Oslo, Norway
Oslo, Norway

The University of Oslo , formerly The Royal Frederick University , is the oldest and largest university in Norway, located in the Norwegian capital of Oslo. The university is recognized as one of Northern Europe's most prestigious universities. The Academic Ranking of World Universities has ranked it the 67th best university in the world.The university has approximately 27,700 students and employs around 6,000 people. Its faculties include Theology , Law, Medicine, Humanities, Mathematics, natural science, social science, Dentistry, and Education. The university's original neoclassical campus is located in the centre of Oslo; it is currently occupied by the Faculty of Law. Most of the university's other faculties are located at the newer Blindern campus in the suburban West End. The Faculty of Medicine is split between several university hospitals in the Oslo area.The university was founded in 1811 and was modelled after the University of Copenhagen and the recently established University of Berlin. It was originally named for King Frederick VI of Denmark and Norway, and received its current name in 1939. The university is informally also known as Universitetet , having been the only university in Norway until 1946, and was commonly referred to as "The Royal Frederick's" prior to the name change.The University of Oslo is home to five Nobel Prize winners. The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded in the university's Atrium from 1947 to 1989. Since 2003, the Abel Prize is awarded in the Atrium. Wikipedia.


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Patent
NewSouth Innovations Pty Ltd and University of Oslo | Date: 2016-12-06

The invention generally relates to the field of saxitoxins and the identification of microorganisms capable of producing them. More specifically, the invention relates to the identification of genes encoding saxitoxin in dinoflagellates, and methods for the specific detection of dinoflagellates that are producers of saxitoxins.


Patent
Nordlandssykehuset Hf, Norwegian University of Science, Technology and University of Oslo | Date: 2014-03-21

The present invention relates to chimeric anti-CD14 antibodies and methods of using the same. In some embodiments, the present invention relates to the use of chimieric anti-CD 14 antibodies in research, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. In one embodiment, the anti-CD14 antibody has a variable light chain of SEQ ID NO: 1 and a variable heavy chain of SEQ ID NO: 2 (isolated from the hybridoma clone 18D11). In another embodiment, the anti-CD14 antibody has a variable light chain of SEQ ID NO: 3 and a variable heavy chain of SEQ ID NO: 4 (isolated from the hybridoma clone Mil2).


Patent
University of Oslo | Date: 2015-06-10

The present invention relates to peptides presented on the cell surface of cells in the MHC class I (MHC I) context in which the invariant chain has been engineered to favor loading of specific antigens and generate CD8+ T-cell activation


Patent
University of Oslo | Date: 2017-03-08

The present invention relates to compositions and method for differentiating stem ceils. In particular, the present invention relates to methods of generating hepatocytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) using a small molecule-driven approach.


Patent
University of Oslo | Date: 2016-12-15

The present invention relates to tertiary amines of formula (I) for use in therapy, particularly for use in treating cardiovascular disorders. The compounds have been found to regulate phospholamban phosphorylation by interfering with the A-kinase anchor protein 18delta (AKAP18) binding to the PKA substrate phospholamban. The compounds share a tri(alkylaryl/alkylheteroaryl) amine structure.


Patent
University of Oslo | Date: 2017-01-13

The present invention relates to vectors, methods and systems for polypeptide display and selection. Specifically, the present invention relates to vectors, methods, and systems for multivalent phage display using pIX protein of filamentous phage and helper phage.


Patent
University of Oslo and Catholic University of Leuven | Date: 2017-08-02

There is provided a process for preparing a zirconium-based metal organic framework (Zr-MOF), the process comprising the steps (i) preparing a reaction mixture comprising zirconium ions, sulfate ions and at least one organic linker compound in an aqueous solvent; and (ii) heating the reaction mixture from step (i).


