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Aimilios Lo from The Cooper Union has been awarded runner-up and will receive $10,000 in scholarship funds. The winner was chosen by a panel of notable judges in addition to David and Sybil Yurman.  Jury members included Paul Greenhalgh, Director and Professor of Art History of the Sainsbury Centre for the Visual Arts at the University of East Anglia, UK; Tara Donovan, an artist whose work is included in the collections of major institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Indianapolis Museum of Art, among many others; and Hans Van de Bovenkamp, a world renowned sculptor. David Yurman, one of America's premier jewelry brands, launched the inaugural David Yurman Young Artist Prize in 2017. As a brand founded on artistic roots and a passion for artistry and innovation, this initiative supports one of the key missions of the Company to encourage young creatives in the arts and in education. The overarching theme of the first inaugural competition was Pure Form, inspired by David Yurman's collection of the same name—a striking yet visually minimalist capsule of pieces that explores the sculptural, essential, pure qualities of metal. It is both a highly artistic and deeply personal collection, recalling Yurman's origins as a sculptor.  Prior to founding his jewelry company, David Yurman was trained as a sculptor—he studied under renowned artists including Ernesto Gonzalez, Jacques Lipschitz and Theodore Roszak.  He is constantly inspired by those early working days. "The competition aims to support and encourage emerging young artists with an audience and platform to showcase their work," says David Yurman.  "I want to give the students confidence to continue to study art and consider a creative career.  I learned so much from my mentors about fine tuning my artistic language, and I continue to this today to reflect on their inspiration." Participating schools included Purchase College (State University of New York); Rhode Island School of Design; Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design (University of Michigan); The Cooper Union; Otis College of Art and Design; Savannah College of Art and Design® and School of the Art Institute of Chicago. David Yurman is the premier American luxury jewelry brand with a mission to share in life's exceptional moments. Founded by two artists, David and Sybil Yurman, in New York in 1980, artistic inspiration, craftsmanship and unconventional yet elegant designs are at the core of the brand. The marriage of David's background in sculpture with Sybil's natural understanding of color and art yields signature jewelry designs; diamond, pearl, and gemstone jewelry and Swiss-crafted timepieces that are renowned for capturing the essence of relaxed American luxury. David Yurman collections are available at 47 retail and concession locations throughout the United States, Canada, France, the Middle East and at over 350 locations worldwide, through their exclusive authorized fine jewelry and timepiece network of retailers. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/david-yurman-announces-lila-reynolds-from-otis-college-of-art-and-design-as-winner-of-inaugural-2017-young-artist-prize-300456730.html


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: cen.acs.org

The American Chemical Society has announced the slate of candidates for this fall’s election. The winners will serve on the ACS Board of Directors from 2018 through 2020. The two candidates for 2018 president-elect are Bonnie A. Charpentier, senior vice president, Cytokinetics, South San Francisco; and Willie E. May, director of research and special initiatives at the University of Maryland, College Park. The winner will serve a three-year term on the board as a member of the presidential succession. The candidates for director of District III are Alan B. Cooper, president of Cooper MedChem Consulting, in West Caldwell, N.J.; and Teri Quinn Gray, regional technology manager for DuPont Performance Materials, in Wilmington, Del. The candidates for director of District VI are Rita R. Boggs, CEO, American Research & Testing, in Gardena, Calif.; and Paul W. Jagodzinski, professor and dean, Northern Arizona University, in Flagstaff. Four candidates are vying for two director-at-large openings: Kenneth P. Fivizzani, who is retired from Nalco, in Naperville, Ill.; Wayne E. Jones Jr., professor and chair of chemistry at the State University of New York, Binghamton; Bonnie A. Lawlor, who is retired from the National Federation of Abstracting & Information Services, Philadelphia; and Barbara A. Sawrey, associate vice chancellor for academic affairs and dean of undergraduate education at the University of California, San Diego. Candidate statements will run in the Sept. 11 issue of C&EN. ACS members will have the option of voting for president-elect and other members of the board of directors via the Internet, or they can opt-in to receive a paper ballot, which will be mailed at the end of September. Results will be announced in early November.


