely screened for symptoms of active Chagas disease, it was assumed that blood samples testing positive for the parasite were from individuals in the indeterminate phase of the disease. Their records were cross-referenced with the Brazil national mortality information system to determine whether each person had died and, if so, the cause of death. Among those who tested positive for Chagas, 159 (5.6%) died during the course of the study, whereas only 103 (1.8%) who tested negative for the disease died, representing a more than doubling of the overall death risk. Moreover, when only deaths due to Chagas or to underlying cardiac abnormalities were analyzed, the different was even greater -- those with the disease had a 17.9 time greater risk of death. However, Chagas was often not listed as a cause of death in patients who had tested positive for the disease and died of heart problems. "The fact that Chagas disease was not reported as an underlying or associated cause of death on the death certificate of 42% of seropositive donors that died due to cardiac causes demonstrates under ascertainment of Chagas disease pathogenesis, highlighting its status as a neglected tropical disease," the researchers say. "Research is urgently needed in order to test new therapeutic options with fewer side effects and to find better correlates of disease progression."


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Chagas disease, affecting millions of people in Central and South America, is classified as one of the 17 most important neglected diseases by the World Health Organization. Now, researchers have found that even the non-symptomatic stage of Chagas infection, which can last for many years, more than doubles a person's risk of death. The new study, published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, also concludes that deaths from Chagas have likely been under-reported in the past. Chagas disease is an insect-borne parasitic disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. A bite from an infected Triatominae, or kissing bug, can cause initial swelling, fever, and headaches but symptoms generally fade away after a few months. Infected people can then live for decades with no more signs of the disease, during which time clinicians have assumed they have no increased mortality. Years later, it's known that cardiac, neurological, and digestive symptoms of Chagas can reemerge. In the new work, Ligia Capuani, of the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and colleagues retrospectively studied 2,842 Chagas-positive and 5,684 Chagas-negative blood donors in Sao Paulo from 1996 to 2000. Since blood donors are routinely screened for symptoms of active Chagas disease, it was assumed that blood samples testing positive for the parasite were from individuals in the indeterminate phase of the disease. Their records were cross-referenced with the Brazil national mortality information system to determine whether each person had died and, if so, the cause of death. Among those who tested positive for Chagas, 159 (5.6%) died during the course of the study, whereas only 103 (1.8%) who tested negative for the disease died, representing a more than doubling of the overall death risk. Moreover, when only deaths due to Chagas or to underlying cardiac abnormalities were analyzed, the different was even greater--those with the disease had a 17.9 time greater risk of death. However, Chagas was often not listed as a cause of death in patients who had tested positive for the disease and died of heart problems. "The fact that Chagas disease was not reported as an underlying or associated cause of death on the death certificate of 42% of seropositive donors that died due to cardiac causes demonstrates under ascertainment of Chagas disease pathogenesis, highlighting its status as a neglected tropical disease," the researchers say. "Research is urgently needed in order to test new therapeutic options with fewer side effects and to find better correlates of disease progression." In your coverage please use this URL to provide access to the freely available article in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases: http://journals. Capuani L, Bierrenbach AL, Pereira Alencar A, Mendrone A Jr, Ferreira JE, Custer B, et al. (2017) Mortality among blood donors seropositive and seronegative for Chagas disease (1996-2000) in São Paulo, Brazil: A death certificate linkage study. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 11(5): e0005542. https:/ This work is supported and funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease - Grant Number 1P50AI098461-01 REVISED and Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq) for scholarship of the Post Graduate Program - process nº 158565/2012-6. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.