The need to align investments in health research and development (R&D) with public health demands is one of the most pressing global public health challenges. We aim to provide a comprehensive description of available data sources, propose a set of indicators for monitoring the global landscape of health R&D, and present a sample of country indicators on research inputs (investments), processes (clinical trials), and outputs (publications), based on data from international databases. Total global investments in health R&D (both public and private sector) in 2009 reached US$240 billion. Of the US$214 billion invested in high-income countries, 60% of health R&D investments came from the business sector, 30% from the public sector, and about 10% from other sources (including private non-profit organisations). Only about 1% of all health R&D investments were allocated to neglected diseases in 2010. Diseases of relevance to high-income countries were investigated in clinical trials seven-to-eight-times more often than were diseases whose burden lies mainly in low-income and middle-income countries. This report confirms that substantial gaps in the global landscape of health R&D remain, especially for and in low-income and middle-income countries. Too few investments are targeted towards the health needs of these countries. Better data are needed to improve priority setting and coordination for health R&D, ultimately to ensure that resources are allocated to diseases and regions where they are needed the most. The establishment of a global observatory on health R&D, which is being discussed at WHO, could address the absence of a comprehensive and sustainable mechanism for regular global monitoring of health R&D. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-04-2016 | Award Amount: 10.77M | Year: 2017

Our main objective is to identify determinants of brain, cognitive and mental health at different stages of life. By integration, harmonisation and enrichment of major European neuroimaging studies of age differences and changes, we will obtain an unparalleled database of fine-grained brain, cognitive and mental health measures of more than 6.000 individuals. Longitudinal brain imaging, genetic and health data are available for a major part, as well as cognitive/mental health measures for extensively broader cohorts, exceeding 40.000 examinations in total. By linking these data, also to additional databases and biobanks, including birth registries, national and regional archives, and by enriching them with new online data collection and novel measures, we will address risk and protective factors of brain, cognitive and mental health throughout the lifespan. We will identify the pathways through which risk and protective factors work and their moderators. Through exploitation of, and synergies with, existing European infrastructures and initiatives, this approach of integrating, harmonising and enriching brain imaging datasets will make major conceptual, methodological and analytical contributions towards large integrative cohorts and their efficient exploitation. We will thus provide novel information on brain, cognitive and mental health maintenance, onset and course of brain, cognitive and mental disorders, and lay a foundation for earlier diagnosis of brain disorders, aberrant development and decline of brain, cognitive and mental health, as well as future preventive and therapeutic strategies. Working with stakeholders and health authorities, the project will provide the evidence base for policy strategies for prevention and intervention, improving clinical practice and public health policy for brain, cognitive and mental health. This project is realized by a close collaboration of small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) and major European brain research centres


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC1-PM-01-2016 | Award Amount: 15.04M | Year: 2017

The complex interactions between genetic and non-genetic factors produce heterogeneities in patients as reflected in the diversity of pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, response to therapies, disease development and progression. Yet, the full potential of personalized medicine entails biomarker-guided delivery of efficient therapies in stratified patient populations. MultipleMS will therefore develop, validate, and exploit methods for patient stratification in Multiple Sclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease and a leading causes of non-traumatic disability in young adults, with an estimated cost of 37 000 per patient per year over a duration of 30 years. Here we benefit from several large clinical cohorts with multiple data types, including genetic and lifestyle information. This in combination with publically available multi-omics maps enables us to identify biomarkers of the clinical course and the response to existing therapies in a real-world setting, and to gain in-depth knowledge of distinct pathogenic pathways setting the stage for development of new interventions. To create strategic global synergies, MultipleMS includes 21 partners and covers not only the necessary clinical, biological, and computational expertise, but also includes six industry partners ensuring dissemination and exploitation of the methods and clinical decision support system. Moreover, the pharmaceutical industry partners provide expertise to ensure optimal selection and validation of clinically relevant biomarkers and new targets. Our conceptual personalized approach can readily be adapted to other immune-mediated diseases with a complex gene-lifestyle background and broad clinical spectrum with heterogeneity in treatment response. MultipleMS therefore goes significantly beyond current state-of-the-art thereby broadly affecting European policies, healthcare systems, innovation in translating big data and basic research into evidence-based personalized clinical applications.

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