Lisa M. Patrick, MD, Addiction Psychiatrist with her own practice located in both Armonk and Manhattan, New York, has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in Armonk, New York. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care. Dr. Lisa M. Patrick is an experienced and respected psychiatrist who has been in practice for over 13 years. Her career in medicine began in 2003, when she graduated from SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, having earlier gained a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology from the State University of New York at Albany. Dr. Patrick later completed an internship, residency and fellowship at the New York University Langone Medical Center. Dr. Patrick is certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, and has quickly become renowned as one of New York’s leading addiction psychiatrists. She treats a wide range of conditions, including alcohol and opiate addictions, provides psychotherapy and family counseling, and is an expert in psychopharmacology. Dr. Patrick is noted not only for her excellent results as an addiction psychiatrist, but also for her caring and compassionate approach to her work. She is fluent in both English and Japanese, helping her to treat a wide array of patients. She is always happy to discuss conditions and possible treatments with her patients, which makes her popular with her patients and peers alike. Her dedication and commitment makes Dr. Lisa M. Patrick a very worthy winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award. Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of today’s most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors.


A deep-learning computer network developed through research led by Case Western Reserve University was 100 percent accurate in determining whether invasive forms of breast cancer were present in whole biopsy slides. Looking closer, the network correctly made the same determination in each individual pixel of the slide 97 percent of the time, rendering near-exact delineations of the tumors. Compared to the analyses of four pathologists, the machine was more consistent and accurate, in many cases improving on their delineations. In a field where time and accuracy can be critical to a patient's long-term prognosis, the study is a step toward automating part of biopsy analysis and improving the efficiency of the process, the researchers say. Currently, cancer is present in one in 10 biopsies ordered by physicians, but all must be analyzed by pathologists to identify the extent and volume of the disease, determine if it has spread and whether the patient has an aggressive or indolent cancer and needs chemotherapy or a less drastic treatment. Last month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved software that allows pathologists to review biopsy slides digitally to make diagnosis, rather than viewing the tissue under a microscope. "If the network can tell which patients have cancer and which do not, this technology can serve as triage for the pathologist, freeing their time to concentrate on the cancer patients," said Anant Madabushi, F. Alex Nason professor II of biomedical engineering at Case Western Reserve and co-author of the study detailing the network approach, published in Scientific Reports. To train the deep-learning network, the researchers downloaded 400 biopsy images from multiple hospitals. Each slide was approximately 50,000 x 50,000 pixels. The computer navigated through or rectified the inconsistencies of different scanners, staining processes and protocols used by each site, to identify features in cancer versus the rest of the tissue. The researchers then presented the network with 200 images from The Cancer Genome Atlas and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center. The network scored 100 percent on determining the presence or absence of cancer on whole slides and nearly as high per pixel. "The network was really good at identifying the cancers, but it will take time to get up to 20 years of practice and training of a pathologist to identify complex cases and mimics, such as adenosis," said Madabhushi, who also directs the Center of Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics at Case Western Reserve. Network training took about two weeks, and identifying the presence and exact location of cancer in the 200 slides took about 20 to 25 minutes each. That was done two years ago. Madabhushi suspects training now -- with new computer architecture -- would take less than a day, and cancer identification and delineation could be done in less than a minute per slide. "To put this in perspective," Madabhushi said, "the machine could do the analysis during 'off hours,' possibly running the analysis during the night and providing the results ready for review by the pathologist when she/he were to