Mumbai, India
Mumbai, India

The University of Mumbai , erstwhile the University of Bombay or informally Bombay University, is one of the first three state universities in India, located in the city of Mumbai in the state of Maharashtra. It is abbreviated as either "UoM" or "MU" .The University of Mumbai offers Bachelors, Masters and Doctoral degrees apart from diplomas and certificates in many disciplines. The language of instruction for most courses is English. A majority of private colleges are also affiliated to MU. One of its two campuses in Mumbai is located in Kalina, Santacruz. The campus houses academic and administrative departments. Another campus located in Fort carries out administrative work only. Several world-renowned institutes in Mumbai were affiliated to the university. Most of them are now autonomous institutes or deemed universities. The University of Mumbai, is one of the largest universities in the world in terms of the number of students. In 2011 the total number of enrolled students was 5,49,432. It has 711 affiliated colleges. Wikipedia.


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Unique resource benefiting practitioners and researchers in clinical psychology is one of five new psychology books published by Elsevier CAMBRIDGE, MA--(Marketwired - February 13, 2017) - Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced the publication of Explaining Suicide: Patterns, Motivations, and What Notes Reveal by Cheryl Meyer, Taronish Irani, Katherine Hermes and Betty Yung. It is the first large-scale analysis of suicide motivation across multiple ages in the same time period, made possible via a unique dataset of all suicide notes collected by the coroner's office in southwestern Ohio from 2000 through 2009. At the same time, Elsevier announced publication of four additional psychology books. Based on an analysis of the Ohio dataset and those from other European and Oceanic studies, Explaining Suicide identifies top motivations for suicide, how these differ between note leavers and non-note leavers, and how that information relates to better suicide prevention. The book reveals the extent to which suicide is motivated by interpersonal violence, substance abuse, physical pain, grief, feelings of failure and mental illness. It also discusses other risk factors, what differentiates suicide attempters from suicide completers, and what might serve as protective factors toward resilience. Learn more about The Complexity of Suicide Motivation in this sample chapter. Cheryl Meyer, a professor at Ohio's Wright State University School of Professional Psychology, has a unique combination of degrees including a Master's degree in Clinical Psychology, a Ph.D. in Social Psychology and a law degree. Her research has an interdisciplinary focus incorporating legal, educational, psychological and sociological perspectives. Dr. Meyer's research interests focus on forensic psychology, specifically intrafamilial violence, and program evaluation. Taronish Irani, a licensed clinical psychologist working at The Counseling Center at SUNY Buffalo State College, received her Master's degree in Clinical Psychology from University of Mumbai, India and a Psy.D. degree in Clinical Psychology from Wright State University. Some of her clinical and research areas include trauma informed care, diversity issues, consultation, psychology education and training, violence and suicide prevention, forensic psychology, and international psychology. Katherine Hermes is chair of the History Department at Central Connecticut State University, where she has taught since 1997. She was co-coordinator of the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program at CCSU from 2006-2008. Dr. Hermes received her law degree from Duke University School of Law and her Ph.D. in History from Yale University. Her fields of specialty are Early American history, the Atlantic World, legal history and Native American history. Betty Yung led this project but died before it was completed. She served as officer of grants, research, evaluation and accreditation for five years at Wright State University, and in 1988, joined the School of Professional Psychology as a grants and proposals writer. Dr. Yung's areas of specialty included violence prevention and health disparities for minority populations. She also was a grant reviewer for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on family violence initiatives. The five new psychology titles are: In order to meet content needs in psychology, Elsevier uses proprietary tools to identify the gaps in coverage of the topics. Editorial teams strategically fill those gaps with content written by key influencers in the field, giving students, faculty and researchers the content they need to answer challenging questions and improve outcomes. These new books, which will educate the next generation of psychologists, and provide critical foundational content for information professionals, are key examples of how Elsevier is enabling science to drive innovation. Note for Editors E-book review copies of the new books are available to credentialed journalists upon request. Contact Jelena Baras at sciencereviewcopies@elsevier.com. About Elsevier Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions -- among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Research Intelligence and ClinicalKey -- and publishes over 2,500 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and more than 35,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a world-leading provider of information and analytics for professional and business customers across industries. www.elsevier.com


Bose S.,University of Mumbai | Ayyub P.,Tata Institute of Fundamental Research
Reports on Progress in Physics | Year: 2014

