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News Article | December 2, 2016
Site: marketersmedia.com

— TiktoPlus, a Wilmington NC digital marketing agency, recently announced the details of their upcoming Google Adwords Seminar. The company is partnering with the University of North Carolina Wilmington Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship to introduce attendees to the Adwords platform and help motivated learners discover the power of pay-per-click ads. The Introduction to Adwords seminar will be held at the University of North Carolina Wilmington’s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship starting on Wednesday, January 11th. The seminar will run for four weeks, with classes meeting every Wednesday and Thursday from 6:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. TiktoPlus invites all interested individuals to email the CIE directly at cie@uncw.edu for more information on course cost and availability. Marc Mereyde, TiktoPlus’ owner, commented “We could not be more ecstatic to host these Wilmington, NC tech workshops to introduce students to Google Adwords. Pay-per-click advertising on the Google platform can significantly boost exposure and revenue for companies and organizations looking to build an online presence, but there’s a caveat attached to that success. Without a proper understanding of how Adwords works, it’s also possible to lose money and achieve little to no results. We want to help people avoid critical mistakes and gain the knowledge they need to execute effective Adwords campaigns.” Marc Mereyde will be the primary course instructor for TiktoPlus’ Introduction To Adwords seminar. Marc holds an M.A in Teaching from the University of North Carolina Wilmington and an MS in Information and Communication Technologies from the University of Wisconsin. He has contributed his knowledge and talents to open source projects like Meteor and was featured on Mozilla’s website after organizing the Wilmington Web Maker Party in July 2015. Marc is a proponent of technology education and often volunteers his time for education and technology. As Marc Mereyde continued, “As a Wilmington NC web design and marketing agency, it is our mission to help businesses and organizations succeed online. There’s so much potential in the Adwords platform, and we are excited about having the opportunity to show people how to harness it.” TiktoPlus is a Wilmington, NC-based web design, SEO, and digital marketing agency offering both local and remote services. With a name based on an ancient Greek word meaning "to birth,” the team at TiktoPlus believes that great achievements happen when clients use actionable steps to make their ideas come to life through words and code. As a one-stop shop web agency, the company aims to empower their customers with the knowledge they need to succeed in the online arena and give them the tools to reach their goals. For more information, please visit http://tiktoplus.com


