Madonna University of Nigeria

Uruobo-Okija, Nigeria

Madonna University of Nigeria

Uruobo-Okija, Nigeria
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Kolawole T.A.,Madonna University of Nigeria
Nigerian journal of physiological sciences : official publication of the Physiological Society of Nigeria | Year: 2015

Effect of honey on reproductive functions of male rats exposed to nicotine was examined in this study. Thirty-two adult male wistar rats (n=8/Group) were grouped as Control (distilled water), Nicotine (1.0mg/kg bwt), Honey (100mg/kg bwt) and Nicotine with Honey. The animals were orally treated for 35 days consecutively. Epididymis sperm motility, viability, morphology and counts were estimated, serum Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), Leutinizing Hormone (LH) and Testosterone were assayed using ELISA method and testicular histology were also assessed. Significant reduction in percentage sperm motility, viability, morphology and counts were observed in nicotine group compared to control. Serum FSH, LH and testosterone levels were significantly reduced in nicotine group when compared with the control. There was significant improvement in sperm motility, viability, morphology, counts, FSH, LH and Testosterone in group co-treated with nicotine and honey  relative to nicotine group. Also, the degenerative seminiferous tubule architecture due to nicotine was improved by honey. In conclusion, honey may suppress nicotine toxic effect on reproductive functions in male Wistar rats.


Ovenseri-Ogbomo G.O.,University of KwaZulu - Natal | Oduntan O.A.,Madonna University of Nigeria
Clinical and Experimental Optometry | Year: 2017

Purpose: Amplitude of accommodation varies with race and ethnicity and Hofstetter's equations are commonly used in Nigeria to calculate expected amplitude of accommodation for clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to present normative values for amplitude of accommodation for Nigerian children and to compare the measured values with those calculated using Hofstetter's equations. Methods: A total of 688 children aged six to 16 years from three selected cities in Nigeria were included in the study. Push-up technique was employed to measure the amplitude of accommodation. The measured values were compared with the calculated values (Hofstetter's equations) using the paired t-test and Bland and Altman plots. Results: The measured amplitude of accommodation for the subjects ranged from 8.00 to 25.00 D with a mean of 15.88 ± 3.46 D. The calculated minimum amplitude of accommodation ranged from 11.00 to 13.50 D with a mean of 12.09 ± 0.55 D and the calculated average amplitude of accommodation ranged from 13.17 to 16.50 D with a mean of 14.62 ± 0.73 D. The calculated maximum amplitude of accommodation ranged from 18.60 to 22.60 D with a mean of 20.34 ± 0.88 D. The t-test indicated a significant difference between the measured and calculated minimum, average and maximum amplitudes of accommodation (p < 0.0001). Also, the Bland-Altman plot suggested that there was a lack of agreement between the measured and calculated amplitudes of accommodation. Conclusion: The mean values of amplitude of accommodation in this study are different from those reported in the literature. Also, the measured values differed from the calculated values using Hofstetter's equation. This suggests that the use of Hosftetter's equations to predict amplitude of accommodation may not be accurate for Nigerian children. © 2017 Optometry Australia.


Egu D.I.,Madonna University of Nigeria
38th Nigeria Annual International Conference and Exhibition, NAICE 2014 - Africa's Energy Corridor: Opportunities for Oil and Gas Value Maximization Through Integration and Global Approach | Year: 2014

Investment and operational planning of gas field development under severe uncertainties in gas reserves poses a major challenge in post parts of Eocene Niger Delta. Such uncertainties include the size of gas in the reservoir, the recovery factor, the required number of wells to be drilled, permeability variations and other criteria. Fekete "FAST" Evolution software was used to run a detailed sensitivity analysis of reservoir properties particularly permeability, in order to determine the number of wells to drill, recovery factor, net present value (NPV) and also the sales of gas produced per well, to effectively ensure maximum hydrocarbon recovery and a good return on investment without posing danger to the reservoir. Results however showed that in terms of recovery factor, scope three had a maximum recovery factor of about 73.61%, in terms of sales gas produced per well. It also had the highest sales gas production of about 10811.5M$, which will yield about 32434.4M$ for the three number of wells investigated as a result of a higher permeability. Also in terms of the net present value, scope one had the highest value of 110633.06M$, for the 12 numbers of wells investigated. It is recommended that since scope three had a better performance than the base case due to higher permeability value, a stimulation job may be carried out at the completion of the project to enhance the permeability of the reservoir, but the cost of carrying out the stimulation job should be considered and analyzed to ensure a good return on investment, before embarking on the decision. Copyright 2014, Society of Petroleum Engineers.