come into the office in the morning." Madabhushi worked with Angel Cruz-Roa, a PhD student, and Fabio Gonzalez, professor, Department of Systems and Industrial Engineering at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, in Bogota; Hannah Gilmore, associate professor of pathology at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine; Ajay Basavanhally of Inspirata Inc., Tampa Fla.; Michael Feldman, professor of pathology and laboratory medicine, and Natalie Shi, of the Department of Pathology, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania; Shridar Ganesan, associate professor of medicine and pharmacology at the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey; and John Tomaszewski, chair of pathology and anatomical services at the University of Buffalo, State University of New York. Much of the study was built on research by Madabhushi and Andrew Janowczyk, a biomedical engineering Postdoctoral Fellow at Case Western Reserve. They led development of what they termed "a resolution adaptive deep hierarchical learning scheme," which can cut the time for image analysis using deep learning approaches by 85 percent. Deep-learning networks learned to identify indicators of cancer at lower resolutions to determine where further analysis at high levels of magnification, and thus greater computation time, were necessary to provide precise results. In short, the scheme eliminated time-consuming, high-resolution analysis of healthy tissue. To manage the variance in staining of digitized biopsy images that can confound computer analysis, the researchers developed a technique called Stain Normalization using Sparse AutoEncoders. The technique partitions images into tissue sub-types so color standardization for each can be performed independently. To speed research in the field, Janowczyk and Madabhushi also published a tutorial on deep learning for digital pathology image analysis. The paper was recently awarded the most cited paper award from the Journal of Pathology Informatics.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Rev. Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III and Frederick K. Brewington, Esq. – two distinguished and well-known civil rights figures, as well as two of this year’s Abraham Krasnoff Courage and Commitment Awardees – will portray a conversation between the two legendary and globally known civil rights figures Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X. The conversation will portray how Dr. King and Malcolm X might comment on the social and political climate of 2017 were they alive today. Dr. Butts and Mr. Brewington will conduct this dialogue in lieu of traditional speeches. It will take place at ERASE Racism’s Annual Benefit, June 7, 2017 at the Garden City Hotel. The evening begins at 5.30 pm. Please come and be a part of what promises to be an electrifying and enlightening evening. At the same time, you will be supporting ERASE Racism, whose work to expose and challenge structural racism in housing, education, and community development on Long Island is more urgent than ever. Rev. Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III, Pastor of the legendary Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem and president of the State University of New York College at Old Westbury, is being recognized by ERASE Racism as a renowned, visionary civil rights leader. Frederick K. Brewington, Esq., longtime attorney who has won many important victories for civil rights on Long Island, is being recognized by ERASE Racism as a pioneer, game-changing civil rights attorney. Founded in 2001, ERASE Racism challenges structural racism on Long Island as well as regionally and nationally. ERASE Racism conducts and publishes extensive research that grounds its work and is used by the media, public officials, academics, other non-profits, and community members. ERASE Racism also redresses racial discrimination in housing, public school education, housing, and community development via community organizing, policy and legislative advocacy, litigation, and educating the public. ERASE Racism’s Annual Benefit will take place on June 7, 2017, from 5.30 pm to 8.30 pm at the Garden City Hotel, Garden City, NY. In addition to Dr. Butts and Mr. Brewington, ERASE Racism will posthumously honor Amy Maiello Hagedorn, a passionate funder who cared deeply about systemic change. This award will be accepted by her daughter, Lisa Valentine. ERASE Racism will also present its Leadership Award to Islamic Center of Long Island for its promotion of interfaith harmony and social justice. To purchase Annual Benefit sponsorships, journal ads, visit this link or call (516) 921-4863. To purchase tickets visit this link or call (516) 921-4863. For more information, contact Elaine Gross, ERASE Racism’s president, at (516) 921-4863 ext. 12 or elaine(at)eraseracismny(dot)org.