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

During her time as associate dean of the Williams School of Commerce, Economics and Politics at Washington & Lee University, Raquel Alexander has invested a great deal of energy infusing the liberal arts into the school's business curriculum. "My passion lies with giving students a full understanding of the world, and equipping them with the critical thinking skills necessary to become contributing members of a global society," said Alexander. As Bucknell University's first-ever Kenneth W. Freeman Professor & Dean of Management, Alexander will bring that passion — along with a wealth of professional and academic experience — to the University's soon-to-be established College of Management. She emerged as the clear choice for the position during an international search comprising a large pool of highly qualified individuals. || Related: Trustees Approve College of Management. "Raquel demonstrated great energy and enthusiasm for engaging students with an innovative experiential undergraduate management education that is deeply integrated with the liberal arts," said Bucknell Professor of Management Tammy Hiller, who served on the 13-person search committee. "I'm thrilled to call her our new dean." Alexander began her career as a tax consultant at KPMG. She went on to earn her doctorate in accounting from the University of Texas at Austin and held faculty appointments at the University of North Carolina Wilmington and the University of Kansas before joining the faculty at Washington and Lee in 2012. In her current role as associate dean at the Williams School, Alexander manages the school's Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) reaccreditation, oversees enrollment activities, and manages strategic planning initiatives that build connections between the business curriculum and the liberal arts. In addition to serving as associate dean, Alexander holds the appointment of the Ehrick Kilner Haight, Sr. Term Professor of Accounting. Alexander's research focuses on tax policy related to personal savings and corporate taxation and has been published in top journals such as the Journal of the American Taxation Association, Behavioral Research in Accounting and the Journal of Law and Politics. She has written for The New York Times and her research has been cited in such media outlets as The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, Business Week and CNBC. Her work has led to reform in the college savings industry, and has been used by policy makers and regulators at the SEC, the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority and the White House. She has also consulted or provided executive education to a number of firms and investment professionals around the country and is currently the vice president for the American Taxation Association. "Raquel's confidence, collaborative spirit and leadership qualities are immediately evident," said Provost Barbara Altmann, who chaired the search committee. "Her zeal for undergraduate education, coupled with her impressive set of experiences and accomplishments, make her uniquely qualified to lead our new College of Management." Alexander succeeds Interim Dean of Management Michael Johnson-Cramer, who has been instrumental in management's transition to a college, including by leading the program through its first AACSB accreditation in 2013. "The University is deeply grateful for Michael's wisdom, guidance and hard work, all of which helped us arrive at this moment," Altmann said. "I look forward to his continuing contributions as a respected member of our faculty." Alexander will join Bucknell in July 2017 — the same month the University officially establishes its College of Management. The third college marks a historic milestone in the evolution of the University's management and business education, which dates back more than a century. "Upon the strength of our academic core we will forge new bridges between arts & sciences, engineering and management, enabling Bucknell to deliver educational experiences and interdisciplinary opportunities unattainable at traditional liberal arts, engineering or business colleges," said Bucknell Board of Trustees Chairman Ken Freeman '72 after the board unanimously approved the new college in October 2015. Freeman previously endowed the deanship through a generous gift to the WE DO Campaign for Bucknell. "Joining Bucknell at this time of great momentum is an extraordinary opportunity," Alexander said. "I look forward to collaborating with my new colleagues across the University to enhance and expand management's interdisciplinary offerings, and helping Bucknell further distinguish itself among undergraduate institutions." "This is a rare moment in the life of our University," said President John Bravman. "Through Raquel's temperament and vision, and her achievements as both a faculty member and administrator, I am confident in her ability to help lead us through this pivotal moment in Bucknell's history." In addition to her academic endeavors, Alexander enjoys attending soccer and basketball games with her family. She looks forward to relocating to the Lewisburg area with her husband, her three children and her mother.


Lisa J.A.,University of North Carolina Wilmington | Lisa J.A.,Virginia Institute of Marine Science | Song B.,University of North Carolina Wilmington | Song B.,Virginia Institute of Marine Science | And 2 more authors.
Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science | Year: 2015

Tidal and seasonal fluctuations in the oligohaline reaches of estuaries may alter geochemical features that influence structure and function of microbial communities involved in sedimentary nitrogen (N) cycling. In order to evaluate sediment community responses to short-term (tidal) and long-term (seasonal) changes in different tidal regimes, nitrogen cycling rates and genes were quantified in three sites that span a range of tidal influence in the upper portion of the Cape Fear River Estuary. Environmental parameters were monitored during low and high tides in winter and spring. 15N tracer incubation experiments were conducted to measure nitrification, denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA). Abundances of functional genes including bacterial and archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA), nitrite reductases (nirS and nrfA), nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ), and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) were measured using quantitative PCR assays. Denitrification rates were highest among the measured N cycling processes while bacteria carrying nrfA genes were most abundant. A discernable pattern in the short-term variation of N cycling rates and gene abundance was not apparent under the different tidal regimes. Significant seasonal variation in nitrification, denitrification, and anammox rates as well as bacterial amoA, nirS and nosZ gene abundance was observed, largely explained by increases in substrate availability during winter, with sediment ammonium playing a central role. These results suggest that the coupling of nitrification to N removal pathways is primarily driven by organic carbon mineralization and independent of tidal or salinity changes. Finally, changes in denitrification and nitrification activities were strongly reflected by the abundance of the respective functional genes, supporting a linkage between the structure and function of microbial communities. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Brownlee C.,Marine Biological Association of The United Kingdom | Wheeler G.L.,Marine Biological Association of The United Kingdom | Taylor A.R.,University of North Carolina Wilmington
Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology | Year: 2015