Quantum confinement and surface effects (SEs) dramatically modify most solid state phenomena as one approaches the nanometer scale, and superconductivity is no exception. Though we may expect significant modifications from bulk superconducting properties when the system dimensions become smaller than the characteristic length scales for bulk superconductors - such as the coherence length or the penetration depth - it is now established that there is a third length scale which ultimately determines the critical size at which Cooper pairing is destroyed. In quasi-zero-dimensional (0D) superconductors (e.g. nanocrystalline materials, isolated or embedded nanoparticles), one may define a critical particle diameter below which the mean energy level spacing arising from quantum confinement becomes equal to the bulk superconducting energy gap. The so-called Anderson criterion provides a remarkably accurate estimate of the limiting size for the destabilization of superconductivity in nanosystems. This review of size effects in quasi-0D superconductors is organized as follows. A general summary of size effects in nanostructured superconductors (section 1) is followed by a brief overview of their synthesis (section 2) and characterization using a variety of techniques (section 3). Section4 reviews the size-evolution of important superconducting parameters - the transition temperature, critical fields and critical current - as the Anderson limit is approached from above. We then discuss the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations (section 5), which become significant in confined systems. Improvements in fabrication methods and the increasing feasibility of addressing individual nanoparticles using scanning probe techniques have lately opened up new directions in the study of nanoscale superconductivity. Section6 reviews both experimental and theoretical aspects of the recently discovered phenomena of 'parity effect' and 'shell effect' that lead to a strong, non-monotonic size dependence of the superconducting energy gap and associated properties. Finally, we discuss in section7 the properties of ordered heterostructures (bilayers and multilayers of alternating superconducting and normal phases) and disordered heterostructures (nanocomposites consisting of superconducting and normal phases), which are primarily controlled by the proximity effect. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.35M | Year: 2011

All over the world, stable concepts of home and belonging have, for a variety of reasons, become the exception rather than the rule. This has led to dramatic cultural, social and political changes and challenges. The study of diaspora and migration has therefore evolved into a burgeoning field of research with an urgent practical relevance. In a wide and sometimes confusing array of approaches it is mainly covered by the humanities and the social sciences. The CoHaB Network unites world-leading institutions in this field in the conviction that interdisciplinary training as well as international and inter-sectoral co-operation are key to any productive study of diasporas. CoHaB gains scope and momentum by its Network of Networks rationale, binding together already existing cooperations. It is based on the resolve to strengthen interdisciplinary research in the field with a view to establishing diaspora studies as a transdisciplinary research area in its own right. Training young researchers on the basis of this conviction means to provide them with the opportunity to conduct their work in a variety of disciplinary environments as well as outside a purely academic context. Specifically, CoHaB aims at stimulating and facilitating cooperation by negotiating core concepts between the various disciplines involved among the partner institutions. Each of these disciplines has developed its own, highly sophisticated understanding of diaspora studies, and it is high time that these diverse understandings entered into a sustained dialogue. For this purpose, early stage researchers from various disciplinary backgrounds, but with similar interests in the field of diaspora studies, will join forces to develop their projects on a shared platform. This will assist them in opening their projects to a strong, interdisciplinary research environment and in producing tangible results for their own research careers, for the scientific community, and for the general public at large.


A Nafion-carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrode (NAF-CNT-GCE) was developed for the determination of venlafaxine (VF) and desvenlafaxine (DVF). The electrochemical behavior of both these molecules was investigated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronocoulometry (CC), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetry (AdSDPV). The surface morphology of the electrodes has been studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These studies revealed that the oxidation of VF and DVF is facilitated at NAF-CNT-GCE. After optimization of analytical conditions employing this electrode at pH 7.0 in Britton-Robinson buffer (0.05 M) for VF and pH 5.0 in acetate buffer (0.1 M) for DVF, the peak currents for both the molecules were found to vary linearly with their concentrations in the range of 3.81 × 10 -8-6.22 × 10 -5 M for VF and 5.33 × 10 -8-3.58 × 10 -5 M for DVF. The detection limits (S/N = 3) of 1.24 × 10 -8 and 2.11 × 10 -8 M were obtained for VF and DVF, respectively, using AdSDPV. The prepared modified electrode showed several advantages, such as simple preparation method, high sensitivity, very low detection limits and excellent reproducibility. The proposed method was employed for the determination of VF and DVF in pharmaceutical formulations, urine and blood serum samples. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


An Amberlite XAD-2 (XAD2) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs) modified glassy carbon paste electrode (XAD2-TNP-GCPE) was developed for the determination of imipramine (IMI), trimipramine (TRI) and desipramine (DES). The electrochemical behavior of these molecules was investigated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronocoulometry (CC), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetry (AdSDPV). After optimization of analytical conditions using a XAD2-TNP-GCPE electrode at pH 6.0 phosphate buffer (0.1 M), the peak currents were found to vary linearly with its concentration in the range of 1.30 × 10-9 to 6.23 × 10-6 M for IMI, 1.16 × 10-9 to 6.87 × 10 -6 M for TRI and 1.43 × 10-9 to 5.68 × 10 -6 M for DES. The detection limits (S/N = 3) of 3.93 × 10 -10, 3.51 × 10-10 and 4.35 × 10-10 M were obtained for IMI, TRI and DES respectively using AdSDPV. The prepared modified electrode showed several advantages such as a simple preparation method, high sensitivity, very low detection limits and excellent reproducibility. The proposed method was employed for the determination of IMI, TRI and DES in pharmaceutical formulations, blood serum and urine samples. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Natarajan L.,University of Mumbai
Physical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics | Year: 2013

The x-ray wavelengths and rates from double electron radiative transitions in Li isoelectronic sequences are evaluated for 17 ions with 14≤Z≤54 using fully relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock wave functions in the active space approximation with the inclusion of finite nuclear size, Breit interaction, self-energy, and vacuum polarization. A detailed discussion on the anomalous mixing coefficients contributions to the 1s2s(3S 1)3p 2P1/2 level for ions with 38≤Z≤43 is given. The sensitivity of transition rates to the Breit interaction is also analyzed. The present results are compared with other available theoretical data. The errors associated with the transitions are highlighted for some of the strongest lines, taking into account the uncertainties on the fine-structure energy levels and also on the line strengths. © 2013 American Physical Society.