Just as a high-profile expedition to retrieve fossils of human ancestors from deep within a cave system in South Africa was getting underway in 2013, two spelunkers pulled aside paleoanthropologist Lee Berger. They had found what looked like an ancient thigh bone in a completely different cave. “Can we go get it?” they asked. Berger was overseeing a team of 60 people, some of whom were 18 meters below ground gathering fossils. “This was day two. Lives were in danger. This was the beginning of my hair turning really white,” says Berger, of the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. “I said ‘No, and don’t tell anyone. I don’t want anyone distracted.’” But on the last day of the expedition, which retrieved 1500 fossils of a mysterious new species of hominin named Homo naledi, Berger gave the spelunkers the go-ahead. They came back with the thigh bone plus photos of a skull poking out of the dirt in a second chamber of the cave system. “I couldn’t believe it,” Berger says. He and his team present the nearly complete new cranium plus 131 H. naledi fossils from the second cave in a series of papers in eLife this week. The new fossils reinforce a picture of a small-brained, small-bodied creature, which makes the dates reported in one paper all the more startling: 236,000 to 335,000 years ago. That means a creature reminiscent of much earlier human ancestors such as H. habilis lived at the same time as modern humans were emerging in Africa and Neandertals were evolving in Europe. “This is astonishingly young for a species that still displays primitive characteristics found in fossils about 2 million years old,” says paleoanthropologist Chris Stringer of the Natural History Museum in London. First announced in 2015, H. naledi was a puzzle from the start. Fossils from 15 individuals, including fragile parts of the face that are preserved in the new skull, show that the species combines primitive traits such as a small brain, flat midface, and curving fingers with more modern-looking features in its teeth, jaw, thumb, wrist, and foot. Berger’s team put it in our genus, Homo. But where it really fit in our family tree “hinged on the date,” says paleoanthropologist William Kimbel of Arizona State University in Tempe. Dating cave specimens is notoriously difficult because debris falling from cave walls or ceilings can mix with sediments around a fossil and skew the dates. And these fossils likely were moved over time by rising and falling groundwater, so identifying the sediments where they were originally buried is a challenge, says geologist Paul Dirks of James Cook University in Townsville, Australia. He enlisted 19 other scientists and several labs to independently test samples using several methods. They dated cave formations deposited atop the fossils using a technique called optically stimulated luminescence, which provided a minimum age of 236,000 years for the fossils. The radioactive decay of uranium in three teeth of H. naledi provided a maximum age of 335,000 years. Geochronologist Warren Sharp of the Berkeley Geochronology Center in California cautions that the maximum age may be off if the team didn’t accurately estimate how much uranium the teeth absorbed from groundwater over time. But Dirks points out that the results from several methods all point to fairly recent dates. “There is a little play in the upper limit, but it certainly isn’t going to shift to 1 million years,” he says. National Geographic leaked the dates in a brief Q&A with Berger in April, but without presenting the evidence. Now that he has seen the paper, geochemist Henry Schwarcz of McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, calls the dating effort “an impressive tour de force.” The recent dates suggest that like the 60,000- to 100,000-year-old fossils of tiny H. floresiensis (the “Hobbit”) in Indonesia, H. naledi was a “twig off the mainstream of Homo—some little relic of a relatively archaic population,” Kimbel says. It was “a lineage that existed for 1 million years or more and we missed it,” says co-author John Hawks, a paleoanthropologist at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Researchers remain skeptical, however, of some of Berger’s other claims, such as that H. naledi might have made Middle Stone Age tools found in the region. That would imply surprising sophistication in a small-brained hominin. “Yes, that hand could make and use tools,” says paleoanthropologist Bill Jungers of State University of New York in Stony Brook. But he agrees with paleoanthropologist Rick Potts of the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., who says the idea is a nonstarter because no tools, fire, or other signs of culture have been linked to the fossils. Ditto for the claim that H. naledi purposefully buried the bodies of its fellows in both caves, or that it might have acquired some of its modern traits by mating with other early members of Homo. “It’s just sheer speculation,” Kimbel says. Berger says the search for stone tools and other evidence to test whether H. naledi was capable of modern symbolic behavior is his top priority. “We’re going after all these critical questions—is there fire in there, is there DNA?” he says. His team began new forays into the caves last week.


