Winston-Salem, NC, United States
Winston-Salem, NC, United States

The University of North Carolina School of the Arts is a public coeducational arts conservatory in Winston-Salem, North Carolina that grants high school, undergraduate and graduate degrees. It is one of the seventeen constituent campuses of the University of North Carolina. Founded in 1963 as the North Carolina School of the Arts by then-Governor Terry Sanford, it was the first public arts conservatory in the United States. The school owns and operates the Stevens Center in Downtown Winston-Salem and is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Chin A.,University of North Carolina School of the Arts
Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications | Year: 2016

Section 16(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 allows for the recovery of profits realized by certain insiders from trading in a corporation's stock within a period of less than six months. For more than seventy years, U.S. courts and corporate attorneys have calculated this liability following the greedy algorithm described in Smolowe v. Delendo Corp. (2nd Cir. 1943), which the Securities and Exchange Commission proposed as a method of maximizing the recovery in that case. Even though Dantzig's simplex algorithm (1947) subsequently provided a more accurate method for calculating the maximum recovery as the solution to a linear programming problem, the legal community to date has resisted its adoption. This paper provides (1) a brief introduction to Section 16(b) and the Smolowe algorithm; (2) a review of the caselaw that has enshrined the Smolowe algorithm in legal precedent; (3) a proof that the Smolowe algorithm's worst case error is 50%; (4) a description of a new Web-based liability calculator for the legal community's use; and (5) a historically important case where the new calculator yields a larger recovery than the amount actually sought and obtained by the plaintiffs. © 2016 The authors and IOS Press. All rights reserved.


"These four up-and-coming artists have strong choreographic voices," said Jaffe. "We are proud to offer them a groundbreaking career opportunity to develop new works as we launch our UNCSA Choreographic Institute." Announced in February 2017, the two-track Choreographic Institute includes both the Development Residency and the Professional Residency. Jaffe and former Dean of Dance Ethan Stiefel, both former principal dancers with American Ballet Theatre, are the first professional residents, who will work with invited professional dancers for two weeks to research choreographic ideas or build toward new works. The institute's second track, the Development Residency, includes individual mentorship by Visiting Distinguished Artist Helen Pickett, who is resident choreographer for Atlanta Ballet. In addition to mentoring by Pickett, the choreographers will participate in daily technique classes, workshops and lectures led by esteemed UNCSA Summer Dance faculty and guests, and will hold afternoon rehearsals with their cast of dancers selected from the Summer Dance Intensives. In the evenings, residents will have access to UNCSA's studios for further choreographic research. The residencies will culminate in a fully produced performance of the new works. Kyle Davis trained at Makaroff School of Ballet and at Rock School for Dance Education and UNCSA. He joined PNB as an apprentice in 2008 and was promoted to corps de ballet in 2009 and soloist in 2016. In 2008, he won the Prix de Lausanne competition in Switzerland. He also won various awards in the Youth American Grand Prix Regional and Finals in 2005 and 2006. Marielis Garcia is a member of the Brian Brooks Moving Company and Peter Kyle Dance. In 2016, she premiered MG DanceArts. Garcia earned her B.F.A. in Dance from Marymount Manhattan College. She has danced with ODC of San Francisco, City Dance Ensemble, Douglas Dunn, Stefanie