Coccolithophores are unicellular phytoplankton that are characterized by the presence intricately formed calcite scales (coccoliths) on their surfaces. In most cases coccolith formation is an entirely intracellular process - crystal growth is confined within a Golgi-derived vesicle. A wide range of coccolith morphologies can be found amongst the different coccolithophore groups. This review discusses the cellular factors that regulate coccolith production, from the roles of organic components, endomembrane organization and cytoskeleton to the mechanisms of delivery of substrates to the calcifying compartment. New findings are also providing important information on how the delivery of substrates to the calcification site is co-ordinated with the removal of H+ that are a bi-product of the calcification reaction. While there appear to be a number of species-specific features of the structural and biochemical components underlying coccolith formation, the fluxes of Ca2+ and a HCO3 - required to support coccolith formation appear to involve spatially organized recruitment of conserved transport processes. © 2015.


Gill D.A.,The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus | Schuhmann P.W.,University of North Carolina Wilmington | Oxenford H.A.,The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus
Ecological Economics | Year: 2015

This study sought to quantify the potential effects of changes in Caribbean reef fish populations on recreational divers' consumer surplus. Over five hundred tourist SCUBA divers were interviewed at seven sites across three Caribbean countries representing a diversity of individuals within the Caribbean dive market. A choice experiment was used to assess willingness to pay as a function of the abundance and size of reef fishes, the presence of fishing activity/gear, and dive price. Despite some preference heterogeneity both between and within sites, the results indicate that future declines in the abundance of reef fishes, and particularly in the number of large fishes observed on recreational dives, will result in significant reductions in diver consumer surplus. On the other hand, improvements in fish populations and reduced fishing gear encounters are likely to result in significant economic gains. These results can be used to justify investment in pre-emptive management strategies targeted at improving reef fish stocks (namely reducing unsustainable fishing activities and land-based reef impacts), managing conflicting uses, as well as to indicate a possible source of financing for such conservation activities. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Birds' beaks come in an incredible range of shapes and sizes, adapted for survival in environments around the world. But as a new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances reveals, there's even more to bird beaks than meets the eye -- the insides of birds' bills are filled with complex structures that help them meet the demands of hot climates. Nasal conchae are complex structures inside bird bills that moderate the temperature of air being inhaled and reclaim water from air being exhaled. Raymond Danner of the University of North Carolina Wilmington and his colleagues from Cornell University and the National Museum of Natural History used CT scans to examine the conchae of two Song Sparrow subspecies, one that lives in warm, dry sand dunes and one that lives in moister habitats farther inland. In this first comparison of conchae structure from birds living along a moisture gradient, the conchae of the dune-dwelling sparrows had a larger surface area and were situated farther out in the bill than those of their inland relatives, hypothetically increasing their beaks' ability to cool air and recapture water. Danner and his colleagues used Song Sparrow specimens that were collected in Delaware and the District of Columbia and preserved in ethanol and iodine to help soft tissues show up in scans. The contrast-enhanced CT scans they used to visualize the insides of the sparrows' bills is a relatively new technique that is letting researchers see the details of these soft, cartilaginous structures for the first time. "We had been studying the function of the bird bill as a heat radiator, with a focus on heat loss from the external surface and adaptation to local climates, when we began to wonder about the thermoregulatory processes that occur within the bill," says Danner. "I remember the entire team assembled for the first time, huddled around a computer and looking in amazement at the first scans. The high resolution scans revealed many structures that we as experienced ornithologists had never seen or even imagined, and we were immediately struck by the beauty of the ornately structured anterior conchae and the neatly scrolled middle conchae." "This study highlights the remarkable complexity of the rostral conchae in songbirds. This complexity has gone largely unnoticed due to the ways in which most birds are collected and preserved," according to Jason Bourke, a researcher from the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences who was not involved in the research. "Thanks to the use of innovative techniques like diceCT, we are now able to really appreciate just how complicated bird noses can be."