Appointment of Richard Ho, M.D., Ph.D. and recent promotion of Kowthar Salim, M.B.A., Ph.D. to Vice President, Development strengthens senior scientific team LONDON, ON and BOSTON, MA--(Marketwired - May 11, 2017) - Critical Outcome Technologies Inc. (TSX VENTURE: COT) ( : COTQF) ("COTI" or the "Company"), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company advancing a pipeline of targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer, today announced that Richard Ho, M.D., Ph.D. will join the Company as Chief Scientific Officer ("CSO") effective June 12, 2017. In addition, Kowthar Salim, M.B.A., Ph.D., has been promoted to Vice President, Development. Dr. Ho's appointment and Dr. Salim's promotion add depth and technology-driven drug discovery and development experience to COTI's scientific and technology teams. "I am delighted to welcome Richard to COTI at this critical stage in our evolution, as our COTI-2 trial progresses in the clinic, our COTI-219 program advances into investigational new drug ("IND") application-enabling activities, and our CHEMSAS® platform technology continues to be validated," said Alison Silva, President & CEO. "Richard's scientific and medical background, proficiency in applying computational platform technologies to advance the drug development process, and expertise in medical informatics represent the ideal skill set for this key leadership role, and his entrepreneurial spirit will fit well with COTI's culture." Dr. Ho will lead COTI's scientific programs from early-stage discovery through preclinical and clinical development, and will guide the continued development and deployment of the Company's proprietary technology platforms, CHEMSAS® and ROSALIND™. "I am thrilled to join COTI at this exciting time," said Dr. Ho. "COTI has successfully developed several innovative technologies, including CHEMSAS®, which have driven the growth of a compelling pipeline and enabled the identification of two novel drug candidates with the potential to target multiple cancer indications. I look forward to working closely with the team to advance the Company's research and to develop effective new treatments for patients with significant unmet needs." Dr. Ho brings over twenty years of pharma/biotech experience, with expertise using predictive software platforms to model disease physiology and biological responses to drug therapies. He spent the first ten years of his career at Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development ("J&JPRD"), LLC where he founded the Disease Simulation Group and helped develop the first FDA-approved SGLT2 inhibitor. Subsequently, Richard co-founded Rosa & Co., LLC., an advisory firm that uses modelling and simulation to guide drug development decisions. Dr. Ho went on to serve as Senior Medical Director at Entelos, LLC, liaising with the FDA on modelling drug toxicity and later as Executive Vice President, Research and Development at Marina Biotech, where he served as chair of its Scientific Advisory Board until 2016. Most recently, Richard served as a strategic consultant to pharmaceutical and biotech companies with a focus on data analytics and clinical trial design. Dr. Ho earned an M.D., Ph.D. degree from The State University of New York Buffalo School of Medicine, and a B.Sc. in Biophysics from Harvard University. After completing a residency in Primary Care Internal Medicine and a fellowship in Rheumatology at The Yale School of Medicine, he pursued a Medical Informatics fellowship with a focus on genomics at Robert Wood Johnson Pharmaceutical Research Institute and subsequently was named Director of the Disease Simulation group at J&JPRD. The Board of Directors awarded 400,000 stock options to Dr. Ho effective on the date his employment commences. The options have a five year life and will be exercisable at the closing price of the Company's common shares on the TSX Venture Exchange on June 9, 2017, the last business day prior to the grant date. Half of these options will vest over two years and the other half will vest upon the achievement of strategic objectives. COTI is further pleased to announce the promotion of Dr. Kowthar Salim to the role of Vice President, Development. "This appointment reflects the scope and caliber of Kowthar's work," said Ms. Silva. "Kowthar has been instrumental in advancing COTI's lead drug candidate, COTI-2, through preclinical testing and into the clinic, and she is leading the IND submission process for our next candidate, COTI-219. Since joining COTI in 2008, she has worked tirelessly to advance our scientific programs. We are grateful to Kowthar for her dedication to the Company, and look forward to her continued contributions." Dr. Salim earned a Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, an M.Sc. in Parasitology and Evolutionary Biology and a Hon. B.Sc. in Microbiology & Human Biology from The University of Toronto. She also earned an M.B.A. in Management of Technology and Innovations from Ryerson University. COTI is a clinical stage biotech company that uses proprietary artificial intelligence technologies to pursue a targeted and transformational approach to treating cancer and other unmet medical needs. COTI's CHEMSAS® technology accelerates the discovery and development of novel drug therapies, allowing the Company to build a pipeline of potential drug candidates faster and with a higher probability of success than traditional methods. The Company's lead compound, COTI-2, has a novel p53-dependent