Pitesti, Romania
Pitesti, Romania

The University of Piteşti is a public university in Piteşti, Romania, founded in 1991. The University of Pitești has over 700 people as teaching staff and administrative personnel, and around of 12000 students. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: Fission-2013-6.0.1 | Award Amount: 1.96M | Year: 2013

The ARCADIA project has been conceived so as to provide a twofold support to the further development of nuclear research programs in the NMS, targeting two major areas included in the Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda of SNETP: ESNII, through the support of the ALFRED project towards its realization in Romania, and NUGENIA, approaching remaining safety aspects of Gen III/III\ that could be built in Lithuania, Poland ,Czech Republic and Slovenia. On one hand, it focuses on the identification of the primary needs for the ALFRED project, mainly to what concerns E&T, supporting Infrastructures and Regulatory aspects (and integrating for the R&D needs the outcomes of other research projects in a common frame of National and Regional needs); on the other hand, it investigates the existing National and Regional supporting structures with a particular attention to the ones in Romania and in all the participating New Member States for defining a map of competences potentially eligible to satisfy the previously identified needs. The entire work dedicated to ALFRED project will be performed within the frame of strategic orientations to be compiled for the ALFRED project, and with the scientific, technical and regulatory advising of the costituendum provisional ALFRED consortium on one side, and of the Romanian Regulatory Body on the other side. Finally, Networking, Cooperation and Dissemination activities will provide the connection with the international scientific community, with the European institutional organizations and with the general public, for ensuring the soundness and palatability of both Gen III/III\ and ALFRED projects in general.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.1.2 | Award Amount: 18.70M | Year: 2008

The overall aim of the DEPLOY Project is to make major advances in engineering methods for dependable systems through the deployment of formal engineering methods. Formal engineering methods enable greater mastery of complexity than do traditional software engineering processes. It is the central role played by mechanically-analysed formal models throughout the system development that enables mastery of complexity. As well as leading to big improvements in system dependability, greater mastery of complexity also leads to greater productivity by reducing the expensive test-debug-rework cycle and by facilitating increased reuse of software. The work of the project will be driven by the tasks of achieving and evaluating industrial take-up, initially by DEPLOYs industrial partners, of DEPLOYs methods and tools, together with the necessary further research on methods and tools. The industrial deployment will be in five sectors each of which is key to the future of European industry and society: automotive, rail transportation, space systems, business information and pervasive telecoms. DEPLOY will deliver methods and tools that:\no\tWill support the rigorous engineering of complex resilient systems from high level requirements down to software implementations via specification, architecture and detailed designs;\no\tWill support the systematic reuse and adaptation of models and software thus addressing industrys requirement for high productivity and requirements evolution;\no\tWill have been field-tested in and adapted for a range of industrial engineering processes;\no\tWill be accompanied by deployment strategies for a range of industrial sectors;\no\tWill be based on an open platform (Eclipse) and will themselves be open.\nThe project will be structured into 15 WPs: 5 WPs on industrial deployment, one in each of the 5 sectors, 3 methodological R&D WPs, a tooling R&D WP, a technology transfer WP, a measurement WP, 2 management WPs and 2 dissemination & exploitation WPs.


Bizon N.,University of Pitesti
Energy Conversion and Management | Year: 2014

A hybrid power source (HPS), fed by renewable energy sources (RESs) and fuel cell (FC) sources, with an energy storage device (ESS) to be suitable for distributed generation (DG) applications, is proposed herein. The RESs could be a combination of photovoltaic (PV) panels and wind turbines (WT) based on common DC-bus, which are used as the primary DC source. The FC operates as a backup, feeding only the insufficiency power from the RESs based on the load-following strategy. The battery/ultracapacitor hybrid ESS operates as an auxiliary source for supplying the power deficit based on dynamic power balance strategy (the transient power - mainly via the ultracapacitors stack, and the steady-state power - mainly via the FC and batteries stack). If the FC stack is designed and operates based on average load-following strategy, then the ESS will operate in charge-sustaining mode during a load cycle. This feature permits to optimize the batteries stack capacity and extend its life time as well. The ultracapacitors stack can be designed considering the peaks of RESs power on DC-bus and the imposed window for its state-of-charge (SOC). This FC/RES/ESS HPS is ideal to be used for standalone plug-in charge station (PCS) or as DG system grid connected. In the last case, which is not analyzed here, the energy management unit (EMU) that communicates with smart grid will establish the moments to match the HPS power demand with grid supply availability, stabilizing the grid. Using load and RES power profiles that have a higher dynamic than in reality, the HPS operation is shown based on an analytical analysis and the appropriate Matlab/Simulink® simulations. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Ipate F.,University of Pitesti
Journal of Computer and System Sciences | Year: 2012

Learning regular languages from queries was introduced by Angluin in a seminal paper that also provides the L algorithm. This algorithm, as well as other existing inference methods, finds the exact language accepted by the automaton. However, when only finite languages are used, the construction of a deterministic finite cover automaton (DFCA) is sufficient. A DFCA of a finite language U is a finite automaton that accepts all sequences in U and possibly other sequences that are longer than any sequence in U. This paper presents an algorithm, called Ll, that finds a minimal DFCA of an unknown finite language in polynomial time using membership and language queries, a non-trivial adaptation of Angluin's L algorithm. As the size of a minimal DFCA of a finite language U may be much smaller than the size of the minimal automaton that accepts exactly U, Ll can provide substantial savings over existing automata inference methods. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Bizon N.,University of Pitesti
Applied Energy | Year: 2011