This study examined the experiential relationship between the parasite density and haematological parameters in male patients with Plasmodium falciparum infection in Port Harcourt, Nigeria reporting to malaria clinics. A total of one hundred and thirty-six (136) male patients were recruited. QBC haematological analysis, QBC malaria parasite specie identification and quantification and thin blood film for differential leucocytes count was used. The mean values of the haematological parameters in each quartile of parasite densities were determined using Microsoft Excel statistical package. Regression analysis was employed to model the experiential relationship between parasite density and haematological parameters. All regression relationships were tested and the relationship with the highest coefficient of determination (R2) was accepted as the valid relationship. The relationships tested included linear, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and power relationships. The X- axis of the regression graphs stand for the parasite density while Y-axis stands for the respective haematological parameters  Neutrophil count had a negative  exponential relationship with the parasite density and is related to the parasite density by a polynomial equation model: ynm = -7E-07x2 - 0.0003x + 56.685.The coefficient of determination (R2) was 0.6140. This means that the rate of change of the parasitemia will depend on the initial value of the neutrophil. As the neutrophil increases, the parasitemia will tend to decrease in a double, triple and quadruple manner. The relationship between lymphocyte count, monocyte count and eosinophil count and parasite density was logarithmic and expressed by the following linear equation models: ylm = -2.371ln(x) + 37.296, ymm = 0.6965ln(x) + 5.7692 and yem = 0.9334ln(x) + 4.1718 in the same order. Their respective high coefficients of determination (R2) were 0.8027, 0.8867 and 0.9553. This logarithmic relationship means that each doubling of monocyte count and eosinophil count will cause the same amount of increase in parasitemia whereas each doubling of lymphocyte count will cause the same amount of decrease in parasitemia. The best fitting regression model for total white cell count (WBC), haemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume (PCV)(haematocrit) and mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and parasite density was a linear model and expressed by the following linear equation models: yWBCm = 1.2314x + 8533.8, yHbm = -0.0014x + 13.004, yPCVm = -0.0046x + 41.443 and yMCHCm = -0.0008x + 32.336. Their respective coefficients of determination are 0.7397, 0.6248, 0.9758 and 0.8584.  This linear relationship means that as the parasite density is increasing that there is a corresponding decrease in haemoglobin concentration, PCV and MCHC and a corresponding increase in total white cell count.  The best fitting regression model between platelet count and parasite density is a power model with a very high coefficient of determination (R2=0.9938) and expressed by: yPltm = 278047x-0.122. These equation models could be very useful in areas where there may not be functional microscopes or competent microscopists and in medical emergencies.


Tomaszewski R.,Madonna University of Nigeria
International maritime health | Year: 2012

The term "cardiomegaly" is found in 5-7% of chest X-ray film evaluations in tropical Africa. However, "cardiomegaly" is a descriptive term, devoid of any aetiological meaning. Therefore, providing information about the aetiological factors leading to heart enlargement in a group of Africans (Nigerians) was the purpose of this study. In the years 2002-2011, 170 subjects (aged 17-80 years, mean age 42 years) in whom "cardiomegaly" was revealed by chest radiographs were studied at the Madonna University Teaching Hospital, Elele. The patients underwent echocardiography, electrocardiography, and several appropriate laboratory tests. Arterial hypertension was found to be most frequently associated with heart enlargement (39.4%), followed by dilated cardiomyopathy (21.76%), endomyocardial fibrosis (14.1%), valvular defects (9.4%), cardiac enlargement in the course of sickle-cell anaemia (6.47%), and schistosomal cor pulmonale (3.52%). This study is a contribution to a better aetiological elucidation of "cardiomegaly" in the tropics and emphasizes the importance of arterial hypertension as one of its causative factors. The dire need for effective treatment of hypertensive patients becomes evident. A high prevalence of elevated blood pressure seems to reflect an impact of civilization-related factors on the African communities.


Ohadoma S.C.,Madonna University of Nigeria | Michael H.U.,Madonna University of Nigeria
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine | Year: 2011

Objective: To investigate the interacting effects of co-administration of methanol leaf extract of Catharanthus roseus (C. roseus) on the hypoglycemic activity of metformin as well as glibenclamide using experimental rats. Methods: Phytochemical analysis as well as acute toxicity and lethality (LD 50) test were carried out on its methanol leaf extract. The alloxan model for experimental induction of diabetes in rats was employed. Six groups comprising five rats each were used. Groups II, III and IV received 250 mg/kg of extract, 100 mg/kg of metformin and 1 mg/kg of glibenclamide respectively, while V and VI were administered metformin-extract and glibenclamide-extract combinations respectively at doses as above. Group I served as negative control and received only distilled water. All administration was done once daily for seven days. Fasting blood glucose was determined at 2, 12, 24, 72 and 168 h using a glucometer. One-way ANOVA with post-hoc tests was used to assess for significant difference due to administration of drug alone and with co-administration of drug and extract. Results: The LD 50 was 2 121.32 mg/kg. The phytochemical studies indicated the presence of saponins, tannins, alkaloids, phlotatannins, flavonoids, triterpenoids, reducing sugars, anthraquinones and glycosides. All medicaments significantly reduced blood glucose levels when compared with control alone (P<0.05) with the highest percentage reduction in blood glucose (64.86%) exhibited by metformin-extract combination. Conclusions: The leaf extract of C. roseus significantly increases the hypoglycemic effect of metformin. © 2011 Hainan Medical College.


