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Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

The University of Papua New Guinea was established by ordinance of the Australian administration in 1965. This followed the Currie Commission which had enquired into higher education in Papua New Guinea. The University of Papua New Guinea Act No. 18, 1983 bill repealing the old Ordinance was passed by the National Parliament in August 1983. The university has moved from a departmental to a school structure to foster interdisciplinary and inter-school relationships.The university since its establishment has not changed much in terms of the physical structures, mainly due to the government's lack of funding. Despite this it is still operating.There are more than 15,000 students annually in Port Moresby campuses, five open campuses and 13 study centres. In July 2008, it was announced that a new open campus would be opened in Honiara. It will be the first UPNG campus in the Solomon Islands.There are programs in:MedicinePharmacyHealth sciencePhysical and Natural scienceLawBusinessHumanitiesSocial scienceProblem-based learning approaches are used. Wikipedia.

Shearman P.L.,University of Papua New Guinea | Shearman P.L.,Australian National University
Ambio | Year: 2010

Existing at the interface of land and sea, in regions of low topographic relief, mangroves are likely to be some of the first ecosystems that undergo spatial modification due to sea-level rise. The mangrove ecosystems of the Gulf of Papua New Guinea are some of the largest and most pristine in the AsiaPacific region; they have not been subject to clearance for crustacean farming nor suffered from land reclamation projects. This article establishes through analysis of a time series of aerial photography and satellite imagery from the period 19732007, that there have been substantial changes in the distribution of mangroves in this region. These changes include the seaward progradation of the Purari Delta and the regression of the Kikori Delta by an average of 43 m year-1 at its most seaward point. While these findings are likely to be continuations of long-term trends, it is probable that they can be explained by a variety of interacting factors including climate change, sea-level rise, subsistence in the northern Gulf of Papua and changes in sediment dynamics. © 2010 Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Source

Duke T.,University of Melbourne | Duke T.,University of Papua New Guinea
Paediatrics and International Child Health | Year: 2014

Despite the provision of oxygen, antibiotics and treatment guidelines, the case fatality rate for hypoxaemic pneumonia is still high in many hospitals in developing countries. Methods of delivering continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) are now available which are simple to use, safe and relatively inexpensive. This paper describes two methods which may be appropriate where resources are limited: (i) bubble-CPAP using oxygen concentrators with an air-oxygen mix function and low resistance nasal oxygen prongs, and (ii) high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy. More research is needed on the implementation, cost and effectiveness of CPAP in the management of pneumonia and in neonatal care in developing countries. © W. S. Maney & Son Ltd 2014. Source

Davies H.L.,University of Papua New Guinea
Episodes | Year: 2012

The island of New Guinea is the mountainous margin of the Australian continent. Paleozoic and Proterozoic Australian craton extends northward beneath the shallow waters of the Arafura Sea to underlie the southern plains of New Guinea and, with overlying sediments, to form the dramatically sculpted southern slopes of the central range in a great fold and thrust belt. The fold and thrust belt marks the outer limit of the autochthon. Beyond, to the N, E and W, is an aggregation of terranes that have accreted since the Late Cretaceous, driven by oblique convergence between the Pacific and Indo-Australian plates. The terranes comprise continental fragments and blocks of oceanic volcanic arc and of oceanic crust and mantle origin, and include two great ophiolites. The plate boundary itself is a complex system of microplates, each with separate motion, and marked by every kind of plate boundary. In the E the opening of the Manus Basin is associated with rapid clockwise rotation of New Britain, and the opening of the Woodlark Basin causes extension of continental crust in the Papuan peninsula and islands. This has resulted in the development of low-angle extensional faults and domal structures in metamorphic rocks and the exhumation of Pliocene eclogite. Remarkably similar extensional structures and the exhumation of Pliocene eclogite are seen in the Bird's Head area of western New Guinea (Wandamen Peninsula). Flat and shallow oblique subduction at the New Guinea Trench has caused the deformation of Plio- Quaternary sediments in the Mamberamo Basin, deformation and Pliocene igneous activity in the central range, and the southwestward motion of the Bird's Head. The island has significant resources of economic minerals and hydrocarbons. Source

Michael P.S.,University of Papua New Guinea
Asian Journal of Water, Environment and Pollution | Year: 2013

The ecological impacts of acid sulphate soils (ASS) and the management of the impacts are a major concern globally. The reasons being how to minimize the exposure, reduce the residual impacts and make available management options. Despite the numerous studies, no review exists that synthesizes the major findings of the impacts from an agricultural soil, water and environment pollution point of view. Therefore, this paper presents a synthesis of the impacts on water and the soil together with the management options that are available. The review also identifies main areas that need further investigations. Source

Bangita B.,Ramu Agri Indistries Ltd | Rao B.K.R.,University of Papua New Guinea
Geoderma | Year: 2012

An on-farm experiment was conducted at Ramu sugarcane plantation of Papua New Guinea to assess implications of alleviating soil compaction in wheel tracks under the zonal tillage production system. Under zonal tillage system only the row area is cultivated in preparation for planting the sugarcane sett and the inter-row area remains undisturbed and much compacted. Three soil tillage treatments were imposed to wheel tracks formed after planting sugarcane genotype Q198 in 2004. Treatments involved, ripping the soils in the compacted wheel track zones (with a pair of rippers), ripping and hilling the compacted soil to cane rows (with the hilling boards attached to the rippers) and a control. Millable cane and sugar yields were monitored for the plant-cane (2005) and subsequent 3 ratoons' (2006, 2007 and 2008). Millable cane yield and sugar yields were found to be consistently (in four crop cycles) and significantly (P<0.05) higher in ripping and hilling treatment than the ripping and control. Millable cane yield production of plant-cane and three ratoons' (cumulative) in ripping and hilling treatment was 21% greater than the control plots and sugar yields were greater by almost 6.75tha -1, which was 24.5% higher than the control. Soil physical investigations revealed that cane rows in ripping and hilling treatment had significantly (P<0.05) lower soil bulk density of 1.21gcm -3 in the first 30cm soil depth compared to the 1.37gcm -3 in ripped and 1.39gcm -3 in control plots. Ripping and hilling the wheel tracks significantly (P<0.05) decreased the penetration resistance in cane rows by 29%. Beneficial effects of ripping and hilling of compacted wheel tracks was attributed to the appreciable improvement in the water infiltration rates in cane rows and consequent enhanced sub-surface (10-30cm) moisture storage. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. Source

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