In this paper is proposed a nonlinear control for fuel cell/battery/ultracapacitor hybrid power sources (HPS) that improves the performance and durability of fuel cell. The nonlinear voltage control is analyzed and designed using a systematic approach. The design goal is to stabilize the HPS output voltage at a low voltage ripple that is also spread in a large frequencies band. All the results have been validated in several simulations. The simulation results successfully show that nonlinear voltage control performs good performances in the frequency-domain (a high spreading level of power spectrum) and in the time domain (a low level of output voltage ripple factor), too. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Bizon N.,University of Pitesti
Applied Energy | Year: 2011

In this paper is proposed a nonlinear current-mode control for the fuel cell/battery/ultracapacitor hybrid power sources (HPS) that improves the ripple factor of the fuel cell current. The nonlinear current control is analyzed and designed using a systematic approach. The design goal is to generate an anti-ripple via buck current controlled source in order to mitigate the inverter current ripple. All the results have been validated in several simulations. The simulation results successfully show that nonlinear current-mode control determines in the low frequency-domain better performances than other current-mode control techniques, such as the hysteretic current-mode controller or the peak current-mode controller. The current ripple factor is one of the used performance indicators. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Bizon N.,University of Pitesti
Applied Energy | Year: 2010

In this paper is proposed an optimization approach, based on optimal utilization of the power harmonics from the probing signal by including a band-pass filter in the feedback loop of the extremum seeking control (ESC) scheme. The ESC is used to track the maximum power point (MMP) of fuel cell power, and presence of the first and second power harmonics in the probing signal assure this tracking capacity. The MPP tracking robustness is improved by including the third power harmonics into the probing signal, given for probing signal amplitude a time adaptive variation depending of third derivate of the fuel cell power. The MPP tracking is demonstrated and the ESC robustness is proved by simulation in case of using a recommended current ripple factor. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Bizon N.,University of Pitesti
Journal of Power Sources | Year: 2011

This paper analyzes a new fuel cell Hybrid Power Source (HPS) topology having the feature to mitigate the current ripple of the fuel cell inverter system. In the operation of the inverter system that is grid connected or supplies AC motors in vehicle application, the current ripple normally appears at the DC port of the fuel cell HPS. Consequently, if mitigation measures are not applied, this ripple is back propagated to the fuel cell stack. Other features of the proposed fuel cell HPS are the Maximum Power Point (MPP) tracking, high reliability in operation under sharp power pulses and improved energy efficiency in high power applications. This topology uses an inverter system directly powered from the appropriate fuel cell stack and a controlled buck current source as low power source used for ripple mitigation. The low frequency ripple mitigation is based on active control. The anti-ripple current is injected in HPS output node and this has the LF power spectrum almost the same with the inverter ripple. Consequently, the fuel cell current ripple is mitigated by the designed active control. The ripple mitigation performances are evaluated by indicators that are defined to measure the mitigation ratio of the low frequency harmonics. In this paper it is shown that good performances are obtained by using the hysteretic current control, but better if a dedicated nonlinear controller is used. Two ways to design the nonlinear control law are proposed. First is based on simulation trials that help to draw the characteristic of ripple mitigation ratio vs. fuel cell current ripple. The second is based on Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC). The ripple factor is up to 1% in both cases. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Bizon N.,University of Pitesti | Bizon N.,Polytechnic University of Bucharest
Applied Energy | Year: 2013

In this paper it is presented a mathematical analysis of the energy efficiency for the Multiport Power Converter (MPC) used in series and parallel Hybrid Power Source (HPS) architectures type on the plug-in Fuel Cell Vehicles (PFCVs). The aim of the analysis is to provide general conclusions for a wide range of PFCV operating regimes that are chosen for efficient use of the MPC architecture on each particular drive cycle. In relation with FC system of PFCV, the Energy Storage System (ESS) can operate in following regimes: (1) Charge-Sustaining (CS), (2) Charge-Depleting (CD), and (3) Charge-Increasing (CI). Considering the imposed window for the ESS State-Of-Charge (SOC), the MPC can be connected to renewable plug-in Charging Stations (PCSs) to exchange power with Electric Power (EP) system, when it is necessary for both. The Energy Management Unit (EMU) that communicates with the EP system will establish the moments to match the PFCV power demand with supply availability of the EP grid, stabilizing it. The MPC energy efficiency of the PFCVs is studied when the ESS is charged (discharged) from (to) the home/PCS/EP system. The comparative results were shown for both PFCV architectures through the analytical calculation performed and the appropriate Matlab/Simulink® simulations presented. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Bizon N.,University of Pitesti
Applied Energy | Year: 2012

In this paper is presented an analysis of energy efficiency for the Multiport Power Converters (MPCs) used in Plug-in Fuel Cell Vehicles (PFCVs). A generic MPC architecture for PFCVs is proposed, which is analyzed for different operating modes of MPC in relation with PFCV operating regimes and the plug-in feature. The basic MPC architecture is described in relation with the PFCV operating regimes. Two MPC architectures are derived from the basic MPC architecture: (1) the MPC1 architecture, which is the MPC architecture without reverse power flow during regenerative braking process, and (2) the MPC2 architecture - MPC architecture without charging mode of Energy Storage System (ESS) from the FC system. Taking in account the imposed window for the ESS state-of-charge, the MPC can be connected to Plug-in Charging Stations (PCS) to exchange power with the Electric Power (EP) system, which will include renewable Distributed Generation (DG) systems. The Energy Management Unit (EMU) of MPC can communicate with the EP system to determine the moments that match the energy demand of plug-in vehicle with the supply availability of the EP system, stabilizing the EP system. The MPC features regarding its energy efficiency were shown by analytical computing performed and appropriate simulations presented in relation with the ESS that can be charged (discharged) from (to) the home/DG/EP system. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

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