mechanism of action with selective and potent anti-cancer activity. P53 mutations occur in over 50% of all cancers. COTI-2 is initially being evaluated for the treatment of gynecologic cancers, including ovarian, cervical, and endometrial cancers in a Phase 1 clinical trial at the MD Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas and the Lurie Cancer Center at Northwestern University. The Company has secured orphan drug status in the United States for COTI-2 for the treatment of ovarian cancer. The Company also plans to evaluate COTI-2 in additional oncology indications, including head and neck cancer, Li-Fraumeni Syndrome, and acute myelogenous leukemia. Preclinical data suggests that COTI-2 could dramatically improve the treatment of cancers with mutations in the p53 gene. The Company's second lead compound, COTI-219, is a novel oral small molecule compound targeting the mutant forms of KRAS without inhibiting normal KRAS function. KRAS mutations occur in up to 30% of all cancers and represent a tremendous unmet clinical need and a desirable drug target. COTI-219 is undergoing IND-enabling studies to support a regulatory submission by the end of calendar 2017. Follow @CriticalOutcome on Twitter or visit our website: www.criticaloutcome.com Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. Information contained in this press release may contain certain statements, which constitute "forward-looking statements" as such term is defined under applicable securities laws. For example, the statement, "COTI has successfully developed several innovative technologies, including CHEMSAS®, which have driven the growth of a compelling pipeline and enabled the identification of two novel drug candidates with the potential to target multiple cancer indications" is a forward-looking statement. Forward‐looking statements by their nature are not guarantees of future performance and are based upon management's current expectations, estimates, projections, and assumptions. COTI operates in a highly competitive environment that involves significant risks and uncertainties, which could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated in these forward‐looking statements. Management of COTI considers the assumptions on which these forward‐looking statements are based to be reasonable, but as a result of the many risk factors, cautions the reader that actual results could differ materially from those expressed or implied in these forward-looking statements. Information in this press release should be considered accurate only as of the date of the release and may be superseded by more recent information disclosed in later press releases, filings with the securities regulatory authorities or otherwise.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

NORWALK, Conn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Frontier Communications Corporation (NASDAQ:FTR) today announced that Chris Levendos, former head of the Network Deployment and Operations organization at Google Fiber, will join the company as Executive Vice President, Field Operations. His predecessor in the position, John Lass, plans to retire. Levendos will report to President and Chief Executive Officer Dan McCarthy and serve as a member of the Senior Leadership Team. Levendos will focus on better serving customer needs by maximizing the effectiveness of Frontier’s robust fiber-optic and copper networks to expand reach and increase speed capabilities. His experience at Google Fiber, where he led network planning, expansion, design, and operations for fiber-to-the-home infrastructure, and at Verizon, as a Region President and as Vice President in the Wireline Transformation group, give him keen insight into the opportunities within Frontier’s operations in 29 states. Dan McCarthy stated, “I am confident Chris will further enhance the robust resources of our field operations teams and our network assets, allowing Frontier to continue to provide the bandwidth options that support advanced technology and connectivity. We remain focused on providing homes and small, medium and commercial businesses with technologies that will help us lead in our markets, scale wisely, and create seamless network experiences.” Before joining Google, Levendos spent 26 years at Verizon, last serving as region president for its New York City wireline operations. He began his career with Verizon in 1989 and held positions with increasing operational and engineering responsibility. He led the massive restoration of Verizon’s network infrastructure in lower Manhattan that was destroyed in Superstorm Sandy. His knowledge and expertise was critical to the network upgrade to fiber and the restoration of services in record time. Levendos is a graduate of the State University of New York at Plattsburgh and earned a Master’s degree in Urban Planning from New York University and a Master’s degree in Telecommunications Management from Stevens Institute of Technology. Frontier Communications Corporation (NASDAQ: FTR) is a leader in providing communications services to urban, suburban, and rural communities in 29 states. Frontier offers a variety of services to residential customers over its fiber-optic and copper networks, including video, high-speed internet, advanced voice, and Frontier Secure® digital protection solutions. Frontier Business Edge™ offers communications solutions to small, medium, and enterprise businesses. More information about Frontier is available at www.frontier.com.