Battan Bland and Steps Repertory Ensemble, and toured South Africa teaching and performing with Ikapa Dance Theater. She teaches at Rutgers University, The Washington Heights Community Conservatory of Fine Arts and in New York City public schools. Charlotte Griffin's repertory has been commissioned by Juilliard Dance Ensemble,  Hartt School Dance Division, BJM Danse in Montreal, Danza UDLAP, Barcelona Institut del Teatre, Juilliard Summer Intensive, Peridance Professional Trainees, Princeton University and Rutgers University. She has created ballets at the New York Choreographic Institute, at the American Ballet Theatre Summer Intensive in Austin, and for Eliot Feld's Ballet Tech Kids Dance. Current projects include Bum Phillips All-American Opera for La MaMa's Ellen Stewart Theater in New York and The Cambrians' Empress Archer remix project, which premiered in Chicago in January 2017. Griffin studied with the American Dance Festival from 1994-1996. She has been a guest artist at ArcDanz in Mexico, Springboard Danse Montreal, The Yard, Cayman Island Arts Festival, and the Bates Dance Festival. Her award-winning dance films, BAREFOOT NEGOTIATIONS (2009) and RAVEN STUDY (2007), have screened internationally. Griffin received her B.F.A. in Dance from The Juilliard School and her M.F.A. in Dance from the University of Texas at Austin. She has taught at Marymount Manhattan College and Bowdoin College, and has offered master classes in Mexico, Spain, the Czech Republic, and South Korea.  Griffin is assistant professor of dance at the University of California, Irvine. Mari Meade graduated from the New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts and UNCSA. In 2009, she started Mari Meade Dance Collective (MMDC). Since that time, she has been an Artist-in-Residence at Chez Bushwick and Lake Studios Berlin (Germany). Meade's work has been shown at Lincoln Center, Danspace St. Mark's Church, STUFFED at Judson Memorial Church, FLICfest, Battery Dance Festival, New Orleans Fringe Festival, and Katlehong Arts Center (South Africa). In New York, she has danced for Dana Salisbury and the no-see-ums, Amanda Hinchey & Dancers, Celia Rowlson-Hall, CJ Holm, touche pas, and Barbie Diewald. She is currently a teaching artist for New York City Ballet and Dancing Classrooms. Helen Pickett has created more than 30 ballets in the United States and Europe. She  has twice been named the best choreographer in Atlanta.  In 2007, she was named to Dance Magazine's list of "25 to Watch."  She received a Choreographic Residency from Jacob's Pillow in 2008, and was one of the first recipients of the Jerome Robbins Foundation's New Essential Works Grant. She was nominated for an Isadora Duncan Dance award in 2013. She earned a Master of Fine Arts from Hollins University in 2011. Since 2005, she has guest starred in William Forsythe's award-winning postmodern ballet Impressing the Czar for the Royal Ballet of Flanders and Dresden Ballet in Germany. She has also performed the work in France, England, Scotland and China, and at the Lincoln Center Festival in New York. The University of North Carolina School of the Arts is America's first state-supported arts school, a unique stand-alone public university of arts conservatories. With a high school component, UNCSA is a degree-granting institution that trains young people of talent in dance, design and production, drama, filmmaking, and music. Established by the N.C. General Assembly in 1963, the School of the Arts opened in Winston-Salem ("The City of Arts and Innovation") in 1965 and became part of the University of North Carolina system when it was formed in 1972. For more information, visit www.uncsa.edu. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/unc-school-of-the-arts-announces-four-inaugural-choreographic-development-residents-for-summer-institute-300446703.html SOURCE University of North Carolina School of the Arts