Janbandhu A.,University of Mumbai | Fulekar M.H.,University of Mumbai
Journal of Hazardous Materials | Year: 2011

In developing countries like India, there are many industrial areas discharging effluent containing large amount of polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) which causes hazardous effect on the soil-water environment. The objective of this study was to isolate and characterize high-efficiency PAH-degrading microbial consortium from 3 decade old petrochemical refinery field located in Nagpur, Maharashtra with history of PAH disposal. Based on biochemical tests and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis the consortium was identified as Sphingobacterium sp., Bacillus cereus and a novel bacterium Achromobacter insolitus MHF ENV IV with effective phenanthrene-degrading ability. The biodegradation data of phenanthrene indicates about 100%, 56.9% and 25.8% degradation at the concentration of 100. mg/l, 250. mg/l and 500. mg/l respectively within 14 days. The consortium and its monoculture isolates also utilized variety of other hydrocarbons for growth. To best of our knowledge this is the first time that Achromobacter insolitus has been reported to mineralize phenanthrene effectively. GC-MS analysis of phenanthrene degradation confirmed biodegradation by detection of intermediates like salicylaldehyde, salicylic acid and catechol. All the results indicated that the microbial consortium have a promising application in bioremediation of petrochemical contaminated environments and could be potentially useful for the study of PAH degradation and for bioremediation purposes. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Aggarwal M.,University of Mumbai
Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics | Year: 2010

We predict proton radioactivity and structural transitions in high spin state of an excited exotic nucleus near proton drip line in a theoretical framework and investigate the nature and the consequences of the structural transitions on separation energy as a function of temperature and spin. It reveals that the rotation of the excited exotic nucleus 94Ag at excitation energies around 6.7 MeV and angular momentum near 21h{stroke} generates a rarely seen prolate non-collective shape and proton separation energy becomes negative which indicates proton radioactivity in agreement with the experimental results of Mukha et al. for 94Ag. © 2010 .


Sanghavi B.J.,University of Mumbai | Srivastava A.K.,University of Mumbai
Electrochimica Acta | Year: 2010

A carbon nanotube paste electrode modified in situ with Triton X 100 was developed for the individual and simultaneous determination of acetaminophen (ACOP), aspirin (ASA) and caffeine (CF). The electrochemical behavior of these three molecules was investigated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), chronocoulometry (CC) and adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetry (AdSDPV). Kramers-Kronig transformation implied that the resulting impedance data were validated and were of very good quality. These studies revealed that the oxidation of ACOP, ASA and CF is facilitated at an in situ surfactant-modified multiwalled carbon nanotube paste electrode (ISSM-CNT-PE). After optimization of analytical conditions employing this electrode at pH 7.0 in phosphate buffer (0.1 M), the peak currents for the three molecules were found to vary linearly with their concentrations in the range of 2.91 × 10-7-6.27 × 10 -5 M with detection limits of 2.58 × 10-8, 8.47 × 10-8 and 8.83 × 10-8 M for ACOP, ASA and CF respectively using AdSDPV. The prepared modified electrode showed several advantages, such as a simple preparation method, high sensitivity, very low detection limits and excellent reproducibility. Furthermore, the proposed method was employed for the simultaneous determination of ACOP, ASA and CF in pharmaceutical formulations, urine and blood serum samples and the obtained results were found to be satisfactory. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.


Sanghavi B.J.,University of Mumbai | Srivastava A.K.,University of Mumbai
Analytica Chimica Acta | Year: 2011

A glassy carbon paste electrode (GCPE) modified with a cation exchanger resin, Dowex50wx2 and gold nanoparticles (D50wx2-GNP-GCPE) has been developed for individual and simultaneous determination of acetaminophen (ACOP) and tramadol (TRA). The electrochemical behavior of both the molecules has been investigated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronocoulometry (CC), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and adsorptive stripping square wave voltammetry (AdSSWV). The studies revealed that the oxidation of ACOP and TRA is facilitated at D50wx2-GNP-GCPE. Using AdSSWV, the method allowed simultaneous determination of ACOP and TRA in the linear working range of 3.34 × 10 -8 to 4.22 × 10 -5M with detection limits of 4.71 × 10 -9 and 1.12 × 10 -8M (S/N = 3) for ACOP and TRA respectively. The prepared modified electrode shows several advantages such as simple preparation method, long-time stability, ease of preparation and regeneration of the electrode surface by simple polishing and excellent reproducibility. The high sensitivity and selectivity of D50wx2-GNP-GCPE were demonstrated by its practical application in the determination of both ACOP and TRA in pharmaceutical formulations, urine and blood serum samples. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

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