Homo naledi, the latest hominin species to be added to the human family tree, still stirs quite the excitement in the scientific community almost four years after archaeologists dug up its bones. The new species was discovered in South Africa in 2013 and got its name from the Rising Star cave system where its fossils were unearthed — the word naledi means "star" in the SeSotho language. Because of its remarkable characteristics, our ancient relative made it to the 2016 To 10 New Species list, a selection of the most impressive newly discovered species published every year by the College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) at the State University of New York. But the quest to find more answers about this new human ancestor is still ongoing, as researchers believe they've only just scratched the surface and expect to find more fossilized remains — possibly hundreds or even thousands — waiting to be brought to light so they can tell their tale. At the time, scientists from the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) in Johannesburg, led by Prof. Lee Berger, uncovered around 1,500 fossil fragments belonging to at least 15 different individuals. All the ancient bones were found stacked in the Dinaledi Chamber ("Chamber of Stars" in SeSotho) within the Rising Star cave system — part of the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site. Since then, archaeologists explored another chamber in the cave system, where they stumbled upon the remains of at least three new Homo naledi specimens, including a perfectly preserved skull. Trying to ascertain the age of Homo naledi has proved a daunting task. Because the fossils were so ancient, using DNA recovery methods to establish the period they belonged to was virtually impossible. To get to the bottom of this, Wits' paleoanthropologist Francis Thackeray devised a mathematical technique to measure the size of the hominin's skull. The results initially suggested Homo naledi may be two million years old. However, the fossils unearthed in the Dinaledi Chamber exhibited both primitive and modern features, boggling the scientific community. The hominin's skull pointed to a small brain, only 500 cubic centimeters in volume, similar to Australopithecus. But the rest of its skeleton was strangely mismatched, showing modern features that resembled the more evolved hominins in the Homo genus. This led researchers to believe Homo naledi was right on the cusp of the transition between Australopithecans and our more recent ancestors, making it a good candidate for the title of earliest Homo species. However, a new method of fossil testing revealed Homo naledi was shockingly younger than previously thought. The scientific community was flabbergasted earlier this week when a new study announced the fossils dugout during the Rising Star Cave expedition were no more than 236,000 to 335,000 years old. The new discovery, which used multiple techniques to date the bones such as electron spin resonance dating, Uranium-series dating on the fossilized teeth, and Uranium-Thorium dating of the sediments in the cave, suggests Homo naledi coexisted with Homo Sapiens. If this theory holds true, Homo naledi would join Neanderthals, Homo floresiensis (more popularly known as the Indonesian "hobbit"), and Denisovans to become the fourth known hominin species to have existed alongside modern-day humans. The most striking characteristic of our ancient ancestor is the mosaic of its physical features. Even though its skull was remarkably different from the Homo sapiens, accounting for a brain size of only around a third of the modern humans, the rest of its body had a relatively lanky, human-like skeletal structure. "Anatomical features of this new hominin found in South Africa are a mixture of those of Australopithecus with other Homo species, combined with several features not known in any hominin species," edescribes ESF. According to their analysis, our ancestor was "similar in size and weight to a modern human" and, despite the size of its skull, shared a series of physical traits with the other Homo species, including "locomotion, manipulation, and mastication." Homo naledi had extraordinarily human-like feet and long legs, which suggest the hominin had the capability of walking upright and was actually accustomed to hiking long distances. However, the skeletal structure of its upper body was more primitive. Just like its skull, Homo naledi's shoulders, pelvis, and ribcage had more in common with hominins than modern humans. Its shoulders were poised for hanging from trees and its fingers were curved, suited for curling around branches. The anatomy of its torso and feet indicates Homo naledi could