Winston-Salem, NC, May 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- In an unprecedented and historic demonstration of solidarity, leaders from all six Winston-Salem-based colleges and universities shared the stage on May 4 at Inmar in support of the entrepreneurial efforts of their students and alumni. The announcement took place during the inaugural meeting of Venture Café Winston-Salem. Each of the six Winston-Salem-based universities and colleges are pledging to incentivize entrepreneurship among their students and alumni through a series of programs based on their areas of focus and unique visions. ●       Inmar Chairman and CEO David Mounts, who currently serves as the co-chair of the entrepreneurial committee for the Winston-Salem Alliance ●       University of North Carolina School of the Arts Chancellor Lindsay Bierman ●       Wake Forest University Executive Director of Wake Forest's Center for Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship, Polly Black The grant(s) range from $25,000 - $100,000 per year for three years, offered to students or alumni of their particular school. Each school's grant criteria, structure and focus will be unique to the vision/passion each school leader has for the grant. Forsyth Technical Community College is creating a special award fund for alumni, current students, and Small Business Center clients.  The Launch Challenge will foster successful business startups in Forsyth County and Stokes County.  The award pool is $100,000 per year for three years through 2020.  The award amount will be based on successful completion of the Launch Challenge.  Participants will be required to launch or be prepared to launch their business by the end of the 3-4 month period. Piedmont International University plans to create a special award fund for PIU students and alumni who intend to stay in Winston-Salem to launch their new non-profit organization. The $75,000 fund will support award grants over the next three years through 2020. The award amount per startup will be based upon the strategic vision, strength of the startup team, business and financial plan, and overall potential for maximum social/spiritual impact and broad success. The University may collaborate directly with the award recipient if a joint venture is deemed mutually beneficial. Salem College will create an award fund to provide financial support to its current students and alumnae in their pursuit of a startup venture located in Winston-Salem. Grant awards will be based upon the strength of the venture concept, validity of business model and financial plans, and overall potential for success. Salem has an entrepreneurship program that seeks to educate and empower women in the pursuit of business, social, and creative ventures. This fund will strengthen the program through experiential learning and real-world application. Winston-Salem State University will create an award fund for WSSU students and alumni that will support projects that creatively address some of society’s pressing issues, such as health equity, sustainable communities, and economic development, focusing on communities around the university. The $100,000 fund will support award grants for the next three fiscal years. Award recipients will be selected based on the strength of their team, the innovativeness of their proposal, and the potential to address broad social issues. UNCSA will award up to $75,000 to students, alumni, faculty or staff for ventures that support Winston-Salem’s growing creative economy through the Chancellor’s Artrepreneurial Grant Program. Up to  $50,000 of support will be provided for UNCSA-affiliated creative enterprises in the form of seed funding and/or finishing funds. and up to $25,000 in support and shared services will be provided for a UNCSA-affiliated creative business that is accepted and participates fully in the Creative Startups Accelerator hosted by the Center for Creative Economy (CCE) if they agree to operate in or relocate to WS. Artrepreneurial Grants are funded in part, and will be administered by the Thomas S. Kenan Institute for the Arts. Wake Forest University plans to create a special award fund for Wake Forest students and alumni who win the annual startup competition and base their startup in Winston-Salem. The $100,000 fund will support award grants over the next three years through 2020. The award amount per startup will be based upon the strength of the startup team, product-market fit, business and financial plans, and overall potential for success. “This collaboration sends a very clear message that if you are a student or alumni of a Winston-Salem college or university and you have a great idea, you will be supported here – through your school, this grant program, the Innovation Quarter, Venture Café, the Winston-Salem Alliance – Winston-Salem has come together to support innovators,” said David Mounts, Chairman and CEO of Inmar, and co-chair of the Entrepreneurial Committee of the Winston-Salem Alliance. Mounts said the schools’ diverse areas of focus are important, “Diversity is critical to innovation.”  Salem College is a women’s college, Winston-Salem State University is an HBCU. UNCSA is a top-tier arts conservatory; Wake Forest University combines the best traditions of a small liberal arts college with the resources of a large research university. Piedmont is a nationally recognized leader of Bible-centered higher education and Forsyth Tech is a comprehensive community college. “For over 30 years Forsyth Technical Community College has been central to community entrepreneurship in Winston-Salem and the surrounding area, helping start 14 new businesses last year alone. Now we are pleased to join the new community entrepreneurship ecosystem with the announcement of the Forsyth Tech Launch Challenge. The Launch Challenge Fund, created by the Forsyth Tech Foundation, will invest $100,000 per year for the next three years in businesses launched by Forsyth Tech students, alumni, and Small Business Center clients. The fund will extend Forsyth Tech support for its students and clients, not only taking them to graduation or completion, but helping them launch their dreams of business ownership.” "Innovation and entrepreneurship for Salem Academy and College did not start last year or in recent years. It started in 1772. The idea of educating women was indeed an innovation in itself. So the notion of innovation and entrepreneurship speaks to us because of our history, but also because of our present and our future. Within the business major we have an entrepreneurship concentration, which is a wonderfully vibrant program that seeks to provide the very best opportunities for students who have business ability, intelligence, and the sheer creativity to change the world in new and different ways. The launch of Venture Café will further these opportunities immeasurably for our students." “Establishment of the world’s fifth Venture Café right here in Winston-Salem strengthens our entrepreneurial ecosystem and positions the city to drive strong growth in the post-manufacturing economy,” said UNCSA Chancellor Lindsay Bierman. “In partnership with the Center for Creative Economy, and the center’s Creative Start-Ups Accelerator, we’re committed to fostering what I call artpreneurship to grow the state’s creative industries.” “Wake Forest is excited to join with our neighboring institutions to keep our brightest young business minds in Winston-Salem. By working together, we can encourage students to launch their startups here and contribute their talents to one of the fastest-growing urban-based districts for innovation in the United States."