News Article | November 9, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Birds' beaks come in an incredible range of shapes and sizes, adapted for survival in environments around the world. But as a new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances reveals, there's even more to bird beaks than meets the eye--the insides of birds' bills are filled with complex structures that help them meet the demands of hot climates. Nasal conchae are complex structures inside bird bills that moderate the temperature of air being inhaled and reclaim water from air being exhaled. Raymond Danner of the University of North Carolina Wilmington and his colleagues from Cornell University and the National Museum of Natural History used CT scans to examine the conchae of two Song Sparrow subspecies, one that lives in warm, dry sand dunes and one that lives in moister habitats farther inland. In this first comparison of conchae structure from birds living along a moisture gradient, the conchae of the dune-dwelling sparrows had a larger surface area and were situated farther out in the bill than those of their inland relatives, hypothetically increasing their beaks' ability to cool air and recapture water. Danner and his colleagues used Song Sparrow specimens that were collected in Delaware and the District of Columbia and preserved in ethanol and iodine to help soft tissues show up in scans. The contrast-enhanced CT scans they used to visualize the insides of the sparrows' bills is a relatively new technique that is letting researchers see the details of these soft, cartilaginous structures for the first time. "We had been studying the function of the bird bill as a heat radiator, with a focus on heat loss from the external surface and adaptation to local climates, when we began to wonder about the thermoregulatory processes that occur within the bill," says Danner. "I remember the entire team assembled for the first time, huddled around a computer and looking in amazement at the first scans. The high resolution scans revealed many structures that we as experienced ornithologists had never seen or even imagined, and we were immediately struck by the beauty of the ornately structured anterior conchae and the neatly scrolled middle conchae." "This study highlights the remarkable complexity of the rostral conchae in songbirds. This complexity has gone largely unnoticed due to the ways in which most birds are collected and preserved," according to Jason Bourke, a researcher from the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences who was not involved in the research. "Thanks to the use of innovative techniques like diceCT, we are now able to really appreciate just how complicated bird noses can be." "Habitat-specific divergence of air conditioning structures in bird bills" will be available November 9, 2016, at http://americanornithologypubs. (issue URL http://americanornithologypubs. ). About the journal: The Auk: Ornithological Advances is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology that began in 1884 as the official publication of the American Ornithologists' Union, which merged with the Cooper Ornithological Society in 2016 to form the American Ornithological Society. In 2009, The Auk was honored as one of the 100 most influential journals of biology and medicine over the past 100 years.


News Article | November 9, 2016
Site: phys.org

This image created from a 3-D rendering of CT scans shows the nasal conchae inside the bill of a Song Sparrow, structures which help it conserve water and regulate the temperature of inhaled air. Credit: E. Gulson-Castillo and E. Sibbald Birds' beaks come in an incredible range of shapes and sizes, adapted for survival in environments around the world. But as a new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances reveals, there's even more to bird beaks than meets the eye—the insides of birds' bills are filled with complex structures that help them meet the demands of hot climates. Nasal conchae are complex structures inside bird bills that moderate the temperature of air being inhaled and reclaim water from air being exhaled. Raymond Danner of the University of North Carolina Wilmington and his colleagues from Cornell University and the National Museum of Natural History used CT scans to examine the conchae of two Song Sparrow subspecies, one that lives in warm, dry sand dunes and one that lives in moister habitats farther inland. In this first comparison of conchae structure from birds living along a moisture gradient, the conchae of the dune-dwelling sparrows had a larger surface area and were situated farther out in the bill than those of their inland relatives, hypothetically increasing their beaks' ability to cool air and recapture water. Danner and his colleagues used Song Sparrow specimens that were collected in Delaware and the District of Columbia and preserved in ethanol and iodine to help soft tissues show up in scans. The contrast-enhanced CT scans they used to visualize the insides of the sparrows' bills is a relatively new technique that is letting researchers see the details of these soft, cartilaginous structures for the first time. "We had been studying the function of the bird bill as a heat radiator, with a focus on heat loss from the external surface and adaptation to local climates, when we began to wonder about the thermoregulatory processes that occur within the bill," says Danner. "I remember the entire team assembled for the first time, huddled around a computer and looking in amazement at the first scans. The high resolution scans revealed many structures that we as experienced ornithologists had never seen or even imagined, and we were immediately struck by the beauty of the ornately structured anterior conchae and the neatly scrolled middle conchae." "This study highlights the remarkable complexity of the rostral conchae in songbirds. This complexity has gone largely unnoticed due to the ways in which most birds are collected and preserved," according to Jason Bourke, a researcher from the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences who was not involved in the research. "Thanks to the use of innovative techniques like diceCT, we are now able to really appreciate just how complicated bird noses can be." Explore further: A/C came standard on armored dinosaur models More information: "Habitat-specific divergence of air conditioning structures in bird bills" will be available November 9, 2016, at americanornithologypubs.org/doi/full/10.1642/AUK-16-107.1