easily climb trees. Our ancestor had ape-like curved toes, as well as longer finger bones than other hominins, which helped it grasp branches while climbing and being suspended from trees. At the same time, its wrists and thumbs closely resembled those of Neanderthals and modern humans, suggesting Homo naledi had the ability to make and use tools. This was surprising given the species small brain and led researchers to rethink the cognitive requirements needed for using tools. But what makes Homo naledi truly special are the cultural practices the species seems to have followed. Our ancient relative may have done something previously thought to be unique to modern humans: burying their dead. The two separate discoveries of multiple fossils in different cave chambers of the Rising Star site led researchers to believe the hominins were intentionally storing the bodies of their dead into remote caches, signaling 'ritualized behavior.' Although just a hypothesis, it would explain why the archaeologists found so many skeletal remains in such a dark and inaccessible spot. The condition of the fossils suggests the individuals died of natural causes — the bones bear no clues to indicate they had fallen prey to carnivores or that their bodies were scavenged. They also seem to have been carried into the chamber by fellow hominins, at different moments in time. What is more, among the fossils unearthed in the Dinaledi Chamber archaeologists found only a handful of bones belonging to other animals, such as mice and birds. This shows the remote space was not easily accessible and would have attracted few accidental visitors. "We explored every alternative scenario, including mass death, an unknown carnivore, water transport from another location, or accidental death in a death trap, among others. In examining every other option, we were left with intentional body disposal by Homo naledi as the most plausible scenario," said Prof. Berger. Researchers point out this is a sign of a highly evolved intelligence similar to the Homo sapiens. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--GE [NYSE: GE] announced today the appointment of three new company officers. William “Mo” Cowan has joined GE as Vice President of Litigation and Legal Policy. Prior to joining GE, Mo was President and Chief Executive Officer of ML Strategies and Counsel to Mintz Levin. Prior to rejoining Mintz Levin, Mo represented the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as interim United States Senator, filling the vacancy created when John F. Kerry was appointed United States Secretary of State. Immediately prior to his Senate service, he served in several leadership positions for Massachusetts Governor Deval L. Patrick, including Chief Legal Counsel (2009-2011), Chief of Staff (2011-2013) and Senior Advisor (2013). He earned his bachelor’s degree in sociology from Duke University and his juris doctor from Northeastern University. Kevin Ichhpurani has been appointed Executive Vice President of Global Ecosystem and Channels for GE Digital, responsible for developing the company’s partner ecosystem across all business units within GE. Prior to joining GE, Kevin was the Senior Partner, Head of Global Alliances and Ecosystem Innovation at Ernst & Young and previously Executive Vice President of Business Development and Global Partner Ecosystem at SAP. Kevin has spent 20 plus years in the technology sector focused on strategic business development, M&A, venture capital and corporate strategy. Kevin holds an MBA from Northwestern University. Athena Kaviris has been promoted to Vice President of Human Resources for GE Transportation and GE Labor Relations. With more than twenty years of experience at GE, Athena has held leadership roles in human resources at GE Lighting, GE Power, GE Capital, GE Aviation and GE Transportation. Athena earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology and business administration from the State University of New York and completed her master’s degree coursework in organization development from the University of San Francisco. GE (NYSE: GE) is the world’s Digital Industrial Company, transforming industry with software-defined machines and solutions that are connected, responsive and predictive. GE is organized around a global exchange of knowledge, the "GE Store," through which each business shares and accesses the same technology, markets, structure and intellect. Each invention further fuels innovation and application across our industrial sectors. With people, services, technology and scale, GE delivers better outcomes for customers by speaking the language of industry. www.ge.com

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