Winston-Salem, NC, May 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- In an unprecedented and historic demonstration of solidarity, leaders from all six Winston-Salem-based colleges and universities shared the stage on May 4 at Inmar in support of the entrepreneurial efforts of their students and alumni. The announcement took place during the inaugural meeting of Venture Café Winston-Salem. Each of the six Winston-Salem-based universities and colleges are pledging to incentivize entrepreneurship among their students and alumni through a series of programs based on their areas of focus and unique visions. ●       Inmar Chairman and CEO David Mounts, who currently serves as the co-chair of the entrepreneurial committee for the Winston-Salem Alliance ●       University of North Carolina School of the Arts Chancellor Lindsay Bierman ●       Wake Forest University Executive Director of Wake Forest's Center for Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship, Polly Black The grant(s) range from $25,000 - $100,000 per year for three years, offered to students or alumni of their particular school. Each school's grant criteria, structure and focus will be unique to the vision/passion each school leader has for the grant. Forsyth Technical Community College is creating a special award fund for alumni, current students, and Small Business Center clients.  The Launch Challenge will foster successful business startups in Forsyth County and Stokes County.  The award pool is $100,000 per year for three years through 2020.  The award amount will be based on successful completion of the Launch Challenge.  Participants will be required to launch or be prepared to launch their business by the end of the 3-4 month period. Piedmont International University plans to create a special award fund for PIU students and alumni who intend to stay in Winston-Salem to launch their new non-profit organization. The $75,000 fund will support award grants over the next three years through 2020. The award amount per startup will be based upon the strategic vision, strength of the startup team, business and financial plan, and overall potential for maximum social/spiritual impact and broad success. The University may collaborate directly with the award recipient if a joint venture is deemed mutually beneficial. Salem College will create an award fund to provide financial support to its current students and alumnae in their pursuit of a startup venture located in Winston-Salem. Grant awards will be based upon the strength of the venture concept, validity of business model and financial plans, and overall potential for success. Salem has an entrepreneurship program that seeks to educate and empower women in the pursuit of business, social, and creative ventures. This fund will strengthen the program through experiential learning and real-world application. Winston-Salem State University will create an award fund for WSSU students and alumni that will support projects that creatively address some of society’s pressing issues, such as health equity, sustainable communities, and economic development, focusing on communities around the university. The $100,000 fund will support award grants for the next three fiscal years. Award recipients will be selected based on the strength of their team, the innovativeness of their proposal, and the potential to address broad social issues. UNCSA will award up to $75,000 to students, alumni, faculty or staff for ventures that support Winston-Salem’s growing creative economy through the Chancellor’s Artrepreneurial Grant Program. Up to  $50,000 of support will be provided for UNCSA-affiliated creative enterprises in the form of seed funding and/or finishing funds. and up to $25,000 in support and shared services will be provided for a UNCSA-affiliated creative business that is accepted and participates fully in the Creative Startups Accelerator hosted by the Center for Creative Economy (CCE) if they agree to operate in or relocate to WS. Artrepreneurial Grants are funded in part, and will be administered by the Thomas S. Kenan Institute for the Arts. Wake Forest University plans to create a special award fund for Wake Forest students and alumni who win the annual startup competition and base their startup in Winston-Salem. The $100,000 fund will support award grants over the next three years through 2020. The award amount per startup will be based upon the strength of the startup team, product-market fit, business and financial plans, and overall potential for success. “This collaboration sends a very clear message that if you are a student or alumni of a Winston-Salem college or university and you have a great idea, you will be supported here – through your school, this grant program, the Innovation Quarter, Venture Café, the Winston-Salem Alliance – Winston-Salem has come together to support innovators,” said David Mounts, Chairman and CEO of Inmar, and co-chair of the Entrepreneurial Committee of the Winston-Salem Alliance. Mounts said the schools’ diverse areas of focus are important, “Diversity is critical to innovation.”  Salem College is a women’s college, Winston-Salem State University is an HBCU. UNCSA is a top-tier arts conservatory; Wake Forest University combines the best traditions of a small liberal arts college with the resources of a large research university. Piedmont is a nationally recognized leader of Bible-centered higher education and Forsyth Tech is a comprehensive community college. “For over 30 years Forsyth Technical Community College has been central to community entrepreneurship in Winston-Salem and the surrounding area, helping start 14 new businesses last year alone. Now we are pleased to join the new community entrepreneurship ecosystem with the announcement of the Forsyth Tech Launch Challenge. The Launch Challenge Fund, created by the Forsyth Tech Foundation, will invest $100,000 per year for the next three years in businesses launched by Forsyth Tech students, alumni, and Small Business Center clients. The fund will extend Forsyth Tech support for its students and clients, not only taking them to graduation or completion, but helping them launch their dreams of business ownership.” "Innovation and entrepreneurship for Salem Academy and College did not start last year or in recent years. It started in 1772. The idea of educating women was indeed an innovation in itself. So the notion of innovation and entrepreneurship speaks to us because of our history, but also because of our present and our future. Within the business major we have an entrepreneurship concentration, which is a wonderfully vibrant program that seeks to provide the very best opportunities for students who have business ability, intelligence, and the sheer creativity to change the world in new and different ways. The launch of Venture Café will further these opportunities immeasurably for our students." “Establishment of the world’s fifth Venture Café right here in Winston-Salem strengthens our entrepreneurial ecosystem and positions the city to drive strong growth in the post-manufacturing economy,” said UNCSA Chancellor Lindsay Bierman. “In partnership with the Center for Creative Economy, and the center’s Creative Start-Ups Accelerator, we’re committed to fostering what I call artpreneurship to grow the state’s creative industries.” “Wake Forest is excited to join with our neighboring institutions to keep our brightest young business minds in Winston-Salem. By working together, we can encourage students to launch their startups here and contribute their talents to one of the fastest-growing urban-based districts for innovation in the United States."