Awah F.M.,Madonna University of Nigeria | Verla A.W.,Madonna University of Nigeria
Journal of Medicinal Plants Research | Year: 2010

Plant derived antioxidant could be useful as food additives to prevent food deterioration and also to impart human health and prevent oxidative stress associated diseases. In this study, the free radical scavenging potential of a methanol extract of the leaves of Ocimum gratissimum was assessed by measuring its capability for scavenging 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH.) radical, superoxide anion radical (O 2 .-), hydroxyl radical (.OH), nitric oxide radicals (NO.), as well as its ability to inhibit lipid peroxidation, using appropriate assay systems compared to natural and synthetic antioxidant s. Totalphenolic, flavonoid and flavonol contents were determined by spectrophotometric methods. The extract significantly inhibited DPPH radical with an IC 50 value of 12.3± 1.95 μg/ml, inhibited O2 .- (IC 50 = 82.9 ± 5.12 μg/ml),.OH radical (IC 50 = 38.9 ± 2.8 μg/ml) and non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation (IC 50 = 270.5 ± 8.2 μg/ml) and also inhibited the accumulation of nitrite in vitro. The plant extract yielded 0.839 ± 0.097 mg gallic acid equivalents phenolic content and 39.12 ± 2.43 mg rutin equivalents flavonoid content. The observed antioxidant potentials and phenolic content of the extract suggest that an ethanol extract of O. gratissimum leaves is a potential source of natural antioxidants and could be useful in the food industry to retard oxidative degradation of lipids and thereby improve food quality. However, isolating the active principles and in vivo studies are warranted. © 2010 Academic Journals.


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Madonna University of Nigeria | Date: 2013-05-24

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Trademark
Madonna University of Nigeria | Date: 2013-05-24

Bandanas; Baseball caps; Baseball Shirts; Belts for clothing; Berets; Bottoms; Boxer shorts; Bras; Briefs; Camisoles; Childrens and infants apparel, namely, jumpers, overall sleepwear, pajamas, rompers and one-piece garments; Childrens and infants cloth bibs; Coats; Fleece pullovers; Footwear; Gloves; Golf Sweaters; Hats; Headbands; Jackets; Jeans; Mittens; Neckties; Nightgowns; Nightshirts; Pajamas; Panties; Pants; Rain wear; Robes; Scarves; Shirts; Shoes; Shorts; Ski Caps; Skirts and dresses; Sleepwear; Slippers; Socks; Sports caps and hats; Sports jerseys; Sport vests; Sweaters; Sweatpants; Sweatshirts; Sweatsocks; Swim wear; Swimsuits; T-shirts; Tank tops; Underwear; Visor Caps; Warm-up Suits; Wristbands. Educational services, namely, conducting courses at the university level; Educational research and library services; Online educational courses; Entertainment services, namely, conducting collegiate athletic competitions, events, exhibitions, games, and tournaments.


Trademark
Madonna University of Nigeria | Date: 2013-05-24

Bandanas; Baseball caps; Baseball Shirts; Belts for clothing; Berets; Bottoms; Boxer shorts; Bras; Briefs; Camisoles; Childrens and infants apparel, namely, jumpers, overall sleepwear, pajamas, rompers and one-piece garments; Childrens and infants cloth bibs; Coats; Fleece pullovers; Footwear; Gloves; Golf Sweaters; Hats; Headbands; Jackets; Jeans; Mittens; Neckties; Nightgowns; Nightshirts; Pajamas; Panties; Pants; Rain wear; Robes; Scarves; Shirts; Shoes; Shorts; Ski Caps; Skirts and dresses; Sleepwear; Slippers; Socks; Sports caps and hats; Sports jerseys; Sport vests; Sweaters; Sweatpants; Sweatshirts; Sweatsocks; Swim wear; Swimsuits; T-shirts; Tank tops; Underwear; Visor Caps; Warm-up Suits; Wristbands. Educational services, namely, conducting courses at the university level; Educational research and library services; Online educational courses; Entertainment services, namely, conducting collegiate athletic competitions, events, exhibitions, games, and tournaments.

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