Ticked Off! Here's What You Need To Know About Lyme Disease The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers Chagas Disease as one of the five neglected parasitic infections (NPIs) that require public health action based on records of its severity and widespread infection. A new study published on May 18 In the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, however, claims that the disease may be more fatal than experts believe because cases of death caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi have been under-reported. Researchers from University of Sao Paulo in Brazil studied more than 8,000 people who donated blood from 1996 to 2000 and found that among the participants, 2,842 donors tested positive for Chagas disease at the time of blood donation while 5,684 tested negative. The researchers studied the participants' records for the next 14 years and crossed reference their identities with death certificates recorded in the Brazil national mortality information system (SIM). Among the Chagas-positive blood donors, 5.6 percent or 159 participants died during the 14-year time frame, while only 1.8 percent or 103 Chagas-negative participants passed away. In the more chronic stages of Chagas disease, patients can develop cardiac abnormalities and intestinal complications but only 58 percent of cardiac deaths were recorded as Chagas-related. When the researchers added abnormal cardiac-related deaths to the equation — one of the disease's more fatal symptoms — the result showed that Chagas-positive participants have a 17.9 times higher risk of heart disease leading to death. "The fact that Chagas disease was not reported as an underlying or associated cause of death on the death certificate of 42% of seropositive donors that died due to cardiac causes demonstrates under ascertainment of Chagas disease pathogenesis, highlighting its status as a neglected tropical disease," the researchers write. Triatomine bugs, more commonly known as the kissing bug due to its preference for biting sleeping humans close to the lips and eyes, transfer the T. Cruzi parasite through its feces, which it leaves near or in the broken skin after feeding. The parasite then enters the bloodstream to slowly wreak havoc in the human body, but its symptoms are mostly mild and, in some cases, patients don't even experience any. Despite its asymptomatic nature, however, the researchers concluded that T. cruzi continues to affect an infected person's body and can result in death. "What the parasite does to the body takes a long time; (it) slowly goes into the heart and destroys it," Dr. Ester Cerdeira Sabino explained. Dr. Sabino is a co-leader in the study. Researchers continue to find a way to develop an effective drug to kill the T. cruzi parasite but there is currently no vaccine against the Chagas disease. So far, the only solution is to control the kissing bug population in order to stop the spread of the parasite. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 13, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Washington, DC, April 13, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- WASHINGTON, April 13 – The Association of Academic Health Centers (AAHC), in conjunction with its international subsidiary AAHCI, is pleased to announce the next phase of its groundbreaking Aligned Institutional Mission (AIM) Program, a means for academic health centers around the world to optimize and measure the alignment of their education, research, and patient care missions. “AAHC/AAHCI successfully completed the Development Phase of this innovative program and is ready to move forward with the pivotal Pilot Phase that will test and refine program elements to prepare AIM for a full global launch,” said Steven A. Wartman, MD, PhD, AAHC president and CEO. “The feedback we have received from the Development Phase institutions has been outstanding. This pioneering program assists academic health centers on an individualized basis to optimally align their mission components to help create learning health systems for the 21st century.” The Pilot Phase of the program includes seven sites: East Tennessee State (USA), Florida International University (USA), Semmelweis University (Hungary), University of Kansas (USA), University of Malaya (Malaysia), University of Sao Paulo (Brazil), and University of Queensland-Brisbane Diamantina Health Partners (Australia). Following the completion of the Pilot Phase, the association plans a full-scale roll-out to all members in 2018. The AIM program works closely with a distinguished group of consultants, all of whom have had extensive experience in leadership positions with academic health centers: “The AIM Program offers participating institutions a program tool for internal assessment and goal setting; a peer consultant review period; and peer consultant recommendations and strategic improvement planning,” said Wartman. “Participating in the AIM program offered UAMS a valuable opportunity to assess its programs specifically within the framework of how they align our institution with our stated health improvement mission,” said Dan Rahn, MD, chancellor of the University of Arkansas Medical School (an institution that participated in the Development Phase of the program), adding “[u]sing the AIM assessment tool and then hosting a constructive site visit connected all of those changes into a coherent story that illustrates how we moved from our strategic vision to reengineering how we deliver care, manage data, ensure sustainability, align education, research and patient care, and ultimately impact population health.” AAHC is a non-profit association dedicated to advancing health and well-being through the vigorous leadership of academic health centers. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/8bb6f932-b76b-43d3-9f00-a8a09bcea085


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-13-2016 | Award Amount: 5.38M | Year: 2017