Winston-Salem, NC, May 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- In an unprecedented and historic demonstration of solidarity, leaders from all six Winston-Salem-based colleges and universities shared the stage on May 4 at Inmar in support of the entrepreneurial efforts of their students and alumni. The announcement took place during the inaugural meeting of Venture Café Winston-Salem. Each of the six Winston-Salem-based universities and colleges are pledging to incentivize entrepreneurship among their students and alumni through a series of programs based on their areas of focus and unique visions. ●       Inmar Chairman and CEO David Mounts, who currently serves as the co-chair of the entrepreneurial committee for the Winston-Salem Alliance ●       University of North Carolina School of the Arts Chancellor Lindsay Bierman ●       Wake Forest University Executive Director of Wake Forest's Center for Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship, Polly Black The grant(s) range from $25,000 - $100,000 per year for three years, offered to students or alumni of their particular school. Each school's grant criteria, structure and focus will be unique to the vision/passion each school leader has for the grant. Forsyth Technical Community College is creating a special award fund for alumni, current students, and Small Business Center clients.  The Launch Challenge will foster successful business startups in Forsyth County and Stokes County.  The award pool is $100,000 per year for three years through 2020.  The award amount will be based on successful completion of the Launch Challenge.  Participants will be required to launch or be prepared to launch their business by the end of the 3-4 month period. Piedmont International University plans to create a special award fund for PIU students and alumni who intend to stay in Winston-Salem to launch their new non-profit organization. The $75,000 fund will support award grants over the next three years through 2020. The award amount per startup will be based upon the strategic vision, strength of the startup team, business and financial plan, and overall potential for maximum social/spiritual impact and broad success. The University may collaborate directly with the award recipient if a joint venture is deemed mutually beneficial. Salem College will create an award fund to provide financial support to its current students and alumnae in their pursuit of a startup venture located in Winston-Salem. Grant awards will be based upon the strength of the venture concept, validity of business model and financial plans, and overall potential for success. Salem has an entrepreneurship program that seeks to educate and empower women in the pursuit of business, social, and creative ventures. This fund will strengthen the program through experiential learning and real-world application. Winston-Salem State University will create an award fund for WSSU students and alumni that will support projects that creatively address some of society’s pressing issues, such as health equity, sustainable communities, and economic development, focusing on communities around the university. The $100,000 fund will support award grants for the next three fiscal years. Award recipients will be selected based on the strength of their team, the innovativeness of their proposal, and the potential to address broad social issues. UNCSA will award up to $75,000 to students, alumni, faculty or staff for ventures that support Winston-Salem’s growing creative economy through the Chancellor’s Artrepreneurial Grant Program. Up to  $50,000 of support will be provided for UNCSA-affiliated creative enterprises in the form of seed funding and/or finishing funds. and up to $25,000 in support and shared services will be provided for a UNCSA-affiliated creative business that is accepted and participates fully in the Creative Startups Accelerator hosted by the Center for Creative Economy (CCE) if they agree to operate in or relocate to WS. Artrepreneurial Grants are funded in part, and will be administered by the Thomas S. Kenan Institute for the Arts. Wake Forest University plans to create a special award fund for Wake Forest students and alumni who win the annual startup competition and base their startup in Winston-Salem. The $100,000 fund will support award grants over the next three years through 2020. The award amount per startup will be based upon the strength of the startup team, product-market fit, business and financial plans, and overall potential for success. “This collaboration sends a very clear message that if you are a student or alumni of a Winston-Salem college or university and you have a great idea, you will be supported here – through your school, this grant program, the Innovation Quarter, Venture Café, the Winston-Salem Alliance – Winston-Salem has come together to support innovators,” said David Mounts, Chairman and CEO of Inmar, and co-chair of the Entrepreneurial Committee of the Winston-Salem Alliance. Mounts said the schools’ diverse areas of focus are important, “Diversity is critical to innovation.”  Salem College is a women’s college, Winston-Salem State University is an HBCU. UNCSA is a top-tier arts conservatory; Wake Forest University combines the best traditions of a small liberal arts college with the resources of a large research university. Piedmont is a nationally recognized leader of Bible-centered higher education and Forsyth Tech is a comprehensive community college. “For over 30 years Forsyth Technical Community College has been central to community entrepreneurship in Winston-Salem and the surrounding area, helping start 14 new businesses last year alone. Now we are pleased to join the new community entrepreneurship ecosystem with the announcement of the Forsyth Tech Launch Challenge. The Launch Challenge Fund, created by the Forsyth Tech Foundation, will invest $100,000 per year for the next three years in businesses launched by Forsyth Tech students, alumni, and Small Business Center clients. The fund will extend Forsyth Tech support for its students and clients, not only taking them to graduation or completion, but helping them launch their dreams of business ownership.” "Innovation and entrepreneurship for Salem Academy and College did not start last year or in recent years. It started in 1772. The idea of educating women was indeed an innovation in itself. So the notion of innovation and entrepreneurship speaks to us because of our history, but also because of our present and our future. Within the business major we have an entrepreneurship concentration, which is a wonderfully vibrant program that seeks to provide the very best opportunities for students who have business ability, intelligence, and the sheer creativity to change the world in new and different ways. The launch of Venture Café will further these opportunities immeasurably for our students." “Establishment of the world’s fifth Venture Café right here in Winston-Salem strengthens our entrepreneurial ecosystem and positions the city to drive strong growth in the post-manufacturing economy,” said UNCSA Chancellor Lindsay Bierman. “In partnership with the Center for Creative Economy, and the center’s Creative Start-Ups Accelerator, we’re committed to fostering what I call artpreneurship to grow the state’s creative industries.” “Wake Forest is excited to join with our neighboring institutions to keep our brightest young business minds in Winston-Salem. By working together, we can encourage students to launch their startups here and contribute their talents to one of the fastest-growing urban-based districts for innovation in the United States."