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

A list of the Best Online Colleges in North Carolina for 2016-2017 has been issued by leading online higher education resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org. Nearly 70 colleges and universities across the state were chosen for excellence and affordability in online education, with top marks going to North Carolina Central University, East Carolina University, Fayetteville State University, Western Carolina University and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro among four-year schools and Pamlico Community College, Pitt Community College, Southwestern Community College, Stanly Community College and Lenoir Community College among two-year schools. "8 percent of undergraduate students and 16 percent of graduate students took advantage of online learning programs at North Carolina’s colleges and universities in 2012,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. "The schools on our lists are those that are best emphasizing the variety and quality of online education options in North Carolina, all while keeping affordability for their students in mind.” To qualify for a spot on the AffordableCollegesOnline.org Best list, all North Carolina colleges and universities were vetted based on several standard criteria points. Only accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions were considered for the list. Those schools were additionally required to provide in-state tuition for no more than $5,000 per year at two-year schools and no more than $25,000 per year at four-year schools. Qualifying schools were then scored and ranked against one another based on more than a dozen statistical factors important to students, such as graduation rates and online program availability. A full list of North Carolina’s Best Online Colleges is included below. For specific school ranks and information on the data and methodology used to determine placement, visit: Apex School of Theology Appalachian State University Cabarrus College of Health Sciences Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary East Carolina University Fayetteville State University Grace College of Divinity Heritage Bible College John Wesley University Lees-McRae College Mid-Atlantic Christian University Montreat College North Carolina A & T State University North Carolina Central University North Carolina State University at Raleigh Piedmont International University Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary St. Andrews University University of Mount Olive University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill University of North Carolina at Charlotte University of North Carolina at Greensboro University of North Carolina at Pembroke University of North Carolina Wilmington Western Carolina University Winston-Salem State University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


Hopwood M.J.,UK National Oceanography Center | Statham P.J.,UK National Oceanography Center | Skrabal S.A.,University of North Carolina Wilmington | Willey J.D.,University of North Carolina Wilmington
Marine Chemistry | Year: 2015

We present the first evidence of Fe(II) complexation by natural organic ligands in estuarine waters. Across five diverse river/estuary systems we find evidence of terrestrially derived ligands with binding constants (log KFe(II)L) mainly in the range 6-8. These Fe(II) ligands were stable over short time periods (1-2days), generally equivalent to, or in excess of, ambient freshwater Fe(II) concentrations (which ranged from 12 to 3600nM) and had similar binding constants to ligands that were leached by water from vegetation and detritus (log KFe(II)L 7-8). A class of terrestrially derived ligands may therefore be important in stabilising Fe(II) concentrations in freshwater systems. However, in coastal seawater the impact of these ligands upon Fe(II) speciation is likely to be diminished due to a combination of dilution, loss of humic material during flocculation and increased ionic strength. The temperate and sub-tropical river systems studied included the Beaulieu (England), Itchen (England), Cape Fear (North Carolina, USA), Winyah Bay (South Carolina, USA) and Loch Etive (Scotland). Freshwaters in each system possessed a broad range of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, 200-1300μM), labile dissolved Fe (LDFe, Fe<0.2μm available to ferrozine after reduction with ascorbic acid, 100nM-20μM) and pH (5.5-8.5). In the Itchen estuary, where anthropogenic discharge constitutes >10% of freshwater input, ligand binding constants were elevated (up to log KFe(II)L 11) and the expected decrease in LDFe with increasing salinity along the estuary was not observed (LDFe and DOC both peaked at a salinity of 7) due to effluent inputs. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

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