Key industrial sectors e.g. automotive, are rapidly transformed by digital and communication technologies leading to the fourth industrial revolution. New ones are in the making, e.g. Smart Cities, which inspire a new breed of applications and services. The salient characteristic of these sectors, known as verticals, is that they are rapidly becoming open ecosystems built on top of common physical infrastructures and resources. This requires a high degree of technological convergence among vertical industries empowering them with enhanced technical capacity to trigger the development of new, innovative products, applications and services. 5G network infrastructures and embodied technologies are destined to become a stakeholder driven, holistic environment for technical and business innovation integrating networking, computing and storage resources into one programmable and unified infrastructure. It is this 5G vision that when it is further projected to accommodate verticals raises a number of technical issues Motivated by them, 5GinFIRE project aspires to address two interlinked questions: - Q1: How such a holistic and unified environment should look like? - Q2: How can 5GinFIRE host and integrate verticals and concurrently deal with reconciling their competing and opposing requirements? Addressing these key questions, 5GinFIRE main technical objective is to build and operate an Open, and Extensible 5G NFV-based Reference (Open5G-NFV) ecosystem of Experimental Facilities that integrates existing FIRE facilities with new vertical-specific ones and enables experimentation of vertical industries. In order to guarantee architectural and technological convergence the proposed environment will be built in alignment with on-going standardization and open source activities. Accordingly, the Open5G-NFV FIRE ecosystem may serve as the forerunner experimental playground wherein innovations may be proposed before they are ported to emerging mainstream 5G networks.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-22-2016 | Award Amount: 12.56M | Year: 2016

The ZikaPLAN initiative combines the strengths of 25 partners in Latin America, North America, Africa, Asia, and various centres in Europe to address the urgent research gaps (WP 1-8) in Zika, identifying short-and long term solutions (WP 9-10) and building a sustainable Latin-American EID Preparedness and Response capacity (WP 11-12). We will conduct clinical studies to further refine the full spectrum and risk factors of congenital Zika syndrome (including neurodevelopmental milestones in the first 3 years of life), and delineate neurological complications associated with Zika due to direct neuroinvasion and immune-mediated responses. Laboratory based research to unravel neurotropism, investigate the role of sexual transmission, determinants of severe disease, and viral fitness will envelop the clinical studies. Burden of disease and modelling studies will assemble a wealth of data including a longitudinal cohort study of 17,000 subjects aged 2-59 in 14 different geographic locations in Brazil over 3 years. Data driven vector control and vaccine modelling as well as risk assessments on geographic spread of Zika will form the foundation for evidence-informed policies. The Platform for Diagnostics Innovation and Evaluation will develop novel ZIKV diagnostic tests in accordance with WHO Target Product Profiles. Our global network of laboratory and clinical sites with well-characterized specimens is set out to accelerate the evaluation of the performance of such tests. Based on qualitative research, we will develop supportive, actionable messages to affected communities, and develop novel personal protective measures. Our final objective is for the Zika outbreak response effort to grow into a sustainable Latin-American network for emerging infectious diseases research preparedness. To this end we will engage in capacity building in laboratory and clinical research, collaborate with existing networks to share knowledge and tackle regulatory and other bottlenecks.


Thanks to modern treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy, acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is now the most curable type of leukemia. However, this progress has not yielded equivalent benefit in developing countries. The International Consortium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (IC-APL) was established to create a network of institutions in developing countries that would exchange experience and data and receive support from well-established US and European cooperative groups. The IC-APL formulated expeditious diagnostic, treatment, and supportive guidelines that were adapted to local circumstances. APL was chosen as a model disease because of the potential impact on improved diagnosis and treatment. The project included 4 national coordinators and reference laboratories, common clinical record forms, 5 subcommittees, and laboratory and data management training programs. In addition, participating institutions held regular virtual and face-to-face meetings. Complete hematological remission was achieved in 153/180 (85%) patients and 27 (15%) died during induction. After a median follow-up of 28 months, the 2-year cumulative incidence of relapse, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were 4.5%, 80%, and 91%, respectively. The establishment of the IC-APL network resulted in a decrease of almost 50% in early mortality and an improvement in OS of almost 30% compared with historical controls, resulting in OS and DFS similar to those reported in developed countries.

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