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

2016 marked a banner year for digital marketing and communications firm mStoner, Inc. with 25 awards from nine national award-granting organizations. Notably, The University of North Carolina School of the Arts was universally praised for its visual storytelling and immersive design. Receiving an award from all nine organizations, UNCSA.edu was granted the following distinctions: 2016 Webby-finalist, CASE Circle of Excellence Awards Silver, W3 Awards Best in Show, UCDA Design Competition Gold, and more. “People call our site ‘stunning’ and ‘beautiful,’ said Claire Machamer, chief technology officer at UNCSA. “Visual impact was one of our goals for the site and it was clearly accomplished. Social media referrals have skyrocketed because people are sharing the site; they’re proud of it.” Most importantly, mStoner’s digital strategy and creative work drove meaningful results for clients: broader brand awareness, increased admission inquiries and applications, revamped and impactful content strategies, and elevated institutional pride. “In the first week alone, our college admissions reps had too many prospects coming in for staff to get back to them. It’s a good problem to have,” said Mark Donahue, managing web editor at Rush University. With 2,000 new inquiry form submissions a month, the new Rush.edu is generating leads at 10 times the rate of the old site. Finding ways to help clients tell their stories with clarity, confidence, and conviction is what drives mStoner’s work. “These projects are the result of those collaborations,” says mStoner’s co-founder and CEO, Voltaire Santos Miran. “We’re honored for the recognition from so many different organizations. Helping our clients to reach their goals and solve their communications challenges is our real goal … but it’s also great to win an award or 25.” mStoner’s 2016 award-winning sites include: University of North Carolina School of the Arts Loyola Marymount University Tulane University Saint Louis University Tufts University (homepage) Tufts University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and The School of Engineering Rush University University of Rochester School of Nursing Northwestern University in Qatar Johns Hopkins University Homewood Student Affairs See a complete list of 2016 accolades at http://www.mstoner.com/2016awards


Lazaro-Munoz G.,University of North Carolina School of the Arts
Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics | Year: 2014

This paper examines how the application of legal fiduciary principles (e.g., physicians' duty of loyalty and care, duty to inform, and duty act within the scope of authority), can serve as a framework to promote management of clinical genomic "incidental" or secondary target findings that is patient-centered and consistent with recognized patient autonomy rights. The application of fiduciary principles to the clinical genomic testing context gives rise to at least four physician fiduciary duties in conflict with recent recommendations by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG). These recommendations have generated much debate among lawyers, clinicians, and bioethicists hence I believe this publication will be of value and interest to your readership. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.


Jonas D.E.,University of North Carolina School of the Arts
North Carolina medical journal | Year: 2013

Pharmacogenomics offers the hope of greater individualization of treatment. Therapies that exemplify the promise of pharmacogenomics include anticoagulation with warfarin and the use of antiplatelet medications (eg, clopidogrel) for secondary prevention after acute coronary syndrome. Good evidence of clinical utility must be obtained before pharmacogenomic testing is widely implemented.


Olbert C.M.,Fordham University | Gala G.J.,University of North Carolina School of the Arts | Tupler L.A.,Duke University
Journal of Abnormal Psychology | Year: 2014

Heterogeneity within psychiatric disorders is both theoretically and practically problematic: For many disorders, it is possible for 2 individuals to share very few or even no symptoms in common yet share the same diagnosis. Polythetic diagnostic criteria have long been recognized to contribute to this heterogeneity, yet no unified theoretical understanding of the coherence of symptom criteria sets currently exists. A general framework for analyzing the logical and mathematical structure, coherence, and diversity of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual diagnostic categories (DSM-5 and DSM-IV-TR) is proposed, drawing from combinatorial mathematics, set theory, and information theory. Theoretical application of this framework to 18 diagnostic categories indicates that in most categories, 2 individuals with the same diagnosis may share no symptoms in common, and that any 2 theoretically possible symptom combinations will share on average less than half their symptoms. Application of this framework to 2 large empirical datasets indicates that patients who meet symptom criteria for major depressive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder tend to share approximately three-fifths of symptoms in common. For both disorders in each of the datasets, pairs of individuals who shared no common symptoms were observed. Any 2 individuals with either diagnosis were unlikely to exhibit identical symptomatology. The theoretical and empirical results stemming from this approach have substantive implications for etiological research into, and measurement of, psychiatric disorders. © 2014 American Psychological Association.


Saver R.S.,University of North Carolina School of the Arts
Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics | Year: 2012

Concern about financial conflicts crowds out sufficient consideration of other interests that may bias research conduct. Regulations, institutional policies, and guidance from professional bodies and medical journals all primarily focus on financial ties. But why? Economic gain is not the only powerful influence. This article argues that we under-prioritize non-financial interests in the regulation of medical research. It critiques the usual reasons given for regulating financial and non-financial interests differently - that the interests contrast in terms of tangibility, that financial interests are optional, and that financial interests can be efficiently carved out as a discrete area of focus. Moreover, disparate regulatory treatment seems inattentive to the very similar social and psychological forces that animate the bias effect of both financial and non-financial interests and fails to account for how financial and non-financial interests synergistically interact. Under-prioritization of non-financial interests threatens to erode public trust and creates negative spillover effects that weaken financial conflicts regulation. Optimal regulation requires a more integrated, balanced, and proportionate response to secondary interests in medical research. © 2012 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

Loading University of North Carolina School of the Arts collaborators
Loading University of North Carolina School of the Arts collaborators